5 Burst results for "Loretta Napoleonic"

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on Covert

Covert

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on Covert

"Of camera you have not just technical but also esthetic stuff like where do you put the horizon or how do you frame a photograph. It's really pretty amazing so I want to give you a special offer and I want you to go there and do this right away. Okay start learning with the great courses plus today and I've worked out a fantastic offer for my listeners a full free month of unlimited access. That's all of the courses you don't or have to just take one special introductory course. It's all of their material free for a month but you gotta sign up using my exclusive. Url Okay so sign up up at the great courses plus dot com slash covert. That's the great courses plus dot com slash covert super important slash covert vert don't forget the great courses plus dot com slash covert to understand how Al-Zour Cali rose rose to become one of the most feared terrorists on the planet. We must look to the town of Zarqa Jordan. Five hundred miles to the west of Baghdad or Al-Zour Cowie was was born in one thousand nine hundred sixty six author of insurgent Iraq. I'll ZERKALO WE IN THE NEW GENERATION Loretta Napoleonic other cow is a working class individual. It does not belong to an elitist family in that is very very different from the majority of the lead there some of the Jihadist Movement and arcade them his his background is he was a criminal. You know he spent time in Jordanian prison for sexual assault salt he was a drug dealer. He was a petty criminal Jordan. Well there is a there's a narrative which you find in the lives of of quite a lot the people who got involved without Kaieda and I suppose you could say that there's a period in their lives which you might call the sinful years crazy years as I mean you saw it with some of the nine eleven hijackers that there was a period of their life when they've been drinking heavily and doing lots of things which clearly Islam would consider very very very Harare unplayed Zaccaria was one of those people I mean accounts differ as to whether he was actually hard boozing villa in his hometown now it's certainly true that he was involved in some forms of crime and that he probably had some kind of a piff unie some kind of moments when he realized that he he's life was going the wrong way and the Islam was the answer for him and of course many of those people who had kind of experience often in jail became the most militant jihadist because they felt they had redeemed their lives and discovered purpose in one thousand nine hundred nine. All ZACCARIA traveled to Afghanistan to become a freedom MM fighter against the Soviet occupation it was there he met his mentor and Inspiration Osama bin Laden at the beginning of two thousand finally finally Auxerre car. We met Osama bin Laden. It was a very interesting meeting with the leader of al-Qaeda a very very powerful man in Afghanistan. Also cow was a novelty. It was the leader of this small group of individuals who did not even have a name that did not not have base and the reason why are the Cowie met is because he was looking for a sponsor he was looking for money. He wanted to set up a little camp where he could look after his followers. Osama bin Laden offer Cowie to become part of Al.. Okay dumb former White House counterterrorism adviser Fran Townsend Sir Kelly really came to at least my attention I think many in the counterterrorism community me during the millennium the ninety nine to two thousand period there had been a series of raids in Jordan and there was a threat in inside Jordan there was tremendous cooperation between the FBI the CIA and our Jordanian counterparts during in fact we deployed a number of FBI agents. It's over to Jordan to work with the CIA and the Jordanians and during the course of that investigation it became clear the leader of the cell was an individual by the name of Zarcal. We we knew he was an important terrorists figure. We knew he was an important operational leader. I don't think anyone at that point in time. Imagine you you know more than a decade later we would be chasing him inside. Iraq where he would become an even more influential figure in Al Qaeda in the wake of September eleventh much of the Al Qaeda leadership went into hiding in the tribal belt between Afghanistan and Pakistan the United States had begun its invasion of Afghanistan Afghanistan Zorka we and other al-Qaeda fighters meanwhile had crossed over to Iran and then into the northern Iraq region known as Kurdistan now now that move is very much the beginning of the making with made because the Americans were informed of the existence of outsor- Cowie at the end of two thousand and one by the Kurdish secret service the Kurdish secret service alerted Americans the odds are Cowan was the link between between Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein it was clear as we were in Iraq the increasing importance of czar calloway inside al-Qaeda circles he had come up during the course of the war in Afghanistan people understood his importance as an operational leader and he was clearly trusted by bin Laden Auden and Al Qaeda senior leadership and so when he was deployed if you will from the federal administrative tribal aries into Iraq we understood as the the American counterterrorism community that this was a significant event this was he was well liked by soldiers and al Qaeda. He was well respected by leadership. He was incredibly capable he was experienced and so he had that unique combination of skills that would allow him to be a real force on for al Qaeda against US inside Iraq in two thousand three the US and other coalition forces entered Iraq and the Saddam Hussein regime quickly collapsed but it