20 Episode results for "London Zoo"

President Trump Says He will Pardon someone Big Today

Bob Lonsberry

30:26 min | 8 months ago

President Trump Says He will Pardon someone Big Today

"External. Not The same thing I've seen at at the Fisher House, the Fisher House I know is a huge part of recovery for somebody like my husband for them to know that their family members are being taken care of that's a huge burden off of them so they can concentrate on their therapies. Just having that assurance that no matter what as long as we were there for Anson that someone would be there to take care of us. It took so much offer shoulders. How can you help go to fisherhouse dot org L. mostly sunny and sixty five I've taught holiday newsradio wham eleven eighty next news at nine thirty breaking news when it happens anytime another hour with Bob Laws Bury starts now on newsradio wam eleven eighty excuse me of. Eighty. Todd. Todd holiday newsradio WAM. Eleven eighty all right. Okay. You sure you're not Joel Lansky. No I'm pretty sure because there was a shorter bald man Not that long ago. I. Think named Joe Laskey I went to the trouble of learning his name Okay and here he covered for me last week while I was on Vaca-. Sta I went camping in the adirondacks now this was this the first time you're trailer had been like away from hookups and stuff like that. This was our first time for any extended period without any electricity or water. It went fine. We have a new Honda generators and kept US charged up when we need it of course, propane for the fridge and You know we were able to stock up on a full fresh tank of water before we camped and we were set up for almost seven full days. It was great place called. Louis. Lake upper the right in the middle not ever hear the town called speculator. Yes sir. Well, it's about I don't know ten or twelve miles north of there yet you had propane in the frigerator Okay. Any Beer? Well Yeah? Yeah? Maybe I've heard that some RV people will drink beer occasionally Yeah. Maybe some wines or whatever. All kinds of of adult beverages. But. Was it. Pleasant. Where was you like trees on around? It was very, very nice. Campground very private, not too crowded lots of trees. It's right on the lake and It was beautiful. The weather was perfect just There was a couple of nights a showers, but for the rest of the week, no humidity just warm pleasant. The water was warm and pleasant it was great. So the camp included like lake frontage whatever like Louis Lake it's near Indian Lake Okay. native. American League, and the beautiful part is that it's it's like about ten or twelve miles from the nearest cell tower. So we had like I was completely off grid of the few times we went into town show. It was great. So it's two o'clock in the morning You're there Louis Lake, you ever whisper to your sweetheart you WanNa, go skinny dipping I do. I do whisper that. Will did you know getting happened in the middle of the night nero what I know I went back nobody would've seen anything. don't think. So he should've said when you get back, you can tell me all about it. Well, that's kind of what she said. You can you can. Do. Not Anywhere out in the woods like that up in the adirondacks at night. Did you hear coyotes? Do you hear loons in the morning her loans that were loons on the lake and I didn't hear any coyotes but it was a lot of little wildlife running around mice, chipmunks squirrels didn't see any real big game didn't senior year or anything like that but I guess they're around you're supposed to leave your food out on the picnic table right to Yeah. Visits you know we were very careful about all of that, but it's funny because some mice did break into our trailer. In the middle of the week and and you know start sniffing around and causing trouble and munching on things and That was not pleasant but I mean you know. When you're out camping like that. Do you eat em Ariz or what? What what do you have for food? Oh well, molly had it. All figured out I mean she had all the menus planned and everything and she's a great cook and she's really smart savvy kind of. Cook. So she knows how to prepare things very efficiently. So we had the refrigerator well-stocked. We had all sorts of terrific meal-sized standing pulled pork and all kinds of chicken and fish. Yeah. It was great there different kinds of chicken Okay. He's on different ways. Knees you know the it's descended from the red jungle fowl is the chicken yes. it's being which last night I ate chicken hearts for dinner. Oh i. went to the Asia Market on Henrietta town right near the town. Yeah I have. I'm ignorant person I just walk in and it's like, oh, my gosh. This. First of all everything's brightly colored to I didn't. We can eat that and third. It's very difficult to read any of the labels and know what's in them. I have no idea how. I got that. Okay. We're good on that. That's about it. I got something that looked like a a fungi fungus or whatever like that, and I got the chicken hearts and I got some Bok Choy and I put him on a pan and it wasn't Chinese food but it was stuff I bought an Asian markets you cooked for your family See, it when you make stuff like includes chicken hearts and you can offer to people but they may not eat it especially young children. Yeah. Exactly. What's that dad? You know the kids of today are frigging spoiled they just don't like the organ meat you. Know sweetbreads just doesn't go over my house. Well good. I'm so glad now your thing is your you and your sweetheart her learning maybe we might want to ultimately retirement be RV people people, right? That's sort of what this has been all about this sort of experiment in on the road living and you know we we take these week long trips and and see if we don't kill each other. Then that's a good sign and yeah, you know in a few years when we're ready to retire, we might get a bigger RV and then you know take our winters down in the South West Yeah still come back here for down by corning or something like that. A little further south over south. Very. Good. Well, that's outstanding. We and we missed you while you're gone I'm glad glad that you're back. Well, it's good to be back. You Know Sam. Shire he works now. Yeah. I've met SAM before. I. Left Oh is that right? Yeah. Okay. I forget these things. Yeah. I almost learned Sam's name to. The Sammy every chicken hearts I've never have. You ever been in a in a camper trailer out at a at a camp. I never have either fine. No Right. Sounds like a great time though it is a good time. All right. Very good. Well, my show up what's at except with my Ravaged by mice in the woods Sam I forgot, have you guys gone on any kind of vacation this summer now we didn't we were supposed to go on a on a cruise. That's with the nanny. Just second is on if I've told you this Todd Sam has a nanny really yes, it. Takes Care of my three year old and my am I one year old I. Think the company is paying you too much. That's a Bob thing to you. But the truth is the truth is is that she likes to be called the nanny but. Manny live in house. It's not a living. No, she's not. She's like twenty twenty two years old Oh. Okay. So a twenty, two year olds can't live in house. We found. That's not good. You're saying she sounds like neither Fran Drescher nor Julie Andrews. Oh. So not not even close not exactly what this thing is. But. The point is Yeah. You're you're relatively newly married. You have little kids in your is going to be the big cruise. Yeah. We're. So she was supposed to come along with with the crews and and be because we can only they have occupied. But she was going to pay her own way. You're going to take the nanny on the cars. Yeah. I heard that. That's outstanding shoes pair on way which by the way I, I've paid in full for the cruise without getting any money from her and also I wonder if I'll actually get paid once it actually I was never called to question the integrity of your. Thank. Todd, you're a cruise I have not yeah me neither my brother has he he and his wife they love Sam used to work on a cruise ship. That's right. I was remember Sam told me that I remember that Third Deputy Assistant Cruise. Director Dan. Assistant Cruiser Sorry Assistant. Got To the cruise director one time one time. They had like a conference, his death in office or something like Oh vice presidential succession. Mutiny on the ship. then. Decide how these towels. To Cruise Director Convention they meet you know. Probably, in Phoenix or something. I don't want any ocean around here. So I had to fill in for one week and the actual cruise director. Wow. Yeah I was there was quite the week. I have no talent whatsoever. That's the week they play twister on the B-. The big. Cabin. Cruiser actors have talent. They can sing there in it during a show or they have some something something niche about him mile an interest I just told cruise director jokes the whole time they call it the same jokes that every cours director towels on every ship you ever go on really yeah, it's hot. Are you familiar with any cruise director jokes? No I'm gonna Sam I wonder what a typical cruise director joke would be excuse me Sir does this elevator go to the front of the ship? Okay I see. All right. What's One of them. That's that's. It their elevator goes up and down. Is. The ICY. Of course would think of that as the bow and moving that direction would be going azure. Right it's for an aft after his backward. Right exactly is also there's like a port and starboard yes. We Hortas left side starboard is is right. Todd when he did that he said poured is left any raised. Really. Little reminder that Ford is left to raise over here. Port has four letters. Letter. To raise your right hand. But you never got to drive the ship no no that'd be scary. Yeah. Well, it's outstanding gentleman. I'm glad that that you have shared these stories with us great, great, todd, Hound, and no problem with bugs irrational. ADIRONDACKS blackflies. We didn't have any bugs to speak of at all going, right? Yeah. Usually, like I remember going up one year and Memorial Day weekend up near placid and it was awful. But that was years ago and that was memorial. Day. Was Not quite as far north and it was was gorgeous. Sure. Sure and thanks to Dt a lot of those things are gone and that's shriners well in this is Newsradio am eleven eighty. Today especially, boyfriend. Donald Trump is going to Saint Jacob Street I. Know We had calls on that Donald Trump's supposed to pardon somebody. Wouldn't it be something if he pardoned Hillary I mean just Don General General principle, Ron thank you for calling up Sir you're on Newsradio wham eleven eighty. Good Morning Bob I've driven past that House on Saint Jacob Street the number times, and they've stopped one time to set to take a look at it. I didn't see anybody out in the yard. And I always think whenever I see little outposts of civilization as I call them. If I was a journalist, there's a story behind every one of them right and on Norton Street. up wage about a block and a half from. Saint Paul Street was a house out a little low rise. Owned by Gentlemen of Color who I did talk to. And it was decorated to the nth degree outside of all sorts of flowers, landscaping and stuff like this, and that stood out an ad rough neighborhood and I talked to the gentleman recently changed hands whether he passed away or moved. I don't know I'm sure the inside who was probably just as interesting as outside and throughout the city, you can find these little gems even some rough places. And I think actually been common is. They are owner occupied they're not rental roach ranches. And here's. Here's the deal there. We'll talk about that. After this next caller, there actually are a lot of of such places an interesting thing about the worst and most dangerous streets in the city of Rochester is you will find a lot of homes with very well kept yards or flowers there to purposely planted or decorations that are put up the it and you know it if it's not all you know squalor and. Falling apart, there are there are clearly homes of pride and self respect all through those neighborhoods Craig, thanks for calling, sir. You're on newsradio Ham eleven eighty. Off Good morning as newlyweds about forty years ago we bought our first House on Saint Jacob Street and we loved it there most were owner occupied. And neighbors were friendly and inviting. And the trouble was that close by within a couple of streets. Often, shootings and crime and such. So I became to refer to it as the demilitarized zone and I understand the point you're making that. Coroner Started with people repurposing plastic and making sculpture even forty years ago. I used to run dog down the street and admire the work that somebody was doing there. So. your client is well-taken. Appreciate that, where where, where'd you move to when you left Saint Jacob Street? Iran. The quite value Betcha just jog up north low bit I it Craig thanks for the call I appreciate that and. I in that house, it's at North and Saint Jacob on the southeast. Corner. and it's just one illustrates the somebody's got an artistic thing in their head. They like those horses and they've made something beautiful out of it. But here's the thing that is that is true and I I run all through the city and you know it's not a large city geographically and if you WanNa, get in some distance. The called bad neighborhoods are where the best streets are for running, and so that's almost without variation where I go And the notion of a yes. There are places where there's glass and trash strewn all over. and. You will find in those neighborhoods houses, where clearly people have self respect out yesterday and I saw a man, this is tournament with street this was on. is either north or Hudson who still on North but there was a man out there and he an elderly man and he was sweeping his grass. Right he was picking up every little thing just making sure was right. There are lovely flowers, Eh the there are you know put up American flags, their signs out front. We've got a a high school senior. Again, there are challenges not not minimizing them, but they're also has pride of place and self respect and well-kept properties that are meant to lift the spirits of passersby all through the so-called worst neighborhoods of Rochester time for news with Todd Halladay. a King of camp and coming up on newsradio wham eleven eighty. Saying tall is not the same thing I say not at the Fisher. The Fisher, house I know is a huge part of land recovery for somebody like my husband for them to know that their family members are taken care of that's a huge burden off of them so they can concentrate on their therapies. Just. Having that assurance that no matter what as long as we were there for Anson that someone would be there to take care of us. Took so much weight off our shoulders. How can you help go to fisherhouse Dot Org? Pay Tax. Plugin, that tank. Propane straight to you extend your. Plan North through. That's pro pain taxing propane pentax dot. com. Let's cook in this weekend. If really is your plan, then make it easy on yourself. Go to propane taxi dot Com enter Promo Code V ten for ten dollars I barbecue tank exchange delivered to your door. It's that easy with propane taxi so you can focus on family friends and fun. Welcome back my friend. Welcome back a president trump yesterday announcing that he was going to pardon somebody big today at first. Obviously I thought Hillary. Okay. but I wonder not joking now I. Wasn't joining by Hillary I would he pardon Susan B. Anthony. She, of course, voted when contrary law. She was a convicted thereof I can't remember the exact story whether or not. She paid the fine whether or not the judge him pose define or whatever along those lines. but I would not be surprised. If. Because today, a lot of attention on the nineteenth amendment, of course, its centenary women have been voting in parts of America for fifty years before that Sadly, New York was not one of the early states to have voting for women who was actually one of the last is but what candidate Gua today I think they are a unveiling a street that will be named for Susan B. Anthony. So it could be we'll see how it is. What's that word just came down you are psychic sir, the president has pardoned Susan B. Anthony for voting illegally. Will you are a man who knows history and thinks that through is that a good thing or nine? Well, it's a it's an interesting public move obviously for a commemoration of the history of women's suffrage and You know it's one of those public affairs kind of stunts that politicians pull from both parties. Sure. Yeah. I know I appreciate that. Thank you so much. Donald Trump has pardon Susan B. Anthony I. Don't think he should have. For this reason. I Have A. Thing I have thought about this in years past. But I think that. The carrying that conviction with her. Is a badge of honor. The law of course was immoral unjust. And she stood in the face of an immoral unjust law. and She technically violated. I would argue just as she argued, and as Frederick Douglass argued that the right to vote of course was innate in our declaration of independence I in eight for all people. If all men are created equal. Then, any privilege your prerogative accorded to one American must be accorded to all Americans both Frederick Douglass and Susan B Anthony each at different times used that premise as an argument for in the case of Mr Douglas of course, the expansion in the end, the assertion and the enjoyment of rights for black people and MS Anthony did the exact same thing of course for the enjoyment and exercise of rights on the on the part of of women. So in in the thoughts of you know of some, she broke no law because the law was immoral unjust at any rate, my my thought would be that. there that lingering conviction is again a badge of a badge of honor. And let me point out. That today it is the Democratic Party. That calls itself the Party of of women's rights Kamala Harris has chosen for herself the Secret Service Name Pioneer carrying that assertion out. But when an actual suffragette stuff was going on it was the Republicans who were the supporters of it by and large in of course, when there was an expansion of African American rights. If both in terms of Abolition and in those first few years after the civil war it was the Republican. Party that pushed for those. Now, you argue about the party's change the sound of the other I don't know but I, do know that. That I do know the name of the people are sticking up for rights then and I do know that rights are the equal property of all and the exercise of them is for all people to include a people in my party. Anyway. So that's what trump did. He pardoned a dead lady I went up by Susan B. Anthonys grave. Just last week I. was I wanted I hadn't been through mount hope in a while. I went up to see Nathaniel Rochester to be honest with you on I'm owner saying out loud but I just went up there to make sure nobody had vandalized his grave back. You know when we were marching and fisting in the air. In I saw stopped off instead saw. It's a weird deal when we travel as a family. We try to listen to a book on tape something. You know that's nonfiction something we can learn from together and at any rate we listened to a a book on tape, the my beautiful bride and the kids, and I that had done talked about Barnum you know the the fellow PT finishes I think was t anyway the point being that he at one point for his circus had this giant elephant. Jumbo the effect that the word jumbo in our language. is just show today because a jumbo was put on that elephant and because it was so large Kinda show some unfortunate You know arrogance at best imperialism at worst but the London Zoo they got ahold of this elephant that was like bigger by far than any elephant it was you know a genetic anomaly was an African element but very large even. For an African elephant and it was there at the at the London Zoo and people came from all over and it was it was sort of beloved and you know they talked about in the newspaper and stuff like that. But p.t Barnum heard about that elephant and he wanted that elephant he wanted to bring it to America and he wanted to tour it around the United States. Right. But again, this belongs to a zoo in London but some American Guy with La all the money in the world comes over and says, I want your elephant and it's old it. This is our elephant and it it's in the zoo and kids go see it and we like it and at any rate the elephant Kinda, got semi not undercover of darkness, but it Kinda got horns swaddled. London Zoo in brought to the United States maybe that they may may Barnum wasn't that Nice guy at any rate the elephant traveled all over the United States an any was in a show I can't remember was up in Canada not far away from Buffalo and Unfortunately, you know the the elephants would perform I. And Then then you know they would you know walk back to the train while the rest of the circus you know went on the other performances And the deal was that jumbo this big giant elephant in the other elephants that were performing with the circus then. they the they're being walked back to the circus train and they're being walked back from the arena to the circus train on The on the railroad tracks right and they get into a situation where the in effect they are on a causeway an elevated place of dirt. But like there was a drop off to the left and drop off to the right and they're out on the middle of this structure, and of course, what happens is you know there is a high speed speed train coming at them. And a jumbo the elephant sadly it. Yeah. No, the train was pretty wacked up to but so is the elephant. So elephants dead up there and if as grand attraction, which Barnum had stolen from the London Zoo was dead on the side of the tracks right and Well, here's a thing barnum thinking like that he He on of called is the right word on. You must have been passed seventy or eighteen, seventy six I can stand phones or may be telegraphed or whatever, but he contacted Henry Ward? In Rochester New York scientific e contacted Henry contacted Henry Ward, and got. Henry Ward up there. Two days later and Henry Ward skinned out jumbo the elephant and stuffed it engaged in taxidermy right turn it into this big giant. stuffed. Elephant which Barnum up what I think in display in new. York City, at any rate out on a run. The other day I hadn't been through a mount holyoke while and knowing that Henry Ward was buried in there or not buried the they made a stone. And they put his earn his ashes in an urn inside an alcove in this stone, and then on top of some kind of boulder came down with it's like a geologic specimen of a boulder brought down by a glacier that sitting on top of the Nice smooth carved Henry Ward Stone will alcove in the center for his earn, and of course, you know his urn was long since stolen and where his remains went You know it's lost history the point being I wanted to run by there and take. A picture of his stone. So I could go back to my kids that night showing the picture and say, Hey, this is the guy who stuffed jumbo. So while I was there chicken on Faneuil Rochester and looking up Henry Ward I of Iran by a Fred and sue to pay my respects and they both seem to be doing pretty well and today Donald Trump. What does she think about trump today she was pardoned we'll be back with you in just a moment on newsradio eleven eighty. Welcome back welcome back, Mary Lou pin is a member of Rochester City Council. and. She tonight will vote in all likelihood in at least speak against the planned construction of a Rochester police substation on East Avenue. Check that that's wrong on East. Main Street it's on the north side of the street there. They've got a sign up She is going to do that because she is at war with the police. She is completely in sync with the de-fund. The police folks She literally has it in her mind that the cops are at fault all day every day. No matter what. When you have groups of people shooting at each other at eastern Alexander she says, it's because of a poverty and because the police don't know how to work with them, it's always the police fault and the deal is that she a true progressive says that building a new police station will merely be a means of occupying that neighborhood and the police must be pushed back, and if we are going to de-fund the police, then we won't need a police station. Here's the deal you and I hear bullcrap like that and we go. She's a frigging idiot. Right. she is however an elected frigging idiot who's been talking bullcrap like that since she started campaigning and she got elected. And you and I listened to what she says and it comes off again like she's from another planet. Okay. One very low on oxygen and brain juice, right? And yet there is an audience for her view and she is representative of a significant number of woke Democrats progressives who truly are comrades if you know what I mean and so it just watching listen whenever you hear her quoted, it's going to be some Species Adum assery no doubt about it. John. Glad you called welcome to newsradio WAM eleven eighty. I by you're exactly right about. Mary A. Is a loop Ian Murphy or she is loopy she is crazy and in my mind, she's a devil. You know we have something called the Beechwood neighborhood callers. which is a wonderful organization. Every year you know we have had in the past an annual meeting for our police and firefighters and our first responders a wonderful dinner which nobody else. But this neighborhood association gives the these police and firefighters and she has been present at some of our meetings in my estimation I. Finish up what happened. In my mind, she should not be coming to any more of our meetings. She's died welcome. If she. Wants to come in. Thank these people. Then that would be a good sign not a bad sign speaking of News Todd, how he's got that for you next on News Radio Cam eleven eighty.

Todd Donald Trump Todd Sam director Susan B. Anthony p.t Barnum Rochester London Zoo Henry Ward newsradio Ham Hillary I US Bob Laws Anson Fisher House Iran Lake upper Joel Lansky Louis
Matt Braunger, Funny Dummy

