10 Burst results for "Lonzo Meadow"

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"One of them and so fair holy was in fact convicted of feeling books from saragossa library in spain and He died unfortunately while he was on parole from prison and so we weren't able to ever questioned him. It seems likely to me that the reason was profit and of course the the there has been a lot of interest in in this country in the The the works that archaeologists are doing in newfoundland northern newfoundland to look at this Evidence of a viking settlement in place lonzo meadows looks like about thirteenth century. And so did that. Did that worked at that. Sort of get tangled up with the belief that this map revealed something. Interestingly the the the map was known about three years before that revelation of land meadows so the forgers weren't aware of that but it certainly once once it was discovered and The map was published in nineteen sixty five. Those two then became linked certainly in the public mind. But again this wasn't the result of of the forgeries or even gaels purchaser are publishing of the map. But they definitely become entwined after the map is published. Let's see all to do with them up. They're going to keep. The map was a gift to the university. And we keep it. It's it's still an important work. Because it does document the twentieth century reception of this very important forgery there were actually protests in the streets of new haven about the announcement of this map because newhaven was largely italian american community and they very much felt that they were being and their heritage is being insulted by the promotion of this map. And so it's important that we keep it as a as a representative of the twentieth century and the reactions that occur with it and of course they're still interest in The scientific analysis of it. There's always there always going to be people that are interested in figuring out how the forgers did this..

saragossa library lonzo meadows newfoundland spain newhaven
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:12 min | 2 months ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"To ancestors that i found fascinating. You know you. You mentioned that or log ended. It seems Parallel to the concept of terroir. When you're talking about what makes wine special and it's more than just the grapes and and it seems a little whoo some time but you get there and you enjoy the wine and you you understand the magic of the love and the generations and the in the culture and heritage. That's all worked into that. And you really go. Yeah that's something much more You it's not just a simple recipe. There's a lot to it. And and maybe that's what shapes our connection with our past and makes that family tree a little more complex on now so in my book. I try to expand the concept of genealogy beyond genetics to this idea of cultural transmission and also to the the spiritual ancestors that we have and i think that's a concept that most people can relate to who are have spiritual inclinations that that you have in essence spiritual forefathers inform others. You know it might be a saint francis or it might be The dalai lama or in the hindu tradition people who have influenced you and who helped shaped your soul and who are in a sense. Your relatives your kin. Laurie ericsson is a deacon with the episcopalian church in iowa city. she's known for writing about spiritual journeys of many varieties. She's written the soul of the family tree. Describe how tracing her genealogy enhanced spiritual life as she recognized her ancestors role in shaping who she is today. Her website is laurie. Ericsson dot net lorries also written about end of life customs that she's observed in different cultures in near the exit. We'll replay her interview on that in late. October on travel with. Rick steves so lori. This is a travel show. And you write about genealogy and the intersection of genealogy and travel his fascinating to me how can genealogy be a catalyst for unique travel experiences that you're having in order to nurture your soul and your identity. i mean. your whole book is filled with being on the road. But i do think that Family roots travel is a huge part of the travel market. That people aren't as aware of because it goes on sort of underneath the radar because people are travelling not to major tourist attractions. Generally they might be traveling to a farm in alabama or to Village in sicily or your battlefield in france and so there are places of individual meaning. But i think anyone who has done any genealogical research at all other than at their computer realizes the joy of being in a place that is connected to your larger story that there's a kind of visceral jolts that can happen. There that is. It's hard to describe but once you feel it you know exactly what it is and you