created a major power vacuum houser Collie who was hiding in the shadows kick started a campaign of violence. He stirred up the hatred between Iraq's two main religious groups the majority Shia Muslims and the minority Sunnis he then created a militant group with the aim of killing as many many Shias as possible and sparking a brutal cycle of violence across the nation and it was drawing the attention of the United States especially Secretary Three of State Colin Powell on the fifth of February two thousand and three calling power when to Security Council and in front of the words presented also Cowie as link between Qaidam and Saddam Hussein nobody at art of Our cowie before that day I mean everybody in the community of terrorists expert and never heard his name interestingly pressingly enough from that moment onwards also cowie became the men masterminded immaturity of the terrorist various attack which had taken place after nine eleven also Conway's group was named by intelligence officials al Qaeda in Iraq or for short short a Q. I when you look at Al.. Qaeda's mission in Iraq is our couch mission. We mistakenly look at these organizations as terrorist groups. This is too narrow. These are revolutionary organizations that want to spread an idea they can return to what they call a caliphate of fourteen centuries old old concept that there's a pure way to live according to the Koran Prophet Muhammad targets included bombing the offices of the United Nations and the Red Cross regular attacks tax on the basis of US military coalition forces but in an effort to maximize casualties the terrorist group shifted its attention to targeting public markets. It's police stations mosques and with it media coverage and in the eyes of our Collie this was attention on his movement and an important recruitment Krugman tool former interrogator and author of how to break a terrorist Matthew Alexander. There's a large influx of foreign fighters into Iraq after the Abu Abu Ghraib scandal which was essentially al-Qaeda's number one recruiting tool for convincing young Muslims from all across from everywhere from North Africa all across the Middle East to come to Iraq and fight in what they termed Jihad in these foreign fighters were extremely potent because they were the ones who made most of the suicide bombers so they're the ones that essentially we're also the most brutal I think the largely the ax you see like beheadings happen because of these foreign fighters and not so much because of Iraqis Al-Zour collie orchestrated numerous suicide bombings a devastating series of attacks in March two thousand four killed close to two hundred people at she a holy sites czar Cowie was is at the top of the target list inside Iraq one because of the bloodshed he was causing and not just of Iraqis. I mean this. This terrorist leader became a primary source of injuries and killings of our own soldiers and coalition forces and so absolutely he became prominent on the scope of the president in terms of briefings and targets then on May eleventh.

Iraq Inspiration Osama bin Laden Cowie Afghanistan al-Qaeda Al-Zour Cowie Al Qaeda Saddam Hussein outsor- Cowie Zarqa Jordan United States Baghdad bin Laden Auden assault Loretta Napoleonic
"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Studio buccaneer London, correspondent of global news Brazilian television service, Loretta Napoleonic, London-based Italian economist and writer your last book, we talked about Loretta at the start of the program about North Korea. What's what's your future project, the division of labor between men and women? Yes. Some runs writing a book about what the challenges of our time is actually challenge of extension and the origins of our species extinction. Well, think about climate change. Yeah. Think about shortage of water think about your also the growth of the population. We are getting to be too many. So are we? Address all of this is not by empowering women and get rid of men in power. I think he the only ways as she took call parade. To to do his excited. Same thing that we did at the beginning. We were very weak species. And we survive we come out the entire planet, and we did it through cooperation. That's the idea. Right. Okay. Silly. We'll talk about Brazilian elections. With a report from Brazil in a moment. But you going off to vote presumably you'll get the child get out of the studio just walked down through Trafalgar Square Brazilian embassy. And register my vote how active is the expert community here. Well, nobody would all the Brasilia's keep out. How many of us are in there? And nobody really knows. You don't have to read sheet anything you just judged by sample that you get. They seem to be reactive. Both even this election has brought demonstrations out on the streets, bro. Uncon- different candidates. And so I expect a little bit of a crowd there. Today. So they'll be polite Q forming when you get there. You think polite? This is the key. It is compulsory in Brazil. It's like in Australia's are the country. I can think of you have to vote if you don't vote you get all kinds of bureaucratic hurdles along the way. You've got you try to do something else. Like getting a password says have the proof that you voted unless elections, and if you don't get it's very inconvenient not to vote. So it's better today. So let's stick with that. Because the polls will open in about four hours time, it's the first round of presidential elections. We should stress currently the man expected to win the most votes at this stage is the far right candidate notice. Brazil's Trump Bolsonaro. He's closest rival is the leftist Fano Haddad. And it's a vote that is very much dividing the country South America correspondent Katie Watson has been following the campaign over the past few months the other day someone remarked to