Slate's The Gist

29:57 min | 2 years ago

Matt Braunger, Funny Dummy

"This podcast definitely has bad language 'cause I just record it and shock myself like right up top and throughout pretty consistent. But now, you know. It's Wednesday February thirteenth two thousand nineteen from slated to the gist. My Mike Pesca usually NPR is not the place to look for if you're looking for a horde on. But the other day there was an interview with Jerry, George former editor of the National Enquirer, MS happened. Well, I think that you know, pardoned of inaccurate. But I think President Trump is as had a hard on for for a basis for many years stemming from you know, professional rivalry and the ownership of the post. So there was and they thought turning to the National Enquirer might somehow sully the air of NPR foolish them, although it may have elevated the Enquirer hard not to according to Bloomberg American media Inc. The parents company of the Enquirer led by the president's longtime friend, David peck. Packer recorded a thirty one point five million dollar loss in the six months that ended September thirtieth. In other words, the fire festival guys heading more profitable quarter than the Enquirer. The Bloomberg article goes on to say that thirty million dollars thirty one and a half million dollar loss was a quote marked improvement over the previous year but nonetheless, brought the company's total losses over the past five and a half fiscal years. Two hundred fifty six million. Owed about two hundred three million more than its assets were worth. Wow. You think that would be enough to make me lose my heart on no back to hard ons before this interview, a search of NPR archives revealed that there was some talk of hard on. There was this story. Brexit could create hard border on island of Ireland. There was Jeff Sessions pushes back hard. Trump's comments made on FOX. And there was switching to middle school can be hard on kids. But there are ways to make it better and hard on kids are just the worst kids. But I gotta say hard on the way the Enquirer guy used it. It always confused me like in that old one thousand nine hundred seventy s cop way. Yeah. Had to transfer out of the one nine mcklusky had a hot on for me so confused for so long. And when you're confused as youngster about hard on their only so many people that you could talk to. So I went to a trusted adult. And went to my health teacher. I consulted a clergyman and went to the cool guidance counselor who always turns his chair around and sat down leaning over what should have been the back. So we could you know, just wrap and there were no help. And then I heard you guys on a moving sight say. Oh, yeah. That guy that Jag offs had a hot on for me since day one. And that further confused me because after you Jag off. Why would you still you know, what I'm saying adult stuff? Sure can be confusing. Mr. h what's that, Mike? Oh, yes. Sorry. The board of Ed said, I got a model proper chair advocate. So I had my back to you. And was just sitting facing the window and see their it's all right? Mr. h I'll be on my way. But I still don't know what it means to have a hard on for someone. And then I found out who taught me, well, it was a trusted friend who would never steer me wrong who knew the real deal when it came to such things. I like, yeah. What would you give it on a scale and went to ten there you go. I like to know what happened to my dial a date. Yes. It was Howard Stern. I would listen to his show one day. There were saying that the program director. I can't remember if it was Randy who is usually described as a hump or the incubus, John Hayes or pig virus. But one of those bosses just had a hard on for Howard was always out to get him. And then I got it. And now I could say thirty years later, I listen to NPR and easily process that statement without any confusion. Thanks to what Howard Stern taught me way back. Then what I'm saying? Is that radio is a medium with great routes that builds upon itself, and I think continues and flourish it's in this format that you're listening to podcasters we stand on the shoulders if not the hard ons of our forefathers and are richer for it on the show today. I should feel about some late animals, but first a funny funny man, a man who you could say has a hard on for laughter. No, please. Don't say that okay map. Bronner's. People are imploring me do not use that phrase in the intro. Very well, ladies and gentlemen, a man who's only relationship with the aforementioned term is that we all know the modern world is hard on us schlumpy, but kind hearted dip shit. That's how he described himself, ladies and gentlemen longer. For thirty four years. Samuel Adams has made their Boston lager. Inefficiently the other guys expensive imports made as a fishing as possible. Most Jews cheap bidding, hops and faster, fermentation, whatever it takes to drive down costs Sam Adams brews with one hundred percent heirloom middle Fru, hops and lagers it's beer for over a month glorious inefficiency in every sip. Sam Adams by the Boston beer company. Boston, Massachusetts savor the flavor. Responsibly. Matt Braga has brought you many many comedic efforts his out with a new special called finally live in Portland. He has a podcast where he gives you advice from a dip shit. He's the titular dip shit. But perhaps my favorite has been our Coenen many times many other late night shows the just for laughs festival, and he played it just for laughs. But also, he touched us, but Matt Braga to me the best project. He's ever done is like one or two podcasts ago a podcast called ding-dong with map Bronco. And the reason is that it rhymes, and if you saw the name or spelled there us involved, no one would possibly know how to say it. So I think Matt Braga for that. And I think him for coming on. Hello, matt. How are you man? Thanks for having me. So now advice from a dip shit. Now. I have this. I don't know if it's a theory people do advice shows tell me that they get into it. Sometimes they don't even know why they get into it. And then a few shows, and they realized it's basically to give out one message, and they're just doing a version of this. Message over and over like, Dan Savage's message. I mean, and he's brilliant. And he knows them all about everything about sex. But basically his message is something like your normal short, very very rarely he'll tell someone get that checked out. But he's saying variation over and over again. Yes, you are normal. But what about you? What have you learned from advice from a dip shit? Yeah. You're one you're one message in life. My one message is all of us our dip shits, and it's used that power to and to you know, the thing is you just gotta learn from it you can keep running into law over and over and over. But then you got to say to yourself. Why do I keep running into this wall? Whatever that thing in your life is but also the same time don't beat yourself up about X shitter, that's the walls doing that for exactly and you're going to have more dip jittery in the future, maybe hopefully less, but you know, don't look back and go phone Li I didn't do this. Or why did I do that? It's it's it's all it's all grist for the mill, and I feel like I have a bit in my act about how I'm a six for four stack of mistakes. How I have a tattoo on my body. And I show it in in the news badge, and I go, what do you guys think that is be in the crowd? It's d for Detroit. And it's like, Nope. That's a be like, I even got a tattoo that looks like somebody else's on a Derna pool hall like that is primed if chivalry. And now, I I love it. I think it's a hilarious dome tattoo, but anyway, I digress. Yeah. That's it. Basically, we're all dip shits. The key is just kind of learn from it and because it's called advice from addiction. I there's no danger of me getting mistaken for Dr drew or someone licensed. I always say if someone is a real problem, don't call me. But or is his tattoo says Dr broke right? So okay. So I get what you're saying. Is that don't beat yourself up about the past? That is so so if you've dip shat yet that's in the past nice. But how much are you telling people to try to change and how much are you telling people accept yourself and whereas the line? Well, it depends from from call to call. I do get a lot of silly calls Kurd, the former guys stop it. No. I love them after a while. Like all right enough of the serious ones. But you know, I had a guy who was who. It's spent a lot of his life in the military, and he had found out that his father who'd always told him. All these military stories was not in the military, basically, his father had been lying to. Yeah. But his dad was very old by that point. Yeah. Exactly stolen valor. And I was kind of like, you know, he was just like, you know, it it. It makes me sad. But he's always been duplicitous. And I think I just settled on you know, maybe don't blow up his spot. You know, maybe just let him he knows. He was lying. He's gotta deal with that. And maybe don't absolutely shattered his heart in the winter of his of his years, you know, and it was a tough one. It was a tough one to settle on because, you know, easy for me to say, I my my dad has always been incredibly, honest almost way, too, honest, when I when I was growing up, but like, you know, I he was never abusive or mean, and so I never harbored any kind of animosity towards him. Whereas this guy, I'm sure wants to be like shut up dad. You know, you were never in the marines. And wasn't that was the tell that the war. He kept talking about was war of eighteen twelve. He was he said he killed a lot of dragons which right then set off like hold on. I wouldn't maybe if I was him. I would say don't do it except it for yourself every once in a while you can slip in and that was quarter canal, right? Wait a minute which. And that's the that's the Wild Thing. It's just like anyone I know who's in the military. They can tell just talking to someone they can say one sentence, and depending on how the person responds. That'd be like you're never though. It's so interesting costs probably the dynamic with the dad and the kid is the dad if he was you're saying kind of a hard ass probably played out that he was very disappointed with his. Yes, for not going into very much, go, great Santino. But if this guy went into the military heat immediately. No, wait a minute. Hold on. Now. How you holster arrive of? Yeah. He's doing everything wrong, his guns or hung wrong. They're they're they're all in strings from the triggers to the minute. No one's cadences. I do know. And I've been told your goosestepping only one army did that and it wasn't ours. So yes, you say just live with it. I mean that was a tough one to settle on. But I mean, I think he was leaning towards that anyway. And sometimes you just figure out what people want to hear give it to them. Yeah. As long as the thing they want to hear is there. Correct. I mean, I've I've had people that are like I have had this this parent who I've supported my entire life, and they're very abusive, and they've started getting mean to my kids yet, I'm supporting this person this person this parent of mine is demanding to move in with me because we're family and accept it. And I I was just like cut him off. You don't you don't you've dealt with that long enough your kids don't need that poison in the house. They blew it. I know so as a self identify dip shit. What happens when it gets so serious that you say to yourself. Ooh, I don't wanna fuck this one up the the the structure of the show is you usually use it as a jumping off point for improv into make good jokes with your co host little bit sure rate, but you also can you give funnily bad advice, if the stakes are Logan six or high probably shouldn't do that. So what do you do to guard against? No, you know, there's always two things. I try to I try to keep it light. I try to say something. Completely way out and almost sometimes like to honest, just about something that I went through beat a weird sexual encounter or something. Really dumb. I did or just extrapolate like an analogy to ridiculous heights. So just to keep it fun. But it's, you know, this just as long as my show kind of makes you go like, oh, ok things aren't that bad and gives you because I I have a great life, but I get incredibly depressed, sometimes just like anybody, and you know, the the just. The pain of existence. It gets to us all. And so I think that's always helped me the most is perspective. So, you know, the the best thing I can do is just give someone perspective. So that's that's my go-to in terms of there's date. So they'd see it from another angle, then oh my God. I'm so fucked so in the early going, I would assume that people who would call in. We're fans of your stand-up. But now they just fans of the show. You know, it has changed a lot to a lot of people that didn't really know who I was. But really got into the podcast word of mouth through friends. I do get a lot of people that are that are fans, and that's very nice, and we are getting less. How do I make it in the biz questions now? Which is it's just there's there's no answer. There isn't one. I think when people ask that they don't really want the answer. They know maybe they're saying like can you help me? Yeah. Oh, absolutely. Yeah. It's like the old overused. Comedian thing if you've ever talked any any comedians in their friends or community around. They'll be like, oh, yeah. I'm doing the tonight show. Then a comical be like, how'd you get that like immediately? Meaning meaning how do you have that night on? Yeah. Who do I talk to it had nothing to do with being funny to make an audience? Nope. Nope. The bookers of this show. Yep. Gave a Duda handy in the back of the flower shop and here, I am. And there's no, you know, the analogy I've always taken his Dan Harmon's, which is perfect which is like when you're a kid, and you get lost your mom, always says don't wander all over the place day where you are. We'll find you. And that's the only way just be get to the point where you're undeniably. Good. And you're going up as much as you can. And everybody knows. Hey, this person's hilarious, and they'll find you. Yes. People that can give you a career managers agents, executive, LA they will hear of you. And it's you know, it's really hard to get there and stuff and networking different. Definitely helps putting things online while LA. But it is just you have to be ready for luck. Yeah. As Robin Williams put it I think that one of the more frustrating things about comedy and a lot of. Acting a lot of performances is that or just a lot of fame these days than there is a lot of people who aren't that talented who have made it, but people who are undeniably talented that don't always rise to the heights. Carlin was never able to get anything other than his stand up, but up the best ever. Yeah. There is something meritocratic about stand up, for instance. Even like, I do think doing something like hosting a podcast, you might not get a huge audience. But if it's really really really good, you'll have success, given this media landscape where they need so much content. Yeah. I mean, that's really it. I think you have to be incredibly, entertaining, and or interesting or incredibly provocative, and I'm not I don't ever you talked about places having just one message. You know, some podcasts some radio messages is it's us against them, folks. Right. That is their whole dynamic no-no. Do not believe what they say. Listen to me. I am your leader. And that is a way that is a way to get an audience but like Bruno God. At what cost you have to be that person? Yeah. You have to be this demagogue. And I think you know, with with doing podcasts there's a billion of them and there's a billion comedians. And so there's really no magic door. I mean there there is for some people if they do incredibly outrageous things say, incredibly outrageous, things said a fireworks. I don't know whatever. But in the end people are going to be like, okay. Well, yeah. You wore a purple suit and your balls were hanging out and you set off an M eighty. But are you funny? Yes. We're still waiting for the joke here that three minute chunk on. I ki- of with solid was good good. It wasn't that personal. You're kind of talking about nothing. Yeah. All right. Here's my last questions is one of the first jokes of your new special. It's not a question. It's an accusation. Sure. Matt you would eat the racist fudge. I believe you would eat the rich. I I wouldn't you wouldn't will. I mean, just a just a paraphrase for people that haven't seen the special. I have a joke about how a lot of media outlets have kind of in a sense, inadvertently or advertently normalized, some racism. We're kind of like a guys getting interviewed. And he he says all these normal stuff and then says and I'm racist. And my my my bid is I don't care what the first thing. You said is the second thing is. And I'm racist. I'm done. And it's I say you have a five of fudge that makes you lose weight as you eat, it know, go on and racist. Fuck your fudge. That's that's the bit. But I wouldn't because I have I'm not even that I'm noble I have a crippling level of guilt crippling that I work on. I mean when I go on the road. I've started passing the time during the day. Day. You know, we have all day to kill. We're on the road doing nothing by doing volunteer work, and I do that. Because it's nice, and it's good, and I get to have these great interactions with these amazing human beings. But really it's so I feel better getting drunk later. I'm being honest here. You know, like, I I listen the guilt of or and also the the guilt of getting to do what I I love and get paid for it. You know, so yeah, I would I would not eat the fudge because I would feel like such crap. But that said there are so many things marketed. So well that I don't know what evil they come from that. I'm sure I utilize. So maybe that's what makes the racist fudge work. Eat it, you know, that it's a racist. And you feel so sick that maybe it appealed fat cells away it. It's the fat cell dre who can't anything down. Yeah. It's like EPA CAC for for for alcohol, you know, but for like cheeseburgers. The racist fudge. And then the guy would actually runs the company he's not a racist. He knows he has to take one for the team. He just knows he's helping you manage that's how on racist. He it literally is a chemical chemical reaction to you not being racist. But because it's made by racists. Right. You know that and interacting, and I don't wanna paint with too broad brush. But I've seen a lot of Trump rallies. And I have the theory that it being overweight tends to correlate with more conservative views. Oh, my God a little angry at the world short. So maybe this is his way to literally eat into Trump's base gives them racist fudge, they'll lose weight. Maybe they'll feel a little bit better about themselves. Get out they'll get the endorphin this. We just need to swing like eighty thousand votes of Wisconsin, Jackley fudge were just marketing. Oh, claire. Yeah. I mean, the the amount of of Klan members who have interacted with their first black person and been like, oh, yeah. This is all dumb all. All the idiotic dogma. Okay. I think also being overweight correlates being in the clan. Those long shapeless road. Exactly. It's like a moon. Let's be honest. These are not Star Trek uniform. Okay. That just mold to your body and show every flaw, which is the problem as you talk about with the cool new racist the alterations. Yeah. But man, Spencer is not looking great. I mean, he's he's still trying to wear the over tight pants and the and the fitted fitted blazer with a giant guy. It's just not a good look. That's good. Look, man. So Matt Pronger is bringing the inside and possibly the non-racist fudge to a platform near you on February fifth, his new special finally live in Portland. We'll be everywhere at once check it out. Check out whatever you're plugged into for that special. Good to meet you Matt good to meet you meant. Thank you. And now the he'll Rover is dead. Oh, no. No, no. It's not sad dog news. I don't want to lose your right up top. It said outer space robot news, the Mars Rover opportunity was on its last legs. Again, not little cute little doggie legs. But machine we Allegra earlier today the golf sized cart went silent. I'm going to actually golf cart sized cart or a golf cart sized Rover. Probably not the size of a golf or golf ball. But I'm not here to spend my time looking over how to describe the Rover. I'm here to check. His vitals, NASA says if there's no response from the Rover today, it will be declared dead opportunity landed on Mars fifteen years ago. These are the opportunity costs of such venture. Look, it could have been Matt Damon out there on Mars. We got off easy. I think as a culture, but indeed the Mars Rover opportunity has died. Now, I was thinking about Rover. The dog's name Rover also dog's name, Fido. And when I say the dog's name, I mean, not actual dog names. You will never meet a dog named Fido or a dog named Rover. And yet these are the quintessential dog names, it is odd because when it comes to other quintessential names, the rest of them only exist in real life. There are white girls named Becky some have good hair. There are super fans of things, and they're named STAN in Arkansas Bill Clinton went after the Bubba vote. And guess what? A lot of guys who voted for him were nicknamed Bubba you'll find the talian Americans who drive Iraq's named Guido there. Agreed does among us. There are cats named fluffy. One made news a week ago. Fluffy's owners found her unresponsive buried in the snow body temperature was dangerously low. Like, this cat has nine lives. Look at fluffy. Now, the frozen cat that warmed our hearts, but Fido is the dog who never comes when called Rover to. Because he doesn't exist. It is very odd. But don't worry Rover died, but that almost necessarily means that no dog was actually hurt in conveying. This news bit on the other hand, we do have a dead tiger in England to Tigers at the London zoo. There was a male named a seem a female named Malati. The BBC reports quote after spending time apart in a tiger enclosure to get used to the new arrangement, which was a mating arrangement. The two were introduced to each other but tensions quickly escalated tensions escalated like describing Georgia navel maneuvers in the Bosphorus, perhaps Malati would pull her ambassador. But instead I see Molter like a good analogy. Like tiger like doing exactly what a tiger does for OSHA. Strangle beasts got a jungle beast, the London zoo officially said, quote, our focus now is on caring for a seem as we get through this. Difficult event. You know, we all more than our own way. Perhaps in a seems case by murdering a potential mate. And then never thinking about it. Again, a seem whose name the zoo said means protector in Arabic. It's another line from the BBC story ironic, or it would be if the fact that names Arabic and the idea of irony or concepts held by us humans not the ferocious beasts who have teeth and claws and sometimes kill each other the reaction to all of this was swift and ferocious and Oso human. And I don't mean that as a compliment Twitter user wrote why on earth would you introduce to Tigers after only ten days, I wouldn't introduce my cats to a new cat and such a short time. Unbelievable unprofessional, cruel unprofessional. Yes. I like that assessment. I mean, what gives zookeepers the idea that they know how to keep zoos because I have a cat. You know, come to think of it did. That Mars Rover really have to be decommissioned. I ask because I have a roomba. And you know, it's pretty pretty much. Same thing. Your experience with your cat is not applicable. Do you want to know? Why? It's this your cats are not Tigers. If your cat were a tiger. Maybe I'd listen to you. But it's not a tiger. So I won't you know, what let's play tiger not a tiger to assess the following claims in the logic thereof. BBC headline London zoo, quote was well aware of tiger death risk. Yes. They were. Because what we're talking about. Our tigers. Here's another headline CNN tiger kills potential mate on first date. No it wasn't. Because what we're talking about is a tiger tiger's. Do not go on dates. This was almost the entirety of my reaction. While hearing about this sad story. We'll say it to me. I'm not a tiger. But general thesis here is that we have a human world and tiger world and the standard. From one cannot apply to the other. I do think the human world has basically destroyed the Sumatran tiger world. I mean, it literally has and it's literally the least we can do as inhabitants of the human world to try to do something to keep the remaining three hundred Sumatran Tigers from dying out to keep them in zoos, but everything else was just tiger death through Uman lens. I read the entire statement put out by Catherine England chief operating officer of the Z S London zoo. Now, these these professionals these are the ones who recognize the strict lines between animal instinct and human emotion. So here she is writing about the efforts to get the two Tigers acquainted which seemed to be working because they were exhibiting chopping. Here's how England describes that shopping is a friendly noise. That Tigers used to greet each other usually during courtship or when a mum is greeting her cubs. It indicates interest. And curiosity. It might be the human equivalent of saying L, A lovely our you sorry for the Dick Van Dyke accent. But when it says, Hello lovely. I can't say that in American lovely. I will you occasionally the Tigers will chuffed at their zookeepers too. And those are moments. They all treasure. The Tigers do not treasure them. Because the Tigers are Tigers. There is a lot of sentiment all throughout this explanation. And I guess it was strategically away to humanize the zookeepers who are under a lot of scrutiny by say note, all cat owners England writing about the female tiger Malati said that I knew her since I joined CSL in two thousand thirteen and I was in namrd with her as everyone else at the zoo. She captivated everyone who worked with her. She was beautiful majestic spirited and every inch tiger year. Well that that right. There's your problem because so was a seam and he did that thing. That very tiger thing about not giving a human shit about her beauty majesty your tiger nece. I mean, there was one being at the zoo who is unlikely to be blown away by a medium sized female Tigers tiger nece, and that is a large male tiger in possession of more inches of tiger nece himself. Zookeeper England goes on writing of the fatal encounter, but in the blink of an eye with no obvious provocation. Except for the fact that they were Tigers they turned on each other. And our years of experience told us it was beyond normal. Wow. Just think what what the rest of us without that kind of training and experience might have made of the dead female tiger on the ground. How would we have processed it? Well, it's good. You have your expertise because I got to say is a tiger novice. I would not have known how normal it was to have a dead female tiger lying on the ground. She goes out and the rest of the day past in a blur. But the key for us was a seam and his needs zoo. Keeper's don't take a Hippocratic oath like doctors. But they really old do in their minds a seam had been through an ordeal himself, and we focused on ensuring that he was cared for and comfortable a seamless fine. Do you wanna know why you guessed right? He's a tiger. I really was saddened by this to deny my reaction, and the general reaction of most people heard about it is to deny how mice species deals with the concept of tragedy, which we invented. But it does seem like if you want to keep the species from dying out and the only way to keep the species from dying out really is to keep them in zoos, then you're going to have what we humans experience as tragedies. And what the Tigers experience as tiger. And that's it for today show Pierre bien Daniel Shroeder produced the gist. They're gentle chopping sounds indicated gleeful nece. Wow, no, hold on actually Daniels choking on a walnut. And here's the trivia inspired by ding tonker with Matt Bronco. We say ding Dong for doorbell here in the US. What are they saying Iceland? And why do I know? TJ Rafael, senior producer of sleet podcasts. And she has had her troubles with mcklusky as well. It wasn't just me the gist. I got admit I'd eat the racist fudge. But I swear I swear to you. I would bypass the ablest taffy because we all have our lines long stretchy salt water lines, Deborah Peru, and thanks for listening.

Tigers matt tiger Malati NPR National Enquirer Jeff Sessions London zoo Mike Pesca President Trump Samuel Adams Howard Stern Portland Ireland Matt Braga Bloomberg England Packer Catherine England Boston Ed
Have a Gift Card? Time To Shop. January 18, 2020, on the National Day Calendar

The National Daily

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Have a Gift Card? Time To Shop. January 18, 2020, on the National Day Calendar

"This is the national daily. Welcome to January eighteenth on the National Day calendar today we celebrate a silly old old bear and a reminder to seize the moment of delayed gratification more after the break from our founder Marlow Anderson. Do you love to start the day with with a smile. Join the celebration nation. By picking up your very own twenty twenty national day calendar visit our website National Day calendar Dot Com for our full color printed guide to all the fun and unusual ways to celebrate every day author. Milne brought the adorable rebel honey. Levin Bear Winnie the Pooh to life in his stories. That are now translated into more than fifty languages around the world inspired by a black bear named Winnie who lived at the London Zoo during world. War One the lovable tales are based on the author's son. Son Christopher Robin who would visit the bear often and named his own teddy bear after her a National Winnie. The Pooh day we commemorate millns millns birthday in eighteen eighty two and his classic legacy of Gentle Adventures. Did you know that there are over. One billion dollars in gift cards left on used each year on national. Use Your Gift Card Day. Gather up those excuses for an unexpected did shopping spree and make the most of each one before they are forgotten. This is your day to leave no gift card behind and to take advantage vantage of the tips ideas and deals found on the website. Use Your Gift Card Dot Com. Enjoy the gift that keeps on giving before before its time runs out. Learn more by following us at National Day calendar Dot Com or on facebook instagram and twitter. And thanks for joining us on our journey as we celebrate every day.

Levin Bear Winnie Marlow Anderson London Zoo Christopher Robin founder Milne facebook twitter instagram One billion dollars
#19 with Michelle Thole - Resilience In Difficult Times

Rest In Peace

37:49 min | 2 months ago

#19 with Michelle Thole - Resilience In Difficult Times

"This is rest in peace. A podcast about death because death is like a mirror in which the true meaning of life is reflected on this show. You'll find stories and real life experiences for our final destination. Here's your host edward today like yesterday. Michelle whole she's been running a successful coaching practice teaching a clients to overcome few. That's why i have a on a podcast today. I'm sure that to this competition will be interesting to our listeners. As as she gives us a few thoughts and techniques to overcome few few about death but before that first of all michelle. Welcome to the show. Hello edward thank you so much for having me today so you're from the uk and you. Why don't you introduce yourself. What got you into this industry. Why choose the in right now. An i love puzzles. Element is something. The i started doing ferry young. Probably the age of fifteen or sixteen started with tony robbins tapes. Most coaches would as i've gone on. I really enjoyed helping other people to make the best of their lives. And i trained as a coach but before that i did a numerous different industries from hospitality to full maintenance and singing and then i moved into coaching. And i just found my my vibe or my groove with it and i just love doing it. Not only because it makes me great and i feel like i'm using my skills but also on making a difference in the world and you know what else could you ask for a job. Brady is actually so when you talk about career of a life coach right. So in order to be sort of qualified to teach people as somebody who is sort of need to have a posner experience or experience experiencing overcoming and you mentioned just now that before you into this fuel you wh- factional senior right. So you're saying that goes that the feel probably speaking the most common phobia of that to mean. That's it's big. Singing is even mafia food of public. Speaking so you. From jewish relief trusted. I went into Do coaching presentation coaching woodshop facilitating and team building. And the reason why i was so involved in all those things is because i saw i overcame fia when it came to performing and use that in my coaching to help others to overcome the fear of public speaking or to get up in front of people to be more than themselves so yet. It's quite a great synergy. Really between getting over this This fear of public speaking. I don't actually have the fear of public speaking. And i think that that surprises a lot of people because it like you said it is the number one. I do have a fever of necessarily gonna love to talk about but everyone fears. Everyone has a hierarchy of what is really scary for them. And that's why. I think doing the work that i do. It's so impactful and life changing when people face different kinds of phobia us so perhaps for you be on the stage is knock onto the phobia for you. It's very natural for you whereas for overnight of the people in the will the simply getting on a station just doing anything is quite fearful is yeah i listen to few of your podcast episode. One of the frameworks that do use is a by this This wasn't call. Dr kao outbreaks correct and he has five bucks off few so whether we to that. Yeah the five types of fear one as extinction so the fear of no longer like being here so the fear of death and it's something that i definitely have on a pilot for such a long time i also think is connected to a set For me is a connection of no longer being here but it is also a reaction to maybe some anxiety. There might be feeling in the day so it always comes up in this feeling of death of an extinction and it's quite a scary autism to to think that you're no longer ever going to be here unless you believe in reincarnation and all those things but yeah so extinction is the first one on a theory that we have. It's a primal fear of humans not to be here. We don't know about animals because we're human so we can't really say whether they have that we don't know but you also bosley invasion or loss so the loss of a an arm or allegra positive. The body is connected to physical. Safety is so The loss of movements or says things like police be employees into dangerous animals. I think this is also connected to when people have a fear of snakes. Spiders and again. We're gonna add into mike fear of you all today. I had a fear of spiders. And so i actually got a. I was polity even at london zoo at the time. And there was a job came to work in the spies ring closure and i actually decided to do it so i go over my fear of spiders by working with spiders so there are actions. You can take the things you can move forward to a These fears another one is as the food would fire fears. Dr outbreaks is the loss of tournament so fear of being restricted and tracked a lack of options on choice and that can be quite scary especially because we have negative cool wounds or negative call beliefs as human beings and if one of those is i'm trapped or stuck than this also feeds into this loss of all tournament. I'll go the other two really quickly. Number four is a separation or abandonment. Overreaction we have a strong connection to belong as human beings and is evolution rewired into us to connect because if we don't connect to try then we die so it's a real primal fear for human beings and we should not take lightly. That's the reason why it's so important right now especially with the pandemic to have social connections and to keep on in connection with the people so we have on needs met and the last one is humiliation shame or worthlessness so this is the ego death that dr brats albreicht talks about and that ego death is how we perceive ourselves but knowing others may not perceive us in that way and we may feel perceived failure or negative judgments and. That's an awful feeling to feel isn't it. And so all of these kids. These feistiest connect together and the can be really debilitating if you have one of them if you have a a mixture of them and they come up in different times allies. So that's that's a pretty quick. A very quick view of dr alvarez five type of pure about your experience what until reading the london zoo we spied. What would you say. What's your fear of spiders back then when you start. Let's say one not really fearful and then we'll be light super fearful on the scale one to ten. What would it be. I would say it was a baton. A it wasn't a ten. Because i see ten is being if you saw a picture of a spider in a book. You close the book nor even look eh. I wasn't that bad. But if i saw a spider even this maybe not a really really tiny verify source something bigger than a thumbnail. Say i would please freak out. I wouldn't go into the room. Somebody would have to take out. There was even a point where a we crashed. My cock as that was there was a spider in it. Yeah it it. Got to the point where it was getting a little bit more of a phobia than just a irrational fear so Yeah that's how far got for me. I know this many different techniques or methods you can use to overcome. Were feeling phobias. For deborah greece's incident. How did you like practice mentally to overcome their fear. East some kind of ritual that you go through. Yeah this quite a few different things. He had this one was definitely immersion. Immersion therapy dove Die does the right into the paint. I was in and what i did was i. I found out more knowledge about spiders. I found out how amazing they are an. I could probably talk for an hour on. How amazing spider. I can't no different types of spiders. I also found the these enclosure within london. Zoo is closure walk through and has golden fight in on these like the the sizes that you'll hand big at the very very big spiders but you also find that. They are absolutely harmless to us. So the more. I found out about this species in particular of spider and change my mindset that the size of it doesn't necessarily mean it's going to kill me you know and that connects dr outbreaks bodily invasion of loss type of fear which is number two. Because i was scared. I was that i could die and it becomes so primal the you have to do anything in your power not to feel so um yeah it was more about finding knowledge first and then from that knowledge so i kind of little tiny steps i stepped in first and look around then i stepped in a little bit more has around by also had to stop feed in the spiders and it will have to give them water and make sure that that k. was all was flying. That was my job so it was very interesting to see my shaky hand giving a flawless by a spider fly but it was one of those things that once i did it once i started on the small of the baby spiders and i just built up and built up and in the end i was feeding america. Gaskin old spider which is absolutely huge. I'm still dig a little bit. You know that that is always there in the back of your mind but through repetition and mercian you'll be able to do it but obviously with my fear of death. Only get to do that once and i don't have any first hand experience of just yet so we'll talk about your coaching business. It seems to me that a lot of your clients are from the entertainment. Will idea general feels you would say maybe what is true. How would you coach a client overcome. He saw her particular. Obviously they have a each individual different sets of challenges they faced. How is your a komo techniques that you use it does differ very widely. Actually so what. I'm dealing with performers. They usually have imposter syndrome a lot. They have the fear that awkward enough. And although it's not i don't think he's classed as the of it comes up like that. They have the belief that they don't deserve to be where they are and that can be quite I won't say tricky but it's just a different Coach immortality to change that. So it's is law Suggestion i would suggest we do. Visualize visualization exercises where they visualize themselves making things go right The the their on stage in all the woods come out. They're able to articulate. Maybe plug a film on a tv show when everything goes by this loads of different ways in which performers spiel that type of fear. Another one is that they have the level of success and that could be lost their grief. There isn't it the grief that they may lose everything because the higher up you go the further you fall but to them. It feels like a massive step way. It's just not fear that i have. Because i'm not experiencing their lives so it's something that is created within their own psyche and their own mindset. so it is about changing their mindset to know that they can deal with anything and they are capable to stay at the level go higher. There is a massive fear in success. There's a massive fear in possessing a successful energy that you've never felt before. So that's something that. I guess the more successful you become the more you realize you have to allow that success to happen to you. You have to allow happiness into your life before the famous. They don't understand the implications of being like a celebrity level famous or successful. So when they get to that level of success as what you mentioned the thanks to attract different kinds of attention that you don't want or a looming fear at you might lose it all or something that right. Yeah absolutely absolutely and the more you have the more you have to lose but also the more you have the more you have to give an is about changing our mindset sushi change a mindset to realize that you have so much to give and such a an amazing life then everything changes and the issue focus. It's about where you put in your focus you put in your focus on the negative we put your focus on what you can do and how you can move forward and it's also about. It's not just positive thinking it's about taking positive action forwards and that makes a world of difference. I lived the book that you that you choose to focus on. Feel because i think a lot of our life depends on dora response to iraq. I don't know whether this is the asian thing or of people around the world would have these restaurants when young people among each other. You say talk about the subject of marriage and people to be single. Usually somebody from the group was a unto afraid of dying alone. Yes so what wife. Dying alone is such a thing for most people is how to imagine pettifor kind of fearful for people to imagine those final. I was being alone but in this. Tara t. for your own personal life. Do you ponder about it a lot. there's also bringing my my life experience of what you've just said because yes you do get that. You're afraid to die alone but also at the moment i'm a child free woman. I have a husband but we asked a lot whether we're having children and we decided this present moment in time not to have children however the first thing or one of the things that people say is who is gonna look after you when you are old. You scared dying alone. And that's another angle to take with this. And i think if we look at dr alvarez types of fear that is the separation of abandonment and rejection. That comes through because again we have this. Strong need to belong is quite a. It's rational when you think about it but also we have no idea of what we're gonna win. We're going to be who go become or what stage of life going to be when we do die. So it's it's all about the inserts. And i think a lot of people try and wash nil. Is it with a sentence. Such as are you going to be alone or you know. Who's gonna look at you when you when you're on your deathbed so to speak but you just. You just never know what's going to happen. So it's yes it could happen but also life is full of beauty wonder and there could be a million things that happen that you could have ten people around joe bed you don't know and it's it. Is that that uncertainty about not knowing what's going to happen i think that's also a big fear the the uncertainty and the other put this. It's that's what makes life magical the uncertainty of it because if things are to suits and you go to work in the in the same car you drive the same roads you take the same bus you get off at the same store. That is it certain. And if feels great but also as the magic with the spontaneity wiza- curiosity with the adventure. And so we need the uncertain to level out the suits and t because otherwise life is boring so yes that could happen but it also may not happen so i'd like to take comfort in that question the way i see we as a species as you. Progress throughout the years. Centuries feel kind of changes nowadays most people living in developed or developing countries. A lot of people who and if you are above average but we you. You have enough food in august shelter to last for the next few years. I like to use the framework of the hierarchy of needs muscle. Howard your knees so most of us were ascend with the highest right so the self actualization though when you think about your life. Can i leave the most meaningful this another set of these fear. And that's why. I think nowadays so many people are having mental issues anxiety depression and even just feeding very. That's why more drugs are taken to. They do cure the mind. And the body how these trend progressing people getting fearful and some of the deeps that you can give us from your perspective. The first came to mind for me was clarity. Because i i remember listening to episode three of your a rest in peace podcast because comment the gentleman sailing but it was russell the the also was on and he was growing maslow's hierarchy of needs. And i love the concept of it because as you pointed out as soon as you get to. The second layer of muslims hierarchy hierarchy of needs to. Your shelter is tick food tech. You know you got a job tech you start moving up and you think okay what what's next what's next. What's next after that and knowing that you have clarity you have direction is what helps you to create that. Lovely triangle and at the top of the triangle is self actualization. Another thing for me is hard with drugs and alcohol in because those coke strategies. They are behaviors that we have to deal ways our everyday life and everyday life can be difficult. You know. i'm not gonna make any bones about it. Life is suffering At times and sometimes we have to self medicate or use coping strategies for instance when my man passed away. I put on a bit of whites. And i knew it was because i was using food is a a to self sues to get through it and sometimes you need the On i'm not saying you need drugs by the way. I'm not saying you need to have alcohol. But this is a great need to heal to fill in the gaps rather than just allowing the gaps to be. The and. I wish i didn't. I wish i didn't use food to to do that. I did it very briefly. I don't do it now. But it was A coping strategy. And it's quite interesting. The the idea that underlying pain is fear and the pain gets medicated. But underneath a pain is these fears but also i think his unmet needs sometimes we have needs as human beings. We have the need to feel loved. We have the need to feel a sense of purpose and belonging and if those things are met than our lives are not filled then not golden vibrant and we're not allowed olwin able to take a fool words and to be true selves and i think this is what the triangle actually represents but come in the wholeness of who we are and having every aspect of the human experience realized at able to be experienced to the point where we know that is who we are at the essence of who we are. We are pure lights. We are a energy on. Were able to choose what we do with the skills and the knowledge that we have. So i also think is a privilege. I think having that self actualization get talk about triangle hot. Most people don't advocate the And that's just because maybe for various reasons They may need some therapy. They may need the life coach. They may need a step on the ladder that they never get. and so. that's the reason. Why sorry important in society for us to be say an openness antivirus as possible to help every body have a full and happy human experience. This is a nice segue where Here's a sexual assault. The cause us my guests. Five rep questions really. Yeah yeah. let's go right so one is just hit someone who is a meaningful life. Same anon- my non passed away in june. And she was the loved she was the most loved person i've known and i don't mean just the fact that she loves loads of people but she was loved by everyone she had to write this down of. Remember it when we were doing her eulogy but she has nine children. Stacey one grandchildren fifty seven great grandchildren and eighteen. Great great grandchildren. She wallows the epitome of the divine. Mother and i miss her dearly but the amount that she has taught me i believe the she has had an amazing life. So you say that she possibly june of last year us because due to covid allow funerals and processions are not able to be carried out hours the ceremony. Light for for your she. How can i put this. She didn't get the funeral she deserves to have but the funeral that she did have any was digital. Only ten people were allowed to go and as you can tell there was a lot of people in our family just from those statistics. Were not people that she was well known in the community and everyone left. It was difficult but we were able to have our individual families at home watching on the screen and edward. I'd like to say that. I thought that it would be very sterile. It would be like watching a tv show in a weird way but it wasn't. It was beautiful and it was. It was person like personalized to her. And no it wasn't the funeral she deserves to have but he's the one she had on. We did her proud to the best our ability so it was a very different experience berry different to the point where the funeral it started but we our our links froze for a bit so for about ten minutes. We did not anything. Hold a kick did it. We were like ten minutes late so we were. We have to watch my aunt's funeral after finished which was really weird but It's that's life things happen by all these things have been the. I just want to bring up the point. That is amazing that we have all these digital technologies that are off online memorial sites being butte. That's one way to commemorate your no one's even passing off the passing. At least you have some memories of them. I just wanted to bring out that kind of those inventions this in today's time and we are getting sidetracked myself so the second president will be. What would you say with alison. I wouldn't say anything to a dime person. I would be present. Actually i probably would say is anything you need. Can i get you anything. I think i remember when my mom passed away. That was just a lot of just sitting there with her and allowing her to tell me stories allowing her to impart wisdom. And yeah i think you realize at the time that although there's lots of distractions in life when it comes to it what rudy maxa is presence a mindfulness and just being with that person in that moment and sharing that experience So no i wouldn't. I wouldn't really give them any partying words. I would just allow them to have the space to say what they need to say. Where do you think you will go immediately after death. No way i have an atheist slash agnostic which is weird in itself. I know. But i'm gonna tell you a little a little brief story about my wisdom tooth seen as you are a dentist. That was extraction. And i went under general anaesthetic for a wisdom tooth extraction and whilst i went under obviously don't like blackness and then when i woke up i i had this massive realization Being the drugs but it was like thus whereas it's like to die like. I didn't remember anything i literally could have been out for the rest of my life that you wouldn't have known and that the me was with this fear of death berry comforting all. It's like that will. I'm assuming it's like like all of my all of the things that make me human all of my senses. My brain synapses my mic. The touch the smell of the you know the sounds all of that's going to be gone. So how was. I ever experienced things in a way that i haven't experienced before i don't know so for me having realization. I was like okay. I think i've come to terms with the fact that it's just like that is just like when i think about where was i before. Nineteen eighty four. When i was born i was nowhere hadn't existed so i think exactly the same stop. Yeah i can understand your your answer once you say you nothing this. I thought that the restaurant. Because i'm also agnostic. Yup over we people i us. We tend to just don't want to answer the question at all. Just kind of illinois i know can be photoed. I just blindness. I quit for now. So you even be blindness would mean i was conscious to experience the blanket nuts so it's not even that it's just woods we say nothing us but in experience it cannot be experienced. Would you like to be remembered somebody who was kind and chain change. I could when i could. So i have this this mission that i never leave. Anything was the one. I saw it so i have to note that i made constant improvement. I liked to help in any way i can. I just i just want people to remember me as someone who made them smile and someone who made them feel good. I hope i hope. That's my life mission. Anyway google on this last question and then you get lost question. So you're having last on earth. What would it be okay. Well i'm gonna. I'm gonna keep the theme of my non because she used to make theme meanness sunday roast with quite sure old international listeners. It's meats vegetables potatoes but it's just pretty good on his stomach that we have in britain and yet. I guess it's a thanksgiving dinner isn't it. Is something like that but i'm vegetarian so i'm gonna go with the nut roaster but has to. It has to have leo. Ps which is a specific Like he'd you get here and you have to soak the tableau in the in the evening. Are we still do my man when we sleep over the house. She's to get us to called. He's so needs to be that. And then i'll go. This is a big meal and then a red velvet cheesecake factory cheesecake which always reminds me. Feed on holiday in america eat cheesecake factory. Because we don't have what he really were sounds yummy. I know i'm hungry now. You won't question if you one. Yeah i've lived to my question is what's more is it about death that fascinates you or makes you interested enough to start the podcast. I guess i'm really person in a sense that i've been thinking about death from the asian. Say immolate teams. I've just been thinking. Because i think puddle is in finding but one of productivity seven habits of highly productive people something in that one of the abuses begin with any mind so the near that man say. I'm going to die. It average age seventy or eighty so career wise. How do i want to leave. You know relationship wise. What kind of was on the be there. Is i think about one more. Walk death in a kind of influence. My other major decisions as that. Whether i wanna get married or not have these things and then death itself When he when about death is very easy to get into all we just believe so that we just believe republic influence your entire will view so we see our a christian. My my dad's pastor so it was like very obedient. The everything's given to you you know how has heaven. This is what will happen. No desktop people writing books about of visions of a getting to live and things like that. But whereas i look into all these yeah and if a few of them i really feel so the whip of come. Debbie's convince myself that does not in those two. So then i started the focus other especially while death that how can i create content like what causes one of my favorite forms are the how do i bring in people who are interesting in this space than we were talking about grief about funeral arthur's with you. Just just do not need to educate myself by the wool. Basically yeah absolutely. And what is the question. I was okay was have you taken from it so far so far we have light in. There's so many different kinds of william. I love me sending phone all of the guest. I have my. I guess while some mine that actually from still crazy man you get to nissan from pasta to psychic mediums to atheists agnostics drools all kinds of people from different backgrounds. Well since this is something that you can prove or disprove is you can put refi yolo. Ryon healy ones guess. The more important question is issues that you can derive off death that can inform you to leave a more meaningful. I think that the war in boston spent our. We should get it. Yeah and i think that. I i find my clients. Once they've been through grief or had a close loved one die or even a pet. This loads of different types of grief is while. But the the one thing i find. Is they get urgency to want to live straight away and You know i. I'm not sure if. I said this overachiever. Aloft people assume that the opposite of death is life but actually the opposite of death is birth and life is what happens in the middle. And there's this this needs to want to live life on purpose in the fast lane and to not waste in the moment and i think that is the one thing that death does bring to. The people who are left behind is perspective. It's humility and is also wisdom. That life is so fleeting and we can change our lives in any minute of the day. We can decide to put the chocolate down. Eat a healthy meal. We can decide to go for the job interview. We can decide to marry person to fall in love to stop a have a divorce all these decisions. Change your life in a moment so you only ever one step away from living that middle part between this and death and having the most amazing life possible for people debt interest to discover more about what you sign up for some coaching resources. We will find you online. You're more than welcome to head over to my website. It's michelle thole dot com. I'm surname misspelled. T h on their also got a resource for building resilience in difficult times. So that is if you're going through recess time especially the pandemic or if you are going through a loss that there's a. I've put ten coaching tools together in a is digital products. You you're more than welcome to go there and have a look at that but also i am very lives life. I'm very active as people on instagram. So head on over to michelle coaching. And that's where you'll see store reason a bit more on my daily life but yeah come over and say hi walsum before i let you go. Any last words directly for the list muscle cost. Yes well before. I say that. Thank you so much for having me on. Today it's been a pleasure to speak to you edwards but my last thoughts are don't waste another moment. Get out the shiny light bright and do your thing in this world.

