12 Burst results for "Lorraine Dalmat"

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:33 min | Last month

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Question, can rainforest ingredient be sustainable? And by the time this recording goes live, you'll already have listened to our discussion in your favorite podcast app because it was released last week. Now it's always great talking to Anna because not only does she have fantastic insights into the world of green beauty, but she also runs our entire education department here at formula Britannica, which means that she and her team speak directly to our students every single day. Now for that reason, we know what the concerns of our formulation community are. And one topic that we touched on in last week's podcast episode is something we see come back time and time again within that community. The question of how on earth a formulator is supposed to know that their ingredients are actually sustainably sourced. After all, supply chains can be lengthy and murky, which makes it hard for someone formulating at a small scale to investigate and find out where those ingredients originated and how they got to them. So for that reason, I wanted to jump on real quick, record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to join me in thinking through solutions for ingredients sustainability. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, chartered environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula botanical. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions, which I share my main takeaways from the podcast interview we released last week. In this short episode, I cook forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed as well as setting your challenge to make the green beauty sector a better place. Now the beauty industry has only fairly recently come to the topic of sustainability, but that doesn't mean that sustainable growing and harvesting projects haven't been ongoing for decades. Much work has been done on the ground to try and protect various ingredients and build the beginnings of sustainable supply chains for them. But a lot of work still needs to be done for cosmetics industry supply chains. After all, once a nut has been harvested in a tropical region of the world and has been processed multiple times to extract its oil, how does it end up in the hands of a formulator as an emulsifier? How many steps does that ingredient have to go through before it's finished? How many people and how much shipping is actually involved? Now the fact is that your ingredient, depending on its complexity, might go through multiple processes and suppliers before it even ends up with its formulator, or with you and me, the shoppers. I once met a medium sized brand that formulated with seaweed, who explained to me that their seaweed crossed the border in and out of their country 5 times before they could use it in the finished product, as it required so much processing to get it to its final extract. So you see supply chains can be complex and difficult to unpick. And on top of all of that, the paperwork you then receive with your ingredients says absolutely nothing about its sustainability. Each ingredient safety data sheet should contain some information about ecological toxicity, although that part, along with various other sections, is often left blank. But you still don't know how it was grown, how it was harvested how it was processed, how it was shipped to you. How many borders it crossed? How many miles it traveled? This is arguably why blockchain technology could be incredibly exciting in beauty moving forward, as it will allow for complete transparency of any ingredient when the originator encrypts their ingredient data. But I also think it's worth considering taking a slightly more localised approach. And while local isn't always better, particularly in terms of its carbon footprint, as we discussed in last week's podcast episode, as well as the 2020 episode we recorded on the concept of beauty miles, which we debunked at the time, it does, however, give you the opportunity as Anna rightly said, to build local supplier relationships and gain a better understanding about the origins of your ingredient. Yet also allows you to refuse your heritage into your brand and we've always seen heritage based brands do very well in the beauty. I've also seen some of formula botanicas graduate brands work with their suppliers to become more environmentally sustainable. The interview I did with Bibi beauty last year was a great example as they've convinced most of their suppliers to move to renewable electricity for their premises. Do you see relationships matter and proximity often allows you to make those relationships stronger and partner together to do the right thing? That was certainly also the message I received loud and clear from male lindstrom of main lindstrom skin and Sarah Brown of pie skin care when I interviewed them for this podcast last year. Manufacturing in-house can be a complete headache. But it does allow you to fully control where your ingredients come from as well as their overall quality. So that's my challenge to you for this week. We need to make the global beauty supply chain less opaque. And while I appreciate that most of us don't always have access to some of the technology that would allow for us to do this through, for instance, blockchain, we do hold one trick up our sleeves, which is that we can build relationships. You don't need to be a huge corporation to get to know your suppliers, but you do need to take the time to get to know them and understand them. And that's where being more local can certainly play.

Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s Anna Anna rightly Bibi Sarah Brown headache
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, chartered environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school for his botanica. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions in which I share my takeaways for the podcast interview we released last week. In this short episode, I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed, as well as setting you a challenge to make the beauty sector a better place. Inclusivity is a topic that is on everyone's lips. And as DJ and I discussed, we are seeing improvement in the beauty industry, but we still have a long way to go. We have to erase hundreds of years of conditioning around the way we view black skin, brown skin, or any of the huge variety of skin tones that aren't what European. And the same absolutely goes for hair. Now, to be honest with you, I initially sat here and thought, who am I to talk about the struggles faced by women of color? When I have grown up in a world that favors my skin tone, my hair type, my culture. Shortly, I'm entirely the wrong person to record this podcast. After all, I could not be more privileged thanks to my background, my upbringing and my platform. And the fact that the beauty industry's ideal images have been set exactly for me and my needs. But then I realized that it is precisely people like me who should be making noise and jumping up and down and waving their arms in the air to draw attention to the fact that the beauty industry perpetuates such an unfair bias to one particular body skin and hair type. It can't possibly be down to people of color to change an entire global industry and everyone's mindset by themselves. That would be ridiculous. It's something we must all work on together. Not using my platform to speak up would actually be doing everyone a disservice. And the beauty industry has very successfully set the eurocentric beauty standards that all of us have internalized, and which we use every day to police our own bodies. And if you're not yet sure what I'm talking about, then we talk to you about just a few of the ways that the beauty industry continues to shape the narrative around white skin and straight hair. Firstly, and we touched on this in last week's podcast, product design doesn't consistently take the needs of darker skin tones into account. And this filters through into clinical trials. Once you start to delve into the testing done for cosmetics, you realize that people of color are consistently underrepresented. As a whole variety of reasons for this, but it's important that this is changed. We know many of the big players in the cosmetics industry are now starting to embed diversity and inclusivity into their business models. But we have a lot of catching up to do in terms of cosmetics, which lies at the heart of the matter. Now, secondly, and I won't be telling you anything that you don't know already here, but language matters. The way we talk about skin and hair needs to be more inclusive. And we highlight this in our hair care diploma too. Did you know that the shine of your hair has precisely nothing to do with its health? A shine is a measure of the amount of light that reflects off your hair. So the straighter your hair is, the more light it reflects and the shinier it looks. The coulier or curlier your hair is, the less light it reflects. And yet, the narrative has always been that you must have shiny curtains in order to have healthy hair. This is a load of nonsense and it perpetuates the myth that one hair type is better than others. Finally, have you ever looked at stock photos? I have, in my ten year career in formulation education, I have spent hours and hours and hours trolling through stock photo libraries for our course materials and social media platforms. When we were designing and writing our organic hair care deployment in 2017, I spent hours ranting at literally anyone who would listen that they were hardly any photos of women with Afro or coily hair in stock photo libraries. Things have improved in the last 5 years, but you'll still see many more photos of the white aesthetic. That means that the way we view beauty is often portrayed by white women. And we can all get better at this and indeed here at formula botanical. We're going through an enormous project at the moment to redesign all of our downloadable course materials to be more inclusive. And we'll take a lot of time, but we're determined to do better too. All consumers should see themselves represented and valued equally. Now that's just three ways that we all need to improve the beauty industry. I'm sure you can think of other areas for change too, such as the issues surrounding skin lightening products or the SPF advice given to people of color or better and more inclusive hiring policies. So that's my challenge to you for this week. Use your platform and speak up to make change. We all have a platform, no matter how small. The Black Lives Matter movement highlighted it for us loud and clear. We must speak up and call out the inequality and inherent racism that is still around us in the beauty industry. And it has to be an ongoing conversation. It can never be a one off campaign. We must all use our privilege to help people understand that black and brown skin is beautiful, or in fact that any skin tone that doesn't fit the eurocentric model is beautiful. While the beauty industry has built stereotypes that span many generations, we have the ability to dissolve those stereotypes. So how will you be using your platform moving forward? Thank you for listening to my green beauty opinions. Remember to visit the formula botanical website at formula botanical dot com to try our free online formulation course. And if you haven't subscribed yet to the green beauty conversations podcast, please make sure you do so now in your favorite podcast app, leave me a 5 star review if you enjoy the conversations I host and I'll be back soon with my next.