me that this time a few years ago. Everyone just thought giant Bolsonaro was a bad joke. The far right candidate has been a congressman for nearly thirty years. But until recently had made little impact his end in. The polls though has taken everyone by surprise. It's pleased his supporters and terrified his detractors. Brazil has always been a divided and unequal country that these elections are something else. There are thirteen presidential candidates running. But it feels like there were only two real options far, right, Mr. Bolsonaro or leftist Fernando Haddad, and it feels so polarized. There's so much anger at the moment to on the right? It's fueled by real hatred of the Workers Party once led by Lulu. Who's now in prison for accepting bribes its critics blame the party for causing Brazil's economic mass overspending on social programs and becoming a symbol of political corruption at the highest level, but at the same time, many people have forgotten the jury Leila's power millions were lifted out of. Cervitti? They call me was booming. The party may have done wrong. But it did do some good to those who have it in for the Workers Party. Forget that instead labelling it a communist movement that wants to push Brazil to become a new Venezuela. It's extreme scaremongering, but in this political climate and with its neighbor in economic free fall. It's a threat that strikes a chord here in Brazil. On the other side, the left accuses the right of a creeping fascism of threatening democracy, but I've lost count of the number of people who dismiss this arguing that. Mr. Bolsonaro NAR is the best man for the job..

Brazil Loretta Napoleonic Workers Party Mr. Bolsonaro Fernando Haddad Mr. Bolsonaro NAR Brasilia North Korea London Leila writer Australia Katie Watson congressman Venezuela thirty years four hours
"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"World Service. I'm Jillian Wawrinka with weekend. And coming up why the idea of a socialist leaning Democratic Party is becoming attractive in the states too, many of its young supporters. What I think is happening is the policy failures of the past or catching up to us. The Texas economy has been to some degree robust, but wages have not kept up, and that's resulted in a new generation of poor kids that are double the size, every sector of our society realizes that this is something that has to be fixed. It hasn't been done and my two guess for the remainder of the program CEO buccaneer. London. Correspondent of Globo news Brazilian television survey San Loretta Napoleonic, London-based Italian economist and writer. Now, it's just over a week since the devastating earthquake and soon NAMI that hit the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. According to latest reports over one and a half thousand people have died, many of them in the coastal city of Palo where some researchers say the surge of the water was unusually high because of the way it traveled through a channel to hit that urban conurbation. It's also been pointed out that even if there were adequate soon NAMI warnings, it wouldn't have been possible to evacuate thousands of people with more or less half an hour's notice so is the focus slowly moves towards rebuilding. What can be done to create structures that can hold and protect people who do not have sufficient time to escape. Well, David McGovern is here. He's been researching the impact of this on man made structures. He specializes in water engineering at the London south Bank university. Welcome David good morning. Good morning. Thank you for coming. In letter. I made that observation in the introduction about the surge. Of water and the channel that it naturally traveled along how much of a factor has that been in what happened certainly? If you have a wave traveling down the channel, what can happen is difficult to tell it's quite early days at the moment. But what can happen is the you can get reflections of the wave bouncing off either side. And you'll have a lot more time to build up its wave height as it travels on this channel. So that could have been a factor in amplifying the damage that way fine. Of course, I also mentioned how with so little notice the reality of evacuating, thousands of people was just Frankie was not going to happen. There wasn't time. Yeah. I mean that part of the world where you've got all these crisscrossing votes, very near the coastlines. Essentially because the folks are quite close to the coast, you'll get the very shortly after every there's never really going to be that much time to sound a warning and give people that tends to I mean, that's just really the way is because of the the of that area the same on the Japanese coast, for example, I think they only had about fifteen minutes in twenty eleven have warning as well. So in which case, you are then looking to the structure of the buildings that you hope will withstand this. Yeah. Yeah. So in order to design buildings that we would call su-nam resilient, you need to think about a couple of things you need to think about how high they might be. So they're high enough to allow people to seek refuge above the waterline. And how strongly said materials are made of and particularly how well-founded there into the bedrock. And that's quite important. A lot of. The structures from what I've seen in the information that we're getting in the area were built on not necessarily well founded into the bedrock built on sort of soil and sediment layers, which may well, if you have a structure on a sort of this loose kind of material it's not gonna be as resilient to those kind of forces as it would be if it was founded well in the bedroom. Well, I say clearly, maybe you can but you can't necessarily build every building to that level. But what you do need to do is build enough of big buildings presumably