dr alvarez Hello edward Dr kao phobia dr brats Michelle deborah greece Tara t tony robbins london zoo bosley edward anxiety depression fia london Gaskin Brady autism rudy maxa mike
The Points Guy UK

Talking Points

24:02 min | 2 years ago

The Points Guy UK

"Talking points is brought to you by ADT. Look, if you're a frequent traveler like we are TB g you know, how important it is to make sure that your home is locked up and in good hands. While you're on the road. Did you know that ADT is America's number one home security provider with twenty four seven monitoring its network of eighteen thousand employees and its direct connection. First responders you'll never have to worry when you're away from home. You can even control your home security from wherever you are with the app, or when you're at home with the sound of your voice. Visit ADT dot com slash podcast to find out how can design and install a secure smart home system for you and your family again that is AT dot com slash podcast. Hey, you out there. Yeah. You listening to this episode of talking points. It's your host Brian Kelly, the points guy, and we want to hear from you about the show what kind of topics do you want to hear more of would you love to hear me interview? Where do you want me to go? What destinations conferences you name it? Give me all of your feedback because we're going to be relaunching talking points with amazing new episodes, and we want your feedback go to the point sky dot com slash podcast to learn more. And let me know by I. Welcome to talking points. I'm your host Brian Kelly. And I'm coming to you live from London with very special guest, our very own Nikki Kelvin, head of content for the recently launched UK. Nikki, thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure to be here on the very exciting that with finally off the ground finally off the ground. So this week has been pretty epic. We're currently in the throes of our launch. How do you feel about everything failing Beatty? Great. It's being a really exciting week. Very full-on. We've million people. We have our incredible pop up shop in London seems to be going really, well and everybody loves it. What's the point of spending so much time and money on doing a pop up shop in Covent Garden, while the points go it doesn't like to do things by Hobbs, generally? And so we're continuing that tradition and we're happy to continue the tradition of the US team. We thought having a physical space where people can check out way up to me as in real. Life have some really cool engaging activities. But to have is there to talk about Muslim points into understand what's going on in the UK, Muslim point space is the reason why we we wanted a physical space for people to talk to us in the UK people don't really know anything about miles and points yet. And we are here to bring information to them. And why do you think that is? I think the culture just hasn't moved as quickly as it has in the US. I know that the U K looks a bit like what the US looked like ten years ago. Maybe loyalty is a new thing to the British public credit cards or something that people generally cautious about reward programs. I think the Brits are quite cynical about things, and you haven't been here, whereas the valley for me, I can never use them these points. Even if I get them, it's all a load of rubbish. It's not true. And that's what we're hits. It sounds like you've got an uphill battle though. How did you get into the whole miles and points game? So I have a bit of a weird an interesting journey I trained as a solicitor in the city. A big scary law firm lawyer for those who don't know attorney attorney is that you. Is that your way of US X can do so much better? They judge me on me. That's for another podcast. I do I do British accents regional accents. Really? Well, but not we'll we'll save those. So I worked as a lawyer then for five years for a very big record label and swung into music circles. Also works as a photographer. So I worked as a photojournalist in Israel. And then when I joined the label I shot load of music stars from you, Justin bieber's, and you show Mendez's to Lionel Richie all sorts of people had incredible experience doing that. But why really loves type pictures of was airplanes at airports and aviation was that ever since a kid you've been obsessed since being a tiny child airplanes flying, airports and everything associated was my obsession. And so as I got older, my sister was British Airways cabin crew. When so I was very lucky to be able to travel with her a lot on the cheap stuff travel back in the days where taxes in the UK with much lower. And I went all over with her and she got. Married, and how children and really admire shaping. Awful. So I lost all of that said Muslim points was my way to replace. How did you get into miles and points? Did you like googling around and you cut someone the flyer talk? Yes. So fly tool quiz. How I begun started using credit cards hair in that to build up points. I got into flyer talk. I think in two thousand and four I think I think I was fly a tool king whilst still at university. So probably I reckon seven eight years. I was on fly tool can not act PG and trying to work out this world, and what was going on. And I remember my first redemption when I finished university was to South America. It was when BMI the old British Midland had a great rewards program. The Gramer there was like thirty six thousand miles round trip and business class with stops. It was insane. So I flew all different airlines business class down to Argentina. There was a fifth freedom on Kaunda from. Renaissance to Santiago flew cover the business down that flew home actually on continental business, which I remember continental which I remember being great. And then I saw of continue my journey from that. I learn more and more about air miles and a few years ago about five years ago now started miles mogul. I was telling everybody about this stuff. I said you go to get a credit card. You got to earn obvious virgin points because there's real value there. Nobody was doing it. So start writing a blog the blog then turned into an Instagram because I take lovely pictures of planes minds to grump quite well people in the community enjoyed my photography than starting masterclasses. The master classes were called how to fly first class for almost free. Teaching people the beginning of this hobby repatriation side before you went on. Yeah. Was associated one hundred people there. Everyone had paid to be this. I was like these. Tickets by the advice is great. I'm giving them enough to that first one people will loving it. And when you were a solicitor did they know that you were doing this on the side. Yeah, I never been loved. It was I know this was the same boy in that people would come up to my desk and be like I need to fly to New York next week. Let helped me I've got a fly business last lot. How am I doing? How do I get my miles? So I became an advisory service to everybody, including my boss, and so I sort the points guy as a mileage booking service, even before it was a blog. It was it was a form where people would pay me fifty bucks. And I would do the dirty work for searching for awards for them. Did you ever do that? I did the elope but not formally and people did that she pay me talk. But not really that was mainly helping people that I knew to be able to do that as opposed people pay me people were paying the to come to the talks though to learn how to do. So. So we followed each other on Instagram for several years. I remember you came to the G offices when we were in the we worked downtown. Yeah. That must be what three years ago, it was probably three and. Hoffy as ago now. So yeah, met you then and even then three and a half years ago you'd like yeah. The UK like something's happening. Something's going to happen that wash the space, and I watched this spent three years until finally we arrived at K being a possibility or reality. I love coming to London. And the UK has been our number two audience at the site for years granted, it's only like three percent or something the US is by far our number one. But we've had several hundred thousand readers a month in the UK for years. So I always knew the UK was something we should do. But it was always about finding the right people. And I actually didn't think that you'd wanna leave your job as a solicitor all the stars aligned. And what was it August of twenty eighteen you got your offer to join you accepted. What was that like telling your parents and your boss at the big record label that you're quitting to go work for a blog I deem waiting on the to come through. And actually, I don't know if you've even know this. I probably never told you this. But when you called me to tell me, right. It's done and this is your offer. And I'm emailing you the formal documents. Now, I was actually on a photo shoe. It was an autism one of our artists. I looked after Cogan city. It was a huge album launch party like a rave, and I was in the rave in the deejay booth with a huge crowd, and yet never taking photos and my phone starts ringing. I look at Brian Kelly. Go about bashed my way through the crowds came out is it east. So funny. I had no idea east London in Hatmi in the summer. It was in early August. It was hammering it down with rain pouring down. And I was in just the t show or Eddie sweat saying to might tell you my to comers over my shoulder took the call Brian's like it's happening. It's time. And then the rest was history. But actually, I was Congo back in that call go back into this grave. I'd thankfully, add nailed the pictures or ready. So I just did a cab home called my parents. I was like oh my God. Oh my God. And then yeah, I think the the reality was I had a very had an amazing job at the label. Amazing people. I love actually, my boss and some of my colleagues. Pop up. Yeah. He's he's a great guy. He was like a father to me, and he really encouraged me to grow in all different areas alongside growing my legal career. And I think everybody the label knew when they heard this opportunity. The wasn't even a question. This was my dream job to be working in the world of aviation and travel and talking about Muslim points, and to do some logic Cameron content stuff on to travel for work was just everything about me. Being a loyal wasn't thankfully, I've got to leave the label on a high. I was leaving the industry leaving leaving music. So there was no pop blood anywhere, which was amazing as well. So I kind of got chaired out the office that makes it sounds like. It is going to be difficult here because you know, in the US were so lucky I mean, we've got probably ten different credit card issuers. They're all competing, the inner change within banks is much higher. So there's much richer rewards and credit cards and hundred thousand point sign up bonuses, that's not the case here explained a reader listeners what the current situation is in the UK travel rewards credit card market size. Roy we have the richness of the US market. However, there is still plenty of rewards to be hats and most people are just not taking advantage of some of the main ones that I think they missed out on. Nobody really knows that Tesco club. Call points can be converted into obvious. Quite beneficial rates said the thing I keep talking about his two hundred pounds a week spend at Tesco after a year would leave you twenty five thousand adios most people are doing shop protests co and just getting nothing of the back of it. We have today scummy club called the credit card market is grunted very different to the US. But there are still some juicy credit card. Sign up bone. Mrs that I'm ex Putnam called has thirty thousand points on bonus at the moment, for example of the top all credit card bonuses to be had. We usually where we see forty to seventy you guys are in the zero to thirty range yet, you know, fifteen is over I twenty is goods more than that is an excellent deal. But again, that's decent chunks of points that you otherwise would just not having them putting day-to-day spending on rewards credit cards earn off every purchase it builds up. You know, maybe it's takes a bit longer hair and takes a bit more planning. But you can totally get that ruled in the end, and we'll say things like shopping portals. I was just looking this morning. The British our shopping portal has six obvious per pound apple so, you know, you'd next time you bought something that people in the US store was shocked by what I'm like shop through shopping portals people like what? And it's free. It's points for nothing and the benefits are great like ace sauce, everybody in the UK shops as us eight obvious per pound the moment, they have an offer not, you know, I know people who spend fifty quid. A day on a sauce, and it's just huge amounts of points that can be owned. So you're the head of content. Your job is to bring really compelling stuff. How is the content at G U K going to be different than the us? So we're going to be different first of all by having a UK slung on things we know loads of people in the UK were reading the US already. But with frustrated the advice didn't have that UK voice in UK, focus. So our primary to bring UK information. How can you maximize travel Muslim points? If you live in the UK, and you can only get UK credit cards and take advantage of UK deals, so bringing miles appoints information credit card information, you deals or European deals. The kind of stuff that people in the UK and Europe actually going to do an use an have access to. And then in terms of how we present that content. We're gonna make that exciting fun engaging. So yeah, we're going to have that solid backbone written information for miles and points. It's super important, but we've also got some incredible video content. Amazing visuals Instagram already day, one of launch over nine thousand followers and crazy engagement most of whom are in the U K. Like, it's I'm excited to see where you guys take this because I am blown away at the creative talent. We're only what seven full-time people here. Yeah. Most are on the content team. What you guys have done already is is awesome. From my perspective. I think the UK is going to actually help encourage creatively. The us a lot of the content. Does overlap now one of the things that I think in listeners probably don't know about is one of the best ways to maximize obvious is the multi carrier award, which is not really listed online. Do you want to explain what it is? And how people should approach it. He adds so multi-car awards a lesser known corner of the obvious world. I did one of these lust March, and it's probably the most exciting action I've ever done. So they use a different pricing. Instead of doing instead of paying per flight. You pay per mileage other you mileage for the whole ticket and you pay a certain amount. So I actually flew from London to Hong Kong on Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong to Taipei in back on cafe Pacific will in first class down to Perth on cafe business, and then hopped over to Singapore another cost airline, and then I flew from Singapore to London British Airways business, and so I flew Qantas cafe MBA. So for the ticket you need to fly tool more Oneworld airline. So I qualified for that by putting all these shorts are more expensive flights. It didn't add to the cost of my ticket. It would have added a huge amounts of the cost of a cash ticket said, I paid one hundred thousand adios and five hundred pounds tax. It would have cost. How'd I pay cash twenty thousand pounds for the whole ticket which is would price as an individual award? Each of those probably would have been worth three hundred thousand dollars style. I think three hundred eighty five thousand. Instead, you got it for one hundred. That's amazing. Yeah. As a super frequent traveler, I've got an arsenal of things that help make my travel experience much less stressful and more enjoyable, so that's what I love clear, I've been a member for years, and it works perfectly with my TSA pre check it allows me to get to an airport like LaGuardia put my two fingers at the clear machine and get to the front of the line, which allows me to enjoy the lounge that much more and it's not just in airports. You can find clear at stadiums. Around the US signing up is so easy. You can sign up online and finish enrolling at participating airports or stadiums. With the clear ambassador right now, talking points listeners can get their first two months for free by going to clear me dot com slash point sky and use code points sky. That's C L E A R M E dot com slash P. O N T S GUI code points guy. For your free two months of clear. All right. You grew up in Leeds, which is what how a couple hours north of London charge of miles to the north. What was it like growing up in leads leads is great. Do you recommend like an American visitor joining up to Leeds on? So yes, maybe not leads itself. Leads is a great city third. Diversity, Tom, right. Yeah. Third. Biggest by population in the UK, depending on how you define it. It's a very cool place. However, the surrounds of late are amazing. The Yorkshire tales are beautiful if any of you have ever seen a box of Yorkshire tea. I know there's one in the office the picture on the front of the box is Yorkshire quintessential Yorkshire dales dry. Stonewalling these beautiful, fences, sheep everywhere. Rolling hills. Beautiful valleys little pubs is incredible English countryside and items and easy train from London. Right. If you went up to leads leads is just over two hours on the train from London and the jails. In a car, and you there in off now forty minutes from my house, I live on the northern edge of leads and wearing the dials in twenty minutes. But you've been in London for how many years I've been almost ten years. So you're a cool guy. You've got your pulse on fun things to do. What are what are three cool things outside of, you know, the big tourist attractions that people could do to get a cool London experience. Okay. I'll give you three I'll give you a food one. And I'll give you two places. So I live in north west London. I've always lived in those areas, and I love up that everybody has that. So of nutshell home area in London. But primrose HALE in north London is a fantastic little spot really cool buildings and houses and a great highstreet with cool food, but primrose hill itself if you woke up to the top of it, it's probably a three minute walk to get to the top. And there is the most stunning view of the whole of London. So it sits above London zoo, she down into the zoo and then be owned and be on regions park. You can see into the city all the skyscrapers. You can see as far as Mary wolf. Why haven't you taking me? That's awesome. I tried to try throughout your tried to you're busy mount number two Columbia road flower market open on the Sunday. I absolutely love it down that it's got kind of touristy now because of the people it's just packed with people. And it gets very busy on a Sunday. Core is still what it was hawkers down very narrow flowers every Sunday. Well, if I go though, I caught resist I have an obsession with Thomson flowers. So this whole because on on both sides of this very narrow street and the will shine out four Paret standard. I get you lillies ten for five all of that. So it's kind of an experience as our town is surrounded by hipster things of these London's cool it or coffee shops and places to grab food at. What makes it is the vendors? On who will shouting out. And it feels like if you close your eyes, you're almost in the east end in the fifties or something. And then my last one will be food place Indian food on the UK go hand-in-hand, we have some incredible options. But Dichou is just the one thing the I guess it's a bit gimmicky the insides of like a Bombay Iranian cafe. But the food is just incredible. And that's SHO. That's it and pass by it. And I've heard from people that I haven't been yet. Does may never take me anywhere. Nikki there's maybe maybe five of them in London. Now, what do you love on the menu? I maintain that the chicken ruby, which is the chicken curry that. They do is the best chicken curry, you can get in the UK. And it's it's bold statement. And this Indian depre- go in that like everyone's Indian in actually someone who you know, from the US Brian was who's from India born and raised there was in our office last week, and she just come from Chombe. And she said it made her feel like she was at home, and she doesn't get in the US. So. Today again, adding these lists. I know I've been meaning to go there we got to wrap it up. But one of the things I'm most excited to travel with you is soon we're going to Israel, which is shockingly a country. I've never been to you've been how many times I think when I when new year it was my thirty first trip while think, and I've spent four and a half years of my life that cumulatively there's so much to offer in Israel, like what are your high level Israel tips? Like, I think I think the easiest way to Israel. If you roll in tights, timing Tel Aviv is just the most awesome city incredible television where the London I could never actually live in Israel like crazy with have lots of friends from England moved. There is a bit crazy for me. But television, London all almost like my two homes along with aids so Tel Aviv. The best food as you are about to experience. When we go there and about ten days incredible food incredible people the vibe is just amazing amazing nightlife as. Well, basing yourself how is great to then hop off to different places. So everybody's Jerusalem. Jerusalem without traffic is maybe a five minute forty minute drive from the recommends during a couple of nights there because to do a day trip. Wouldn't do it Justice? Right. Day-trip would not do just that. I would say if you can do two nights in Jerusalem, great if you can visit the north at least for a day somewhere in the north to see an aspect of Israel, the woods of fools in the greenery. Eat just even this Societa with the Middle East or Israel is awesome to see and you have to go to the desert. The desert is my favorite place in Israel. It feels biblical Bowron and combining a day in the desert with the Dead Sea having afloat in the dense as if I Uni case Berens on call way to get you slotted in mud and the heat on and employing in the Dead Sea. Nikki we've got a wrap up, but I'm going to hold you to it. You gotta give us some of those UK regional accents. I. All right. Well, if I were from if I were from if I spoke like our from lease would talk where this this is our should talk because I'm from lates, actually, you just been in Scotland. So maybe we'll take it up there because you know, this is. No. I know it's good. I actually one place that Brian is very passionate about visiting widdly waivers. Actually, the Welsh accents is one of my easiest ones. It just rolls off the tongue for me. I love speaking in a about shocks. And I could go on the night, but millions of these. But maybe let's leave good ones. We'll Mickey once again, thanks for being on and I like to end allowing people to self promote. So do you want to tell people how to follow the points? Go UK on social and the site and your Instagram show. So my Instagram is out Nikki Kelvin unless you really love planes, then it's up miles mogul. And you can see me my aviation surrounds. We are at the point sky UK on Instagram and Twitter on the point sky on YouTube on Facebook. Please follow us on all of those social media platforms on our website, the points guide, Cody cage, she'd go that check it out. And also sign up twenties letter, which you'll be able to do on our website as well. And once again, that's the point sky dot co dot UK. Mickey congrats on the launch. And I'm really looking forward to see where you guys take this thing. Thanks again to my guest, Nikki Kelvin, head of content the point sky UK and everyone at the London office this launch. Pesident ton of fun and also special thanks to my amazing new executive assistant Christie met suey. And of course, thanks to our production team back in New York City. Caroline, shea grin and Margaret Kelly with help from Ryan Gabose and thank you to fill. Bader freelance engineer in London.