Lorraine dalmat formula botanical
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"In time for international women's day 2022 to help break the bias. So settle in, hang up that do not disturb sign and join us as we discuss how indie beauty can support the drive to gender equality. Welcome to green beauty conversations, the podcast that challenges you to think about how you buy, use make and sell your natural beauty formulations. We tackle topics that will make you think and encourage debate about green beauty with your Friends, followers or customers. I'm your host, Lorraine dalmat. I'm a chartered environmentalist, biologist and the CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school formula botanical. We have thousands and thousands of students in over a 180 countries around the world who study with us to become organic beauty formulators and entrepreneurs. Visit our website at formula botanical dot com to try our free online formulation course. So in today's episode, I'm joined by Anna green, education manager at formula Britannica. Anna has worked in green beauty for over a decade, and.

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

06:06 min | 4 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"I've just finished recording an episode with sandro Velasquez, formula Botanic graduate and founder of, in which we talked about her incredible brand and the way she's built it over the last year. And by the time this recording goes live, you already have listened to that discussion in your favorite podcast app because it was released last week. It was fabulous talking to Sandra. She is such an inspiration for all of us. But she hasn't just created a successful indie beauty brand. She's got further than that. She has built a movement, something unstoppable. And she isn't just formulating beauty products. She's formulating change in the beauty industry. So for that reason, I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to think about how you can formulate change in beauty to. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, Charleston environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula botanical. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions in which I share my takeaways from the podcast interview we released last week. In this short episode, I preferred my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed, as well as setting you a challenge to make the green beauty sector a better place. So if you listen to last week's podcast and I'm sure you're feeling very inspired if you did, then you'll know that Santa shared her incredible story of graduating from formula Botanic and then growing from a kitchen table business to a brand that's generated over half a million U.S. dollars in its first year. Now, I walked away from our interview with many takeaways, but the one point that really stuck with me is the way that Sandra is making change. She kept hearing people tell her that Mexican products are cheap. She kept hearing people devalue her culture and her heritage, and she decided to do something about it by creating a brand that would stand strong against that prejudice. And in doing so, she created a fantastic successful business. As very easy to say, her formulations are great, which they are, or her brand is fantastic, which it is, or she's got great business acumen, which she does, but the secret sauce in her brand is the fact that she has a mission, and that mission is bigger than herself. She is trying to formulate change. It really stood out to me in our interview that Sandra told me she has other Latino founders messager in different industries to tell her how much she inspires them and how she's almost giving them permission to put their prices where they belong. And that's what makes her so successful. Her permission is bigger than just creating a few formulations, slapping a label on them and selling them. She wants to change the world. Now, I've worked with thousands of PC brand founders globally, and I can tell you this. It's the ones who have a mission who actively want to formulate change who see the greatest success. In 2022, if you want to be a successful beauty entrepreneur, you have to have a mission. It has to be the golden thread that runs through your business and guides every decision you make. When I talk to brand founders, I find myself asking this question all the time. How do you want to change the world with your beauty brand? And I often receive the same blank answer. I want to create formulations that help people. Well, that's lovely, but how do you want to help? What are you passionate about? How are you going to change people's lives? And it's the answers to those questions that separates the unsuccessful beauty founders from the ones who saw. But more than that, it's about Tapping deep into yourself to discover what you stand for. Each of us has something that drives us or interests us or even defines us. If you want to become a formulator and start a beauty brand, how do you bring your uniqueness to your overall business concept? As this episode is airing, we are in the process of enrolling over 1000 new students of formula botanical for our January term time, and almost every single one of those future formulators wants to start their own beauty brand. So this is my advice for each and every one of them. Write down three words that define you. If you don't know what to write, go and ask someone close to you for advice. Now, write down the one thing that you are most passionate about. That can be a hobby you have or your family or a cause you feel strongly about or your heritage or the way you feel about your place in the world. Anything is fine. Now that you have those two pieces of information, think about how you can weave them into your beauty brand mission. How can you use your business to formulate change? So that's my challenge to you and the new students who are currently enrolling with us at formula Botanic for this week. Let's formulate change in the beauty industry together by creating skin care hair care makeup deodorants and any other personal care products that actually make a difference. Let's create missions that are bigger than anything we stand for as individuals that can actually change the hearts and minds and lives of the people around us through our formulations. That's exactly what our graduate Sandra is doing at, which is why she is such a rockstar in the beauty industry. Every new formulator should be feeling excited by the way that they can change the world. And I can not wait to see what the thousands of students at formula Botanic are formulate in terms of both their products and their missions as.