where people know they go to in data. So so excuse me. Sifounakis structures dwellings and things like that. It wouldn't be economical, and it wouldn't be socially acceptable. I wouldn't imagine to ask every person to live a three story concrete reinforced house on stilts. So you need to kind of think about which buildings. This two types of structure. I would say that you need to think about when increasing the resilience of an area. So the first one would be where two people seek refuge. And those structures would only be for that purpose, and you could build them out of reinforced concrete or steel members without walls. And so you can imagine a structure, which is maybe the shell of a building. It doesn't have any side walls or anything like that. It looks like a car park or something. And you'd have a sort of the stairway around the side and people would evacuates the roof of this building. And maybe on the roof, you'd have a hotline communications and medical supplies and some water and the thing about a it's going to be totally enough. And be because there are no sidewalls and is well-founded into the bedrock. The force of the water is much less on that structure. Most of the soon. Nami water's just going to go straight through. That'd be bring my guests in with some questions. Well, I guess my question is how realistic is a poor country. You can do something like that where the resources for that. And as part of that question is how realistic is it to imagine not allowing people to build in those dangerous areas and force him somewhere else. I I wouldn't want to encourage anyone not to live anywhere. I think we light living by the sea. It's where. For number of reasons, there's also where people make their living. It's where they go fishing is where the ports of most of of the world's population lift by the ocean. So the idea of just saying you can't live in a place dangerous, especially actually these things these events. I know we've had three big events now in the last sort of fifteen sixteen years, but the relatively rare let's been unfortunate this last two decades. So saying that you can't live there as engineers. I think what we want to do is trying encourage a built environment which allows people to live where they want to live, but in the most safe and resilient way. Some of the structures like an evacuation tau is not necessarily expensive or difficult to build it just needs to be well planned and well constructed with the right materials the right knowledge. So it's a lot of this is about getting that knowledge to the people who are building these destructions Loretta. I think it's a great idea, actually. Amazing that you can build a tower like that then you can have people escaping to the tower. Now, my question is you will need to create a system whereby you do sorta trion grants to make sure that is going to work the people know where they're going because one of the the the the reason why often we have a very high number of victims because people panic and so do the wrong thing. So especially in them thence sleep, populated areas should think, you know, you need like sort of the real rank. Maybe every year or something like that. So that is time consuming you have to those consuming resource, consuming means you have to convince people to do it and all that stuff. And. So we can advise about the the engineering side of things, but the whole idea of resilience is empowering the population into taking their own responsibility in in their safety. And that's about giving knowledge. Where are the evacuation structures which structures the ones to vacuum a to seek refuge to? Certain time if day maybe everyone's in the shopping center, maybe the shopping center should be designed with a structural integrity. That will make it safe the schools. You know, you've got the kids in the schools, maybe the schools should have. But it really depends on the local authorities in societies. And what they they wish and just a brief final. So what you mentioned Japan other lessons in Japan that people are beginning to learn specifically in this area. Yes. So I actually visited Japan sort of three years ago to have a look of the reconstruction what they're doing and they were hit very badly by the twenty eleven to hope you to nominate wake and some of the things they're doing. So the Japanese builds lots of big engineering, they're really into that big engineering. So they build these large walls, and one of the interesting things that I saw they had whole villages. Unfortunately. Said wiped out small residential areas and building them in the same place, but they're building on artificial the reclaimed hill. So I saw the diggers piling on lots of dirt and soil, and then they're just rebuilding it higher up. So the keys elevations. Thank you very much tape coming in. That's pleasure. Thank you, David McGovern. It's six forty two GMT the Iranian artist. Shirin Neshat this week unveiled a portrait of Malala Yousafzai. At Britain's national portrait gallery, but Allah is a campaign for girls' education. She was shot in the head by Taliban gunman in Pakistan in two thousand twelve when she was just fifteen she's the youngest ever winner over Nobel prize. She won that two years after the shooting when she was living in the UK receiving medical treatment. Now, she's a student at Oxford University. Now, the picture is a black and white photograph inscribed with a Pashtu poem. The two women who never met before spent three hours together for that photo shoot. And I've been speaking to Shirin Neshat, I must admit that, you know, I was a bit intimidated meeting her, although she is far younger than me, but buyer, accomplishments and the life that she has lived for being a noble peace prize winner and in written a book before she was like twenty. And but I remember when she