UK London US Brian Kelly Instagram Israel Nikki Kelvin ADT Leeds Tel Aviv British Airways Beatty London zoo Covent Garden PG BMI South America Argentina New York
Darren Turner podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

1:19:05 hr | 1 year ago

Darren Turner podcast

"Hello everyone very warm. Welcome to nicholas me. This is truly a mecca for aston martin motoring. If you haven't haven't had a chance to look around all the different sheds shouldn't come. Sheds not bonds small smaller than bonds. It's truly amazing so do do you please go look around. If you haven't already before we saw a mustang our event honours nicholas may classic and sports on. I'm with them. This event just simply wouldn't have happens. Also thank you the barbecue. That was delicious. Also andrea hold it all back to look at racing. Gold has done things such as this table which is my new favorite table because hidden in his a bottle of wine so great stuff before we go anywhere near commercial director. Thank you yep thank you and welcome everyone to essendon berry farm which for the year now has been on you home having relocated from west london where we previously had separate showrooms and workshops we moved fifteen here in the end of may last year so we've just had our first birthday part of the vision of moving out to these this type of premise in the countryside. It was to create a destination for us in boston enthusiasts. We've been involved in the sale and servicing and maintenance of aston martin's for twenty six years and we we have as a result lots of clients and we enjoy spending time with them socially and to create a venue to host events which becomes becomes a destination for us enthusiast was always something very high up on our list of priorities so hosting this event tonight really is a pleasure for us with motorsport motorsport magazine <hes> my favorite magazine the one that i take on holidays to read this and our good friends classic and sports finance who have been a very big supporter of the business for for many many years and it's good to work with darren turner again darren and i <hes> were involved in the early days of us in racing. That was what i was doing prior to being a second hand car salesman commercial manager asked maassen racing and darren was there at the very start of that program and i'm sure he's going to be touching on that tonight. So we know further do one hundred back toward enjoy the evening things who've becoming ahmed foster. I'm keepings roughly on track said joining me is the features editor of magazine and some samuel. If you go to raise circe he'll he'll be taking photographs. If you've got to london zoo he'll be that taking photographs but also an intimate knowledge motor racing history the me too evening guarantee. He doesn't need t- much of an inch doctrine for me 'cause you will. I'm multiple class winner in the mall. Aston martin's longest serving works driver so either extraordinarily talented or you know the right people. Both i'll go with the latter but thank you for sparing the time because you just telling i mean how many race weekends you'll doing and how u._b._s. Thank you very much joining us just quickly before we get going. We're gonna talk for forty five minutes forty five minutes an hour our and then we will go to the floor and we've got a roving much phone so any questions you like it is being recorded but we can't cut things out so no matter how ridiculous question feel oh free to oscar those and then just where we got started might just zine is starting a new bent series neck hold major sports game changes that going to be very very special and ultimate they always the very best interesting racing drivers and people we can find and the first two on audio and gordon marine both in september in london. You can buy tickets on much magazine dot com or you see the go out. The back with a truly will be an astonishing evening both of them a knowledge amount so i'm having a meeting within the other day and him doing tricks in the middle of it will be very interesting evening anyway. Let's get cracking. I'm dan we would briefly talking and you were saying how you'll memory patchy so to kick things off. I think we should do is roy rewind right back into the saw and very early aston martin memories okay even the thanks for the even i guess before the rising star it was it was a james bond must've been it would have been james bond of seeing the brand around and understanding what it meant to aston martin <hes> in terms of the prestige and just what those cars were but to be over young racing driver. You're not really worried so much about the the call is just is it faster than can win races especially in those early days when who single-seat base etc are you all about the single career and then and as time went on and that's avenue dried up then the opportunity to go into touring cars or sports 'cause then you start to really appreciate all the marks motoracing especially the ones that have a good pedigree as well so it was definitely aware of of aston martin but they weren't really doing anything at the time into the the front line of racing at that point you know as i moved out cingo. C. is in the late nineteen into mercedes at d._t._m. For a couple of years and then i started with the sports car stuff. Ferrari customer ferrari team so again asked him was more about historic racing really so as a driver trying to carve solve professional career. It wasn't so so that the front of my mind is that i should be an 'cause. I just didn't have anything to go racing with realistically ask the trigger was for you because it's rather nineteen. Eighties drivers came up single seats a letter and quite often the case the british drivers run out of money when they go to three thousand level and some of them just disappeared goslett james weaver andy wallace realized quite early on that rather than fighting and struggling to get season for the one that was going to be at the back of the grid with money that didn't have they were better off going to the states where you paid properly to raise sports and they they vermont's first to forge a very good solid professional sports car career away from the single seater kind of mainstream. When did that moment come for you. You begin to realize realize that that's a good way for me. I did say this is going to be a history lesson. You have very good. I have to say i've never really had a career plan because everything is just happened just by agua but in the right place right time people people wanting to come on the journey with me as well so we're not going single. Is that was by accident from a lotta people that suv that we're happy to pay me to go to the jim russell racing school that going to and then that's what kicked off a single career and i got to the point where i one mclaren autosport be our d._c. Award and that gave me an opportunity with mclaren got me my first test in one car and it was under martin whitmarsh mclaren that he basically pushed me on mercedes so i never never really said right. That's what i'm gonna do because that's where i think microfiche ago. It was more okay. They've given me an opportunity to go down that route and that's what happened with mercedes as in d._t._m. Got sacked from ladies and then you're back on the market and other year or just trying to tread water and find something to bryce even if it was for free and i did you know just i don't into money from driving from mercedes and then out of year of earning any money from racing cars to then get in an opportunity. We have a privateer ferrari team so it wasn't a choice in terms of my choice. It was just what the opportunity was available at that time so that was is it basically but you see even more now right now g._t. Writing is booming and a lotta guys are early in their career already given up on the phone wondering and and thinking. I need to align myself with manufacturer. That's where i can earn a living and the only place that the manufacturers are spending money and pain. Dr is effectively g._t. Racing right now a sports car race in there's a little bit in enduring caused but there's more opportunities now so you see annoyingly for us us older boys in racing. You'll see more drivers. Come across to sports car racing. They're fast brave and cheap so from that point of view. Hey this is quite annoying so you hope that your experience outweighs the benefits of the driver and i think that's what's kept me within this off the squad up until this period. It's instant isn't it because he masinga million years ago do renovation. The average age of the drivers is about seventy you something now kids come out of karting and they go straight into minis or renew clears whatever it is because they identify immediately. That's that's the thing the thing is the whole all kind of philosophy. The sport has changed in the last twenty nine hundred seventy british g._t. and g._t. Four is full of kids on the anita anita china calva career out and trying to but themselves in a position a manufacturer will give them a g._t. Three opportunity which then we'll hopefully g._t._e. Or opportunity lemond and and then moving across to anything else that gives you some opportunity to money so yeah he's. He's a different marketplace on a thing right now. Suicidal came for the british going pre in an amazing race and former on is still the pinnacle of us school but the opportunities for drivers to get eh reducing so. I think you know the cost of getting more expensive the opportunities less so it's more like lottery numbers playing the lottery if you're going to get there or not so i think most people are smart enough to work out. If i wanna long career in this sport as a driver you've gotta get yourself along with a manufacturer and go leverage right now. Just before we go and so i said morrison and how that brave i started. You mentioned the lamar with the ferrari. Sorry customer team. I've got to ask you shed with colin mcrae and your second year how was house if you to share with that was one of the most amazing experience he's it just feels like everyone is really good and i didn't know him at all before he joined the squad any whatever now sees in the media on t._v. and these interviews and stuff like that so you got some really special come into the team and it was one of those oh why they put him with alcohol you know surely is going to be in a different car and he's had that relationship with pro drive because of the subaru abruzzo etc so came along and he was just so down to earth such nice guy to hang out with no as gracie's now on the on the big show is so make sure everything's about me. He was just the same as any other driver. Just there's a there's a bit on on the test. Hey where we were trying out seats were. I don't think he's ever had to do a senior. Mould which is then compromise because there's two other drivers in the car so he's trying to work out how he can fit in the call the best way for him but also works for us and he's out the back of the garage with a hacksaw lot we all are carving up suit trying to like make modifications to get comfortable is not like he's just told them mechanic go out there and fix see he's just hands on getting involved and at that point i was like this guy he's ruled the right reasons just to enjoy the racing aspect so that was the build up on one of the things that stood out from that weekend was done in chateau near the circuit. Nowadays we stay at the circuit for the whole week. Versus the normal thing now in little motorhomes but that's that's a period is all about hotels near by or chateau's and bits and bobs the chateau and i remember reading looking through books and you see from periods of history where drivers hanging out together and they're having a laugh away from the circuit they join each other's company well that doesn't often happen rid nowadays and this was a bit of a pinch pinch me moment because the whole squad another team of drivers was at the same place and this sounds glamorous the shattuck but it was quite rundown thing and yet to share different ball rikio place but it was still much they had a pool. I remember sitting on the choosey which is dial from sitting there and everyone's by the pool. Everyone's having fun. Everyone and i was just like this. This reminds me of what these photos were of back the day when the sixties and seventies racing where there was a bit of a social scene with the racing so it's really nice to to have experience in the build up and then in the rice you've detested qualify and the rice us just just fantastic the was really surprising was asking but someone asked him a question you said about did he find it difficult and he just said it was more physical cool than he ever expected it to be and that surprise me because i was thinking you bouncing around the woods in a radical must be fairly physical and he said that actually doing two hours round the morning g._t._1. Cole was was much harder than expected harder than being in rally car. I think it's just because of the g force compared to radikal and etc so it was it was real privilege to to use half that rice. We've we've called in just to enjoy that moment. Sorry someone what was your first experience because i think with some some young drivers that they fully appreciate what it's all about and it's anyone should get hits them. Were you very aware of what it was. When you went in for the first time so i i was called the mercedes team in one thousand nine so as the reserve driver so why i first and the first over experience of lome was right in the deep end with everything that happened with mercedes that you a nineteen hundred so so just to remind everyone that was they had calls literally flipped going down the most australian mandated fifty inches from the soccer for them so <hes> yeah. I don't think they've been back. It was one of the austin's of never done that. I it was it was one of those okay. This is nice to the reserve drivers. I've done all the test in the car some other car. I come to this event with no pressure. I could just watch sarah works on the scenes understand the whole how the whole race works and i'd still recommend that to any driver before they just go to the mom for the first time. Go the year before and just shadow a team show a driver just experience also when you come to do it for you. I am as an actual driver and be part of that event. You know the routine being because this is a hard week. It's not just the hard right. He's a hard week. We've all the build up and over elements of the rice wheat that you have to be involved with. You've been there that this is quite nice. I'll get to do the hospitality with mercedes and just have a nice time. I went out on the circuit. Okay workplaces. I shouldn't have gone because at the time to go and do it and i know pointed north think i was going to be in the car so i think mark flew on thursday evening and so that was the first on the carter cough and of the car was heavily damaged in the accident and then on the mount was pretty beaten up from the first flight and so the team like okay. You need to get yourself prepped mentally because you're going to be going out on warm up saturday morning. The next on the calls were run so that point the whole fun paul of being among disappeared and i was really scared because i've done no laps because because it didn't do the testee they wasn't simulators then to the thing you could do as you grainy videos of what was going on and the idea of going out saturday morning for thirty minutes and then going to be in the race it was too daunting really but said marks and a pretty bad way thursday night not sure he's going to be ready for saturday morning. Get yourself ready so all of friday. I was looking as much data as i possibly could absorb asking all the other drivers what dude the corner. What do i do this and then thankfully friday now. At mark's been had some treatment. I think he went off to this room. Boaters or tron loosen too often confirmed that marks good to go and he's going to do the right. Shaw completely relaxed at that point. That's nice. I can just enjoy this race it. It was a saturday morning on the outlet mall flew for the second one so that would've been me on my first ever lap open the mon- if i hadn't felt okay on friday night so and probably would have been the last time i'd ever gone to lamont because i would not not for me this twenty four hour race in so yeah. It was one of the week and a huge amount of pressure from within the teams. We've what was going on. It wasn't a very nice atmosphere from you know from the beginning really because of the pressure doing a good result in terms of what i can see looking team and then obviously when that happened it was it it was a game changer as well so to be surprised that they took the start having to cause fly before the event stop but they did and then unfortunately eddie's big accident and that was that was the end of that really so <hes> but yeah that was my first experience so the second time was two thousand three with the that pro drive five fifty ferraris as much more enjoyable. Did you have any drew become single season ladder and the guy sniffy impressions of pneumonia going back talking because it's not as the single season career installed on a sports car driving the months roll man and then they go are there and they realize wow i mean. Did you have any preconceptions before you went. I guess the only thing i thought was i didn't realize it was such a sprint and has become become even more of a sprint as years ago and even my first experience with two and three so what seventeen years i've done it now so even in that period the the pace has become hotter every year. You know the level of competition not already competitive. The cars are now even even more reliable than they were fifteen years ago. The competitions gone up. There's more cars in each class and the margin for error is has been reduced so i think back then i was more aware of what the race was the enormity of it all but wasn't really thinking it was the most competitive place to be in the world is it's more about the car rather than what the drivers are doing and now equally because go to be reliable but the drivers push every otherwise they just want to be a result in japan is a shame in some ways that the prototypes there because the button and the g._t. Class over the years aston ferrari porsche corvette several others. I mean the the competition g._t. Classes traditionally ten fifteen years been incredibly intense. Yes i'd certainly think right now look at g._t._e. Live seventeen brokers this year. We've asked the martin ferrari corvette b._m._w. Ford and porsche so all great manufactures coaches and the am class is equally as competitive. We've some super foster over. There is pro drivers in that class so again. Those guys are putting in some great performances so yeah you have to say g._t. At lemoyne is the most competitive but it's always going to be about the fastest cars and unless they mate g._t. The fastest causes is we put on the show and it's probably more competitive but it's about the for winner. Which is it's annoying when your is knowing when the rolex only get given is really annoying so that's yeah that's that's probably the most disappointing thing especially in the last couple of years because he hasn't been the most competitive in in terms of over a number of cars and and so i think last year was it last year the the porsche so important lost in it. It was in the box a couple of hours. It's still overcome the l._p. To car that was leading at the time and it soviet. I don't know what you're fighting because he's not it's not a will to will battle like g._t._c. but sometimes the olympic to put on a good show as well so it will happen fraud. There's going to be times when the the the top class will put on the best show and at the moment is is all about the g._t. Combs do you g._d. Class of time maximum scorch or something just a trophy so the daytona twenty four hour. Each class gets a rolex and honest like especially. I'm not bitter about it. Ah half on about two thousand seventeen we won and it was a great for all the way through in and lots of g._t. Cars will lead in a different times. The race went to the last four or five minutes and it was an epic battle in that rice and we'll go though is just the trophy but sign ex. Justin trophy is really bad because it's outside. The podium at lemond is he's like no other podium of ever experienced is real magical place to stand alone to win and be on the top step just to go out on that podium is incredible place and the first time to build this upset. It was one of those things where i felt a little bit sad. I could share it with everyone else in the team because he was such a big event for us a big win in two thousand and seventy it was nearly overwhelming and the emotion similar emotion it was when a completely different won the london marathon coming across the line in london. Matheny was similar so that was a big deal and so is such much much probation. My parents come to many races but do remember one. Year wasn't a year when we had a win but it was before that on a podium. I have no idea idea to this day dot gov there but as you turn around and walk off the podium. There's a gloss as a room above thing and there's dad tapping on the window. I don't know how he got himself but it was really pretty strange thing to say but lovely to say something but it's amazing you must've aw l'amour was ready to easy and you'll i six visits. You've finished on the podium five times. It was a remarkable run of of of success of course some missing trophies name because the first podium there there was no trophy. I've ever them for the winner of the class. They were the only ones that trophy so the second pitcher by not missing trophy but it was zim. There was less 'cause n._j._i._t. One of that tone or less competitive car so if you make the end of the race there was a good chance you could. The podium where now is so different is like if you if you go down a couple of minutes it's unlikely you're going to be on the podium and especially the last two years the safety cars of resolve the g._t. Off so two years ago the porsche just a nice buffer because because they just happen to be in the right place tom when the safety car came out so yeah but then it was probably easier if you kept out trouble and just got the car to the end you'd you'd be in a good position position sunday top five in the classroom. I accident that you raise them on the d._v._r. One this with any manufacturer there are few calls throughout his paired. I heard that just kind of have that little bit more shocked by what was it like to drive. A runaway says good things about it. He's still my favorite car full full stop and shop driven a lockers and cars lots of different periods and i'm lucky now to do things like goodwood and i get to drive older cars and appreciate always and modern cars going free been really lucky with the amount of cars of enjoyed over the years but the d._v._r. Nine is always going to be my absolute favor. Aver the five fifty ferrari was built by the same company of pro drive and it was it was a fun car to drive but they took all that learning from that car. I've a couple of years of racing and then they had time with the db db nine to make it into the race car. It wasn't in a rush project. We were offering running. I think the design before we start at the beginning of two thousand four bio table. We had a car and we're out running at donington. That was the first day of testing the car and strike out out of a box. It felt superior. It felt like the next level of what g._t._1. Racing was going to be about and the reason. I love driving those cars cheese. It had a sequential gearbox. You had to halen tahoe. So you still out the involvement. It had a lot of horsepower not so many electronics in the car and good era plus taja were fairly consistent about there as well so there's a lot of things about that period that meant those cars were really special being part of that program from day one and also the impact of solve not that they ever had anything to design actress catch something like that but it was more of you you know you were involved with the economics off the car from the design of the early the build up in the factory before we went to the racetrack so that was really nice to be involved with that to everything is simple and easy to appraise as possible and completely completely different. We're only talking. I'm going to use we talk maybe fourteen years from from that point of view fifteen years and the environment energy to current g._t._e. As completely different to g._t. One was so that call me an occasion at the chance to get back in one and it just feels like home having spent so many kilometers behind the wheel it just fills block of going home in that car so love it just still enjoy the rosen as much despite the reduced physical involvement i think is more mentally taxing now than it was before thermal buttons more bonds. More procedures is involved. More pressure is definitely more pressure your as a driver your analyzed more in your performance. The more data to this involved the more teams can look at it and so we've lost a tenth there. What what are you doing that. Excuse you talking about. You know there was no data so you could get way. You could make anything you know. You have to trust what you said definitely not. The case is the opposite and quite often. They point things out to you and that does make sense. It's a completely different driving experience to what it was before. An overseas paddle shift thinned dry car control with a._b._s. and g._t. Traction control and all these elements but it means you have to focus more on them to optimize them so it's just a different kroft than it was before but we definitely under more pressure to perform at every point and so when you're watching racing on t._v. Things you hit the commentators talking about all that going to stop you mentioned procedures and the call just tell us a little bit by what those are because i'd deny my procedure if gone off the tracks but it's quite it's quite complicated tonight. Thanks to shake that said we have like a big war. If document is something we as drivers to remember every element of that document document not so good so we sat down and every now and again to go through the steering wheel which panel and our dash so we get tested fairly regular on you know. Here's a picture of your steering wheel with no indication. Each of the buttons are and you've got to a write down what they are because when you sat in the car you can glance and are neat that you can have a little look at the buttons and it's just you know roughly where you you need to make sure that we're fully gym with everything and too so it's subconscious we get this test and then the switch panels got twenty-one buttons on that they must be john fifteen on the stairwells and there's lots of things on the dashboard in that so they're basically making sure shaw given any circumstance on in the rice with any issue with the car we know what to do because if the right radio files then you might because they thing is get the callback whatever happens in the race callback so they want you to be completely self sufficient to understand what's needed to get kalpa in case the radio fires. There's understanding those procedures to to get through in the right. Selfish is fairly easy. It's like you go fuel and arm and you have a point on the circuit. Which is if the fuel alarm comes on before that point you box. If it's after that point you've got one and that's and that's on a normal racist luna's a bit different because the regulations means. You can't do more than fourteen laps in our car so there's less to even think about that point but you still be self sufficient in case the radio goes down. That's the the hokey of it ready. Side of the nat- the procedures are fairly so you make adjustments to what what the car bright bars basil elements that you can change a little things little tricks in the gearbox election so like as tie wears increases. The stink goes on. You'll have more issue with real came so you can use to break boss. Maybe go forward but there's there's a point where it's to food so you can do things with the engine that will help with relocating as so. There's all these things that parameters that you can adjust to try and make sure you optimize as the call at every stage of the one stint. You're probably going to be in the car. Have you had any particularly difficult carl rescues or anywhere else in strings strings in the countryside somewhere with a spanner. I've had hunt the worst. One was nurburgring twenty four hour. I think we're on yokohama's that year and ah at a blowout and overseas. It's a narrow track. There's not much area to work on so all the cars if you didn't twenty four hour racing you have two kids in the car. There was no way because i still probably sixteen kilometers from the pits at this point. There's no way i'm going to get all the way back up the hill with this blowout support over to the edge of the track learn about tar construction in the forty five minutes the oeste while the edge track with my little junior hacksaw axel and some cable ties snippers so i was trying to cut off the star so i remove it and then get going again and so i was cutting through the rubble with my actual oh and then i'll go the bead that there's a metal bead isn't it didn't know about off two minutes of cutting through the rubber. I got to the beat. The point is a martial car behind twenty four as is proper cowboy talk racing. They're not gonna worry instant. Call behind you an black with a yellow flag and let crack on and try and do your job after forty five minutes of sweating by the edge of the track events she goes. You're not gonna get three three. They will hacksaw blades gone blood. Little snippets of god is now broken and he's with you and there's a there's a small gap and then the team can come and give you a new tie they had pitched up out on the circuit so i've had that and he's a race engineer for four now but he it was already in the works and he's a great writer engineer but we're having shift issues with the the i five fifty and add by two flat shift. You had to cut the ignition so back then it wasn't done on a load cell in the top of the galley was done on a little optical light things that lever moved it broke the beam and that gave up so you could do a flagship so you didn't have to come off when you went on gays anyway these things start playing up which trait in a misfire so i'm on the most end and they can see a little bit in this quite crude telemetry decor and i'm describing what the problem is and okay misfire is better if from holding the labor or something like that so then he's like okay so i need you to do as pull the reverse gear cable off the back of the gearshift and then you can remove the l._e._d. And do the two men to hand job and you need and allocate and then he was annoyed and how's it looking at thinking. How can i account. I can't do it anyway. We saw soldiered on until the pitstop but it the fact that he's got his head to be able to do it. Hold the stimulus of rich crossing toolkit yeah. That was probably the worst but you car gets damaged any twenty four hour race. Don't give up you know fight into the bitter end to try and get it so you can drive back and if you see some of the accidents especially like the audi's commend the prototype audis they have a huge. John is all be will one will point in one direction another meal will missing and one wheel drive and they still get the thing back and it's like now <unk> out because the colorado and that whole attitude to twenty four hour race is is part of the joy of don't give low nowadays if you've if if you've lost five minutes on track you're not going to go but it's even now one of the last parts of our briefings is we want to get to the finish said do whatever raised to get the cost of the venture now become sort of with you and not talk about olympic one astor did go on and p one racing which is a very phone calls of my memories having teen your wheels for twenty twenty four hours which you didn't even know such as your bonds with the team and said tell me right stepping up to that and there was a star for two thousand nine and two thousand ten but very different machine and you're forcing the front you taking calls draw than watching mirrors that call was magic to open as well and so many nice event and lemond included remember spa for one one of the one of the six race there and we got punch on a parrella installation so i had to box before the race even started. It's a right at the back as it went green and i can just remember the first off five laps cutting through the g._t. Cars and the l. n. p. cars and getting getting back onto the olympia one. 