want to feel it more in other races yes and you know. A lot of people are wondering post coverted. How are we going to be traveling. an interesting thing about genealogy travel is it's meaningful travel rather than just bucket list sort of travel and it gets you away from the crowds which people are wondering. How can i travel and just kind of me. More peaceful genealogy trouble is by nature not touristy and i think another aspect of that is that during the pandemic when people were home so much. I think a lot of people were doing more genealogical research. It was something that you can do from the safety of your home. And so i actually think there's going to be a real boom in family roots travel once people really start getting out and about as you said graveyards and Small towns and places. That aren't packed with people but still have a lot of potential meaning. Okay now you went to norway. And i bet your expert at genealogical travel or genealogy travel. Where did he go norway. What were you hoping to find the in the course of my book. I just chose one set of great great grandparents because no one is going to be that interested in all of my many norwegian relatives. And so i. I've chosen at random. Because i like the sound of their names from my family tree. They sounded very norwegian. They had lots of those norwegian vowels in them but it actually was a very serendipitous choice because they turned out to have interesting stories and they were from one of the most beautiful parts of norway and they were both baptized in the borgen. Church which is probably the most beautiful medieval church in norway. It's one of the stock iconic stave church. I think isn't it right right with dragon heads on the cy and the on the edges of the roofs. And it's quintessential norway. I and so i went to their place. And i went to a farm. That my Great-great-grandfather haunts had had been a sharecropper essentially. He had never owned land. They had never owned land. They were very poor in norway. And i got the chance to stand there. And i took some. I took a little bit of the soil. My husband laughs at. I took probably half the soil from that little plot because it was so rocky and i took the soil and i brought it back and put it on their gray. Their joint grave in northeast iowa sort of connecting stories. And that was that was really meaningful to do that. And i brought my son's along. I brought my sister as well so it was a real family pilgrimage and then to follow up on your viking heritage. You did some traveling in the new world. You went to the coast of newfoundland a viking settlement. Tell us about that. Well my name. Is laurie eriksen. In for my entire life. I have always said that. I am a descendant of the explorer. The norse explorer. Leif eriksson who was the first european to live in north america in canada in a colony that it was called finland but it was later discovered in newfoundland as lonzo meadows is the name of it and so i went to stand in the footsteps of life. Eric said even though i have to admit that the thousand years between us probably means that is going to be awfully hard for me to to trace my direct descent from leif eriksson but have been fascinated by the vikings and to be able to go to that windswept remote spot on the very very edge the continent and see The artifacts artifacts that were left behind to see the re-creations of the the eleventh century. Norse buildings was tremendously meaningful. Even though it was family in that larger sense we're exploring how genealogy can be a tool for travel and self-discovery right now travel with rick steves. Laurie erickson this our guest her latest book. The soul of the family tree seeks to show us. What's so interesting about our forgotten. Relatives basically lorries also explored end of life traditions around the world in her earlier book. It's called near the exit and global spiritual connections is our topic of her book called holy rover. Laurie it's so nice to have you and you know Dna testing has been hugely popular. Lately you wrote. It's kind of the the lazy persons entry into genealogy. What do you think about dna testing as as a way to to help. Empower.

norway Laurie ericsson episcopalian church rick steves saint francis iowa city dalai lama leif eriksson laurie Ericsson lori sicily alabama laurie eriksen france newfoundland lonzo meadows iowa Laurie erickson finland
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