arrived. She seemed more timid than I was and within this short amount of time that we had I really really good to like her and her she, and we had very intimate chats about the work that we were doing together the expressions that I was hoping to get out of the pictures. And I and I think we in the short amount of time that we did I was able to capture what I was really hoping. I'm struck by your references new you've done it several times the amount of time that you had with a three hours, which obviously in your mind is a very. Short space of time for the work that you do why is that potentially a difficulty for you. Well, first of all really, I think the challenge of going under the skin someone such as hers in it's really not an easy job. And I myself, I'm not usually making portraits of people who are well known. I work as always been a conceptual about women were living under their difficult political environment and yet trying to capture the emotions behind their faces. But to really the facing a person as well known as hers and trying to really create a single image that in my mind characterizes hurt, but yet sort of tries to capture the vulnerability of behind who she is it something that you would think that it would take a long time, maybe days, maybe at least a four day, but that kind of contradiction that I was looking for the strength defensive bravery the confidence yet at the enzyme activity that melancholy the von ability that you can predict. From of women that has gone through such Matic experiences, yet achievements. At the same time inscribed on the image is a Pashtu poem. What's the story behind that? All of my work has calligraphy inscribed on the women's bodies. And I wanted to make sure that their poetry and nothing else. And so I had this conversation with her father, and he recommended this beautiful porn about Mela. But also referencing to Mellon activists that are father Ashley named her after it's a poetry. That speaks about the notion of bravery. The original LA was an activist. That was really well known. And so he's a beautiful poem, and I don't speak pasture..

David McGovern Shirin Neshat Japan World Service London Palo Texas San Jillian Wawrinka Democratic Party Sulawesi CEO London south Bank university writer Frankie Nobel prize Oxford University UK Taliban
"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Past six GMT. Welcome to weekend from the BBC World Service with me. Julia worica coming up a little later in the program. A portrait of the Pakistani girls education activists Malala Yousafzai. At Britain's national portrait gallery will hear from the Iranian artist who captured the image and really really wanted to show this side of her that felt very human. We have such expectation from her now, I really wanted to also imagine what is like to be her as women who is just beginning her life. That's coming up a little later. I have to guests with me throughout the program. Silly Abakan era is here London. Correspondent of global news Brazilian television service and Loretta Napoleonic, London-based Italian economist and writer looking Loretta no doubt with interest at the Italian government. The relatively new Italian government, and what will feature in its next budget, which I think you've been keeping an eye on. What are you anticipating? Bates compromise. The budget is due to be presented the EU on the fifteen dollars told by there's quite a lot of tension because the new government as promises certain kinds of policy in order to boost growth. So it goes to gain some day agreement. There was reach with the EU in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve he's only would contain its budget that so now they want to increase it. But I think that if they want to stay in power. So they want to maintain this government, which is a coalition government. They will have to find a compromise otherwise, otherwise cool seeing the government will most likely fall because you know, the markets will turn against eight. But what about the Greek comparison, if if the Italian government decides to do something the EU does not approve of where does that take us? Well, I mean exactly so what take will take us to an economic crisis because easily we'll be coming Chris difficult for Italy to call. It's an service is on debt because we will have interest rates rising. So at that point the government will we'll have to fall which could be could be a strategy of Salvini who is the leader of the league. Because let's not forget this a government to the league came in with seventeen percent at the moment. The opinion polls gave the league at thirty two percent. And they had a party of course, much lower. So it could be a political gamble, but one way or or the. Eagle is heading towards an economic crisis of talking of economic crises city. I think one of the pieces he recently worked home was the ten th anniversary of the big financial worldwide crisis. What was it? What was it impact on Brazil? And what's happened since in that specific at the beginning of the crisis. Brazil. Reacted calmly and. The famously the then President Lula's this is just a small wave one at the beginning of did country was in a growth. Trajectory, but then it hit an hit hard and since two thousand sixteen for instance, Brazil has lost like ten percent GDP per capita, which is gigantic a gigantic number country started to grow again. But one one and a half percent, which is too small for country of that size that level of development. So it was it was affective substantially still suffering the effects of that. And when you talk to lots of people about the anniversary, and they keep saying signs are still there. That crisis is over. But another one may be coming up even the IMF considers that and says the world debt is reaching gigantic proportions of trillions of