'cause i remember thinking it's like a game. This is just like a game the way that it's so much faster than everything else and and then he comes through and it's effortless to drive serving so that particular two thousand nine two thousand ten th it was a great experience to be an olympian obviously with a v twelve petrol you needed to be in a diesel and that point but even so i think the monarch best lap was two or three seconds off of the diesels were doing at the time so is considering. It's such a small program and done on real really small budget. It was gained david and goliath type experience in terms of we weren't ever going to be on the level of the diesels. At least we could show and the nice thing is the car sounded epic and even now i can if on a demonstration or sometimes at lemoyne recently they've had the mount in the aston support rice and you can hear malls way okay. That's the one in college such a beautiful sound and i think i remember it and if it's true or not but i can remember someone signing the design office okay. We're not going to win outright pace but he's got a look it could and is going to sound good and paul. Exhorts was done in such a way to make sure that was maximized as well so three seconds. We probably got the performance for for a great sound but is it was a great book is still quite basic inside when you jump back in it now and again at the chance to drive it recently. It's how much these cars move on and how quickly they move on and ask them well she. That was a highlight dr l. n. p. one that particular adam be one and then we came back in in two thousand eleven and that was a bit of a low light in terms of estimations history since two thousand and five but it was brave and and black a budget like time and that was the result but it was one of those things that we saw shelved moved on pretty quickly amongst the historic look if you've driven. Have you had a chance to drugs. Nineteen fifty-nine winning the winning con- i did drive the deal one at goodwood festival speed up the the hill and i've driven it recently lebron just from the curse re rouge. I'm back against filming a bit of experience with that car and there's a a number of calls from that period that i've had the chance to get on the world. The deal considering it's completely open is still so hot inside the car. Nowadays they really concentrate on the heat transfer between the engine by the carpet. There's so many different materials used to make sure that minimize and all these things that make a big difference but obviously then engine can up the bulkhead and that was it and the film at the moment it was probably late twenties and and i was surprised my feet were hot on the pedals so gave you some idea what they were going through back in the day and the still still cannot get my head around is they did those races two drivers. I don't know how they did it back. In the day we're just too it's hard to drive on driving on the limit and then having to do twelve elven minimum twelve hours in the rice teammate so different old together and very i like driving because it gives good understanding of what racing was back in days and the level of driver talent as well. You happy though that you grew up you started racing when you did. Would you think you'd have preferred oh tough to safety. I think more out school. I i think right now my racing is becoming more sanitized and there's a lot of people say that strike decipher is the better than everything else but i also think of the pill is the risk and challenging yourself with that risk compensation that comes up a lot. There's there's a balance and i think we've gone too you too far this moment the cost safety keeping proven that and everything else but if they keep removing the challenge of the circuit and the spectacle than than it just becomes becomes a fairly mundane sport really and is always your choice to go and race and even if i wasn't a professional. I'd still be racing still find the money somewhere to pay for me to go racing because it's the thing the i love an enjoy the competition i enjoy finding my limit. I enjoy understanding the car and oversee trying to make the most of it so yeah. One of the things from the british going pre this weekend and it was a huge news. It's news where they bought the gravel trap closer to luffield on the exit and he thought well. It's great that they've done that. I really liked that. They've done that but it's a shame that went away why in the first place and they just put concrete there and everything else because you gotta have an area to work in and then when you go over it. It's it's got to be a negative and i think we always talk about runoffs everywhere. It's there's no penalty for mistakes now other than if you get attract limit which is so boring you know rather have a big fight on the grass. Hopefully not hit the barrier. Get the thing under control lose five seconds myself and then get on the track rather within this is beginning to get a moment. I'll just open this doom us a bit. Tom i can then get away with a panel or might not get a penalty so thing so you've just yeah i think i probably would've enjoyed racing back in the day by joy thing. He's racing racing the thing i really like. He's getting the experience with the goodwood revival and classic next weekend as well because the 'cause don's. That's the thing about like float. They move around on the straight. They don't want to break. They don't wanna turn. You're you're in this constant dont with a floating car and it's really nice to get one of those old cars on that sort of drifts and just start to move around round where modern courage is pretty much agree. Even any your annual is is negative on laptops or you're just trying to keep it within this restraint of always limited lawsuit revival you raise the fourth quarter twenty one and then scott driver the meaningful to get watchful eye but is it those calls utah just on the weekend and you're showing the call before qualifying and you get into that andrey sale and quality cajun's as you've got your calls the race but it's quite a difficult thing. You've got an owner there watching you and a very different thing too big of a a professional driver is optimal is my weekend off as just looks real name because i want to enjoy my wife loves ickes the dressing up in the ball and everything else so it considering. How many weekends away anyway it's nice to get a free pass. They were always a a provider saw my so that she can come and mike nice weekend and the drive is wives and partners down there as well so it's a great atmosphere for sure you turn up at some stage in the first last time you'll see the car will be qualified and the owners. I guess if the i think the reason you get invited back is because you respect the on your calls all the time of race. There are only a few scratches on a couple of cars no big damage or anything like that so that should you should stop enough of a reputation with other owners. Okay you can put them in the car because he's he's not gonna. Put it in the wall hopefully and you know that i don't want to get to the point where i'm good and it's all about performance because then it's a work weekend and why like is every time i get in on an older car. They're there for the same reason if suddenly i don't own a sane you've got to win. This race probably like okay. You need to find someone else to do because that's not what that weekends about for me. It's about enjoying the the event enjoying the cars and enjoying the owners as well. Last year is a ham more. I think which is a first time i had experience can anchor so go ask bike goodwood. If i would drive it and okay well it was more. I think the way that we would find that. We really appreciate if you drive this car. Which is basically please drive otherwise we invite you next year really early friends. I'll drive this time and then someone. I know found out that i was driving. You sure you want to drive that car and i was like it was the wrong with their animals. Those whole canam car random moves and that one in particular is not really known and a few dryness of difficult carts drive. We're not checked into the hotel on thursday night. I think so marcus pie at the reception. Usually you wanna draw really nervous and then the next day was qualifying starting to qualify and and so went went out and as soon as i see co ties on you go out and collect near you go turn shot right to join the circuit and the thing just lit up a little bit of throw coach is bolton erupted behind me and i was like oh my god i thought this is going to be the worst i think fifteen minutes qualifying of my life and but then temperature in the toes more more comfortable than that three someone put down so that was pretty much end of of qualifying but somehow ended ended up third on the grid quite happy with that i met in this call it's an animal and ended up third on the grid and then i had a great race rob huff off pretty poor star but i was just glad not stole it post and then got got a bit of a rhythm going and then had a good good scrap. We've robin and came in second seconds. I was not really happy with that but the really enjoyed that we came was the d._b. Two because one of the guys that but one of the db four continuations friends going to enter a dna at goodwood would you yep great perfect and so this d._b._2.'s had a long history of racing and so i was texting got the number texan the owner and we're going to little protest down at goodwood for you and why guy tony will be there to the co okay great so arranged to go down to goodwood turn up and i'm looking for a race transporter of historic racing team looking around no nothing and then in the corner see this old land rover with a db two on the back of a trailer but it's not like a cartwright. It's one of those farm iphone ones that you've put that can't be solved so i wanted i ever and this chirpy chappy tony. You've been running the cars for years and years and years you buzzing about his car and it was really nice to spend the dove in because he had so much love and affection for his for his d._b. Two or not his d._v._d. But the d._b. Two that he was running so we had a good day just testing but wants. I want to show what the performance would be like against the rest of the so then came to the revival left the clinton area who knew race cars that hamburg's new to me so the home colours lines and i can't i was going around thinking this. It's the smell denting scraping talk. That's neither just burning them. So there's the smell uh-huh maybe tony's put new brake pads in and that's just forgot to tell me that we came in and something going on on the front row for the for the race and then twenty dropped when he's looking at the drums and how everything is and get put in the car on the handbrake still on and he goes back. Oh no no no so he had to go point a car original evening so on the on the sassy go and find a guy. I think fifty miles away had a db two standard road car debbie too tight drums and the pads or the bat some drums. There's chooses us off that we had someone else. He's drums shoes on for race day relied on on the front of the grid and there's sam tool of three five six next door so he's on pol. I'm sitting down and thinking still can just getting a little rhythm and it'd be nice little little rice he stills so if i didn't make dinner at the best stocks were dropped a few places and then finally go back into the lead the screens at goodwood a great because you can see the racing especially in one of these really old cars because they're quite slow more time just avenue look so i knew sam in the three six must have been doing well because every time i saw the two screens i could see three five six and then i'm trying to see what the timing screen the ball and they're not funny are picking him up in the in the mirror as well odd please. Can i just get in this race and i closed weave in five seconds so he had a fantastic light just went around around but it's really nice to get a win especially tony in colorado because it was it was for them is a big thing that there was was a at goodwood and i just got to enjoy enjoy that and the car that weekend says okay. It's really nice if untested varied career into the modern machinery other circuits yet. You'd love to raise that you've never visited so. I think now is there's multiple. I'd like to go there. I missed out in the o._t. Dean wanted british touring cars because there was a clash american one series rights so as a bit gutted about about that and macau although i've been to macau many times just to watch fringe racer and just have a good time of not actually done in many taxi so i think the two circuits left did have first on my list. I was lucky enough to go out. Company is gone and get to enjoy that raise as well so now. It's just those two two seconds really one car one circuit. We'll get us. It would be the deal annoying and it'd be eh it'd be. I think noise life just because i don't think anyone's other g._t._1. On the noise off so i think it would be nice live and this year. We had lebron one weekend following. We can number twenty four out for twenty four hour rice. You can't be any more different a huge pressure and big crowd. Everything's analyzed. I wouldn't say it's the most enjoyable event is definitely the special event in terms of what it means to the teams and the drivers and everyone involved but enjoyments taken out probably because of the pressure involved in in performance thing then the next week you go to twenty four hour and it's the complete opposite is secure enjoyment because every lap is completely random. You don't know what's around the corner. It will be crazy. They'll be stuff stuff that happens and you lie. I kind of believe that's just happened and they're still letting us race. <hes> the weather on seoul through that at least the things to worry about a lot. I think the first time we did number twenty four hours. A mini had a big chunk is on fire but as we is it known as you came down the foxhole oh thing area the minis on fire. You know it's like the drive stood there looking annoyed the next time because there's no immediate lat next time become round the fis out but the mini just sort of a wreck but then the tracks completely covered in water where they've doused the things that's now big problem problem because you can and then you've got around the next nothing all gone. Minis gone was gone because it's such a big lap and it takes a long they can have a cross cross always accidents and two laps on. There's no safety car. It's literally a slow down in that little period and then you're free tailgate old school rice and that's what's so magic about having some safety vehicle safety vehicles there are big can truck looming. Go down at the same time as you could possibly breakdown recovery truck and then there's an intervention vehicles which agenda just a some sort of a streetcar weaver yellow on the top and that they're there to help if you need to to help an to let people know that as you're coming up on that so larry that there's something going on but the biggest thing is because it's such a big circuit. There's thousands of martyrs involved and like modernism on the ray stretch succeeds everything where that track because it's so big is like how i presume. It's always used to be where the marshalls are self sufficient to appoint so they've go to assess what's going on then make a decision on what the right procedure should be and because of the slow zone areas and stuff ain't gonna make it happen so it's always clear what's going on and then the amount of college i think the one tom did it was like two hundred and ten cars in the race. There's a law caused get through the level of the causes huge level of drivers the difference in drivers this huge as well so weird stuff that goes on the wouldn't experience vince liberal now. We're going to come to readers questions and second now so do do you have a think about what you'd like to ask. I thought it'd be qantas just bringing up style weary of opening a a kind of worms with just a few minutes left but <hes> can you just kind of tell us what happened to the mall this year because you put on pole and then you saw the opposite balanced performance and g g racing so we'll call it. A kind of level died and then in the race. You just drawbacks doc u._s. Saddled with so much white about right so it's a source of the in the w._b._z.'s he's w._a._b._c. championship. There's a the up and you have to have bought for g._t. Rice and so one of those things that i want to hike but he's like if we didn't have the racing wouldn't be as good budget would be through the roof and this keeps gives more manufacturers the chance to be involved with g._t._s. asian if there was and i bought you wouldn't have a b._m._w. On the great you know the call wouldn't fit within that so all the performance window as it has done for the season so you've got to have have that mechanism his in the for many years the bops been a little bit who shouts the loudest so what they've done is come up with a mechanism for all the w._c. Races where it's an old type up so they take certain laps and drivers and they work out what the difference in the cause was and there'd be monir justin's from rice to rice and it could be two kilos or it could be a very small difference in horsepower. Maybe four or five horsepower so that's the thing as the season goes on the performance between the cars get closer and closer because the auto brings it so the hardest thing is when a new car comes into the championship because i don't know where to pitch it to start with and it takes a few few races for them to understand where its performance window is and then that's what happens any new car coming in if they pitch it to high in its bop formats is likewise coming into one straightaway which would be a good standpoint so generally cost of now a bit below the mon because it's completely different from the circuits. It has a standalone baugh all figures etc so this shit look quite close. Everyone's fairly close laptop informants in the wednesday and thursday night mauka goes out and he goes out early on the thirty pops timeline no traffic no yellow flags and it's a good time he did a good lap use the taj world. I think he had a total and a couple of streets so you think that's brilliant. That's been great lap and then other cars. Go out strong and beat it so we're waiting two hours thinking inevitable. We're not going to be on pole because other people are now gone out new toys. Every time people were guy now they'd get yellow flag back or they'd get traffic but you can see from the times that the performance is there from nearly every manufacturer and quite often. If you put together a rolling lapse maybe not line to line from rooster tete rouge people done quickly up to half a second quicker than what marco done so. I think he ended up in po- by ten into something and you think are still fairly close and is close because people were able to get quicken so con con imagine there's going to be any change inch to the bop during friday and there was and effectively if you look at what are much gap change was is just over second informant to our detriment. I think they just changed boost. We had effectively so we're already on the for nikki did a good job of the beginning of the rice citron. Hold everyone everyone out but you could tell once. Everyone got up to speed them into the rice. Because then i point trying to be a hero and let one because you know gonna win lemond on that one so you can tell once the the other guys were getting up to speed and come from the cars they came pass and and oversee the ninety five ninety seven muso gone backwards at this point and if we were going backwards extent because of what happened with the change in the friday so back it completely had all over and it was done on friday and we're trying to make the most of it and you don't want to give up you get the bulk change but you still feel like there's a chance we can we can still do this but it was evident after one hour that wasn't going to be the case and and then unfortunately alex had a moment with a pasta p. One car in the porsche curves must've been around when that i only only just at the home because i was about to get in ninety five so he had a moment he was able to get the callback so they're repairing the car in in the garbage average and then it will win on the t._v. because market going in the war and he had a technical failure basically under breaking and it was a it was a big accent so the call was out on the spot they noise have run into gain and that went to the flag but hopes equality of lapsed down at that point so the the disaster started on friday with the bob changing per nice two thousand seventeen was an amazing year for us at the moment new car two thousand eighteen exactly what you'd expect. I is the second race car straight into a twenty four hour race. We didn't have outright performance book to get any any call to the flag and in two thousand four rice in the second race. He's a big achievement to get both of them there without any issues because we didn't have the performance the technical i was like drive the car as hard as you can hit everything you can hit on curbs and stuff like that because we're not gonna always freedom absolute freedom because we're not gonna win it on price so we should use this as a learning experience for coming back in nineteen and we did the performance but it was taken away writes. We've got laura hit. He's gonna roving mike. I'm so if you've got a question is worth. Please put your hand up all the time. Wary lorde has won the front. I'm very worried that we've we've only scratched the surface feel free to to hide. I'm amazed at lemond the speech you guys do an account comprehend. How you get your car in the position. Barren mothers 'cause varity. How how how far ahead do you have to think because you get the car right to get the next corner. Wherever how'd asking the question driving's a bit like dot to dot so you build up your reference points around the circuit where so you know and they they adjust to do with tire wear and fuel load right so that's the thing that is adjusting but we're not talking huge amount would maybe ten meters or something like that so you start to build up a picture of the circuit and it can be a bump. It could be a mark on the wall. It cabela's line surface changes. There's a million things around the circuit that you can use for reference points and that's how you build up the picture around the track and get the consistency so there's a lot of fail experience using the sort of <hes> elements around the track as reference points to build up that that's all rhythm for driving the track and then you just might be adjustment for new ties or ties and full few low fuel etc so that's what's going on with just driving the track but then there's lots of variables that are happening every lap. We've people overtaken you you overtaken bits of other people so you might not being the right spawned tracts. You got to take into account. The level of the same areas they bumps over that i don't know about is going to be okay and all that stuff the hardest this thing and traffic management is one of the most exciting things about sports car racing because you got four classes doing our own race but still the big race that's going on which is all of us and traffic management is is key to being good at sports car. Racing drivers come across to it from secrecy is and they hate it. I hate other classes because it ruins the purity of their. I love it. I think that's part of the skill set required to go sports car racing needs to it'd be out to focus to manage different 'cause doing to use the body language of the car to work out. What driver is what they're trying to tell you as well. If a <hes> defensive if they're going to let you go and stuff like that and it's one of the skills he's like looking in the mirror trying to work out. What car is and then predicting where that caused going to. Ah take you especially with the ellen because so you could start to build up plan. Maybe it's a columbus to down the road. That's going to happen but you've already start to think about it. I'm what you're gonna do. When that happens things so yeah that's part of the fun of it and you don't get it all the time and you'll see tom's win. Slow a causal been overtaken and the most efficient way to do it is not to fight at the corner. If you're especially when you've been overtaken by car on a different class is to just come out and throw for a second second straight. Let the car overtake because then you'll both do the corner quicker. If you try an outbreak each other for the apex stuff you'll lose two seconds and the risk factor goes through the roof so sometimes it's better concede sometime down the straight to make sure that you just might the most of overlap term so it's so highest speed game of chess going on but it's fun any more questions viewing now uh can can. I ask you all vikash. You've driven right back to the single seaters which is one. You've most disliked. I've never had that question. <hes> crossed this holiday because the thing is even the ones crowd this still fun because you've got to learn how to drive it. The first car had was a former first round myself which in principle should be rubbish. He's next to transverse engines for that and the other day like it like a bus or something like that but it was it was horrendous. Fantastic is reasons. That was yeah it. It was a difficult did you did you racist yeah. I mean there's been caused. How's that been bad because the south wasn't on the dial tawes went right but he's been anything that has been particularly oracle rice cows. Ah good even the bad ones good because it's still erasing accents other. Another couple of noise was one hair then we'll work our way back i don sportsman in most fears of spall coached even when the top game so to you talk racing drivers get get coached is happening in a lot of the entry level now. That's the norm where styling did the jim russell racing school at donnington and and then you had some coaching there and then that was it by she learned he'll tell you one apex was and understeer and away you go make sure much you paid so you've done you weeks and that was it but now it's it's very common for driver. Coaches is a big market. They're older drivers running reasonable ah over ladies because coaching younger drivers but we tend to at a high level always is more self tool in terms of especially in sports car racing. Can you got teammates to work off so we got six drivers. The rodent things slightly different. You've got the data you've got the video so if you're not happy with what where your promises homies as you got all these tools to help yourself to improve it and you've got the experience to be able to look at it and say okay. That's what i need to do for that so it. It doesn't seem to be common in the top level in fact. I don't really know anyone who walks around with the driver coach certainly in the lower formulas this this is fairly common but we've all these tools that you can analyze your performance makes easier so that's maybe why there's not so many coaches in the tall a i think there's a couple of rows back on that thinking you've mentioned that some one weekend was this is twenty four hours in the morning the next week in green twenty four hours so that type squawk fit person to do that already magin. What would be your a to fitness regime. Yeah could make something in the gym but very drug fit because of pretty much driving all the time and then i i tried to find something as a target like the marathon orlando and jonah something that means. I've got to try to do stuff and random. We a health check or finish check from the team beginning of the season at the moment and is a very somehow i'm able to trick it goes numbers or i'm just very naturally fit so most of the drivers some training program but generally odd doc. It's the next day of sign early. The next day <hes> actually not doing something racetrack is the sixth of august so then it's like to try oy and fin fish program will not one day. You know. It's just a dial off. I want to go home and see the family of some tom. Tom just do nothing so then because the rest of the time in the same yesterday in the seem to today tomorrow thursday fly disbar spa thirty forty study sunday into barcelona monday tuesday wednesday then silver classic then stood japan for to join something in you could ah but it would be a token gesture so i think because of all the traveling around the driving them doing don't ever find them. I'm alvin energy in the car and i know from we run hot right monsters. No unfairly loan lazy on the will or i'm just quite relaxed so i'm not really over one hundred and four on the heart right there so in the car so the biggest thing for me as a driver change. That's when i'll i'll get my peak heart rate the driver change because you've got an explosion of energy to get in and out and you don't want to screw up so there's a little bit nervous energy as well and then and then in the car unless it's a big scare or something then it's sits at one thirty. One forty i excellent question is actually one behind you and then we'll come to darren say the vowel creates inaugu silverstone at the weekend. Can you see yourself driving. You'll be part of some of that development program with the car so chris goodwin's like the lead engineer lee test drive over my car so most of it'd be done by chris but there's always a period when you go to high speed your ability tested so i was involved with that with volkan volkan a little bit with the ford g._t. Continuation as well so you'll head down south of italy and one of the proven grams around there and they just want to philip if you'll send it and just keep going round and round and round and round and put the malls on the call and the columbus is on the call so that point. I'll get a chance to be involved with that program so yeah. I've been to the workshop in the last couple of weeks to see the bill before it went to seal. It's an incredible incredible car. It looks amazing. Obviously we everyone sort of on the footage photos that have been so from from silverstein but when you got up close to see the detail then you can really appreciate what that car truly truly is and what he'll be in history as time goes on is amazing absolutely amazing. Now i spent a good hour just looking around and looking at the detail bits and the materials and just can't really put into words just how incredible the car is so it'd be great to to finally get beyond the wilbur that might be in the next couple of months as well. I'm not going to see in the next couple of months. It's over the anymore anymore. Questions yeah absolutely no pressure right because i'm the host of having to actually actually off your fastest team night. The bruins of course jon andrews must've been one day and everyone super i. I'm currently not nikki's is super boston the team he's able to get some great laptops out of the call garcia tony garcia he was. He was pretty damn special in the in the g._t._1. Call as stephon stephan so. I have a very good friendship steph. I'm worker and we spent a lot of time together. Ease the columbus driver. I know alpha call one of the noise. He's no as well out of the car and you know we were pretty similar. In terms of where our strengths were and so we guy and another false driver more recently dinu sarah from brazil <hes> <hes> he was just one of these guys that you could just put in any race color and you would fall in the limit and be be super fast so yeah and then there's a <hes> like people like joni added. Just does an incredible job every race. Just put him in waco so i've never had anyone that wouldn't wouldn't want to share a car with anyone well sangha but thomas he's he's deathly all or nothing you know it will be a big crash or a massively fast lap time and that's great to watch less fun when it's your car so he's a guy in great team. I love them so yeah. There's anyone that really comes to mind didn't enjoy eighty something from an is politically correct in. I'm not a good make something i hated. Imagery is rubbish but there's no one that i've ever ever seen. I've gone account that but they've done a massively good job to do to do what they've just so. I think that's the thing we get to professional national level. Everyone's has days. They want us slightly off days gemini. Everyone can perform at the same level good second one. Is we know your call going and you've had in the past. We've had a walk around the showroom in workshops tonight. Which which call would you like to take tonight. It's the one seven seven above got the cable ready. I don't know if you knew that the secret squirrel at that way so luckily of driven one once before ah he's really beautiful beautiful onto you. Sign can take it goodbye. Phrase the question dr tonight so i don't know if you've heard about the mortgage excellent got anymore any more questions. I don't to see two questions. What she you off the next then it's going to be a rolex what's what's that one and the second thing is as a marathon runner. How do you train and what's your time for london. So the watch thing is obviously we're. We're relying with tycoon so i'll be looking for one of those next. The rolex zeal from last year was was a huge treat to get driver of the weekend and the revival so i wasn't expecting that and the funny thing was oversee houston texan. Don't leave because i didn't even know there was a prize given at the end of the i also adds double check that you haven't made pumped up with anyone drive over the weekend. He actually crashed five people. I literally one one thing about the revival was and is the really wanted to do to to be in a position to the podium was to get the cigar. That was the only thing i've ever wanted it from. The revival weekend was to get this ago so that was the first thing and i thought that was the presentation at the end of the rice. You get gone. You know if she got so. I didn't know there was given at the end of the weekend so then you don't rush off his approach given some stupid nick padmore and he goes this is really good and the fastest just the guy that does the fossey slap at the weekend gets. A rolex is amazing. That's more frank. Saw rancor stood there waiting for the price cuban dude. You're going to get a watch. Monica is gone the weekend gets watch because how whatever i'm on the m twenty-five but there's a guy that he can hit you for in twenty minutes. I go up and get watch karoon. He didn't get the what that was like. A huge haege something i'll treasure forever that will be so and then the money beat light any training normally do like ten twelve overruns before and then broke up and so that was it. I always die running. It's slow out of blisters. I get halfway gets tower bridge and i wish i did some training. This would be easier so and last year was particularly so it wasn't the most enjoyable experience but at least she gets me out and i tried to put some ause under the field what till four thirty last year so it wasn't particularly did she did it with my wife. The i on her first guy was in the hottest marathon out there and she got the line and then the nice thing was as crystalline line all emotional crying in the game and see what you say. It's more didn't say that to a buzzer. I'll bet you next all really want to do that so i. I think we're gonna enjoy some point. This thomas i was fine because because of you start in different periods so so she used on in the slow group so she's always going to be behind me and she ran a bit slow so i had a good hour at the finish line and so that was nice and the sites you see people coming across crossed. The line was great from people in great enjoyment but to people that are throwing up and all that stuff so great asset for now and thanks relaxing. This is a good wife. Finally came crystalline excellent and we got anymore. Questions protect one more question. Anyone's got one aw if not good well. The darn is being an oxidizer wonderful stories. Thank you so much for joining us. It's it's been pretty. Aren't you will song so. I'm a very very intimate knowledge. Ever amazes me. Thank you nicholas may for hosting this wonderful events and for partners as well coskun sports point on and thank you you guys goes all turned up and joined. This was not a good night. We'll be around for chatting away. Thank you just aren't the.