02:59 min | 9 months ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"There's another artifact <Speech_Male> the so <Speech_Male> you know readers <Speech_Male> if you read my stuff and <Speech_Male> you've got stuff in your backyard. <Speech_Male> Jimmy call <Speech_Male> let me know <Speech_Male> because it might all fit together. <Speech_Male> Another puzzle piece <Speech_Male> at <SpeakerChange> added to the <Silence> gestalt. They're <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> absolutely. I'd go <Speech_Male> so far as to say this. <Speech_Male> Is the <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> future <Silence> of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> the breakthrough work <Speech_Male> in this area. And <Speech_Male> we have to kind of <Speech_Male> re condition ourselves <Speech_Male> and segue <Speech_Male> academia <Speech_Male> because every once in a while <Speech_Male> they'll stumble on something <Speech_Male> and it'll trickle <Speech_Male> out of <Speech_Male> their corrupt machine <Speech_Male> but really. <Speech_Male> This is the way <Speech_Male> that information is <Speech_Male> going to go is gonna come <Speech_Male> out and i think <Speech_Male> we just need to change our <Speech_Male> focus and <SpeakerChange> not be <Silence> so surprised <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know. Oh my god <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> dave brody. <Speech_Male> An attorney has written <Speech_Male> this. We have to go. <Speech_Male> No <Speech_Male> the other systems completely <Speech_Male> corrupt <Speech_Male> in completely <Speech_Male> rigged <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> project a certain <Speech_Male> narrative. So <Speech_Male> yes that's <SpeakerChange> where you <Speech_Male> would expect it to come <Silence> out <Speech_Male> yet. <Speech_Male> Although the lonzo meadow <Speech_Male> site in northern new finland <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> were amateur hockey. <Speech_Male> He was an attorney <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> you know they had to <Speech_Male> drag the mainstream <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> archaeology community <Speech_Male> kicking and screaming <Speech_Male> up there. <Speech_Male> You know they wouldn't <Speech_Male> come look at it <Speech_Male> but it <Speech_Male> seems to be like <Speech_Male> you said it. <SpeakerChange> It seems to <Speech_Male> always be the amateurs <Speech_Male> who <Silence> are pushing <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> pushing the envelope <Speech_Male> on this and and <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> the professionals who will get <Silence> dragged along <Speech_Male> you <SpeakerChange> know <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> as its but <Speech_Male> yeah. I think you're right <Speech_Male> about that outs. I think <Speech_Male> i think this is the way this <Speech_Male> kind of research <SpeakerChange> is the wave <Silence> of the future <Speech_Male> great <Speech_Male> work and <Speech_Male> thanks again so much <Speech_Male> for joining me. It's <Speech_Male> goats <Speech_Male> pleasure. Great <Speech_Male> host thank <SpeakerChange> you for having <Speech_Male> average it. <Speech_Male> Thanks again to dave <Speech_Male> brody for joining me <Speech_Male> on skeptical. <Speech_Male> Check out his book <Speech_Male> america. I think you <Speech_Male> really enjoy it. It's <Speech_Male> a great read. And <Speech_Male> as i mentioned <Speech_Male> lot <Speech_Male> of great <Speech_Male> historical <Speech_Male> references <Speech_Male> and links. <Speech_Male> If you have the kindle <Speech_Male> version you just <Speech_Male> tap and you're right <Speech_Male> over to the real <Speech_Male> archaeological <Speech_Male> finds <Speech_Male> and other <Speech_Male> information <Speech_Male> that he has in there <Speech_Male> so do check that <Speech_Male> out <Speech_Male> question to <Speech_Male> tee up from <Speech_Male> this interview. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh boy <Speech_Male> i don't even know where <Silence> to begin. <Speech_Male> <Silence> one a simple one. <Speech_Male> How <Speech_Male> fake do you think <Silence> this history is <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> part to <Speech_Male> skip <Speech_Male> toco <Speech_Male> second <Silence> level <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> is. Why <Silence> is it fake. <Speech_Male> Why <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> this history <Speech_Male> so fake. Why <Speech_Male> do they care <Speech_Male> about keeping <Speech_Male> this <SpeakerChange> history <Speech_Male> fake <Speech_Male> boy. I'm tipping <Speech_Male> my hand. <SpeakerChange> And where <Speech_Male> i intend to go on <Speech_Male> the stuff <Silence> of your thoughts. <Speech_Male> Talk <Speech_Male> to me. Talk to <Speech_Male> be out there. <Speech_Male> Skeptical former <Speech_Male> wherever you reach me. <Speech_Male> Lots of shows <Speech_Male> coming up till <Speech_Male> next time. <Speech_Music_Male> Take care <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> and bye for <Music> now.