sandro Velasquez Sandra formula Botanic Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s Charleston Santa U.S.
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

07:06 min | 5 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, Chelsea environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula botanicum. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions in which I share my thoughts on the beauty industry. So let's get started and set the tone for the year as we mean to go on. The beauty industry has been lying to you for over a century. They have told you time and time again in thousands of tiny ways that you need to be a chemist to formulate your own skin care and hair care, that making your own lotions and cleansers and conditioners requires a PhD in science. That you can't make legitimate and safe formulations until you're wearing a white coat and you're stood in a lab and you know where it all started with the first mainstream beauty pioneers back in the 1930s and 40s who came up with the very clever concept of wearing white lab coats in their marketing photos. And then that filtered through to the beauty counters of our department stores where brands made their sales staff wear lab coats. And then that filtered through to the adverts that we started seeing with scientists blending together complex synthetic chemicals to create your beauty products. We've been brainwashed. The truth is that formulation as a skill has been around for millennia. Archeologists have even found 2000 year old face creams from ancient Roman times that are really not that hugely different than chemical composition to the ones you'd buy today. The ancient Egyptians used to carry around a little blending pellets to make their own makeup. I have DIY beauty books dating back to the 1500s, where people were using ingredients that we still now use in our formulations. People used to be able to formulate for themselves, but as a society we don't do this anymore. And why is that? After all, it's not hard to formulate your own skin care. It's really easy. But the beauty industry has fetish this lie over and over and we fallen for it. We've had thousands of students go through our courses without any previous experience. They had no formulation experience before enrolling with formula Botanic. They didn't have a lab, and they have no background in chemistry. And all you need to do is look at them by scrolling through our graduate gallery on our website. They're running amazing, incredible, natural skin care and hair care brands. And it's not just our graduates. Let's not forget that most of the big beauty players also started as DIY indie formulators at home. You only need to delve into the history books to see that I'm right. The truth is that everyone can formulate and formulation is fun easy and empowering. If the beauty industry makes you believe that you are not capable of doing something that is really as simple as cookery, then you won't even try it for yourself. And you'll keep falling for that advertising you'll keep buying their products. It would be the equivalent of having to buy ready made meals or eating out all the time as a fear that you can't cook for yourself because it's not safe. You won't then surround yourself with herbs and flowers and roots and seeds and buds and barks and petals and leaves and stems, you won't make your own serums or lotions or toners or conditioners or masks or scrubs. And you won't then reclaim a skill that everyone can learn. Here at formula Botanic, we started talking about the fact that everyone can formulate in 2021. It became a big part of our message. And we put out one short video on social media in which we discussed the fact that you don't need to be a chemist to formulate. Now, suffice to say this video was very well received in our community. Our students are graduates are followers. They've all heard this nonsense before from their customers from their family members. In fact, from anyone who feels inclined to share their opinions, our followers felt like they'd suddenly been given a voice. But what we hadn't expected at formula Botanic was that the beauty industry was also closely paying attention. After all, we reach over a million people a month. So you can imagine my surprise when we started to get feedback. The mainstream beauty industry really didn't like what we were saying. And they wanted us to tone down the message. In response to just one video, just one video. And this is amazing. This is so good because the only reason we're getting this feedback is because people are taking note of what we're saying. And that made me realize our disruption is widespread, and we are on the cusp of global influence, as we push forward our mission to teach the world to formulate. Formulation isn't a skill that specific to a white lab coated chemist. Everyone can formulate. You can formulate eye can formulate. Yes, a chemist can formulate all of us can formulate together. This is a skill we are reclaiming. And I know that we've already made formulations so common and so widespread that we're all part of a bigger movement now, and it's a movement that the beauty industry is watching with a degree of unease. They can see it coming, then not enjoying what they're seeing, but by the time our message spreads to every corner of the planet, it'll be too late for them to do anything about it. After all, why should we listen to a mainstream beauty industry that's been telling us for over a hundred years that we are not good enough? We're not clean enough. We're not attractive enough that we need to fundamentally change our appearance to be accepted and that the only way we can do all of that is by buying their products. This is societal brainwashing at a level we've not even fully begun to appreciate. We are reclaiming a skill that all of us can learn. So not only can everyone formulate, I believe that everyone should formulate. Seeing how formulation has changed the lives of so many of our students. We know it's empowering. It does change lives, and everyone should be able to feel what it's like to make their own skin care for themselves. With their own hands. So that's my challenge to you for this week. Next time you see a beauty product for sale, just picture yourself making it at home for yourself. That's how we reclaim some of that power one day at a time. That's how we change the stranglehold that the mainstream beauty industry has had on us for over a century. That's how we empower ourselves and become formulated. Everyone can formulate and so can you. Thank you for listening to my green beauty opinions. Remember to visit the formula botanical website at formula Botanic dot com to try our free online formulation course. And if you haven't subscribed yet to the green beauty conversations podcast, please make sure you do so in your favorite podcast app. Leave me a 5 star review if you enjoy the conversations I host and I'll be back soon with my next episode..

Lorraine dalmat formula Botanic Chelsea
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