mercedes ferrari aston martin london lemond Tom i racing d._t._m mark lemoyne darren turner nicholas Shaw london zoo boston aston martin motoring lebron
Rich Lennox: I came from a culture where I saw big ideas transform businesses.

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing with Bob Pittman

37:45 min | 1 year ago

Rich Lennox: I came from a culture where I saw big ideas transform businesses.

"Though we're apart. These days was sharing more so at Geiko. We'd like to say thanks. Thanks for sharing your savage dance moves. Thanks for sharing your diy haircut fails. Thanks for sharing your inner lip sync star. Now it's our turn to share with the GEICO. Give back the fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies for current and new customers, because we're committed for the law, the fifteen percent credit lastra full policy term visit GEICO DOT com slash, give back for more info and eligibility. You're listening to math and magic production iheartradio. When I arrive, sales were running a very promotional approach to meeting jewelry, and it was a simple truth. A man ever go down on his knee put his hands had here. Look Darling I got you a deal. Stop doing that doesn't mean the value is an important, but the brand has to mean something more than just simply bashing out jewelry at low price points. I am Bob. Pittman welcomed this episode of Math Magic Stories from the frontiers of marketing. On this episode. We have someone who's made his mark. One of the toughest sectors retail, and he brings a wealth of experience and insights force the CMO of macy's rich Lennox. He was born in the UK a military kid. He studied animals in college, worked with some big cats at the London Zoo for a year, but wound up in advertising. Instead he joined J. Walter Thompson right after sir, Martin. Sorrell took over and went onto a terrific career in the agency business that got him the US. He was on the De Beers business. Business and probably knows as much about diamonds is can from there. He moved onto his first CMO job at Zales and eventually to macy's where he has created ads. Stephen Saturday night. Live has parodied the ultimate mark of success. He loves horses and rugby. Welcome rich. Thank you. There's a lot to talk about, but I. I WANNA. Do you and sixty seconds ready? Do you prefer veer wine. Yeah, twitter or Instagram, Instagram New Jersey or New York Neil US or UK us. Oh, we won you over twenty years here. I think it's about time Kentucky Derby or Belmont Belmont country or city, country, lions, or horses, horses about to get harder secret talent, then com under Fara thing favored city. Florence smartest person you know. My Dad was probably the smartest childhood hero Chuck Yeager. Historic idol probably Nelson Mandela, proudest career achievement I think the tunnel. Rhonda's hills corporate my proudest career achievement to date proudest personal Jeevan. My daughter's. Vote to lose by one of my favorite quotes is courage doesn't always rule sometimes. It's the quad voice at the end of the day. Saying I will try again tomorrow. Who would play you in a movie? Probably, Shrek Shrek with an English accent for that Earth Job. Consultant I hated it. I was terrible. Okay, here's the last one. What did you WANNA be when you growing up I, wanted to either be in the military, or I want it to be a vet. I sorta described my career as a sort of bizarre series of accidents after that I never really imagined myself working in corporate, and certainly not behind a desk, and here you are here I am so with that. Let's get going. Let's start with macy's. It's really an amazing historic brandon retailing and I think it's probably the only retailer with those really big consumer franchises. They're actually embedded in American culture. macy's Thanksgiving Day parade macy's fourth of July fireworks and really the big. One your flagship store at Herald, Square here New York. You didn't invent these, but you inherited them. When you took the job. You look at those things. How did you think about them? The first thing you think about as a marketer is wow, they're amazing. The macy's Day parade is sort of unique in the fact that it's not something that macy's rights check for. It's something that macy's built. We have a parade studio. We engineer the floods near the balloons. The vast majority of people who are in the parade, our our colleagues, our friends, the first thing you do, you begin to understand the tradition. What is it that makes it so? So powerful, and makes it so beloved by America Re and a half million people on the streets of New York fifty million people spending a very important day with their family, watching it growing up in rural Mississippi in the nineteen fifties and the nineteen sixties, every Thanksgiving turn on the TV, and that's what we did. I think that's true today as it is for a lot of America, it is part of their Thanksgiving tradition, and so my role within. The parade and the fall work and operating around Herald Square is to constantly ask very talented group of colleagues. How do we move from good to extraordinarily good? How do you think about what brand permission you have to move it I mean they've got to be some limitations. I suspect you. It's some of the boundaries somewhere in something that. How do you think about that? Your challenge is how do you evolve, but main fruit to those core brand trees that are sort of Bait. Bait into the bronze, DNA and Sally when I was doing that. With two Bizet was something I was very very conscious of I was running a campaign that was ranked as one of the top in the last hundred years. A diamond is forever. You were seeped in the brand's DNA, and over time, and certainly macy's in the last three and a half years you begin to get an insured, if grasp for what is brand, right and warriors pushing the boundaries a little bit. But every so often you sort of have to flirt with those boundaries, and I think that's what makes it fun. So when you first started saying okay, let's think about this or this. Is Scare people. Yeah I think so. macy's was a company that a run a very successful retail model for a very long time retail marketing model. My job was to come in and create an environment where he established people stopped the New People Doing Dr Staff and the new, people stock the established people from doing the same old stuff, and that's a very powerful combination. If you can get it right. But absolately central to being able to create that dynamic is building trust with the teams that you're listening to both sides and that you're not just going to blow everything up and that you are highly appreciative and respectful of the work that has come before you. My job is to carry the torch further. You and the entire macy's team had been very aggressive in literally spending your time looking through the windshield, not obsessed with the rear view mirror. How did these institutions like the parade and the fireworks and Herald Square play into that plan? We run a complex model, really designed to sort of engage customers to move them into acquisition, and then to get into purchase, either on the ECOMMERCE platform more in the stores, but right at the center of it we have these amazing properties that really are huge acts brand generosity. The fact that macy's puts on a prayed for America or America is a hugely generous add. We don't charge anyone any money to come and see it. I've always said to people if you can begin to win the initial highground ground around bronze, a lot of the reengineering, we've been doing a macy's is moving from a transactional model to a relationship model harbor relationship model is making people like you as a Bryant and listening to them and having conversations with them as opposed to just bombarding them with messages, and the best examples of us engaging with the public and I. Really Unknown Commercial Way is the parade the fourth of July fireworks? You're in the middle of many transit. macy's and we touched on a few of them. Here and I want to get into that, but I I wanNA rewind the young rich. Let's Talk A. A little bit about being military. What branch of the service by the way was your father in? My father was in the Royal Airforce. He was an odd combination, because at the time in the royal airforce will, though he trained as an engineer, they decided that it would be a good idea to allow some engineers to fly planes, so they could get into them to see what was wrong with them. They don't do this anymore. Because it's too expensive to train pilots, but because of that he spent time actually flying Fox jets, which was amazing, and then after a couple of tours of duty transferred back to being an engineer, so I spent three his my life in Sweden. Threes freezing to death up in Yorkshire being moved around the country. It was an amazing way to grow I was very very fortunate to have that altered being a military kid. Does that make you different? I think say military people are amazing. They are all about service. It's sort of abuse you with a sense of the importance of the team and the spreader call, and even though I wasn't in it. I was sort of immersed in that from a very very young age, and the other thing is you become very flexible because you move literally every eighteen months to three years up until I was nine I was. Was Moving, and then when I was nine I went away to boarding school, which makes self reliant. You came of age in the seventies in paint, the picture of England in the seventies that era. It was a tough time. You had Thatcher you had. The coal strikes. He had the unions inland was tearing US apart, but despite it all the English have an amazing sense of humor, an amazing sense of resilience everything is always understated does matter how bad it is. Everything's with understated and bad has been a thing that is very much in my DNA anything from that stage of your life that you use today. Absolutely I spent the majority of my youth playing rugby which I loved. I always can tell when I worked with people whether they ultimately played in team. Sports or individual stores is colors. How people play because you're in such a pressure cooker in these schools, you have to learn to live with people you have to learn to. Accommodating and to be collaborative. So off, you go to university. Is Stories a right? You wanted to be a vet. I did, and where did that come from I. Just Love Animals I've always loved animals like we're labradors and I grew up with horses in England there was a famous series. Cool James Hera, which was about a your Chevette in the the sort of trials and tribulations. It was wonderful series. It was a really romanticized view of what being that was, but the result was in I spent six weeks, treating ringworm fleas, and not romantic. I realized it was actually quite a lonely job. That wasn't the type of person I. was. What in your university years? Shaped you the most? And, that stays with you today. What you gotta understand. His British university was very very different to American University in British. University you essentially teach yourself. You turn up too late shows. You have a couple of Utah Oriels a month. My professor would recognize me if his life depended on. Just do what you want to do, and we'll give you a set of exams at the end of the year and if you pass them, you get there and if you don't pass them, you fail and it's really sort of entirely up to you. But what undoubtedly shapes me? It was my friends of friendships that I made so you spent time at the London. Sue The big cat. Yeah had to be some. Really. That's probably a podcast and itself. Yeah, what did you do working with? The cats will harm my zoology degree in my final year was to do a dissertation, and I was specializing in behavioral studies and really quite. Quite cheekily I wrote to the head of the Zoological Society at London Zoo, and basically said look. I'm really interested in this phenomenon called stereotypical behavior, which is how animals exhibit and relieve stress in a captive environment. How do they really it manifests lot through the pace patents so when you're seeing an animal walker very repetitive Patton around his panel is a symptom is highly stressed. Stressed and what it's trying to you think about it is get normality with polar bears. You'll see them weaving their head so I go to spend three days a week for about nine and a half months working with a young Lana school to Anika, who is in Asia Law? They were trying to integrate into a pride of African lawns Lonzo amazing. They are so beautiful when you. You see them up place now I want to jump a little bit time for us to get your how I got started in advertising story. Okay, you join J, w. t just after Martin took over and began to build WPP, and really was a big shift in the advertising industry as a result of that. Did you feel like you're at the beginning of something big shift? I joined. Jada is an account planner, which is basically a business strategy or Brian Strategist at a time Jada. Ut had a rule that in order to be in the the account planning teams, the bronze stress she teams. You had to have ten years industry experience, either as a marketer, advertiser or media person, and then the guy who stepped in to run the department after Stephen King had left Stephen. King is like a legend in the advertising industry. He basically invented the discipline of account planning in the UK. Guy Who David Baker basically decided I'm going to see if I can train baby plumbers, so I was an experiment myself in a really good friend with the first junior baby planners that they ever brought into train from scratch. Did you prove it worked or fail? Well? I think my friend proofed. It works I think. Let's put it this way. I didn't mess it. It up so much that no one else ever got the opportunity, but my colleague that was brought in Lady Mary state went on to be very very talented planner, and when I came into Jay WC they sort of looked at me and said look. We could put an account planning where we could put you in account management so I did my first five years. In Account Planning and then I transferred to account management. How did you get an advertising? How'd you think of it? It doesn't sound like you had any interest in it in high school or College. And why did you pick up a magazine and say yeah, that's me. Advertising came out of university and I thought I was going to go into the army into three years short on commission, as luck would have it I kept damaging. My shoulder, which meant I couldn't take up the short on commission that I was being offered. As a stop gap I joined a company in London. That was a consultancy and didn't really like that very much, and my sister is a graphic designer, was spending a lotta time in and around agencies, and said to me look, you're either GonNa go off and try and be an investment banker. Wish you will hate or what are you a Samat agencies? It was the simplest the Hanukkah. Time advertising was amazingly. Joining Jay wbz in the late eighties, it was like arriving at the end of a really really good party. You realize that they had been one hell of a massively fun party, but it was sort of waning down and I think that's what Sorrell this sorrel came in, and took is amazingly creative companies, but not really very well run companies and put a lot of professional discipline into them. How did you learn advertising? Who taught you? Some of the best marketing strategies brains was sitting in the data to account. Discipline us. I arrived people, F, Jenkins and Bernadette knocks unbelievably talented brand strategists. Every lunchtime they used to sit in the open area and we'd eat sandwiches and I would just sit there and listen to them. Talk about brand strategy. It was like a PhD about. How do you create compellingly differentiated bronze? And how does strategy and creativity play together? What's the insight? And how do you then fund a compelling expression of that insight in order to bring those brands to Nice in? In customers minds knowing you as a marketer. You still use that today. Yeah, they sort of ingrained it on me. I was incredibly lucky to train that way. A lot of people coming through marketing. They do junior brown management tool. They do junior account management, and it's the so much process work in doing that. I go injected straight into the strategy side of it, which looking back home was. was just incredibly fortunate place to start. So how did you wind up at the beers and diamonds I did seven years. Jay WBZ London operating across London in Europe and this was a time when jaded London I. Think was ranked as the top agency in the world. The Daily Mail used to do the talk ten favourite campaigns in England. Jada bt had seven at ten. It was ridiculous but I. I always had this really huge desire to go to New York. Come and work in New, York so I went to speak to Chris Jones who was the worldwide head of Jada bt at the time immensely talented individual, and said to him I want to come to New York and he said Okay that's very interesting came back to me. Three weeks later said she wanted to go to Tokyo. I spent two years of my life and take which was an amazing working. Working on Warner Lambert WanNa. Lambert was the largest affiliate outside the US for Japan. I really wanted to two years because I didn't want to sort of become a fall eastern Asian expert I wanted to come and work in New York and when I came back Christine. Set Me I. Don't have a job for you at the moment. But the bears of just started working with Ben, consultants, and they need someone who has this O'Brien strategy within that port? Would you want to do that? And I said sure, but it really was a parking strategy. It was like until another big global J. WTI account came up I was about thirty, one, thirty, two at the stage, and I spent nine months working. Working with De Beers and I was walking down the corridor one day, and there were white Cmo, NCAA stopped me in the corridor, and said the individual who runs the neo. Corporation has just resigned. Would you be interested in the job and I spent sign me up. I often think if I hadn't walked down that corridor at that moment. What would have liked being? Just hold on a second because we've got so much more to talk about. We'll be back after a quick break. Though we're apart these days sharing so at Geico, we'd like to say thanks. Thanks for sharing you savage dance moves. Thanks for sharing your diy haircut fails. Thanks for sharing your inner lip sync star. Now it's our turn to share with the GEIKO. Give back the fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies for current and new customers, because we're committed for the long haul, the fifteen percent credit lasser, full policy term visit GEICO DOT com slash, give back for more INFO and eligibility. Guys it's bobby. Bones host the bobby bones show and pretty much always sleepy, because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. Wisher allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. If he possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stop by the hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W. M Q in Washington DC or wherever the takes you on the iheartradio APP. Welcome back to math and magic a tear more from my conversation with Richland. Tell us about this. Iteration of a diamond is forever campaigning. We talked earlier about the parade. The fireworks you've got Herald Square. You can either be afraid to touch them. Or you use them, and it sounds like you touched. Diamond is forever campaign. Talk about it and talk about how you manage to persuade people. Let you do that and what? The impact was the busy really amazing organization in very unusual organization, because essentially it was a group of miners. Group of marketers so they were digging out of the ground and enable persuading people that they needed it, and all of that was done in a jv venture with South Africa and Botswana Namibia, so the company that was really quite ahead of its time in terms of benefits and working to make sure that a natural resource was benefiting both the country and being commercially successful. When they asked me to come to America, the US market had stalled, it was essentially growing. I think about two percent a year at the time fifty percent of the world's words, Don's being sold out of America. So that was pretty scary I can remember being briefed by the worldwide Sierra de Beers guy called Stephen Lee sir. He's mentally talented is brief literally was we don't think the US market is gonNA. Grow much more, but don't screw it up. Your job is not a blood up, but when I got that, we started to go look. Domin forever is an amazing campaign. But what if we built big product stories that went underneath it. What would those products stories be? We started to engineer products rather than campaigns. The best example of that was the past present future. We did a lot of in depth research with consumers. We actually hypnotized man. I kid you not. We kept asking people in quant. Do you agree it's a good idea that give your wife at diamond anniversary gift? Yes, I do. Eighty percent of men agreed with that, but I only temps in a actioning on it, so there's obviously quite a big gap, so we go really fed up with this between what they were saying. They rashly doing, and so what we did is we arranged hypnotize a group of men and literally one of the exercises. We have been diet. We had them say you're looking out over a valley. Imagine that valley is a vision of your marriage drawer paycheck, so all the people who had given domin jewelry you had green pastures snowcapped mountains plowed DHS and the literally. Some of the guys who hadn't we have volcanoes rivers with sharks in them. It was absolutely fascinating, but what that led us to do. Say Look you call fix marriages, but what you can do a very good articulation of what men want to say, because men really on that particular and what we found women wanted to hear. Was I love where we've been a love where we are an committed to a future that translated into the full your posture President your future, which then translated into three stone diamond ring, which by the way was fantastic as rather than selling one time and you're selling. I'm was even more fantastic. It was easy to manufacturer, so we essentially went on a road show with the trade, and basically said look. We think we gotta get idea, and they said No. We've been trying to sell three stained rings forever. They didn't work. We said well. What if we could it? Hospitals and future and ran this advertising campaign behind it and they went. That's interesting, so we did it. The trade aligned and it became a billion dollar success literally within three months of launch. It was unbelievable. To me was a good example of how we stopped being marketers, and what we became as sort of like cultural engineers and product tension is to basically go. Okay, there's a need here. We can build a solution then we can market the hell out of so let's talk about another solution. I love market expansion ideas, right hand diamond ring. That turned out to be about a three billion dollar business. Yeah, every time. Yeah, who came up with that idea I? mean it sounds like a risky idea. That was a really interesting one. Because essentially minds are unpredictable things. One month they'll be producing lots of large rushton's that cut to one carrots, and then they can suddenly start producing a whole Lotta little diamonds. The bears basically, we're producing too many small diamonds, and we needed to find a way to create some market velocity underneath them. Someone had the Brealey Revolutionary break-through observation. The women have to Hans the left hand could be about commitment marriage. The right hand could be an expression of individual taste, and who I am. When we initially went to the bears, and said we got this idea. We're GONNA. Make the right hand about self expression. You can buy yourself. It's very design intensive, which is great because that will use lots of little stains. A lot of people thought it was heresy. They will hang on a minute. A diamond is forever. It's all about love women buying rings. This sounds ridiculous now, but. We're dealing in fifteen years ago. And there was a lot of nervousness around the idea, so of course we the sensible thing we went and spoke to women and women went debbie ridiculous I can absolutely reconcile in my mind that there dunst apart from other dominance, the water self expression. That's a great idea. Let's do it so on the simple premise of torture customer, Dane, go in with preconceived ideas. That was a really good example, and then the creative team came out with his really really good idea of women in the world razor right hand. It was a beautifully crafted campaign with great product that really was sort of pushing an open door. That's a great case study for market extension. Let's go to case study for transformation turnaround two thousand nine. You make a jump. But this time Mr Client your first CMO Job Zales. You had fourteen consecutive quarters of positive comparable same store sales growth until sales actually was acquired in two thousand fourteen. How did you do it? Mean this is your first time in the lane. Now it. You're the client you're making the calls. What did you do well firstly? I was high by really really. Talented Sia Theo Killian just an enormously talented, generous, smart leader that makes all the difference in the world and second. If you're going to get involved in turnarounds, you have to be good in a firefight. You have to be the type of person who actually runs towards fires robin away from them, and you've got to have that sort of combination of arrogance and naievty arrogance that you can succeed where others fell and Naievety that you can succeed where others failed. Is a very talented group of people. who were brought in to help? Fix it very be not company, but at the end of the day, the sort of the core of the Brown was still left. We started to do things really simple things, and I took a lot of the lesson from De Beers and that made the transition easier because I understood the category when I arrive sales were running a very promotional approach to making jewelry, and it was a simple treatment Amana ever go down on his knee push. Hansa had here look Darling I got you a deal. Stop doing that doesn't mean that value is an important, but the brand has to mean something more than just simply bashing out. Juliette, low price points I was very lucky in the fact that Theo absolutely got on board with that very quickly chief merchandising officer. You'll Honda the humble with that very very quickly. Those case Nutty of small company. It was about two billion dollars. It wasn't big. In real trouble, but a team of people coming together on. We're going to get this done, and we're going to get this done, because it's not just about share price, but it's about people's mortgages and is about car payments. There is a responsibility here as a group of leaders to get this right for the people that work for us. There were seventeen thousand people that were sales, and one of my proudest things is the the first year I was there. There was a fairly significant ref, and then there was never one often. So we got it right, what sales allowed me to do? Not just a marketer. It was about brand engineering's about business engineering. It was about team dynamics. You spread your wings a little more. You've jumped from this category. You're comfortable with being CMO at toys, r US or two years. Yeah, one insights. Did you get there that you still keep with you today as a marketer? Toes us was an amazing brand, and I had some really talented people working at it, but it was laboring under a debt. That was just crippling. Absolutely huge and I think it was sort of victim of the acquisition models that were developed in the early two thousands, which made a lot of people a lot of money, but left the companies that were standing really really struggling. I've been in the jewelry industry in the diamond industry for about fifteen years with two beers with bells, and what I needed to prove to myself was that I could take the call marketing skills as a CMO and transfer them to a cash grave. It was. Plastic an IP ideas so I went from talking to Donald supplies to Disney or Hasbro Mattel, and I learned a lot of good lessons. Some of them were very useful. Some of them would don't do that again. Those are usually the best lessons we really. Oh, so we're back to macy's yeah, it's two thousand and sixteen. Yeah, your new CMO. Yeah, you made some changes early on. Can you describe them? Talk a little bit about the big successes and also talk about some of the things you tried. It didn't work. When I joined macy's I was sort of the first external. See Sweetheart Boston and a long time. macy's had been enormously successful as a retailer. Putting on astronomical growth rates right up until about two fourteen to fifteen, and they've been doing that by running very high frequency promotional transactional model that was really the absolute central core of their marketing model. And what we started to talk about was this isn't the old model was wrong. It's just a dozen work today, and it doesn't work today. Because the media landscape is changing, so we can't run the same model. Immediate vehicles that we need were beginning to falter underneath them. If we were going to run that same model consumer's shopping habits are changing profoundly, so we need to invent a new model. We said look. We gotta get out of the transactional business, and we go to get into the relationship business and. And that really then said okay. We're GONNA designer of marketing model that's predicated on building, strong customer relationships and looking at l., the rather than what was the last transaction that you did then lots of things flowed out of that. We had to launch Orrin Loyalty Program. At the time. We were part of the AMEX assaults him around plenty, and we had to exit that and launch, Star rewards program. We had to start, nor just offering things that alert price. We had to talk about our products and editorial authority. Reinforced the fact that macy's is go good stuff so that when we put it on discount that pulls harder and when we put it on discount, there's a model where our best customers can be constantly engaged. Bryan Bryant and then on top of that. We had to blend in the parade and everything down and make it so the work together one of the things I love about retailers. The marketing ecosystem is so incredibly complex. You have a high. High Frequency promotional model which changed weekly. You then have a loyalty model credit model lead into a product authority in a bottle with coop, running right through the middle and e Com. Demont antics on the other side, so what that does is, it creates almost like a Rubik's cube of decisions that you have to flex between in order to get the optimum balance in your marketing models and that Rubik's cube flags. They some the cycle that you're. You're in that year. The Rubik's cube position the works of black. Friday looks nothing like the Rubik's cube that you're running for full fashionable spring fashion, so it's a sorta endlessly fascinating ecosystem to try and get that perfect WanNa calibration, which of course you never succeed in getting the hallmarks of your career seemed to be big ideas transformation, not afraid to take a chance. Probably many things don't work, but as you say you learn a lot from. From It. I know that's gotTa be scary to the people there. You've alluded to it a couple of times here. What kind of culture is necessary? What can I culture? You have to build within the marketing group and what can I culture does the company have to have to allow those things to happen? Well? I think the role of CMO's today is to do two things. You call it maths magic I. Call it the art of persuasion. And the auto position talking. But what CMO's also have to do is they have to be able to talk to Piss in the C. Suite. Particularly the offense CFO and translate what marketing is doing into business results. You have to be able to explain how you all driving marketing productivity and the investment decisions that you are making across complex media, ecosystems and complex marketing tasks in order to make sure that every dollar we spend his returning as highly as it possibly can, and you have to be brave. Brave in decisions because I don many marketers today, if any who are getting budget increases, which means that you've gotTa Bring Analytical, teams and data science, and all of the things that allow you to make data driven decisions around your marketing decisions, and then at the end of the day you got to understand is you can have the best targeting in the world you can have the best decision. You can have the best personalization if you have good ideas to put through them. You minimizing impacts of this campaigns. I forget who said it, but it's absolutely the best way to make a small budget work harder is have bigger ideas and I. think part of that is because I came from a culture where ideas were absolutely king, and I saw the power of big ideas to transform businesses. I'd like to get some insights. What is different about being on the client side from being on the agency side? You've both successfully agency side. You have a responsibility, but you don't have the same degree of accountability. I also think agency side the shear breadth of marketing disciplines that now in play the involvement marketing attack. CMO's and senior clot leaders have to be such really really good generalists now. Creativity in production of content is a very small component of what we actually do is a very important component, but it is a smoker house. I changed what you look for in an agency partner. That's a really good question. First and foremost they have to be capable of creating big ideas that just have the ability to go. Wow, I would have never thought of that. That's fantastic and the relationship disciplined to push you when you need to be pushed and listen when you're gang. Hell I know what I'm about to do is a bit dark, but bear with me. There are methods in the madness that I. Think require was really good account management skills. You have to be able to push on people, but at the same time support them when you work with the good account leaders, they are exceptionally editing. If, you could give some advice to your eighteen year old self thinking back looking back, what would it be? Then worrisome, much take risks, and I think one of the things I'm proudest in my career. Is I have taken silver risks. I've done things that people said to me at the time were best silly, worst foolish. What advice would you give for somebody who would like to be a CMO of a major brand like you? CMO's have to do two things simultaneously. They have to be for want of a better word or really good cheerleader within an organization, and they have to be able to be very quick learners and editors. They need to be able to come into a room. Add value to a conversation that they have not necessarily been portal. You've got to be fast enough on your feet, really good understanding of Brown management, really good understanding of consumer inside generation, and a really good understanding of how you work with creatives to edit good ideas, and then really good understanding of media and investment decisions so. You've got to chase breadth of experience just depth of experience, because the Rowley sobral now and has so many disciplines within it. You'll never going to be in the master of all of them, but you've got him a pretty good working knowledge of most of them, and then you find people who are subject matter expertise, and you figure out a way to work with them in a way that empowers them. We always in math magic with math and magic shoutouts. You've seen a lot of marketing business folks. Who is the best one on the analytic side? The math side of the marketing equation. People, like Terry, prue. We're really at the forefront, really beginning to develop the marketing mix models that we all now take for granted, give us the best now on the magic side the creative. There's just some campaigns that I absolutely admire the amazing old company in a night when it first came out with just is that amazing? Scott peppery right about the origin of the just stood idea back. Campaign was what I wanted to get into advertising. Rich you've got a great story. You tell it well. The accent helps thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Be munching. If you picked up in my conversation with rich one. Don't just be a marketer. The cultural engineer at De Beers recall an opportunity to help men do a better job articulating the feelings, so he created a product, the three diamond ring and a campaign past present future around it to talk your customer out preconceived notions when richest team talk to women about their desire for self expression, it led to a whole new product, the right hand diamond ring, which became a cultural phenomenon, not to mention a business success, three ideas, or still king, as rich says you need data translate into business results, but without big ideas behind them. The data's useless. Just look at what he's done at macy's. Thanks for listening I'm Bob Pittman. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to and magic a production of iheartradio. The show is hosted by Bob Pittman. Special thanks to sue Schillinger for booking and wrangling are wonderful talent. Just no small feat Nikki tour for Pulling Research Bill Plaques and Michael as our for their recording health are editor Ryan, Murdoch, and of course Gail Rowell. Eric Angel. Noble mango everyone who helped. Bring this show to your ears until next time. I'm Bob Pittman and IHEART. We know America's ready to get back to work, but to win a new economy. You need every advantage to succeed. SMART companies run on net suite by Oracle the world's number, one cloud business system, so join over twenty thousand companies who trust net sweet to make it happen. Receive your free guide right now. At that sweet dot com slash map. That's net sweet dot com slash map.

macy America CMO De Beers engineer New York America Bob Pittman London bears so. macy GEICO UK London Zoo Stephen Herald Square Jada bt Sorrell England Martin
277 | Unusual Living Arrangements