america Jimmy northern new finland kindle
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"Thing anymore so in half generation. We've actually made a lot of headway now. people realise. Yeah the north. Were definitely here to me. I always say people. We know for a fact the north of here in the earliest parts of the eleventh century. Leif eriksson all those icelandic sagas nor saad as we know they were here. We know they came down least as far as northern new finland. Now most experts say that lonzo meadow site which is to stop over point. They came down probably as far as mame runs. Look were sure of at least new brunswick. So they're right. The doorstep of new england already to me it would be more surprising over the next five hundred years after the north. Where here that. Nobody came back. That's way more surprising than the idea that people did like to meet five hundred years as great reasons to come over here. Trading mining cop whatever it was economic advantage that lots of all the land the land of of of ah plenty. There's plenty of great reasons for coming over here. And part of the human condition to to seek out new life. A new civilization as star trek says and so again the idea that the atlantic ocean was a barrier during times. and before. that's that's a fiction that the church wanted people to be afraid of falling off the edge of the earth that they crossed the atlantic but that was because they wanted to maintain control they wanted. They didn't want people exploring of being scientific. But most educated people understood that there were the earth was round and there were other lands across the atlantic and this goes back to ancient atlantis and whatever goes way back but again to me the takeaway. The surprising thing would have been if nobody came back between the norse and fourteen ninety two. That's almost five hundred years. That would be surprising to me will will. I think is kind of really interesting where you went there. A couple of ways. Day this one. You're pushing it way back. At least it seems to us. You're pushing way back and we'll dive into that in minute because you're pushing it back to the second century and you're pushing a role but let me just throw a couple of things that i picked up from a another interview that i heard you do because you have a kind of broad knowledge of all this stuff that i want to kind of tap into and that's that we've kind of moved from one kind of wacky paradigm that we shouldn't look before columbus and we've moved off of that and now we moved to the. Oh okay we can look to kind of the medieval period like you're saying and nor did it and you know what we want to stop there when really we have no reason to stop there like you point out the phoenicians who are the people in lebanon right and they were great seafarers and they kinda sailed all around in boats bigger than columbus. You could also point out that the whole easter island thing. I mean that's a harder ocean across and you got all that and then you've got all connections in south america. You also got all this other archaeological evidence in formula club instance it's popped up with you.

Leif eriksson south america atlantic ocean lebanon atlantic new england earth eleventh century easter island five hundred years new brunswick northern new finland lonzo meadow columbus fourteen ninety two next five hundred years saad one kind second century ah plenty
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

08:22 min | 10 months ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Evil. There are some. They're very much a rarity so that most people that we label as bad evil whatever. The do have a softer side. There is a chink in their armor and this race lead character in the dragon lent series to me was the most believable of all because of his humanity and in the very end of the stories he ends up being very selfless and sacrifices himself for his brother. Better not give away too. Many sports like yeah were part of Talking authors and helping promote their work is. Is this idea that you just brought up like you. Don't wanna give away too much. You wanna be able to tease to work enough. That people are interested and want to pick it up and read it for themselves but not give away so much that i don't need to read the book. You just told me everything it now. And that's that's one of the biggest challenges with doing. The sometimes i feel like i need to stop authors from from rambling on about their book. Because i don't want you to give away the keys to the store it's a it's a difficult thing Let's talk a little bit about how you get started because Not at not that. People need necessarily guidance on starting. But i'm always curious because there are so many different methods for me if i thought if i'm thinking about how i would go start to write a book. I would do a lot of research. I i'd have the whole story at least thought out in my head at a post it notes about plots and all that kind of stuff. I know that's me. But i've talked to enough people. I know some people. Just sit down and let what the blank page Know give them inspiration and lead the way. What is your process like. How does it work for you. It depends on the piece of work. And i'm sort of dm vacuous that way. You know it's interesting. You should come up on this. Because i recently did a series of articles on my blog. Code raiders craft and that was one of the very subjects i dealt with is how do you start so for me it. It depends on the piece. I'm working on Sometimes the novel. I'm writing requires a tremendous amount of research