dollars. So that will be in people's minds to an extent as they vote. Of course, I'm sure they're thinking about that as well. With many other things in data some of which we will talk about a little later Celia buccaneer at here, Loretta Napoleonic is here earlier this month a prominent Saudi journalists known as a fierce critic of his country's government vanished. After visiting a Saudi consulate in Turkey will now. The authorities in Turkey say they believe the journalist Jamal kashogi has been murdered inside the kingdom's consulate in estan bull a source at the consulate is described the accusations as baseless Muhammad Al Oteibi is Saudi Arabia's general consul in Istanbul. I know I would like to confirm that the citizens Jamal is not at the consulate in the kings in Saudi Arabia and the consulate and the embassy are working to search way. And we are worried about his case. Lopez is a senior editor with the Washington Post where Mr. kashogi contributed a regular column, and he says that Mr. kashogi was fearful for his life. I call him that he had with us it talks about the very difficult decision that he made to leave Saudi Arabia and that happened after he saw some of these friends and colleagues arrested people that were that had been in. What seemed to sort of sort of, you know, high positions in government journalists and from one day to the next day would appear in jail, and they will be charged with very serious crimes that didn't seem to have anything to do with reality. But more about what they represented or the that they had so he left and after leaving he spoke about the feeder that he had for for his family. They're feeling that he had to be in exile to be able to speak up. He understood that his ideas where we're challenging the most powerful entities in Saudi Arabia. And fortunately, he was. I think you always took calculated risks. But the fact that he went into his counselor thinking that he was going to be able to just come doctor regular bureaucratic process, and we haven't seen him since. Well, it says that maybe he was right? So be careful that was Eli Lopez of the Washington Post and a source I should say quoted by the Washington Post said that Mr. kashogi was killed by a fifteen member Saudi team sent an I quote specifically for the murder. We will go live to Istanbul. An correspondent Mark Lowen. In a moment to speak to him about that. And we will do that after we've just brought you up to date on events in the United States. Where of course, there have been significant developments in the supreme court in the last twenty four hours. Members of the US Senate confirming President Trump's nominee Brad Kavanagh as the next supreme court Justice. He's appointment following weeks of intense debate and allegations of sexual misconduct, which the judge denies it ensures that the court now has a conservative majority. Many Democrats remain bitterly opposed to what's happened. Here is the senior democrat in the Senate Chuck Schumer speaking during the debate when the history of the Senate has written. This chapter will be a flashing red warning light. Of what to avoid. Truly judge Kavanagh's confirmation is a low moment for the Senate for the court. The country. What President Trump speaking at a rally in Kansas said, it was a great day for America. I stand before you today on the heels of a tremendous victory for.

Saudi Arabia Jamal kashogi EU US Senate Loretta Napoleonic Brazil Washington Post Saudi consulate Istanbul Malala Yousafzai Eli Lopez BBC Julia worica President Lula President Trump Turkey Britain Brad Kavanagh London
"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"loretta napoleonic" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Wait rest of europe has really got its act together it seems you'd nine said they talk about how how they talk about disruptive innovation they talk about how the rest of the eu is going to be more integrated so there's definitely a very strong feeling around those themes but you can't be complacent i think that's the other lesson of the fractured will that everyone here at the forum has been obsessed with this week at just because you had a good year last year doesn't mean it's going to be a good next year globalization is still very confronting for a lot of people technology is still going to get rid of millions of jobs so just because you're getting organized now it doesn't mean you're gonna be safe in two or three ryan he's from politico would let you get back to it in devils thank you very much for joining us you're listening to the globalist ubs has over nine hundred investment analyst it from over one hundred different audience in over nine hundred of the sharpest mowing misin freshest thinkers in the world of finance today no one has more no one knows small to find out how we can help you contact us yesterday it's fifteen fortyseven in beyond yang seven seventeen here in london north korea the hermit state sealed off from the world a nuclear threat characterized by violence and oppression will that's the popular narrative about a new book challenges some of those ideas political analyst and bestselling author loretta napoleonic is the author of north korea the country we love to hate in which she encourages us to reexamine out west in preconceptions about the dprk she joins me now in the junior loretta thanks for coming in now you'll book gives us an insider narrative from the north koreans themselves you argue that the image that they have all themselves is actually quite radically different to the one we have of them can you elaborate on yes um they are extremely proud down to be north if they concede adam southend appearance of the pure race said they're very they nationalistic also.

eu politico investment analyst north korea political analyst europe london loretta napoleonic adam southend