The Minimalists Podcast

55:48 min | Last month

277 | Unusual Living Arrangements

"This episode of the minimalist is brought to you by nobody because advertisements suck all cast has bad words every little steam. You think me every little thing you every little seeing. That's feeding your greed. Bear that you'll be fine league. Hello everybody welcome to the minimalist. Podcast where we discussed. What means to live a meaningful life with less. My name is joshua fields. Millburn and non ryan nicodemus together. We are the minimalist today. We're gonna talk about alternative. Living options ryan. Sounds like we're opening up a center does. Doesn't it the alternative living options center. I'm trying to think of the most like crazy living. You know with like you. And i could do if maria moved in with you. And then beck's moved in with me and we were roommates. That's not unappealing actually yet is but we'll be gives is in. La one hundred percent of the time right. We would never get any alone time. Yeah that's true so there's much we could talk about whether we christopher kelly here from nurse. Balanced thrive chris. They be as well. Thank you for having me. I appreciate that now. There are reasons that you're here. We'll get in to that. But i i. I wanted to do an episode about communal living. But i thought maybe that wasn't all encompassing enough because people had questions about throttles about combined families about long-term single hood about nomadic living in a whole lot more and so i think what happens here. The reason i found this topic to be so appealing. Is we think that there is a way that we're supposed to live and let me give you first a thirty second overview of chris. I've known chris. We've been friends for five years or so now. And i often say chris one of the few people would he have some of the best podcasts that we never record us right on the phone phone call and we'll talk for an hour or something and i'm like man. I wish would recorded this. And now he's here. We could actually record it. But chris helped me out with a lot of health things early on. I was starting to figure out some of my my health problem. How did you find chris when you were looking for some help with your health. So ben greenfield. I'm not entirely. You're okay that might have been it And so when. I stumbled across chris and he helped me through a whole lot of mercury poisoning. A bunch of other stuff. That was going on things i think. Yes yeah yeah c diff etcetera. And and chris really helped me navigate the the beginning of that nourish balanced thrive dot com health issues. You wanna talk about that. We're not talking about health stuff today. Although we're talking about component that directly affects health. It might be the most important in hardest problem. I've had to try and solve. Oh yes so. Let's talk about the problem. In fact you wrote down that you're a zookeeper for obligatory gregarious. Homo sapiens. what does that mean. I think this is a good segue ancestral health right. So what i meant by that was imagine you are a keeper. And some new species of upright bhai pedo ape shows up at your zoo and you figure out how you're gonna look off to them right. So what are you gonna do are gonna keep them in separate enclosures. Are you going to put them all in together. I gonna make them sign a contract saying that. They'll never put their genitals near another ape. You feed them subway and pizza hut. Where are you gonna feed the wh. What are you gonna do. Are you going to design that zoo right. Like you have infinite degrees of freedom this place ryan in ohio where they used to have that chimp or he would smoke in the bars all the time. Yeah it was so sad. I wouldn't do that right exactly. And this is what they did. Do look up the story of guy. The gorilla was granted showed up at london zoo and in the beginning. They didn't really know how to keep gorillas in captivity and they allowed the the guests at the zoo to actually feed guy and eventually he died of cardiovascular disease and diabetes just like humans. Do go through that. They learned a lot about how to look after guerrillas captivity. And they don't do that anymore and look at how they keep greenwich and captivity. It's amazing we're san diego zoo looking their guerrillas. Recently absolute incredible the enclosures so much thought has gone into that enclosure and the diet. It's not exactly like the diet a guerilla would eat in. The wild is really close right. You can go to the local supermarket and reconstructed diet. That's really close to what the grid eaten wild now. My argument is the we should be doing the same as as humans right. We been on this planet. Millions of years. Our ancestors Walking around under the same light. Dark cycle Anatomically modern for probably three hundred thousand years and then everything changed. You know ten thousand years ago and then in particular thousand years ago because of agriculture because of the of agriculture here that change like once we became sedentary that that changed everything by sedentary mean we stopped becoming hunter-gatherers that just wanted to savannah hunting and gathering and became. Sedentary we settle down we started growing we domesticated fire and then plants then animals And that changed everything. But of course those things domesticated us as you would say right and you could argue that You know did we domesticate fire or did it domestic us. There is an interesting question when you look at the last. Even ten twenty years technology has changed is beyond recognition like artificial at night is a good example. Social media is a really good example and seem that these changes are not great for overall health. And and they're not great in ways that we don't notice right away and especially i what i've noticed the younger. We are the the more. I won't say immune we are to these external stimuli but the more resilient we seem to be but over time for whatever reason and i'm sure you have some hypotheses around it these things affect us negatively in you in your practice nourished balance thrive dot com. You have lots of people who come to you because conventional medicine have broke down wasn't able to find the answers for them in fact it wasn't even about finding solutions. They couldn't even identify what the problem is right. And a lotta. I've heard you say that a lot of these problems that we deal with now there. There isn't like the we get so caught up in silver bullet thinking and you'd like to do is sort of take a a more holistic approach and i think part of that holistic approach has to do with with our living arrangements. That's why i wanted to title this one unusual living arrangements because it's unusual in the sense that society has prescribed something to us. And i by the way i do want to dive deep into your own communal living you. You have a communal living situation. We want to dive deep into that on the maximum episode. But i chris. I wanna talk about why you're here today because well Feels like we've been prescribed this way of living and what you're saying. Is that prescription while it may work for some people. It's not natural Well i'm not sure like i'm kind of scared of that word. It conjures up thoughts of the naturalistic fallacy. Okay it's not birth from nature. How about that. It may not be optimal okay and personally. I didn't realize they were choices. Conform to the societal expectations. And then only once i had kids. That's when really hits. The fan is when you have kids. You realize oh. This doesn't actually work very well to people the nucleus and then however many dependents orbiting like charged particles. We call this a nuclear family. It doesn't work very well now. Didn't work previous to kids. In in only the introduction of kids made it not work or was it the introduction of kids that made you say Maybe the whole thing doesn't really work. Yeah i think that's a good point. I think that the kids The straw that broke the camel's back. Cry kinda shopping's it and you're like oh i see. This really doesn't work. So where did this all sort of an. Where did this idea. Start that of the nuclear family. Well i think he's quite modern. You know there's a really nice piece in the atlantic. I read recently. I think it was like the one thousand nine hundred fifty s in the us. At least the nuclear family wasn't a thing before the nineteen fifties and it was an idea it was a boom time where it could possibly work. We had died after work on his own. Mom stayed home and looked after the kids. And of course now it's not really possible in silicon valley and if you want to buy a starter. Home in mountain view then probably. Both of the parents need to be working fulltime job or apple or facebook google or something in order to be able to pay the mortgage for a two million dollar star home. So i i think even now now this go. Together we're from dayton. Ohio two million dollars. You're like the richest men in the county. Give a two million dollar house. that's seriously there are like two million dollars starter homes for sure instead. It's like maybe this moment. Time in the nineteen fifties where the nuclear family was an option. It could work since. Are you arguing that it never works. It doesn't sound to me like that's it either because it seems to me that like that's the traffic we caught up in whereas it's supposed to be one way as opposed to yes. There is a for lack of a better term natural way. In which we we evolved become humans An evolutionary way of living. But of course we've we've changed. We've improved upon our lives. We have electronic and we all think that's for the better if we don't think it is then none of us that i know are are you're completely doing without these things right and so i'm wondering if I look at these these these living situations these these arrangements. It's not to say the nuclear family is bad or wrong or anything like that but it's not to say that the other way is even right or better. It's it's to say what is appropriate for you. I think that's i think that's right. I mean so what how. People make the nuclear family work. Is they purchase additional social support. That would have previously come from the community right so people hire a wet nurse a postpartum jila a therapist immense. Aw shooter all these different things. That normally would have been part of your tribe now hiring a community. I would say so i mean. Don't you think interesting. Yeah ever thought that way. Yeah it was a great perspective yelich. They're hiring daycare. Yeah it's actually mean even teaches as well. Yeah i mean. Suddenly when you're young you don't really teaching you just doing babysitting right right. Yeah yeah so so but it has to go back before that as well where we started to believe that that You know i. I don't know if it's a puritanical sort of way of thinking. Whatever it is there. Is there something here where we've been forced into believing we have to live a particular way and i don't think the reaction to that to be well. No that's wrong. here's the right answer. I think what we're talking about here today is hey. Here are some other options. Perhaps so we're going to get into that. I want to dive. Deep into chris's story as well but i thought we would start with some questions from our audience. We have a question here from gwen in athens ohio. How should i go about eighty or firms of roommates used. Remind the to rely on such as food or any or care so chris. Let's let's rephrase gwynn's question here basically say how do i appropriately set boundaries with the people in my community or in my home or whatever to ensure those boundaries are not crossed. You wanna prevent people from stealing obviously property damage but also just tents living situations right Now you live in a. Can you talk a bit about your. Maybe you're communal situation. Said we've experimented with a number of different configurations over the past year ranging from like time segmented type arrangement where for a few days a week living with another family so i've got two kids one. He's gone who seven boy. Who's three and we've spent time living under the same roof with another couple. Who have kids of similar ages and so we've lived with a number of different families. But i think they've all had two kids now about the same age is now. What have you learned from living with these different families. Because you gwynn's question. Here's you basically have introduced roommates. What what we are. Today's society would say roommate is different from that. But that's how you even have to classify it. It's almost it's euphemistic. There was a time not too long ago when gay couples used to have to say they had roommates and as opposed to having A partner or husband or and and so now you are trying. These sort of experiments With other families living together How did you. Why did you start doing this. I think the kids are actually the main driver. I did a podcast interview with pizza. Gray you you may might might know his His book called free to learn accra. Pizza talked about the common word is unscrewing yes I didn't really like that term. Peter doesn't like it either because it focuses on what you're not doing Versus what you are doing. So perhaps a better description is noncoercive self directed learning meaning. You're trusting the kids to find the best opportunity on their own without doing much of anything And in order for that to work you needs older kids. Like i don't care how old your kid is. You need an older kid because the odor. Kate is like the scaffolding that helps the younger kid up to the next level. So you're not doing the teaching. The older kids are doing the teaching. I've i've seen this happen firsthand. We've got an older kit that can read. And they're looking at words on a screen or a piece of paper and telling younger kid what they say so. The older is actually teaching the younger kid even though the kids know what. They're doing in that teaching here. She is also learning through the primary learned so much more by teaching than than just about any other way. It's actually and so the problem is that you can't do that. We just two kids. You need more kids than that and so the question then becomes a. Where'd you get more kids now. We live in a very rural area. Where most of the houses on very large lots and so there are some kids around the neighborhood but not enough and so we needed to do something to bring more kids in. And that's exactly what we've been able to do. It's been great well sock a bit more about that I mean you say it's been great. It sounds like you've lived with several different families explained that yeah so we've done a couple of different things. We've had people living in our house. We live in a small house. It's about twelve hundred square foot and that's not very much space when you've got to families living under the same roof also another things like having people bring on a trailer these trade. I don't know if you've seen them. But these travel trailers a tremendous value for money. You can get a house. That's nicer than our house for twenty thousand dollars or something and you can move it. You can just rolled onto so we're lucky that we live on quite large property. We've had people bring on a trailer. Aaron use that as a separate space from the main house that can definitely get a little bit crazy at times. And and so. How do you navigate these relationships because these different people have different desires. Different ones different preferences. Different hobbies Different levels of tolerance and and different desires How do you navigate all of that. Well i think he stopped by having similar value systems ryan so health is super important to us and it gives us some guiding principles the we operate by finding people that shed is values. Like i could live with you. Be great because i know you same food. He goes to bed at the same time. I think we could. We share a lot of things in common. And so it's not that much work to try and close the gap. You know some. I had once a lawyer told me that. That sometimes case we'll go to mediation and the judge will just refuse to do anything they won't try and close the gap because it's just too big like there's too much distance between the two sides and say go way to go soo yourself. Go see each other because this is not a gap. I can close and i think the same is true with like communal living like you. Need z find people that share your valley system so that whenever conflict does arise like not that much of a gap to close and that is indeed. What we've been doing so all of the people we've lived with have had very similar valley systems ryan. It sounds like you. Obviously the the thing that The best way to deal with conflict within the house to get back to to gwynn's question here is to screen the roommates beforehand right back to relationships that i've had whether friendship brenta intimate relationships quite offense is simply a screening problem. Because chris said like we don't have the same values of course with that greater gap means there's going to be greater tension between the two of us. Yeah yeah. I mean when it comes to gwen question. I would ask her. Is there a way to close that gap with with her roommates them with a roommate's friends it sounds like yeah If it's not possible. I mean she could certainly do things like i don't know when i had roommates would lock my door I didn't it. Didn't get to the point where i had a where i had to get. Like my own mini fridge because That gap with the particular roommate. You know talking about I will not name him to not shame him publicly patriot. Yeah exactly but you know. If i couldn't move out and if i couldn't afforded to have moved out would have come to this situation where i would have had to spend a couple hundred bucks. Get my own. Mini fridge ram. Yeah so Yet if the gap is too large gwen she's got a move out. This really rough is different from my situation. I everyone we've lived with has been tremendously respectful like cautious if anything you know what it's like when you move in with an and it it's kind of intimidating right. Let you're moving into this space and you tread really lightly and very respectful. That's more similar to my situation versus living in college with a bunch of our so roommates. They're like find about taking a food and that's a very different situation. So then you have. You have conflict right and so they'll be times where maybe you don't agree on a parenting thing. And how does that work out actually ended one one. Yeah you're right like and our the juicy stuff. Yeah i thought so. I don't have a parenting style. Pizza talked about that. My podcast as well but hunter-gatherers don't do parenting and they don't do teaching either and some books on this alison gopnik. The carpenter and the gardner is really good. One and i love that metaphor sue relevant for dealing with complex systems wearing carpentry. You measure twice and cut once and it's like building dining room table and it's very obvious when the job is done you test to see if it wobbles and all this stuff and maybe make some slight refinements and in the end you've got this perfectly crossed a piece of furniture whereas in gardening it's mostly about keeping the weeds out this creating an environment for the for the plants to flourish. And you never really know what you're gonna get. I mean of course you know what. Cj put in the ground. We don't really know what's going to grow. Alison gopnik is arguing is that parenting is more like gardening and less like carpentry but a lot of people they treat it like carpentry and that in the beginning i thought i don't care you know it's fine if like if you wanna do. Helicopter parenting go hadn't helicopter but and don't have a style. So i should be compatible with any star. Be right it like once they start. Helicoptering your kids and there's like. Oh shit i can't handle this and said that actually did end one relationship give examples of of helicoptering. What does that look like in in the real world. I mean it looks exactly what it sounds like it. It's you you. you're literally hovering over the child. Micromanaging their every move and the way would know is happening. Even if i'm not paying tensioning is like i would hear the kid's name over and over again like over and over again. Why why is why is the pass using the kid's name over and over again because they're constantly trying to direct them towards its control controlling. Now what about that. Control is so appealing to us. I know it's like i think one thing i think is going on in silicon valley as people are really struggling with purpose. They do like. There's this kind of standing joke. That the the brightest minds in the wild or working in silicon valley getting people to click on stuff right with phd's and get people to click on stuff and and it's not. It's not really scratching people's issue. It's not like a great purpose. And i think it's a really common thing for people to quit their job or this is what they do is a hobby like they go all in on parenting. It becomes a new obsession. Exactly i think a lot of the helicopter parenting to probably sponsor from good intentions. You're just trying to protect your kid from not getting hurt and there is a. There's a balance there right but yeah if you're constantly hovering over them you're not allowing them to flourish themselves. It's good intentions and bad ideas. Jonathan heights book. The calling in the american mind blinds. The whole thing thing and i think if we back up and re remove ourselves from even the parenting situation the thing can happen with roommates or or significant others spouses. Whatever we can become helicopter partners. We could become your helicopter roommates and and it quickly becomes an untenable situation. And so it's fascinating to me when we're talking about communal living really what you're talking about is in a traditional commune necessarily but it's maybe iteration of that. What do you mean by commun- well what do you. What images that conjure. When i say commun- It conjures up images. Wild wild country. That was i don't watch. Tv we watch that and it was really good. I really enjoyed that. So yeah i think gurus like stop me somebody a boss like no but it sounds to me like often those intentions of. Here's the thing we hear about wild country or we hear about nexium or or whatever these these cults right in there so many that you don't hear about because they are actually just commune's that are working fine and there isn't some sex crazed leader who is making the news. It just happens to be that there. Fi we hear about the salacious stuff right and so we hear about when people are drinking kool aid in killing themselves and or joining some sort of cult the cash straight see each other. Whatever it is that stuff makes the news you know. It doesn't make the news. Four families decide to live together happily exactly stories. No and so. I don't know. Do you see this evolving over time as you get acclimated with different families or whatever you see a larger group forming out of this potentially well. That's question that how much is enough is Is a very interesting question. Yeah we've yet to figure out what the ideal number is. I know that things get way better in my motivation to go find the others goes exponentially down as we add more people so even one of the couple in kids is so much better than just the nuclear family. In my opinion. How many families are living on your property right now so at the moment so we were in a relationship with another couple. That's going really well and they've got tickets you're eleven just turned seven and then we've got another neighbor who has a four year old go. He recently trailer on our property. And she's more like the time segments if they come for a couple of days a week and that's i mean so far so good taste so good awesome. I wanna talk about your sleeping situation on the maximum episode. But we have. We have some more to get into gwen. I'm gonna send you a copy of the mls rula because one thing we didn't talk about. But it should be self evident at this point is boundaries now the first boundary is before you even luck. The roommate into the house right Until you see the first boundary is not coming to an agreement with someone who has complete opposite values with you. you know you're setting yourself up for discontent for quote unquote failure for tinson etc property damage. Whatever like there's going to be all kinds of of things you don't want to get involved but even then ryan i have the same values. We don't always agree on things. In fact he and i've lived together before we've had different preferences in sometimes dictates. I think what what really helped ryan and i live together was kind of what chris was saying is like we. We didn't just tolerate each other. We respect each other's desires. Yes and in that respect even don't completely understand that i completely appreciate the way that you live and vice versa. Look harming me or anyone else. We were totally capable of telling each other. If something was bugging us or something our preferences were being stepped on. Maybe yeah it was very simple to just have a conversation in. I mean that might just spawn from. I think we haven't accepts an exceptional relationship in that sense. Where like we can deliver the truth to each other in a way. Even if it sounds negative like we don't take it negatively just kind of take it for what it is. Yes and Yeah i mean. That's i think that's a unfortunately a rare thing and relationships but i think the closer people can get to that in their relationships to not be offended. When someone's like hey. I'd really appreciate it if you x. y. or z. Yeah that will create some living situations for sure. Yeah i found five words that are really useful for me as well Would you be willing to be willing to shut up but instead of like how come you always leave your Salt crumbs on the counter. Hey would you be willing to clean those up. Yeah it just it. This not a patronizing way. But hey you know. Would you be willing to and those have disarmed. So many arguments in my life but also shows a just a respect. And i think another way to show respect is to set boundaries up so we have the minimalist rulebook at sixteen rules for living with less. You can download it for free over at the minimalist com slash rulebook also. The audiobook version is available. There as well where you get the free e book they're just download thumb analysts dot com slash rulebook. What time is it. You know what time it is time for our lightning round where we answer your text messages. You can text your questions and comments to area code nine three seven two zero two four six five four is indeed so they're in lightning round. You're familiar with this. This is where we do our best answer questions. The short sharable less than one hundred forty character response. We put the tax to these minimum maximums in the show notes. So people can copy and share our pithy answers on social media. If they'd like oh and you can find all of our minimum maximums in one place now. Minimal maximums dot com. I love getting random tweets with things that i've said and they quote me and i'm like oh yeah i did say that like that was good. They're all in the show notes. A genius quote came up with. Oh that was me think. Offer the website. Because i would not remember all of them got crashing from eric. All right are there. Countries tribes societies where y- unusual living arrangements for example communal living through combined families long-term single hood nomadic. Living isn't actually on usual. How happy are these people with these arrangements. What are the pros and cons of these arrangements. Okay chris so there's three questions here in the lightning round that's all we do is lighten around longest segment. Yeah strangely so i do have a pithy. Answer on unpack it with you. And i want to hear what you have to say. So here's my my pithy answer. Searching for pros and quotes tethers us to the cons. And so. I think that it's okay to to learn the negative and positive lessons from yesteryear. But i find that whenever i take a piece of paper out and make the line down the middle. Here's the pros on this side. And here's the cons. It's an intellectual exercise but it doesn't really help with a deeper understanding of our nature and And so i think in these situations because they are so complex. It's not like do. I want to buy the honda accord or the toyota camry. Okay the procon list probably going to help out with that or even then you probably know which one you want and the procon list is relevant. And i think the same might be true with our living situations. You've been told you've been prescribed. Here's what you must do at age. Twenty two you're supposed to get married and you have three and a half kids and a dog and a cat and you live in this house and of yard and offense nothing wrong with any of those things they're not gonna make you happy their externalities Happiness and peace are only uncovered right. And so you ask a moment ago. What is enough. Maybe four pin. That i would say well prepared for your life for your preferences and it seems to me. That like chris. The situation urine at all. Now it's not because i think it's wrong. I think that i spend most of my time alone. So i think that being around more people is going to decrease my tranquillity in a way yes. That's so weird perspective isn't it. You know where it is actually occur. Name here western is educated industrialized rich and democratic hung. There's a really good book called the weirdest people in the world. By joe henrik where he writes about this phenomena and includes the big five personality traits introversion is one of them and it's unique to weird societies. Yes so the. Us canada uk. australia new zealand. These are weird places. Right and introversion does not exist in hunter-gatherers. It just doesn't make any sense if you think fierce egalitarian. If your existence depends on sharing the best place to store food is in the belly of my brother. Yes then where does introversion fit into that. It doesn't and when they go examine hunter-gatherers and ask them questions that should identify these big five personality traits. They didn't find them. But what about the most enlightened people in history have all gone off. We can take away the terms introvert extrovert for the sake of this in. Had large stretches of solitude Now that could because they're trying to beat the culture out of them right. That was the that ruined the hunter. Gatherer nature And and so. The buddha for example had to go off for seven years supposedly eating a grain of rice a day or something absurd and in doing the that stillness the solitude the the alone time It almost feels like a deprogramming of of the culture in a way or of society Yeah i really like county ports definition of solitude. I know he know him on the puck. I interviewed him to remember him. talking about. Solitude is a state that you can achieve anywhere right. You can have solitude in a coffee shop working surrounded by people noise. It's the absence of input from another human mind. Which ultimately is your choice right so you can still have solitude my chaotic living room with a bunch of kids bouncing around between the wars right. If if you choose not to get tugged arounds by every input that comes your way. I think it's a choice. I think you can still have solitude noisy environment. Yeah i totally agree with that. I call ambient people. Like i like the right and coffeeshops quite often but i disagree is like you can. But you can't if people were demanding your attention and so if hey ryan ryan ryan and he's trying to be in solitude he's either going to be a total jerk to me but i'm really the one being a jerk because i'm constantly ryan ryan. Belay him not reciprocating. That is actually going to hurt our relationship. And so that's what. I'm talking when i talk about boundaries even like figuring out what is appropriate in in my life and so i. I have a unusual living arrangement. You know my wife. And i have separate places separate states and we spend every other week apart and in in doing that. It's the most ideal scenario for us given our current year constraints however If if i was forced into your situation could i. I can of make it work. Yeah i could. But i don't know that it would be optimal for me. That's the difference. I wouldn't deny that again. It's like choosing people that share that value system. You're probably a bunch of introverts are probably not going to work together but the resource seven economy of scale their imagine. You've got a bunch of kids. It's like really hard for you to have a loan sign but if the kids are happy together i mean i can look after five kids as easy as after two kids and so maybe in the end you end up with more alone time like you can go off and take a walk and wherever you want to do. Because i'm that to take care of your kids and actually it makes my life easier when there are more kids sense so paradox. Say it seems like you're getting less time alone but in the end you will end up with more. Because i i know right now with having just one kid and we don't even have her full-time right it. But we have two parents parenting parenting one child parenting the activity not relationship And and so. It's it's strange. It's a strange thing because of if she had more siblings than it would. I think it would actually easily totally so you know about this. Having multiple kids are as you're finding as you're going through these living situations. Is there anything that is the you found to be your sweet spot. The is applicable to other people between how many people. You're living on the same sort of commune with I honestly don't know the answer to that yet. We've been doing here. Is it big as twenty people. A forty people yet. I suspect that once you get to a certain number you then start having problems with communication you know that then becomes like a so you know you have to have like democratic processes and keeping everybody on the same page. I can imagine that would start to become inefficient Yeah we've not found enough. I mean that's the reason why i'm here today. Is to try and find more like minded people. How did they. how did they find. You can find me my email address. Chris response thrive dot com. Oh ask for. Chris moving to santa cruz. Let's so back to eric's question here. We're talking about an obvious on the maximum episode. We'll talk more about. We have a whole article about throttles. combined families long-term single hood is well nomadic living And so what you're doing isn't nomadic living because you're in one place was too sedentary right but it is it from our societal standpoint. It's it's it's semi nomadic in a way. Meaning you're not tethered to that place. You know you're not commuting to the same job every day cetera. Even though you have a career you can do that from pretty much anywhere. The tightly happy to move somewhere else for the right opportunity. Maybe that's the right thing to do. That's the problem we've got right now is california so ridiculously expensive that maybe we just need to find a plot of land texas or colorado or something like that whereas all montana's probably be a good option right so much cheaper although it's it's very cold there and that's why he wants to live in california it's sunny and nice and yeah right. Yeah yes indeed. It's like florida's got summer year round but the humidity that's the that's the thing that keeps people away from florida. Summer and florida man. Yeah so ryan. I'm looking here at eric's question. The how happy are these people in these arrangements again. I think this is. This is highly individual right. yes. And that's why i don't think there is a supposed. They're not that. I think there is no supposed to we. Were not born to live in a nuclear family. But it's not wrong to live at a nuclear family either may be the most appropriate thing for you but instead of here's the problem i have. Chris is we. We often feels. I'm supposed to do this thing right because society and culture has has convinced me. It's the quote unquote right thing to do. But now i'm feeling discontented by and it's not that well. I'm saying you shouldn't do the thing that society's telling you to do it's that knowing that you're better you're better off if you know that it's not the thing that you have to do. And therefore if you do decide to intentionally embark on a nuclear family and you have the dream or whatever you're contented by that great but it's not It's not the prescription Is the prescription of the catholic church. She depends so. I think that's important to understand where this came from. That's what joe henrik wrote about. In his book is the monogamous. Nuclear family is an invention of the catholic church in the fourth century. And it was the best money making system. either right. you couldn't get divorced. You couldn't adopt a child. You could only pass on your money to your son and heir to biologically speaking some point. You're not going to produce a son. And and if you don't produce sunair log onto the august the church and at some point the catholic church ended up owning like a third of germany. It was like the best business model ever. and so. that's where originates. that's where the idea originates. And so. I mean if you don't really subscribe to the ideas but not by the catholic church and the protestants weren't much better. They just kind of took it to extremes but joe henry writes about that history in his book. So i'd recommend you're not saying that. No one was monogamous. Previous to that you're saying it was not the default setting of the culture at the time. Now i think anyone was monogamist before that and even to this day like this the idea you know. The monogamous family is unique to weird societies. Right there still places around today where they don't like cousin. Marriage is really common. Polygamy is still a thing it's not it's only we don't know because we're inside of this bubble. We can't really see out. But i mean that's definitely gonna be people. Listen to this site yeah. Of course this monogamous nikolay. Why would you do that stupid. Were interesting. It's funny though because i don't think this is where i push back. I don't see it as stupid but this is just my acculturation like the i've been i've been forced to think it's not. That is not stupid. I don't think it's stupid or not stupid. It's it's there's a reason that we've continued to do it for a prolonged period of time right now may not work for the average person. Listen to this or it might work for you and so it. It's hard for me to say that it's stupid. Because i i do feel that in a way like there's something emmy room like yeah let me let me substitutes deepened with species-appropriate back to my human zoo. You wouldn't keep the penguins on hot sand and you don't keep the humans in monogamous nuclear families. That's why arguing is not species-appropriate. I mean there is an upside to the the upside henrik writes about that is economic prosperity. Is you get people who are strangers to cooperate in ways that they wouldn't otherwise because the alternative kin based arrangement. It's like all nepotism right like all the you know like all your business goes to someone whose family like. That's how that's the alternative. And that's why the monogamously families become so prevalent. Today is because of the economic prosperity. Which is the upside ryan. Rainier anything pithy for a listening to eric's question. I think you know. Maybe he's looking at different levels. Because maybe he. I don't know i'm just assuming that. Maybe he feels that the way he wants to live with his family. Maybe it's a little weird But yeah i mean. My answer is a genuine. Life doesn't require someone else's approval. So when i think about your Your non extroversion introversion. Like that is strange to me. But it's not strange to you. That's you living genuine life so because of that you know. Josh isn't looking for external approval from other people to be like well. Is it okay that that i'm alone I did do that for the longest time in any miserable. Oh absolutely especially during like the corporate days for sure but you know i look at question. The last one about the pros and cons And we could sit here and maybe we put together a nice pros and cons list for eric here. But there there would be our pros and cons. That's a great point and by the way what's usual for you could be unusual for me. Some people pros or other people's cons also wrote down here. Unusual is usually ideal so. Chris lives an unusual situation. Because he's done so deliberately right intention to exactly rather than just choosing this societal ray defoe instead of charging the cia decided on the usual thing right accepting the usual thing. You've done something protocol on usual right. And and that's what's probe review vaccine. I've done something. That is unusual. Meaning it's not doesn't conform exactly to the societal standards. It's it is a vin diagram but there's even a ven diagram with you and and you have a wife right that's a. That's a relic of your past right. And if you see absolutely to say about that. I mean that's the thing though right like we. You were told that you needed to be married at some point. But you're hunter-gatherers never married ray. That's that's another interesting point actually. The joe henrik archies the what came before monogamy was liberty and i had an interesting conversation with mutual friend chris ryan about that And so the short answer is that it really depends how you define marriage so for some hunter gatherer bands or indigenous people. They define marriage is like if i hang my hammock next to yours and we spend the night together. Then we're married. And then if i take my hammocks morale's then we're not married anymore right so it really depends which is really hard to interpret because it really depends on how you define marriage is like a really slippery thing to define. Yeah no. I totally agree ryan. I call our our significant others our our wives but we don't have a piece of paper that says that we are really interesting is because i don't i don't wanna get government involved in our love and so there's in beck's feels the same way thankfully i know ryan is on on the same page but like it has a lot to do with you. How do you define marriage. I don't define it as involvement by the way like even our government people early on your george. Washington didn't have a government certificate for his marriage but he was married I find that monogamy works really well in in my relationship However we have actually. I'm going to save this for the maximum because he's gonna get kinda private here so We'll save that for the private pockets. We've got a bunch more questions. well also I do have a a communal. Living themed added value this week but We got some listener comments and tips as well and a bunch more surprise questions like what are some examples of successful nomads. How about successful throttles long term single people don't most societies. Treat the hoarding of things from past generations. Things like sentimental heirlooms as a net positive. So we have someone arguing for hoarding. And then what would have been the unexpected upsides and downsides of communal living for chris. We've touched on a few of those. But i really do want to. I want to get honest about what What lessons you've learned their plus million more questions about unusual living situations. And if you want to hear all that. Listen to this week's maximal episode on patriotic. That's right your chrome. Listen to our weekly minimal episode but each thursday ryan and i and our guest. We were a much longer maximum episode for the minimalist private. Podcast visit the minimalist dot com slash support to subscribe. And get your personal link. So that our private podcasts. Plays in your favorite podcast app if you are show wanting to support the minimalist. This is the only way. Our podcast earns money cheaper than a cup of coffee and it keeps our show. One hundred percent advertisement free plus privatize pop private podcast scrubbers also gain access to hundreds of hours of archives. What else you got for us this week. Here are some voicemail comments and insights from our listeners. Check him hey This is emily. Stewart from florida south carolina. And i wanted to share a tip. So i've been a minimalist my entire life even as a kid but i find myself thinking that i don't have anything to get rid of because i'm a minimalist so i came up with a game with myself. That kinda helps me to keep cleaning things out. I often shop at trader. Joe's in all these. And i bring mound that sometimes i forget an end up having to grab the paper bags at checkout so my new rule for myself is every time i do this. I have to fill up the paper bags with things from my home to give away or sell so all those forgetting my own bags isn't good for the environment. It turned into a great way to consistently clear out and help keep it fun for me and fresh even though i am have been minimalist for so long very rose. Coughlin brennan connecticut So that's happened to me. Several times has lost a great deal of money and profits that i gave away or tipping from the wrong pocket money traveling and i like to think that person needed the money more than i did so whether you say god wanted them to have it or the power of the university they needed. That person needed the money more than you did. And blessed to have opportunity to share it with them are offer added value. This week you talked about. You saw this chris you saw. What was the name of the while country he is. Yeah so there's another docu series about nexium. Have you heard about next. I can't wait to watch this great. Yeah i'm like fascinated by the colt documentaries that they do or even the man the one that the reenactment one. They did the series with Waco one yeah with awake at all. Yeah kitsch was name Karesh are just. Tell us about nick too fast. And here's why. I'm fascinated by this. Because i am often fascinated on the trajectory of where you are right now or you have two three four families living on the same land with kids whatever and then all. Where's the tipping point where it becomes a colt. All that chris's missing is a guru. That's the thing right like if you keep egalitarian than it can be a call. Guru like venue. You're in trouble yes. Yeah and but also the aren't there. They're like great gurus who have no interest in forming a coal whatsoever. they don't want they. There's going to be teenagers or whatever. Maybe that's the difference. They they call himself teachers masters. Or it's wild how it always starts with usually something positive lake so mariah has been reading a book and i don't know what the name of it is but she was like you should really check out this book. It talks about this guy named osho. oh And she's like she's going on and on and i'm like i'm like that rings a bell. We're heard the name before. And then she's like. Oh my god she's like. I've been reading this wild wild country guys book and i had no idea until she got three quarters of the way through it. She was like. Oh wow this. Is that wild country guy. It does seem that osho was probably an enlightened person but also had some sort of weird fascinating fascination with materials offices understanding. Maybe i mean i or maybe he no ego at all like. I don't know what that looks like. I think he doesn't even matter. I mean personally. I think he trusted the wrong people and heated. Yes why was he driving all of these. I mean there's nothing wrong with rolls royce on the. He did anything wrong. No i also think he had a lot of wisdom and so the book because she read pro. I've i haven't read his stuff. She's been sharing some of the wisdom. And i'm like oh that is a pretty awesome inside is pretty great. I mean of insights. Yeah but i think you know You know absolute power corrupts absolutely So maybe that's the point. He got to. But i know like with when i saw wild while country i was like oh like osho got to a point where he kind of like put his hands in the air inlet everyone else around him run everything and maybe that's where it started to go wrong. When he stopped trying when he reached nirvana he was like all right. I'm here and i don't really care what happens around me. I guess would be. Yeah someone else stepped up and was power hungry. And and so there's power struggle and even like david koresh. I mean like watching that docu series like it started out where he was. You know helping people. I mean he was a little insane But i guess we're all a little insane you know. Just the level of how insane are we. I dunno chris. Maybe we can talk about that. You've got you have a this this these colts and commonality in fact the the line from oh. By the way my added value this week it's called the vowel vw the vow and it is a docu series on hbo about next the nexium colt. And the thing that you you learn is i think two things sort of converge. Whenever one of these cults forms one is you have some sort of brilliant ideas wisdom insights cetera. Least the most compelling. That's how they get people to join because there's some sort of brilliant insight there right and then you have kooky beliefs that are sort of mixed in with that right. Yeah and so. The david koresh thing is a great example of you know who he believes because eventually he's like well. God has told me that. Only i can have sex with the women in our tribe and men must be monogamous and are mean they must be celibate rather. It becomes very strange very quickly. Yeah it's weird hold starts with some type of like good intention with like a deep truth that gins uncovered but then it gets mixed with all this belief. Yeah the craziness and so chris. Nobody joins a cult is one of the lines in this in this Love that and that's true right. It's a guy who's in the cult whose race no and he's a he's found out like oh i've gone too far. I've got to get out whatever. And he says. No one joins a coal ray. You never anyone who's looking to sign up for a call and yet lots of people join colts. Yeah because they don't realize in fact maybe the time they joined. It wasn't yet a colt man and so We talked about how to avoid that but also I'm just fascinated because parts of this are so good in human and nourishing and there are spiritual components in all of this and then it's always tainted by something else and abusive pile. Yeah i mean that's the desire to belong is so strong isn't it's not surprising that people are drawn into that sort of i mean even in our country did you not. I mean especially the early episodes. Do you look at that and think while awesome argues that definitely it really really good and then it came off the wagon. Eventually right but in the beginning looks great. The whole concept was we're going to have a community to like show how a community can thrive and yet and they and they did a very good job at that in the beginning. Yeah i totally agree and some. I don't know maybe the key is that you keep it below a certain threshold. I can't be a called as long as there's fewer than people like. I don't know what it is but that's certainly something that we want to avoid real quick for right here right now. Here's one thing that's going on in the life of the minimalist. We have a new book coming out next. Balanced thrive is actually mentioned in it briefly. Thank you it's called love. People use things you can pre-order. It really helps us out if you do pre-order it The print book the book or the audio book over at love. People use things dot net. You could also see the beautiful trailer. That jordan put together for the book. It's called love people use things that'll be out this summer but you can pre-order it. Now help us out. A lot of people use things dot net. You can follow them on facebook twitter and instagram at the minimalist chris. What are you on social media. We tell you what you do social media on that after county. What a a hipster. That's great man. One of our live. Podcasts shows visit the minimalists dot com slash tour to find a city near you. You can find chris over it. Nourish balance thrive dot com and. Apparently you can email him. Chris at nourished balance thrive dot com. If you have a question comment or minimalism tip for our podcast. Email voice memo to podcasts at the minimalists dot com comment on this episode youtube dot com slash. The minimalist show notes in your inbox. Sign up for our email list over the minimalists dot com. You'll also receive are simple sunday emails and if you leave here today with just one message we hope this love people and use things because the opposite never works. Thanks for listening. You will see an time every little thing. 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106| How to Mimic Nature in an Unnatural World and Optimise Your Health with Tim Gray

Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

45:58 min | 2 years ago

106| How to Mimic Nature in an Unnatural World and Optimise Your Health with Tim Gray