07:51 min | 5 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Negativity. Welcome to green beauty conversations. The podcast that challenges you to think about how you buy used make and sell your natural beauty formulations. We tackle topics that will make you think and encourage debate about green beauty with your Friends, the followers or customers. I'm your host Lorraine dalmat. I'm a chartered environmentalist, biologist and the CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Botanic. We have thousands and thousands of students in over a 175 countries around the world who study with us to become organic beauty formulators and entrepreneurs. Visit our website at formula Botanic a dot com to try our free online formulation course today. In today's episode, I'm joined by elsie Rutherford and Dominika minarovich. Formula Botanic had graduates and the founders of IV beauty, one of the hottest natural skin care brands on the market right now. Elsie and Dominika are on a mission to create affordable and clean skin care for all, supporting sustainability at the highest level. To not only preserve skin health but also the environment. In my opinion, they are two of the most forward thinking beauty founders of our time and I'm very happy to welcome them back onto the podcast today to discuss the way they've incorporated sustainability at the very heart of their mission. Welcome to the podcast LC Dominic it's so nice to have you here. Thank you so much, we're over the moon to be here and see you again Lorraine. Well, thank you. Well, let's dive straight in. Obviously we're going to be talking about the awesome work that you're doing at Barbie, but I think before we start, let's set the scene a little bit. What does carbon negativity mean? Yeah, that's a great question. And to be honest, it's one that I still feel quite nervous at answering because I feel like the definition is still somewhat murky and we're still figuring out exactly what it means ourselves. But for us that baby being carbon negative means that whatever our operations or our carbon footprint is, it becomes negative in that we end up absorbing more carbon than we release. That for us is focused on our supply chain. So from our early stage of raw material procurement right through to distribution, we're looking at how we can balance out external emissions eventually coming to the point where our supply chain actually absorbs more than it releases. This is not through carbon neutral process. So we will always have emissions. It's more about can we employ and develop more processes in our supply chain that can absorb carbon to essentially offset the emissions that we can't avoid. Okay, wow, that's a very comprehensive answer. So why did you decide to go down this route? When we first started by biweek came into the industry with completely fresh eyes because we didn't come from Beatty backgrounds. And we were pretty appalled by a lot of the practices that we saw across the entire supply chain. So things like manufacturing processes, a lot of the distribution around raw materials like raw materials being shipped all over the world before they ended up in the place of manufacture. And then, of course, the big sort of conversation that had already started to develop then around packaging materials specifically within beauty, the recyclability, what was happening to them end of life. And I think all in all we just recognized that the beauty industry was operating in quite an archaic and old fashioned way. And there were changes that could be made that would have a more positive impact on the planet. We felt like those changes could happen fairly easily. So it was for us there was a real sense of that will be the mission of the brand. Everything that we do will be centered around not only creating great skin care, but doing it in a way that's really climate conscious. But there was no central mission to that definition of climate conscious at the beginning for us. So we wanted to kind of do it all. We wanted to reduce our use of plastics. We wanted to make sure that they were all recyclable. We wanted to use compostable materials. We wanted to reduce our carbon emissions, but we also wanted to support communities of people who were putting together our raw materials. We wanted to make sure our packaging wasn't ending up in the ocean. We wanted to clear up the oceans. We wanted to help the rainforest. We wanted to do everything. And what that meant was, as we were coming to making quite critical business decisions, when we were putting together our products, we had no anchor to assess what the right thing to do was because we were trying to do so much. So that became a little bit problematic when we then started to really dig deep into the type of packaging materials that we wanted to use or manufacturing partners that we wanted to work with. And it also meant when we were trying to tell our customer what we were doing, we were just like, we just had this really broad scatter gun. We do a bit of this. We do a bit of that where investing in this charity and we're offsetting this here. And they were a bit like, well, you know, it sounds like you're doing loads, but are you doing much at any depth? And I think the answer was no. So what we decided to do was take a pause before we grew any further as a brand, so this was maybe like back end of 2018. So we were like a year and a bit into the brand. Do a huge audit, do a huge piece of education for ourselves, big bit of research into the industry and really identify where we thought beauties biggest negative impact was on the overall climate crisis. And then center our mission around that and really we just kept coming back to the fact that greenhouse gases when combined with solar radiation are heating up our earth and causing the climate crisis. We couldn't get away from that. It just kept circling about everything that we pursued every thing that we've been thinking about it all came back to climate, really, to greenhouse gases, and then more specifically within that to carbon. And really, we decided together that if we could lower our carbon footprint overall, that would have the best impact that we possibly could as a brand trying to do better. I will also say that I'm really trying to avoid using the word sustainable and perhaps we can talk about this in a bit more detail. I know that you talk about this as well. We're trying to find out how to do things better, but we had to also accept that we're a brand producing consumer goods, which inherently is not sustainable. So really it was about we're going to continue doing what we're doing. We're going to continue producing skin care. What is the way that we can do that that has can be more gentle on the panel basically and really for us that was about reducing carbon? I love it. And I have to say, I think what you're doing is absolutely incredible. I mean, you are one of the most forward thinking brands on the market at the moment. And obviously I've watched your evolution from 2016, 2017 to where you are today and it's been really exciting to watch. And I love the messaging you're putting out. So absolutely wonderful. I think the one question that everyone listening will have is how do you plan to sink more carbon than you emit? Let's start with the basics. It's not the basics. I mean, it's very, very complex, but how are you actually going to achieve this? This is the golden nugget, isn't it? To figure out what processes that we can implement in our supply chain that can actually absorb carbon. And there's a number of ways that we can approach this. So we can look at avoidance emissions. We can look at things that sequester carbon, so raw materials, or materials that we can use for our packaging. We can obviously look at things like renewable energy, which has zero carbon output. And then the big big thing to tackle is distribution. How do you transport your goods in a low carbon way? So first and foremost, the way that we're currently in setting our emissions through various kind of practices that we have primarily around our packaging. So our sugarcane material, which we also use in a number of our raw materials, some of our emulsifiers and some of our preservatives are derivatives of sugarcane as well. So the sugarcane plant itself is a carbon sequester. So for every one kilogram of sugarcane grown, it absorbs three kilograms of CO2 from the atmosphere. And we've done a life cycle analysis across the raw materials on.

Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s elsie Rutherford Dominika minarovich Formula Botanic Dominika biweek Elsie Lorraine Beatty
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"I've just finished recording an episode with Emily king of bare wild, and by the time this recording goes live, you already have listened to my interview with Emily in your favorite podcast app because it was released last week. It was so interesting to talk about sustainable sourcing projects in the cosmetics industry, and we discussed baobab frankincense rose hip amongst others. Many beautiful ingredients that we know and love in the cosmetics industry. But talking about the sustainable sourcing of ingredients made me think. How does this fit with the ongoing naturals versus synthetics debate in the industry? After all, there is still plenty of people out there, even some influences, telling their followers that it's better to use synthetic ingredients because they deem them to be more sustainable. But that reason I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to join me in thinking about what sustainability really means for our ingredients. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, Chelsea environmentalist, biologist and the CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula botanical. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions in which I share my main takeaways from the podcast interview that we released last week. In this short episode, I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed as well as setting you a challenge to make the green beauty sector a better place. So before we get into the nitty Gritty of my latest green beauty opinion, what does sustainability actually mean? Well, when I completed my postgraduate studies in environmental management and corporate sustainability two decades ago, we used to talk about the so called three legged stool of people planet and profit. If one leg isn't there, the store falls over. If both legs aren't there because you're only focusing on profit, there's no stool. So really, we need to think of sustainability as a balancing act between environmental justice, social responsibility and economic viability, where we consume beauty products in such a way that we don't compromise the needs of future generations. And that's why it's so interesting to learn that there are influences out there telling their followers that it's not sustainable to use naturally grown ingredients in their beauty formulations. Now, to be fair, I don't follow any of these people because I have better things to do with my time. But I hear snippets about what's going on in the industry. And I sit here shaking my head a lot of the time when their opinions reach my ears. So is their opinion valid? Is it more sustainable to use a synthetic ingredient over a natural one? Well, how on earth would I know? Any scientist worth their salt would answer that question with it depends on the ingredient. And on its life cycle, and we'd have to test it. But that's not the sort of nuanced answer you expect anymore on social media, where opinions have to be communicated in binary simplistic terms. So not only is it wrong to say that one entire category of ingredient is more sustainable than the other without having any data to back it up whatsoever. It also tends to disregard two legs on that three legged stool and for me, that came out of last week's podcast episode very strongly. The sustainability of an ingredient not only depends on its ecological sustainability, but also relies on the communities and round that ingredient being able to continue with their traditions and cultures. Think of shaya butter, seaweed, coconut oil, Moringa oil, I'm sure you can think of other cooperatives that you've heard of around the world where livelihoods of forged by producing and protecting plant based ingredients. We can't just make sweeping statements that aim to wipe out the trade around traditional beauty ingredients just because some people dumbed down the naturals versus synthetics conversation on social media. People's livelihoods depend on these ingredients and ensuring a sustainable trade of those plants may actually lead to them being protected further for generations, enhancing biodiversity and driving environmental conservation. Ultimately, I find the sustainable beauty conversation is currently still far too simplistic, and the industry needs to do better. There are nuances to all of these discussions. Sometimes, yes, it may be better for the environment to use a lab synthesized version of a specific ingredient. But sometimes it may well be better all round to use the natural version. The truth is that we don't know unless we investigate on a case by case basis. And we're not qualified to make any such statements. And unless we delve into the story behind that ingredient and have cold hard data to back it up. So my challenge to you for this week is simple. Next time you hear someone making a simplistic argument about a complex topic, consider whether it's just a crowd pleaser for social media or whether they have actually considered all of the nuances involved. Chances are they haven't. There's a lot of polarization in the beauty industry, particularly when it comes to naturals and things just aren't that clear cut. You can't make sweeping statements about the sustainability of beauty ingredients. It's just not possible. So I also challenge you to consider whether you want to follow people who don't consider the nuances. There might be.

Emily king Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s Emily
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"So it made sense to add waterless beauty to the mix. And if you listen to our episode together, then you'll know that we did not think much of the marketing term waterless in relation to beauty since every single product has a water footprint. In fact, we concluded that waterless beauty might just be a load of greenwashing and the more I thought about it, the more annoyed I got that we allow these conversations to continue. So for that reason, I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to join me in asking why the beauty industry keeps avoiding the elephant in the room. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, chartered environmentalist biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Britannica. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beefy opinions, in which I share my takeaways from the podcast interview that we released last week. This short episode I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed as well as setting you a challenge to make the beauty sector a better place. So if you've listened to last week's podcast, then you'll know that Anna and I unpick the term waterless and questioned whether using less water is really going to be the answer to our sustainability challenges. You're also know that we concluded that water less is a marketing term that's generally been used by well meaning people who genuinely want to do and make the beauty industry a better place. But just seem to be focusing on the wrong things. And I see this everywhere I go, the beauty industry as a whole keeps latching on to concepts such as biodegradability or veganism or cruelty free, and then heralding their choices as the ultimate sustainability solution. Rather than just being a tiny component of the blueprint to a sustainable future. The media doesn't help either. I can't even begin to tell you how many articles I've read about how wonderful waterless beauty is, which gloss over the main sustainability issue we face. The fact that the industry encourages rampant out of control consumerism. Even recently, I had an email from a major cosmetic industry publication that asked the question what would it take for the beauty industry to actively clean up the environment as it innovates and grows? And there's the elephant in the room, overlooking the fact that this industry still wants to achieve infinite economic growth with finite natural resources. Why do they try and Herald a concept such as waterless beauty as the answer to our problems, but simultaneously try to get us to buy as much water as beauty as possible? How do those two concepts even marry together? The fact is that no one wants to face the ugly truth that the beauty industry needs a complete and total overhaul. That's really what my green beauty opinion is all about this week. When can we expect truly leadership in the cosmetics industry? A consortium of the world's largest personal care brands has recently announced a harmonised environmental labeling scheme for consumers. It's a step in the right direction, but it doesn't push far enough and still expects us to follow the same outdated model that's been around for decades. I see a lot of indie brands talking the right talk and my hope is that they will start to push change from a grassroots level. After all, Indy beauty has completely overhauled the beauty sector in the way it works with naturals in just a decade. So I think we can absolutely achieve the same with the way that we embed sustainability into our beauty products. So that's my challenge to you for this week. I've said it before and I'll say it again. We are in this together. And if you're listening to this, I want you to consider yourself part of the global sustainable beauty task force. To quote the infamous words of the lorax by Dr. Seuss unless someone like you has a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. I want you to join me in having these conversations. I want to encourage you to speak up. I do feel like I'm shouting into the void a little bit at the moment as the industry trade bodies, the big players, and ultimately the shoppers don't seem to be on board with the idea. Going right to the heart of what makes the beauty industry is unsustainable. But I can see a future where we take our bottles and jars to a local shop for a refill, made by a local company with sustainable ingredients. And I don't think that future is that far away. We've just got to push for it a little bit harder than we're currently doing. I hope you'll join me for my latest challenge. We are all in this together. And no one ever said any of this would be easy, but its conversations like the one I had with Anna last week, which I really hope you've listened to already that.