and a huge amount of depths and commitment on my part to be able to understand the world the subject matter the characters all of that and in those cases i have a tendency to become a bit compulsive I usually read far too much research material. I take far too many notes. I write outlines. That are a novel in themselves. Almost tolkien esque sort of thing. The way tolkien would write all his backstory for for his work I have been known to do that. And hence the reason it often takes me into anywhere between five and eleven years to write some of my novels on the other hand there are some that are not quite what i would call a pastor novel. I hate that term. You know kinda fly by the seat of your pants But but kind of close what gives me the germ the colonel for that story. That also depends for instance. There was one novel. I wrote Cold for mount for mountains of ice and the impetus for that was the idea of hero. Someone who didn't think himself as a hero someone who was just committed to being a good person in doing his duty at all cost. So that's kind of a nebulous thought although it's a specific character and what am i going to write about with that character so great. You know i've got this guy this person but where do i put him and had to be a man So yeah out of that developed entire novel. That's where it started the novel. I'm currently working on Started with again. It was a nebulous concept. The idea of wind the feeling of wind constant buffeting wind and the place i connected with that is a place in canada. Code lonzo meadows. And it's the site of the first norse settlement in in north america dates from about nine hundred a d And that point that that point of land is is just hammered by wind all the time. It's always present. And i wondered what that would be like to live in that. How would that affect your psyche. What would that do to your ability to function and hence this novel. I'm working on now. Heck lament Was born and social. Wrote all of that novel. There will be an undercurrent of that idea of being buffeted hammered not just with wind but by actions so that the wind then almost becomes an entity in itself. However when i wrote the rose guardian it was a concept of Unspoken conversations that happen in relationships and how it is. We have a tendency to be our own worst enemy. And so then. How would i tell that story. Well as it happened My mom died three years ago and there was a lot non unspoken between us so while story isn't autobiographical. Certainly i was able to draw a lot of from my own experiences with the Unspoken conversations that happen didn't happen between mom and me for that novel. So that's how that was born. Do i outline. Always because my mind hesitancy to go off in all directions all at once. So i need to be organized. And i can't write unless organized. I even get stumped if i can't think of the right word and i'm frozen for hours days sometimes because i haven't been able to think of the right word i so admire those authors who can just leaves a blank space and continue to write. I can't do that. I get frozen over outline. I over characterize all of that. I'm obsessive note taker Thank you for sharing that. And i think it's important because i think this is true. And i'll see if you agree with me and you can teach so many things you can teach grammar. You can teach about literature you can teach about form and all this kind of stuff and all at all the stuff that authors need for tool the tool set. The creative process is something that somebody really has to figure out on their own is not all canopy taught. I don't think the creative process can be taught. No i i totally agree with you that you can learn techniques and i think this goes for any art form for instance. Let's talk about painting. Because i also happen to paint you can learn how to the technicalities of painting in oils or watercolours acrylics. And the you have to be bound by that because otherwise the painting work but the art happens when you break all rules you have to understand how it works so with writing. I think you have to have something to say. And i think you have to have the ability to be able to say that.

canada north america three years ago first one novel one about nine hundred a d five Code raiders craft eleven years Cold for mount tolkien norse dragon lent rose guardian one of the biggest challenges
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"It was written in 1992. And it's one of my dad's library books. I was going through all those library reading books and had something like that in there. People are seeing things, hearing things and at some of these megalithic sites in Europe. You know, and it sounds a little bit like what some of these people were experiencing. You know that kind of thing, And I just finished a book, actually, about two days ago, so it sounds a little bit vaguely like, but some of these people sense, you know? You know, with the With so many people looking at the structure's has science investigated this too, not just archaeologists and geologist. Maybe, but I mean Have they come up with any theories? Well, we you know, we were open to a lot of different disciplines. Like you know, you mentioned archaeology and geology is very, very important. You know, the know the geology of the hill and everything and Also, um Oculus Oculus Tron, Ammi and we have people that are involved with the inscriptions and everything. But, yeah, I mean, people have looked at thee says. I think the new technology that's coming out so much of it coming out is going to be a big a big help to doing