Lorraine dalmat Anna Herald Indy Dr. Seuss
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Welcome to green beauty conversations, the podcast that challenges you to think about how you buy use make and sell your natural beauty formulations. We tackle topics that will make you think and encourage debate about green beauty with your Friends followers or customers. I'm your host Lorraine dalmat. I'm a chartered environmentalist biologist and the CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Botanic. We have thousands and thousands of students in over a 175 countries around the world. This study with us to become organic beauty formulators and entrepreneurs. Visit our website that formula botanical dot com to try our free online formulation course. In today's episode, I'm joined by my colleague and a green who is formula Botanic as deputy education manager and who also loves talking about the environmental and sustainability challenges of the global beauty industry. Hi Anna welcome back onto the podcast. It's so nice to have you here again. Oh, I'm thrilled to be back on Lorraine. I'm really excited about today's topic. And we've also covered some fantastic topics previously. So I'm really, really looking forward to this one. Yeah, me too. And it fits so well with the other topics that we've covered. So let's jump straight in, what is waterless beauty? So waterless beauty refers to products that have been manufactured without water in the actual formula. So the term we use to describe these products is formulators is anhydrous products because the ingredients used do not contain any water at all. So think about things like face and body oils, lip balms, facial balms or body butters blended from oils and butters with no water or emulsifier. Waterless beauty products mainly consist of ingredients such as plant oils, butters, and waxes, all of which can be blended together in a formula without any water. In many products we see on our shelves, water will actually be the main ingredient that you see at the top of the ingredients list. And there's a reason for this, which we will talk about a little bit later on in this podcast. But there are different ways for people to use these water list products. So for example, many people make masks. That come in a powder form, and then they get their customers to activate the mask with water at the time of use, so it's not entirely waterless, but the product itself is formulated that water, or there's other products like lip balms and body oils that can be applied to the skin without adding water, although there is a case to argue for the fact that they could in some cases work better on slightly damp skin. Well, I should caveat this whole podcast before we get into the details by saying that both you and I do love a good waterless beauty product, I think. I know that we teach these at formula Botanic as well. We work with both water and water less beauty products and in the formulations that we teach at our students. But yes, there are a few more nuances to the conversation that I think we're going to get into today. So Lorraine, let's start with an important question, can beauty products ever be truly waterless and how would that happen? And this, I think is the most important question in the whole podcast. And the answer is no, which I know flies in the face of literally everything we've seen and heard in the beauty industry, but the fact is that there is no such thing as waterless beauty or waterless skin care. It is just a marketing term. And the reason for that is that every single consumer product has a water footprint. So a water footprint measures the amount of water used to produce each of the goods and services that we use. So it doesn't really matter if your beauty product contains water or not. It will still require water to be produced. And then by claiming that your formulation is waterless, when it requires loads of water to be made and shipped, and even used by the customer, in my opinion, it's just greenwashing, and I think it needs to stop. And let's not forget that our agricultural crops use 70% of the world's water, even if you make a beautiful barm packed full of oils, butters and waxes, you still need water to grow and harvest those ingredients. And shipping also has a huge water footprint. For instance, even when using bioethanol, a plane transporting share butter from Garner to the UK might still use as much as a 136 liters of water per passenger kilometer, and then there's the manufacturing process which will also require water to operate machinery and clean equipment and run the general facilities in your lab, and then let's talk about packaging. I mean, globally we produce 400 million tons of packaging every single year across all industries. And this uses between 650 and 800 billion cubic meters of water. And that doesn't even take into consideration the water footprint of your customer using the formulation. And then its consequent disposal. So it's not a straightforward as it initially sounds. And then I've got one final bug bear, so humor me, which is that people who use Hydra cells in their formulations and claim that their water less, well, that's not true either. The distillation process of essential oils uses a lot of water, which then mainly ends up in those hydrosols. And you simply can not claim to be making a waterless product if you're using an ingredient that contains lots and lots of water. But isn't pure water itself. So I got on my soapbox for a little bit there. I feel quite passionately about this topic. I am seeing it throughout all these publications online, saying, you know, waterless skin care is the answer to all our sustainability problems. And I just don't agree. Yeah. When you start to look at all the different ways that water is involved in the process is not just in the formula, then you really start to understand that this is a very small part of a big, big problem. So why do you think that the concept of waterless beauty is caught on so much? I think there's a few different reasons. I think one of the reasons is it sounds very trendy, and it sounds very fuzzy as you've already pointed out. It is a little bit of greenwashing. But I think there's other reasons why it's also popular. So for example, when we're talking about natural organic products, and that's our particular niche because we teach people to formulate organic products. Then water is products are very appealing to formulators because they can be made very easily a 100% natural or a 100% organic with very little need for other ingredients. So they really appeal to people for that reason, I think. And we have a whole podcast on the different shades of natural that we talk about when it comes to ingredients and how they can be classified in terms of the processing that they undergo. The second reason I think waterless products have really caught on is because you do not need very much of them. So they are in terms of their use, very, very economical, because you don't need as much as you would if you were using a water based product. Use a lot of a facial oil or a lot of a facial balm. You are going to end up looking very greasy very quickly. You do not need as much as you would, for example, a moisturizer. You don't use them in the same way. They are used sparingly. And I think customers quite like that because they don't have to repurchase as often and they feel like they're getting very good value for money because the products are long-lasting. And the last reason I think that water is BT has taken off as a trend is because a lot of these waterless products can also be made to be multi purpose. And this is something that we've talked about before on the podcast. They're actually multi purpose products are a good way to go in terms of minimizing. We talked about this in the skin and melis podcast..

Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s Lorraine formula Botanic Anna UK BT
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

04:35 min | 7 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"I've just finished recording an episode with Jessie baker of Providence. And by the time this recording goes live, you all already have listened to my interview with Jesse in your favorite podcast app because it dropped last week. I loved chatting to Jesse because I am so excited about the way that she and her team are making the beauty industry as well as other industries, more transparent and traceable. There's been a lot of talk about transparency in the beauty industry for years, but it's mainly been focused on whether an ingredient is natural or synthetic, and the conversation has never really gone much wider. In fact, even last week I was contacted by a podcast listener on Instagram, who highlighted to me that some online influences are still stuck in that binary discussion of synthetic is good, natural is bad or vice versa. And haven't really embraced the nuances around sustainability. But that reason I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short opinion piece and challenge you to join me in thinking about how we can embrace transparency, the right way. Hi, I'm Lorraine dalmat, chartered environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula botanical. I host the greeve beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions, in which I share my main takeaways from the podcast interview that we released last week. In this short episode, I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we last discussed, as well as setting you a challenge to make the green beauty sector a better place. So the polarizing discussion around naturals versus synthetics has been ongoing for at least 15 years in the beauty industry. It's a discussion that has attracted millions of people to the natural PC world, as I even recently covered in my podcast episode, number 63, in which I laid out how parabens kick started the Indy beauty sector. Until now, when people have talked about transparency in relation to beauty products, the discussion is always boiled down to the question are there any synthetics in your formulation? And if so are they safe? I've watched people build apps and large online databases just to answer this question. We are all familiar with the giant ingredient database that even scores ingredients based on their supposed safety. The problem of course is that you can't boil down this question to a binary answer. As with all ingredients, it comes down to dose and exposure. So if you've been following formula Botanic for a while and we reach over a million people per month, then you'll know that this is not part of our ethos. We work exclusively with naturals and botanicals because we love them, not because we fear the alternative. So I do question whether the transparency discussion we've all been having in the industry has been the right one, and I think my conversation last week with Jesse really highlighted that point. After all, is it more important to you to know if the organization you're buying from thinks about and mitigates its climate ecological waste or social footprint, or is it more important to know for sure that none of the ingredients are synthetic? I stood on stage at in cosmetics in Paris back in 2019. Back when in person events were still a thing. And I gave a talk to hundreds of people in the cosmetics industry on this very topic. I said at the time that we need to focus on how we create sustainable formulations using sustainable ingredients, housed in sustainable packaging, sold by sustainable brands and I still stand by that point. The concept of transparency and beauty must now transcend the tired debate. We've been having for the last decade and instead focus on eradicating greenwashing. So I hope that the beauty industry starts to embrace transparency at a different level. I don't know how you feel, and I really hope you come and tell me on my Lorraine dalmer account on Instagram where I talk about sustainable beauty. But for me, I want to know the provenance of my PC ingredients. I want to know how that brand I'm buying from is managing its climate footprint. I want to know if the formulations are designed to circular principles and I love that the beauty industry is starting to embrace systems that demonstrate a verify these points with proof. So my challenge to.

Jessie baker Jesse Lorraine dalmat organic cosmetic formulation s Providence Lorraine dalmer Paris
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

07:36 min | 7 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"The BT industry has been making insane claims for centuries. From the hair oil in the 1800s that was meant to prevent baldness to the makeup of the 1950s that would guarantee to snag your husband to the mainstream white lab coated pseudoscientists of today who claim that their serums will erase your wrinkles. The beauty industry certainly knows how to circumvent advertising rules to their benefit. So it should come as no surprise that with the dawning realization that there's half a $1 trillion global industry, finally needs to take part in the sustainability conversation, plenty of brands are out there greenwashing to their hearts content. But how do we as beauty consumers verify that it's true when our favorite beauty brands tell us that they're packaging is made out of recycled materials? Or that they've offset their last year's carbon emissions? Or that they pay all of their workers and living wage? Sustainability is a huge complex topic and none of us can hold every single beauty brand to account on every single impact. But one ambitious entrepreneur has set out to change all that, and she is on a mission to encourage the beauty industry as well as many other industries to open up their books and turn positive social and environmental impact into brand value. If you've ever wondered how we can stamp out greenwashing in the beauty industry, then you don't want to miss this episode. Welcome to green beauty conversations. The podcast that challenges you to think about how you buy, use make and sell your natural beauty formulations. We tackle topics that will make you think and encourage debate about green beauty with your Friends followers or customers. I'm your host Lorraine dalmat. I'm a childhood environmentalist, biologist and the CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Britannica. We have thousands and thousands of students in over a 175 countries around the world, who study with us to become organic beauty formulators and entrepreneurs. Visit our website at formula Botanic a dot com to try our free online formulation course. So in today's episode, I am joined by Jesse baker, MBE, the founder and the CEO of Providence dot org, the software solution for sustainability communications with proof. Providence works with brands to be transparent about their impact, empowering shoppers to drive progress through purchase power. As a social enterprise and B corp backed by impact investors, provenance exists to make commerce of force for good. The first to apply blockchain technology to supply chains in 2013, Providence are now working with businesses in the UK and across global supply chains. Hi Jesse, welcome to the podcast. How are you doing? Hey, really great to be here doing well, thank you. Sunny London today. So feeling good. I was so thrilled that you're here and I can't wait for this conversation. I came across what you were doing months ago and I was fascinated by it so I know our listeners will be too. So let's start at the top. There's a growing rallying call by customers and governments demanding more transparency from brands, manufacturers and producers throughout the supply chain. Why has this demand for transparency arisen? Do you think? Yeah. Great question. And I think there's been a particularly sharp rise through the pandemic, which of all the things to come from a global pandemic, it seems we all got very interested in sustainability and I think potentially shopping more online, maybe making more thoughtful purchases. I think particularly over the last 18 months, there's just been a real rallying call for consumers to know more about the impact of products. I think that's being kind of in the pipeline for a while. I mean there's definitely a kind of growing movement of shoppers that quite frankly know that the purchases they're making all kind of a vote for the world they want to see. And so increasingly are getting a bit more vocal about asking those companies where their money's going. Brilliant. Yes, and we're certainly seeing that in the beauty industry as well, and it's about time if I'm going to be brutally honest. Taking the sweet time to talk about sustainability, but it's finally starting to roll. Let's talk a little bit about what you do then. So can you tell us what provenance does and why beauty is one of the core areas you're working with. Yeah, I definitely. So I started prominent personal frustration for how little we know about the things we buy. I'm kind of like originally studied manufacturing engineering at uni, so I love knowing how stuff's made. And I guess I like just very interested in the impact that products have on people in the planet. So yes, started Providence really to solve that problem because I thought I'm not alone. I think lots of shoppers want to make more kind of thoughtful purchases and care about the planet and protecting people. So we decided to solve that problem. So yeah, I should mention now that I'm also a software geek. So we decided to solve that problem through technology. The way we're doing that is a software service that's designed for brands in order to help them be more transparent on the impact of their products. In their own channels. So inside their own kind of ecommerce channels or from kind of packed QR codes, but really making that information about the impact of their products accessible to consumers. But in a way that's really credible. So I think we're seeing increasingly brands want to make claims related to sustainability, huge market opportunity. I think sustainable brands grew 7 times faster than non sustainable brands. So there's a huge opportunity there. But it probably is what we're trying to do is make sure that brands communicate this in a way that's really credible. Not only to meet up and coming regulation that's kind of starting to make sure that brands aren't green washing, but also just to make, yeah, just make sure they're protecting their brand and talking about this stuff for the most credible way. So yeah, so we started out with food and drinks. And then yeah, to a partnership with online retailer called beauty, we ventured into the beauty industry. I mean we started conversations with colt like almost two years ago now, but it's been crazy. The adoption's gone so fast. It felt like beauty is sort of transformed much more than I thought was possible over the past few years. And now working with almost a hundred different beauty brands helping them be transparent. Wow, congratulations. That's very exciting. And I just want to say I've watched quite a few companies come up over the years to try and do a component of what you've done. I've seen a lot of companies try to embed transparency tools to look at whether an ingredient was synthetic or natural. But I think that conversation has already fallen by the wayside. So I think the fact that your encompassing all these different sustainability tools is absolutely phenomenal, but we're going to come to that. Provenance enables every physical product to come with a digital passport that proves its authenticity. So is this product what it claims to be? And as well as its origin to where does this product come from? You say you're creating an auditable record of the journey behind all physical products, which is incredible. So how do you do this? It's taken a while to figure out the right solution. And key component of Providence is that we didn't want to just help businesses to be transparent. We wanted to make sure we were helping businesses be transparent in trustworthy way. So really like a future proof method that goes beyond just what a brand says, but actually enables them to prove what they're saying is real. So yeah, how we do that is we firstly help brands to collect the data together that they want to be transparent about. So that's usually pulling data out of internal systems. Sometimes excel.

Providence Lorraine dalmat Jesse baker Providence dot org blockchain technology corp Jesse London UK
"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:35 min | 7 months ago

"lorraine dalmat" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Of just finished recording an episode with Timo von bargen of cavallo on the best way that the indie sector can source cosmetic ingredients. And by the time this recording goes live, you already have listened to that interview in your favorite podcast app. So I really enjoyed my discussion with Timo, and I think it's worth highlighting a few extra points from us that formula botanical, because I know that the indie community really struggles with minimum order quantities of their ingredients. So I wanted to jump on quickly record this super short bonus episode and set out my thoughts on the way that indie formulated struggle to scale their ingredients. And also set you a challenge to help you change the green beauty sector with me. Hi, it's Lorraine dalmat, Charleston environmentalist, biologist and CEO of award winning online organic cosmetic formulation school, formula Britannica. I host the green beauty conversations podcast and these are my green beauty opinions, and which I share my takeaways from the podcast interview that we released last week, which I hope you've listened to. In this short episode, I put forward my main thoughts on the topic we've last discussed as well as that you were challenged to make the green beauty sector a better place. So my key takeaways of my conversation with cavallo was it's great that platforms such as cavallo exist. Because the struggle is definitely real for many indie players. Now, this isn't necessarily the case when you first get started. But once you start to scale up your production and scale up the amount of ingredients you need, you'll need to work with suppliers who can handle your increasing demands. So I used to go to trade shows, pre COVID, and I would quickly get ushered off stands when I told people that I run a school that teaches indie beauty entrepreneurs online formulation. In fact, I vividly remember one woman from a UK distributor treating me like something she'd scraped off her shoe. I mean, she was horrible to me. The moment I told her about all these indie formulators, she was going no, we don't want to work with people like that. They waste our time. It was a horrible, horrible experience, and not an isolated experience either. Nowadays, thankfully, that experience has improved dramatically. And we now see major ingredient suppliers approaching us at formula Botanic to talk to us and our students, because they recognize that the indie beauty sector is the future. Not everyone has got there yet, though. And the irony is that some ingredient supplies have lost sight at the fact that today's industry giants all started at indie formulators. And it's the ones who have lost sight of their roots who are missing out on this huge booming in the sector. So even recently in the lab are exclusive membership site where we share many specialist courses every month on a trending topic in Indy busy, we approached the UK distributor for a very niche ingredient supplier that we were featuring for that month. They actually refused to work with us. This is in 2021. They told us point blank that they are not interested in working with small brands that don't place larger orders. Now thankfully, this shortsightedness doesn't apply to all ingredient supplies, though. I've met some really inspirational ones over the years. Fact I vividly remember speaking to someone from croda 6 years ago, who animatedly told me all about an indie beauty entrepreneur that they had supported in their early days who had turned her business into a global success. There was so proud to have played a role in her success and now had her as a customer for life. So it's great to see that there are these platforms out there that connect formulators and suppliers. And I also want to give a huge shout out to the in cosmetics teams who do an amazing job in trying to make those connections as well. They work really hard to connect people, and I feel that all of them deserve recognition for their work. So people often look to us that formula Botanic are to solve these issues. And these are really big issues. So I wanted to point out that this is going to be a team effort. If we want the ingredient suppliers, globally, to be able to provide ingredients in smaller minimum order quantities to indie players, we're all in this together. So my challenge to you for this week is that I encourage you to work with some of these matchmaking platforms. Like cavallo like in cosmetics, like the other ones out there, and to try and make connections with those ingredient suppliers. Big and small. But when you do that, tell them why you want to work with them. Tell them why you're starting your brand. Tell them why and how you're going to change the world with your business. Dazzle them, with your plans and your ideology, your big why. And then when you're in there, build connections. And when you have those connections built, do more, talk to them about the global green beauty movement, talk to them about the struggles that indie manufacturers face. Tell them about formula Botanic. We're out there talking to ingredient suppliers all the time, but we can't cover everyone. I have a team of 40. We can't still can't cover everyone. We need your help with that. So send them our way, tell them that we are a hub for indie players and that we will do our best to work with them. So that's my challenge for you. We can do this together and I want you to remember that. The global green beauty sector is an amazing movement, and I love the way that everyone in our community supports each other..

cavallo Timo von bargen Lorraine dalmat formula Botanic Timo Charleston UK