research on these sites. They just found in fact, the maybe the second Viking site up in Newfoundland, Canada. It was actually a PBS streaming last year. And since 1960 when they found Lonzo Meadow of the new film, and they hadn't found anything yet, But this worldview three satellites over 300 miles in space. Actually, the option actually. Saw something on the ground, so the archaeologists were allowed by pox Canada to go in for two weeks and do a you know excavation to see if they could find anything. And right now it appears that it's a second Viking settlement, so that type of technology lied are Standing. They just did my computer with US laser scanner and that's what we really needed our site in order to get the accurate measurements, you know, to find out as I mentioned the megalithic units now, that would help. Oh, big, healthier. The objective, not subjective, you know, would be very, very accurate. But we need a lot of different disciplines, you know? And how Why did these people build issue? No. So more of a humanities like your caller was saying, you know, why did they build these sites? Do they have like visions when they were building these sites, and that's what that book I'm read had a lot about that about people having visions at the sights, you know. Well, with about 50 years of experience at this site, Dennis, do you think there's still things there that you haven't even unraveled yet? You know, we just found in the last We gonna have a wall across what we call the watch house. We've been going by for 60 years and it's been the ignored wall. Just a little while it runs out into the dense woods. You know very junglee in there, and we just recently cleared out a lot of the stuff and we found the wall. Has some upright stones. It ends about 100 ft. With a triangle ahead. I think it's one of the serpentine walls and it has four windows near the base of it. He's a stone windows. And that's another thing that that Stonington, Connecticut out in Monticello, New York, these wells have the stone windows and, um, and they make no sense whatsoever. So that was found like a week and a half ago, these four little stone windows in the wall. And we've been going by that wall. I mean, right next to the path where the people go up to the main site, and now in clearing it out, you can actually see it. And people are actually taken note of it now. So, yes, we're finding things it almost seems like on a weekly basis. We find something you know, like the revealing themselves to us, you know? I don't my dad helping out with that or, you know, whatever. But it's pretty going to write a new book and put a lot of this in it. We do have to survey the serpentine walls these walls and not on the survey from the 19 seventies and early eighties. So we're finding things almost on a weekly basis up here. All right, stay with us. We're going to come back with final calls with Dennis Stone on coast to coast a out feeling lost not by your radio. Grab your smartphone or a computer and listen, toe I heart radio pick up the free I heart radio APS in the APP store, or Goto I heart radio dot com. Okay away. NewsRadio. Time is 10 30. Cal would fire in Boulder County that started Saturday has.

Dennis Stone Canada Europe US Lonzo Meadow geologist Boulder County Stonington Cal Newfoundland Monticello New York Connecticut
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:18 min | 3 years ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wipe your family. Loretta decker. Speaking from Lonzo meadows in northern new found land to Alex last. So what more do we know about what the Vikings were doing in that part of the world. I'm joined now by professor Judith Yash specialist in the north people and traditions at the university of Nottingham if you could just set the scene for us I in general terms about where the Vikings stand in the spread of European history. The Vikings is a name we give to people who have their origins in Scandinavia, so Norway Denmark, and Sweden, and what happened between the eighth and the eleventh centuries of the Christian era, they became a global phenomenon. I'm they spread east south and west. They reached the Black Sea the Caspian Sea the Mediterranean North Africa. And of course, they also headed west to the shells. And then across the North Atlantic all the way to the North American continent as you've just heard why were they such inveterate travellers and successful travelers given that I mean, we must. Remember that they were traveling across the seas in relatively tiny exposed boats. They were tiny and exposed, but they were very well engineered. I think the the ships and boats of the Vikings are the key to their successful travels. But I think they also had a sense of adventure. They were on the lookout for opportunities of various kinds of settling or trading or indeed of ratings as they did in in Britain. When you say rating that there is a tradition of rape and pillage which goes along with the the stories of Vikings certainly in Britain. Well, I I think writing in and trading sort of went together if you're trading and have a valuable objects with you, then you going to want to defend them. And certainly when they came to Britain, if they found undefended towns or monasteries or farmsteads they would take what they needed. So there's no doubt that the rating went on. I'm rape is a bit more difficult to demonstrate archaeologically and is not really mentioned in the sources. So I think that's a bit of a myth good. We've established that there are others myths surrounding him. But were they are warlike people. I mean, if you're traveling to new lands, I presume you're going to be prepared to meet whatever confronts you, well, they they were skilled at using weapons certainly in as I've said that they had to defend themselves. If you you're going into strange territory and certain aspects of of their culture and religion suggests that in general, the male members of the Vikings were very able warriors. They did what they have to do. I don't think they were necessarily more violent than anyone else in that age. I think it was a violent ages. Indeed, most ages are and we heard there that the colony in what they referred to as vindamme lasted only about twenty years doing if it was completely abandoned with any Vikings left at other DNA records that would suggest that perhaps there is Viking blood mixed with the indigenous of the people of the Americas. Well as you heard. In the piece the inland is quite a large area. And at the moment, the settlement Atlanta meadows is are on the definite evidence that Scandinavians reached North America. The reason it says the open quite describe it as a colony up the way station, perhaps that it only lasted twenty years is because the archaeologists can tell that the houses were never repaired and in that climate after twenty years he would expect to have to repair the buildings. So they use that as a base there may have been other bases that we haven't found yet. But I don't think they really establish themselves in North America. They were just occasional visits. But we do know from some written sources that they were still going to labrador for timber into the fourteenth century. So I think they were still travelling in that direction. We just haven't found any evidence other than Lenzi meadows up until now, and we're still looking are we people in your field because you got the source material in the Norse sagas. Yes. That we're reliant on archaeological finds to establish any further. Details. Others archaeological finds still emerging today. I'm not aware of anything new totally convincing from North America. No. But I do know that there are people looking, and and I think there is there is some work in high Arctic Canada, which shows that Scandinavians were trading with the indigenous people up there, but that might just be trading. It might not actually be any kind of settlement. Professor judith. Yes. From the university of Nottingham, many things next a quintessentially British story, but one which has resonance around the world, you may have noticed in the past couple of weeks news surrounding the queen's New Year's honours list. This is the time of year when the establishment in this country recognizes the work done in a variety of fields by handing out medals and titles. Well in the New Year's honours list for nineteen Ninety-one the best selling author Barbara Cartland was made a Dame Dame. I'm Barbara became a well-known personality late in life because of her romantic fiction and her Royal connections. Gusty read has been trolling through the archives to bring you a taste of a very British celebrity..

Vikings North America Britain university of Nottingham professor Lonzo meadows North Atlantic Loretta decker Barbara Cartland rape Judith Yash North Africa Black Sea Alex Scandinavia Caspian Sea Norway
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Missile. Of nineteen sixty Norwegian couple the venture held instead and his wife the archaeologist Tina sailed up to a remote tiny fishing village called Lance meadows and the rugged northern tip of new found land on Canada's Atlantic coast. So they came to to Lance the meadows in nineteen sixty in the summer, they asked around about where there might be old ruins. And the actions of talk to George decker. Now, George decker was my graduate. That's Loretta decker. She works for parks Canada. And she spoke to me on the crackly line from a home in Lancer meadows as the area was battered by snowstorm the area in is right on the edge of the North Atlantic. My grandfather. The pig. Chiefs, and he was really Representative of the people in the little village here. My grandfather suggests I know where they're all chew. It's up essentially in our pasture land in our meadow. And there's a fresh water brook that goes down through still salmon, and there's a marine terrace is description of it, but it's a raised beach, and it's grass is a beautiful spot. And they're in that meadow, there are essentially the outlines of houses now for generations. It was called Indian can't people here assumed that it had been indigenous people that were living there, but when the solid it really reminded them all things they had seen in Greenland in particular. Now, this was a tantalizing discovery because the ink stats were hoping to be the first people to find physical proof that Vikings had come from Greenland to North America one thousand years ago, and we're in fact, the first Europeans on the continent. Some five hundred. Hundred years before Christopher Columbus. The remains of these buildings suggested they were onto something. So excavations began and esteem that said, you know, the locals that they hired. It's excavators. Were some of the best year ever worked with no training? Yes. Their work ethic, determination, Lonzo meadows is a tiny crofting community of only about seventy people at the point where Newfoundland almost touches the coast of labrador Scandinavian. Archaeologists have uncovered remains of eight turf walled structures here of characteristically north type. There were built in a row along the marine terrace formed by the action of the scene..

Lance meadows George decker Loretta decker Representative Lonzo meadows Lancer meadows Canada Greenland Lance North Atlantic Tina North America Christopher Columbus Newfoundland one thousand years Hundred years
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me, Alex. And today, it's the story of an amazing discovery that resolved a thousand year old mystery where the Vikings the first Europeans to actually make it to North America. The summer of nineteen sixty and Norwegian couple the adventure hedge instead and his wife, the archaeologist amnesty sailed up to a remote tiny fishing village called lots of meadows and the rugged northern tip of new found land on Canada's Atlantic coast. So they came to the meadows in nineteen sixty in the summer, they asked around about rare. They might be old ruins and they asked him to talk to George decker. Now, George decker was my graduate. That's Loretta decker. She works for parks Canada. And she spoke to me on correctly line from a home in Lancer meadows as the area was battered by a snowstorm the area in is right on the edge of the North Atlantic. My grandfather the chiefs, and he was really Representative of the people in the little village here. My grandfather suggests I I know where they're all too. It's up. Essentially in our pasture land meadow. And there's a fresh water brook that goes down through still salmon, and there's a marine terrace is the description of it, but it's a raise the, and it's meadow grass is a beautiful spot. And they're in that meadow are essentially the outlines of houses now for generations. It was called Indian camp people here assumed that it had been indigenous people that were living there, but when the solid it really reminded them all things they had seen in Greenland in particular. Now, this was a tantalizing discovery because the ink stats were hoping to be the first people to find physical proof that Vikings had come from Greenland to North America one thousand years ago, and we're in fact, the first Europeans on the continent. Some five hundred years before Christopher Columbus. The remains of these buildings suggested they were onto something and say excavations began. And esteem at said, you know, the locals that they it's excavators. Were some of the best she had ever worked with no training. Yes, there work has determination. Lonzo meadows is a tiny crofting community of only about seventy people at the point where Newfoundland almost touches coast of labrador Scandinavian. Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of eight turf walled structures here of characteristically north type. There were built in a row along the marine terrace formed by the action of.

George decker Loretta decker Vikings North America Representative Lonzo meadows Greenland Canada Lancer meadows North Atlantic Alex Christopher Columbus Newfoundland five hundred years one thousand years thousand year
"lonzo meadow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"lonzo meadow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Norwegian couple the adventure held instead and his wife the arc eulogised anna-stina sailed up to a remote tiny fishing village could Lance a meadows and the rugged northern tip of new found land on Canada's Atlantic coast. So they came to land meadows in nineteen sixty in the summer. They asked around. That might be old ruins and the absence of talk to George decker. Now, George decker was my graduate. That's Loretta decker. She works for parks Canada. And she spoke to me on the crackly line from a home in Lancer meadows. It's the area was battered by snowstorm the area in is right on the edge of the North Atlantic. My grandfather the. Chiefs, and he was really a Representative of the the people in the little village here. My grandfather suggests are I know where they're old ruins to it's up essentially in our pasture land in our meadow. And there's a freshwater brook that goes down through still salmon, and there's a marine terrace is the description of it, but it's a raise the and it's meddling in grass. It's a beautiful spot. And they're in that meadow, there are essentially the outlines of houses now for generations. It was called Indian camp people here assumed that it had been indigenous people that were living there. But when the solid it really reminded them all things they had seen in Greenland in particular. Now, this was a tantalizing discovery because the ink stats were hoping to be the first people to find physical proof that Vikings had come from Greenland to North America one thousand years ago, and we're in fact, the first Europeans on the continent. Some. Five hundred years before Christopher Columbus. The remains of these buildings suggested they were onto something and say excavations began and esteem at said, you know, the locals that they hired its excavators. Were some of the best year ever worked with no training? Yes. There were cats determination. Lonzo meadows is a tiny crofting community of only about seventy people at the point where Newfoundland almost touches a coast of labrador Scandinavian. Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of eight turf walled structures here of characteristically north type. There were built in a row along the marine terrace formed by the action of.

George decker Loretta decker Representative Lonzo meadows Lancer meadows Canada Greenland North Atlantic Lance North America Christopher Columbus Newfoundland Five hundred years one thousand years