"I'm Leon Spencer founder of body. Shop formats limited bestselling author Ted speaker and your host. This is the remove the guesswork podcast the show interview. Influential people in the health, fitness and wellbeing space to bring you the latest ideas on how to optimize your mind. Party of Welby is brought to you by my company forty show performance. We create total solutions to optimize your health by focusing on sleep, mental health, energy, forty composition digestion, fitness, we weren't with busy professionals on a one-to-one basis for six or twelve months using the latest science and technology, and what is your also work with businesses want to create a culture of energy, quite Taliban performance position, wellbeing the competitive advantage. Find out more at BodyShop forest dot com. And enjoy the shirt. My guest this week is a friend of mine who had so much fun recording this episode, actually, we we had to stop it about forty nine minutes of it is a bit longer than usual episode. But I hope you'll enjoy and get a lot of value. We actually could have gone a lot longer. So you may or may not wish we had but you'll find out soon. The my guest is Tim Gray. Tim L? I met up at the London biohacking meet up group for which Tim is actually responsible. And we realize we've got quite a lot in common. He brings a lot of value to the whole world of health optimization. So we got together and we were called this face to face. It's about how you can mimic nature and unnatural world. In other words, the world we live in. Now, he's not let natural place compared to what we were designed for certainly patterns of ancestral living. So we talk a bit about bio hacks biking is the use of science technology in nature to optimize your health. Basically, you could disappear a long way down the bar hacking tunnel, but we don't we stay right up in the clouds where the stuff I think you're gonna find really relatable and really use. Awful, and you got questions or feedback on this. You can contact I guess directly. His Email is Tim health optimizations dot com. You can get hold of him on Facebook. So Facebook dot com forward slash Timbo, gray, and that's G R A Y on Twitter. He's Tim Gray UK and the website for the summit is health. Optimization dot com forward slash summit. And that's a summit that's going to be taking place on September fourteenth. And fifteenth in London this year, if you can get that I really recommend it. It's going to be a ton of great speakers on got health on nutrition and all kinds of other things is going to be lots of exhibitors with really interesting funky product. So definitely something ticket to an of course, body shot my company, and I will be there for joy this episode. We talk about sleep took about blue light nutrition got health other kind of buyer heck, a tech like the ring the human charger few other bits and pieces. So it's going to be a really interesting episode. If you know anyone who'd really value, this please share the episode and gives you feedback as well in the comments on social media. That's where your download in this episode. Owed. So that's it for me. Enjoy my conversation with Tim grades. So Tim, Mr. health optimization, welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. That's why it's a pleasure. So let's get stuck into. 'cause I think we probably got an awful lot to cover. What I really want to talk about is what are some of the best buyer hacks for busy professionals, so sort of people listening to this will be probably thirty five to sixty five time poor noticing flags going up around the health probably around sleep, mental health energy, those sort of areas, what are some of the little hack so most Pacific by hacks that they can use maybe before we go into those. We should explain what a buyer hockey is even do you like that? So I know conflicts people over Christian. So why don't we start with that term? Or do like the term by Akbar. I don't at the same time. So it's something that's is a quirky term for health optimization. And it's about using your environment supplements or whatever necessary to optimize your health and often through trucking through data as well. So you can quantify what you're actually doing postage just taking supplements. And and hoping for the best I think, that's why biohacking has increased in size and reach and why it's turning heads in lots of industries because he's quantifiable and health up to this point don't think has been so quantifiable how salvage it quantifiable zone. For instance. Common example is the ordering obviously. No, no, no. It's just. Although I wouldn't mind the second one to check to see how Harry. So with the sleep for instance, I like track mostly I'm very particular about it because Donald Lama apparently is nine for saying that sleep is the best form of meditation. So by optimizing, my sleep tracking it with my own ring tonight, more deeply Rhames late light sleep. And how many times I'll way cool. What not I can then see how I feel subjectively the next day and compared to the data, but I only check in myself before I look at my own data siphons tomorrow ring data for last night. But imagine it probably had about an eighty five to ninety score in terms of slate. Which would be interesting to check to see how my subject if feeling is compared to that. So there's quantifying how you fail. So that's an example of that or adding in a mineral supplement, all adding in better hydration than than seeing your bloodwork comeback showing that you have actually better electrolytes, et cetera et cetera. So I mean, it's not just going. Let's do this and see how I feel on its own. It's going to find through data. Okay. So. You're basically saying there is it's a blend of using by hack, whatever that might be. We're gonna come into some of those and and the good old fashioned sitting them thinking, how do I feel? So it definitely not saying what lean on the data lean on the tech. It's just another input. Yes. Figuring out. How do I feel? What should I be doing today? How should I pace almost the efficacy inventiveness of some of the other stuff on doing? So if you're meditating before bed. How can I measure the effect on my deep sleep exam? Perfect perfect. I think this is where everything's a bit of data. For instance, subjective feeling is still data is up to thirty five points, depending on the day of different things in my health, and some of it's subjective. Some of it is through like this. So I think it's about using your common sense of going his stuff I'm doing, and here's how I feel and here's the data that backs up and saying, well, actually what other areas should I test subjectively and then seeing what I can quantify through data. And I think it's really important to me. At that point. That's why we're not suggesting that you just rely on this stuff. I think were ready quite disconnected from what's going on in bodies. And some things you need data for like heart rate variability resting heart rate to a degree body temperature. It's release as the moment. He does that. But just sitting there and and tuning into your nervous system. I feel Todd do by the way use the temperature. Well, that's why you'll be held one session. A lot of people listening. So it's I think it's important to preface at the outset. Actually, nothing substitute cheating into your body. And we do need to get better connected to our bodies without technology, in my opinion. I mean talking about by how can you can delve really deeply into the barking. I mean, just you personally how far down that. If you go because so let me what was something that the very extreme. Be. Would it be putting something into your eyes to see in the dark which somewhat has done chlorophyll? So. No. So that's very extreme. Yeah. I mean, I don't go extreme extreme maybe by some people's types opinions on me, but really becomes to one of the beliefs for the help up towards ation. Some is that it's to use technology to mimic natural environment and on natural world. Yeah. So for instance, an example to mimic a natural environment on natural what? So for instance, people use app year. If is in the city that why because we haven't got clear who we need clearer. So therefore, we're using technology to mimic and more natural environment. Or we're putting plants in our house could cleaning air or we're using blue light in the morning such as a looming night to give us more natural blue light to wake the brain up to reset this Acadian rhythm or human charger with blue light into the air or red light in the afternoon, stroke evening or blue blocker glasses to block out the blue light. So that your brains awake thinking, it's morning still. You know, this like technology to mimic natural environment. And on that Joel that is one of the key things that I think biohacking truly is because of the spike on this journey to many people across the world now. And it keeps them coming up the places like Africa. They have completely different illnesses. They have different things that they don't need root canal fillings, for instance, and they don't need dentists like we do because I didn't have the level of sugar and all the other things that go into their bodies. They're actually seem to have very very different cases of sicknesses and different chronic illnesses. So we're going backwards in my opinion, but we're using technology or certain other interventions to right? The wrongs that we're having. Whereas sometimes it's just going back to the basics. So I'd like to think by hacking for me is using the basics getting back to the basics using technology where where possible for me like people say to me. Well, you live in London you live in this monkey sits. In zone one. Well, yes, I do and NASA choice, and like I would actually I'm going to minimize everything else. I can't loan doing. So that I can joy this for the moment. But at some point we'll move on. Then guy actually, I won't clean fresh air and more sunlight and less, right. But it's best in Davis is now again, that's an important message not to get cheap and shape about this stuff. You to do what we can let some of the other stuff guy in every both live in central. And as you say you've got to let the pollution go. Can you mitigate that maybe having lots of anti-oxidants lots of really good vegetables. Maybe you can vegetable garden, even though you live in London zoo, grow some of these organic vegetables, so groundings. Well, there's things like grounding, which is a thing that's controversial area. But I think explain what it is. So it's based on the principle, but we don't connect with the earth anymore. Religion don't connect with the earth. While we were rubber shoes or leather shoes, and we're working on tarmac or vinyl flooring, or whatever. And we're not actually thing out connecting with with the money a layman in this area. And I trust the people in my circle fully, Dr Jack cruises work, and Matt Maruko who's a friend of ours and show who works for me in health. Optimization summit. Definitely more details in this area. So to go into that in more detail with need them to talk. But essentially, the basic sciences that we connect with the F, and it's all about free radicals, basically and connecting with the. Apparently is great as an antioxidant industrial in the background over. There can can come in. If I'm if she thinks is appropriate, but essentially is all to do with the positive and negative ion electron sorry. So for instance, for me, I've got a grounding bedsheet, which I plug into the wall. But just in the thing sock. It not the negative or the positive, and apparently is very good for inflammation and healing. I've tested it now for two years, and I did notice it was actually good for my sleep. At that point. I wasn't tracking my aura data. So I can't quantify it. But I have had offer the last two weeks, and I'll be having it back in again to see what it's dumb data. So yes, I mean, that's an another example of where we're not connecting with the earth because we're in the city and we wearing shoes. And then thing out would be a great thing. A lot people say that's very woo. But how many people do you know, that they go just love sitting in the park taking off my shoes and sitting in the grass or swimming in the scene. I just feel so amazing. I don't know what it is. Well, it's funny actually because that's how humans evolved having that environment. And it comes back to things like sleep as well people saying, well, actually, I prefer harder beds. Or when the sun comes up I wake up, and that's because we're supposed to be not supposed to be in like buildings with sense. Exactly, exactly. But still be rooted in the modern world, I think we've lost a lot of our connection back to the natural world than in nature at a lot of people. I think it's affecting their mental health quite severely. I'm here. We are in the city of London. We can see the short and the city and Canary Wharf not from this from this building. But not from this move as a lot of people stopped in that building. It's a very natural thing in dreaming of getting back on the land. Yeah. Lost connection. Well, there's did a interview with the times magazine few months ago, and it was quite an interesting pace in the angle. I think was about a coat of wellness, not necessarily a positive spin. But it was really interesting to meet with the guys there in the news building. Because one of the girls was working in a closed room with fake blue light. And they said do people think you're extreme and whatnot. So well as soon as they start realizing how good this is your health and energy, then people start being drawn in. It's not about selling something's about being drawn in. And she said, well, what these classes that you have here, basically, these blue blockers, and they cut out a large portion of the blue light, which means that my brain's not being kept awake late in the afternoon. And it was like six or seven in the evening when I was there. We're talking about I had the guys basically within the rim. Not captivated that'd be the wrong word, but really really interested in knowing more about this. And it's like you could see. When there's something in it for people, and they go, actually, yeah. I have been filling ties and I haven't been able to sleep properly, and we'll have been wide when being getting into bed. That's because you're playing on your phone until five minutes before bed and your brains thinking, it's early morning, all the blue light and people are drawn to it. And they actually, and that's where the labor health optimization is perfect. Whereas if I said, you wanna get into biohacking they would have been like what is this guy on? But if you optimize your health and optimize your sleep. Yeah. Totally meet many people in any even our industry. Up to myse- sleep. What we're going to have some sort of fishy. Let's talk more about blue light. So it's a frequency of light emitted things like televisions, laptops, though, ball's not true light. But obviously the sun goes down a certain point in the day in the negative effect of this blue light later in the day visited suppresses melatonin. Walk people do about that many things many, many many things I'll give you an example of a friend of mine whose English is go Turkish genetics as well as English and he lives in Copenhagen. And there's really interesting because when we go an ordering on him because he's always had horrible, sleep and amazing health, but not bad bad health. And there's like, Tim, I'm doing this. I'm doing I'm doing the other thing and all these things, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, first of all, let's get an ordering on you. I think it's important is so we did then we look to his deep sleep and he had anywhere from three minutes to seven minutes. Sometimes fifteen minutes of deep sleep, which is just like horrendous, and he was talking about all these different things. We have a cool now. Call every few weeks and catch up. It's very very good powder. Mon and I sit gymnast just go back to the basics all comes razor. I love saying. I mean for me, it's like often people go too far down the rabbit hole and forget the basics. And I think that's actually what's wrong with a lot of the medical space. Should I say, so so many people are caught so far down in the detail? They forget the basics such as the environment. Yes. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think the basics offer instance, making sure that the light is correct making sure the hydration and nutrition is correct. Correct. Not end the day locking Lula in the evening. Yeah. I mean, I'll go into the detail of radicalizing the blue light in a bit so lights hydration and bearing in mind, for instance, hydration used to be drinking water from a stream that was mineralized and full of the electrolytes that we need to make our electrical system work now bottled water, that's not necessarily the highest quality. It's got all the chemicals that come with it or some chemicals with it. All we use really good water filters that take all the minerals or taking the minerals out. So therefore, we're just putting water in us which were then paying out which then washes out more and that lights, which means we become dehydrating. Even though we're drinking more water when not supposed to drink mountain water we drink when they say two liters a day. Personally. I think that's bollocks. I think my opinion isn't of tested this to the extreme adding in singular minerals and testing to say what my response my buddy. And then gene, mental, clarity and everything. And so having proper mental is water in the right minerals that comes onto gut health and nutrition. You're some people say, well, I eat healthy I shouldn't ever need supplements. Well, the next thing is nutrition. Well, if you know eating organic, or should I say naturally grown foods, the minerals or nutrients in the food aren't going to be to the level of what they should be friends. I heard the other week the other month. Sorry that spinach now has about twenty percent of the island than it used to have in it because everyone didn't like the taste of spinach and to make it more popular they removed, the it tasted better. So just on that. It's a brilliant book by Joe Robinson could eating on the wild side. And she talks about how vegetables have been modified to me less. Bitter more palatable and free shipping. Modified to be sweeter. Because that's what we want to conceive. So we have bastardized some of these. I'm going to read that book, I'm going to read. So I go up dinner and were so even if people are eating the right food in their mind that resembles the right food. It might not have the right nutrients in it or in it, and then that comes onto we'll have they got the right gut bacteria to digest the foods to get the nutrients from that. So it's a double so double whammy, and if anyone had antibiotics in their life, they're not going to have the right micro volume. They're not going to have the right balance is one of the areas for me, I looked into because I started forming kidney stones years ago, just before I start getting ill and one of the areas of bacteria. You can't get hold of and supplement is oxygen back to from NG's, and that is a type of bacteria that breaks down oxalates and therefore stops. You're getting kidney stones potentially. So a lot of these issues are caused by sure we get an infection. We need to take antibiotics sometimes it's emergency, take it. But but they've been dished outlet front and center or microbiomes been damaged. Therefore, we're not digesting the food. We may not even notice it. If you check out what goes in the toilet. Afterwards, but on a nutrient level, are you getting it? So not only the food depleted. You got bacteria's not getting it. Right. So therefore, you become dehydrated and lack of nutrients, which means you buddy doesn't work properly tweeting a person lifestyle. It does discovering. What you should look like it's been coming more cost effective deters while DNA tests testing some micro by staying with that takes millions more next point of like show, your gut bacteria might be correctly. You might not have ever had in biotechs. But there again, if you go genetic variation like the MTA fall, gene variant, but one of them, which means that your methylation processes aren't working correctly. Which means your liver isn't working at the speed. It should do which means it's not breaking down chemicals or jetting chemicals, as it should do, which means that your liver Bal, isn't as it should be which means you aren't necessarily clearing your digestive system, which means that you could have bloating CBO or some form of it. Which means that you're not getting the nutrients you mean food as well. So. For me. I look at the basic. So I say well, first of all look at the genetics and see if there's anything in the MTA Jaffa's specifically that needs. Optimizing a look at the hydration side of things because if you've got is bad, and you all dehydrated, then using minerals, the right minerals in the right balance is a quick fire way to shortcut, the gut until you fix the gut and got the right bacteria in it, which means digesting the right food. And then you change your diet as well. So really that that combined with sleep at light people's health turn around significantly to round off on these points of what the fundamentals are is that an error that I've been looking into recently with a colleague of mine from the state's share it's meant to below mix which is into cellular health. Yeah. Here so metabolism. So basically into cellular health. So what do you look at the body? You look at the body on a cellular level you say, right? What are your cells deficient of because? Health issues will tell you that something's gone wrong in the symptoms say, hey, something needs fixing. And then you have to figure out what's gone wrong. Genetics will tell you what could go wrong potentially in the future. And based on Bruce Lipton's, and Joe dispenses work believe it that. Well, you've got a twenty percent chance of the genetics having a role in that box into the health is the right now, it's what your body needs now to work and so looking at the cellular health, and you say, well, actually, okay, your you may be supplementing with magnesium and eating the right foods and have the right gut bacteria, but you'll magnesium levels are stupidly, low Tesco interesting. So there's a specific test that Dr Scott share does in the states. It's through Genova. I think it's called the neutral vowel test issues one of three or four key tests that they do relate Tunis listening or you're watching this stuff in the show. Okay. So so yeah, that basically tells you what you need to fix what you need to supplement with or get from your diet for your body to start working as it should. It's incredible. Actually, I'm just being testing over the last three months before I talk about it on a wider scale. But yeah. So that's the I believe the future of healthcare right there. So yeah. Those are the those are the key things. Interesting. So they're the basics. So we got to that from blue light. We will actually like and actually your friend Newark, we twenty one to pick up on blue light. Let's go to the blue. I think it's because sleep number one hack is sleep optimization. Yes hundred without. Yes. Multiply can anything else? No. You can't you just can't you buddy doesn't hill. You bring doesn't work correctly. You don't have the energy, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And everyone knows what it's like to have an out and not have a lot of sleep regret it. So I think the first thing to do is that so the blue light you can rather do which is very hard very the TV sitting dark. You know life. No, nothing. No, instagram. So it's about minimising that to some extent in cutting out the blue light earlier can so for me I wear blue booking glasses in the evening. So the raw ticks ones. So they're not crazy bright orange ones. The I have I have the lighter yellow ones so eccentric. But depending on what I'm up to where I am. If I'm on a plane or where the orange ones depending on the time of day, I want to do. I'm not night wear will Bono king funky glasses that most people wouldn't go around. But they do I wear tree docs. And again, we're linked to that in the show notes and some of them just look pretty much like normal glasses. But they only block certain maybe forty percent. So the roar upticks ones Maruko, he's nineteen year old guy. Darshan? I know he's a guess mentored by jet crews must become a good friend. He's amazing guy. Knowing teen in knowledge that he knows. It's just absolutely flipping incredible. In the space and tell you about podcast that you should have listen to this you probably put it in the show notes. But he was Luke stories podcast the lifestyle list, and he did a podcast with Matt Maruja. You may want to do a podcast with Matt. Offline what will link to that say, it's incredible. I've said it's the best one of ever listen to any. And he has a blue light meter to check spectrometer and checks all the different losses and things like that. And so the ones that I wear cutout seventy percent of the blue light. So it's not all the way. But it minimizes it to some extent. Oh, so use the orange feature on my iphone. So you can set it up. So you can triple click, and then it makes it go orange. Nightshift setting. Yeah. Well, no, actually, there's actually a color screen where you can put the filters the colors the blue out or show you off to this. And there's instructions online can put people in the dimming doesn't necessarily cut out the blue light, it just dims the phone automatically. So it's not so glaring. It's still a blue light. Visit key difference. Flux is the cuts out in the blue light. But really minimizing at the best. You can using things like the blue blockers is great. But really actually just cutting out as much as you can. So my friend deigned to go back to we basically got him to use blue blockers candle light in the evening all light sources where he could then his deep sleep suddenly shut up overnight, and we spoke a few weeks ago. And he was like, yeah. My sleeps, very, very consistent. Very very good health follows from that really does did you do anything. I mean, we have this is the show would have helped me talk about four sleep staircase. Basically, it's a set of St.. Let's steps Mitchell steps that you take to get from sympathetic dominant. Just got in state to a parasitic dominant ready for bed so change into casual clothes putting your blue blockers on eating his earliest possible. No network out success. Did you do anything on his mental state because you can be wearing the glasses sitting in candlelight? If you're still mind worrying, it's still going to affect sleep. Did you need to or for yourself? Do you do anything already? I list down something when I have a thought if I'm in a meeting with someone or hanging out with a friend or something and there's an introduction to do anything unnoted down immediately. Then it's not an open loop anymore. And so there's a book called getting things done is quite well known that something required. Reading from. My team is about when you've got an open loop. Make sure it's close. You don't have to keep them thinking about it. So people say, well, I have a note that next to my bed. So that when I wake up and have an idea, I can write it down. And then it's gone that need to worry about it. I used to do that. So I put things in that. Or he's my note paddock depending on how quick you need to type. And if I want to look route during a conversation, so I always try and close off every loop or at least everything down. So that way I don't have to keep on thinking about it. And are generally like our read before bed. Also, use my red light rising full stack. Yeah. Nice. Yeah. Guys. They're brilliant Brian James over there. But tennis because that's another by academic compasses that people can can use. What do you use it for benefits you get what is it as well? Red light therapy is brilliant for healing. So I had an operation eighteen months ago, and it was supposed to take a long time to heal up supposed to be a three month painting process. So I combine that with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and red light and the majority of the wind was held up in three weeks and the surgeon just went. Wow, that's incredible. You've got a great buddy hailing and it went. Well, this is what I did here. Yeah. Okay. Sure. Is you get target light which is a spotlight or there's a full stack is an average of three four foot long, which you stand right in front off. And it's different frequencies of light. Isn't it the penetrate the skin very deeply? Yep. We're big fans of eight we've done quite a bit of content around before. But are linked to a podcast episode. I typically one who runs red light rising. So you use it for heating. But it's quite a lot of anti-aging. Benefits many many benefits from it like recommend people to Google it and have a look into the benefits because I don't want to start spouting off the best things. But for me, a note just gets great for my skin. So I sit in front of it. I use it for seven minutes a day in terms of therapy. But I use it for about twenty minutes a day in terms of the light itself. So for the healing. I find it very good for my skin. And actually my sister in law. My brother got one and he wanted to try out, which he did and his wife is a muggle, I guess in terms of biohacking previously. But she noticed that it was good for him and his skin especially around his eyes. So she started using it. And then she noticed a benefit from it. And she has a big fan, and then she fell over at work and tooth into lip. So every morning should pull a and put it in for the light to hear it healed up. So so quickly. So she became a believer. And all of a sudden one percent changes less of a mogul, some more of these. Blacks. And now she was blue booking glasses, which is really because it shows that it does work through the result. Postage just people saying it. I think the plea blockers should be mass for anyone because we sit in so much junk light the majority of us during the day, which is one thing, but to come home, and then sit under junk lighting, and does matter have fancy lights are in the frequency of coming out of them. It's such an easy thing to do to pet. A parrot losses on if you already wear glasses. Get wraparound going talk over the top of those and we've noticed a measurable improvement in sleep quality who's asleep duration. I find for me nowadays, it's fairly minimal because I minimize it in the evening, Louis C. So I don't need to wear the blue blockers as much as some of the other guys do in this space, and I think that was actually discussing this Greg Potter who's a PHD in sneak SCI. He's been on the sheriff. As a wholesome guy. He and I both agree that wearing blue blockers before a certain time is just bonkers. I mean, if sure if you're on stage, four o'clock in the afternoon before for clock is there's no point. Let's just absolutely no point in my opinion. It's interesting because we both he has the very science side of it. And I have the very biohacking less scienc- more application. It's so it's been really interesting discussing this with him. And so for me, I mean, I won't wear blue blockers before four o'clock, generally. And if I do is because say, for instance on stage, and there's a lot of junk like around, but really I like my brain being awake during the day. And I need to let it know when it's time to start getting ready to sleep. And that's when the red light comes on. So in the evening, I'll switch on probably an hour hour and a half before I go to bed. So that my whole bedroom is completely red. And I don't use it for therapy for that. It's just that my eyes get used to not having blue night everywhere. And so if I for instance, forget that the hallway lights on and I walk out of my bedroom. The whole world is blue like crazy crazy blue because I've been in red environment so much shows you how much blue light we're having on an unconscious level, but we don't necessarily consciously pick it out. So I think minimizing is the key thing. And now, I find wearing blue block is minimal in terms of return for me, unless out of my usual routine, I guess, but it's definitely important for general people that have an optimized their life as much as I have because I spent six seven eight years in any I guess now in in this kind of this area, don't watch TV. I haven't turned that thing on for a very long time. I use my laptop it's got flux on it. I minimize the use of it in the evening. So yeah, I mean, some people might find that they have a ten or twenty percent gain in deep sleep beat Matt sent it could be on the subject of light if you played around with the human charger. Yes. Right. Right. You're watching listening. That's a little device like an ipod nano. I have spoken about it before in the pilot. There's one coming over. I think there it is. It has a couple of eight bucks and it shines a free blue in which dose of white light into the is with a reporter receptors. So essentially, it's like simulating natural light medically approved for seasonal affective disorder and jet lag. So tell me about how you use it. I used to use it every morning in my routine because you getting up before the summer's up. No, just to let my buddy. No, this is the time you should be waking up not due to sunlight or anything particularly. And because of traveling a lot I want to make sure that my body knows when it's time to wake up, and then you get tired of their early on in the evening, if you've cut the blue light out in the afternoon. So it's a good reset for me. I've since been testing the Leumi lunches here in these on plants, these are generally, this is where they are. Around the whole house, though, things like it. So the Lou me like I have on. So it's generally about forty five degree angle outside of my in my eyesight, while I'm working so here at the coffee table there or standing here. And that tells me my brain should be awake. So human charger is a great portable version of it. So if a fun traveling to Eliah wherever when it's time for me to wake up this up in flying through the night and on there in the morning time, then I wear all use it three or four times in the morning. Just to let my buddy. No, now's the time to be awake. And then that kind of helps reset it. And I find that my jet like will be done in the day twenty four hours twenty six hours on generally. Yeah. Your trip either way just sorta varies some it to pass. Yeah. I mean, I find coming back is actually even easier. I don't even find get jetlag when I come back so time before last and I came back I flew back from the states six seven right hour difference. I can't remember where I was specifically. And I came back to London to run the meet up in the morning landed two hours before the meet up. Judah start jumped on a train came back. I had slept two hours three hours on the flight carried on this noble went to bed in the evening because of the human charger resetting the time when it was morning, and then I just her it's like people find it more difficult going east than is going west. I find it's pretty much right across the board. I do wake up say five thirty six in the morning a time for a few days. But if you like four hours or two or three hours difference today, you reset it is very very easy and he's getting the Senate. And so I think your body just doesn't know what time of day is. And you need to let it know and using human charger or loom Eli or whatever is perfect for that tips. A jet lag. Jetlag? So obviously using light food. I've heard it can be used as well to sign reset the bar. I mean, if you're sleeping you not going to be up to eat. And so your body your body knows? So for instance, if you're on the flight, and you're eating at the time, you would normally be sleeping what's sites in the buddy? It'd be awake. So I think that you should be eating at certain times of the day specifically, and if you're flying you should try and eight for the time that you're going to be in the time that you were in. Yep. Unfortunately, we're program to think that we should eat breakfast, lunch and dinner and some people eat three or four five times a day, which is just like never giving digestive system a chance to shut down. So it doesn't know when it should be awake. Or when it should be Asli. So I think during that is is really important to have it, right? For instance. I'd have breakfast. We'll have a but it proof esque coffee. So you're taking in calories while I have a little bit better a lot. So it's a bit creamy. With black coffee generally have. And then I'll have a lunch about one thirty two o'clock. And then I read six seven o'clock, and that's it and some days. I'm very short. So it's very time restricted feeding more which is quite popular. Now, I'm doing that allow Hungary as we speak, but I have actually had a very small green smoothie about an hour and a half ago, but we try neat between ten and seven nine hour window. Yes. Yes. Some days didn't even need to think you behind the time restricted eating one on really busy. And sometimes they'll just forget to the generally get hungry anymore to think instead as being key to which I did do for million to twelve months, which is really amazing really amazing actually for health and for resetting the whole and getting organic gases tests come in the line, and what not after being on lots of antibiotics years ago. It was the one thing that worked nothing can the of these things. So I found that metabolic flexibility is key especially something that rubbed wolf talks about medical. So the people go where you should be key to you should be paleo should be. Blah, blah, blah, and they attach themselves to this labeled and they hold onto that. But why were they there regionally? So for instance, I'll touch on the the vegan Kito my opinion on this and appreciates controversial. But who cares put it out there? So some people go well being and because I got so much healthier. When I went vegan. Okay. Cool. How you doing? Well, my health plateaued not been so good. Now, it will people go, actually, I'm Kita Kita. It's amazing. I haven't been so well, you know, how you doing now? Not so good Schnee, I'm having headaches. And this the other might well all of these things are modalities. They're all things to help fix your buddy for period of time. Peyot I think is the nearest to where we should be because it's natural. It's not processed food with leads of rubbish. But for instance, the vegan thing people go onto it to be healthy. They eliminate all this crap all the processed foods and all the meats like this is Sarah. Well, no. Yeah. So there's Pekan which is paleo vegan and not just vegan. Okay. We're taking the books because we're trendy vegans. And we're eating all these products of all this rubbish in we've into I'm not going to name the show, but went to a vegan show and actually the goodie bag that they gave us the most edible thing in the bag in my opinion was the lip balm. I'm not joking. A really not joking. So vegan is a label to go. Now. I appreciate and some people are in it for health and some people are in it for ethical reasons like their beliefs and values around animal cruelty. Sure. And I appreciate in value their opinion very much. But if it's the health sort of things, do you not eat crap, which is generally manufactured products that just don't have animals stuff in it, which is bunkers, and then they wonder whether they didn't healthy. But they're all the vegans that do eat just leafy greens and vegetables and eat very clean. But when you look at them on a cellular level, and this is something I've been discussing with Scott, recently, you see that they are so deficient in many things like they're just not getting the right foods, and it's hard to do it. With health is the top measure success. I think it's hard today. It's not impossible. But it's hard to do. I would like to get there purely for animal welfare reasons and rescue reasons, but I'm not yet willing to put in the amount of effort, principals, not a principal unless it's costing you something. Trotting out. Now, we'll be posting things our animals, but I didn't think the time and energy to put into doing it with else's top phone. There's one of our beliefs in the health optimization some is that we respect and appreciate other people's opinions. And that's really really really important. So for instance, I don't agree with veganism forever. I believe yes. It's a tool to go in help fix health boy eliminating lead rubbish, and because you know, eating eighty percent meat or fifty percent, meet you're actually having lows more nutrients than the vegetables or you could just eat better quality vegetables, not governed here, and you genetics which then obviously fixings, but really there stuffing themselves with so many more vegetables such a plethora foods, therefore, it's helping their health. But then they start getting deficient of other things that they're not getting because they often trim back. Oh, have manufactured vegan food and then their health platters. And instead is reassessing going. What's the next step to get better health gang? I did this and I noticed a big difference. And so I'm gonna continue on that. But what got us here won't get us there. And it's about reassessing. That attaching ourselves or he goes to a label and saying what is next. So that's why I guess the health optimization summit to touch on. That is so important. So tells me about the summit really when is it where is it? September fourteenth and fifteenth timber okay in central London, and it's essentially bringing in health, fitness, medical, and nutritional world's altogether. So that covers biohacking peyot Kito, even the vegans everything altogether and saying that we respect each other's mindsets. Wayne respect our opinions, but let's use all clever mines because there's a lot of clever people, but they will just disjointed let's use this brainpower together for the first time ever. So we're working on getting the specialists from across the world in each of these areas. Stateside Europe UK Russia everywhere together to say, let's look at this health pace and say how can we work together collaboratively, and I'm including the medical world in this as well. Because it's incredible. We've achieved is not necessarily working as it should do which is the goal of health. Appreciate it's very controversial and difficult area. But the point is is going, well, let's work together. Let's do this. Because no one's out to do bad. Everyone's out to either make a profit or get health or both. And it's like, well, actually, let's work together and actually have health and wealth. I guess and again this comes back to a company belief for us. It's health before prophets. Both are important. Don't get me wrong. And we need to live, but it's health before profit suppose, the profits before health, and that's why we're including all of these areas and all of these diets so one of the algorithms that we touched on before we started recording. Is that people that may have brain fog, and this is a common a really common thing people have brain fog. So if they heard about the health optimization summit or if they're googling brain fog. They might try new tropics like I did an arrest in town or whatever, but they're going to have neuro feedback because at city with the brain. And that's reductionist way of looking at it will we can do is we say, well, his all the air is that we're covering this. Wasn't you go and check out a talk on gut health, or why don't you go in check out talk on this or that? And. Against these these exhibitors because then it's an integrated approach opening people's minds, and we're not saying any of these things at curing. But it's about having the right knowledge. Your information in front of the right people. So they can decide which avenues they wanna take posted you go into a key to conference or paleo confrontational, very one. A big conference or this. Or I'm going to go in go to whichever conference is based on what they know. What happens if we open this up open awareness, and then bring the right people from each area that to talk about it from the most specialist with the most researched and backed-up people that we can ever possibly find. That's a win win. We're healthy. Our ourselves we got healthier, friends and family, and we're all enjoying what we do. And we've got one place to go for it. So that's really what we're working on. So big goal. But it's extremely fun. Another side of it completely behind that. Hopefully, we can get involved as well. I think some of the takeaways from this conversation for me, I like go on forever. But on the we've got a few minutes left is taking responsibility for your own health and focus on the basics before you even think about tracks buying any technology or gopher one or two things to enhance what you're doing. Don't just spending money spending time going back to the basics Personalizing everything as well. Personalize your. And if the right diet for you. And I think it should be I recorded podcast on this recently by person is my diet by referring to my DNA results, and my annual gap test at that forms amazes, the Dr I eat, but that can change because the results of my next GOP tests might mean that I go more towards a certain dot type. And then not served me as you said. And then it might be another type of diet, but I don't go for anything name. My daughter doesn't have a name just a personal to me and taking responsibility. Ultimately for our own health really appreciating the interconnected nature of health as well. So it isn't just about health. It's about sleep. And the body is composed and things what would your main takeaway for people listening or watching bay just to wrap up? Well enjoyed properly and sleep properly. I mean that would be too simple things that the to those are the most important things that I mean, we haven't touched on light getting some light. And one thing I think is important people say, oh, I feel amazing. When I go on holiday, well pilots to do Vitmain d level. But the summer is very healing is like if you put a plant under top holing and jet cruise cruise Cruces known for saying this plant under Tom polling will it grow. What? But what about us becoming close? We don't get the sunlight etcetera etcetera. And a lot of us have moved around the. Senate into areas where genetics Princeton's typically darker skin needs more sunlight, and yet they're in Dhaka country. We're blessed sunlight and darker skin there for they're going to be even more deficient. And so I think there's a real heating power from the sun, and it may sound movie. But it's not there's a lot of science behind it. And when you think about it on a binary example like a plant under a top polling go. Yes. Obvious because we see it on a day-to-day change. But we not buddies because it's not an on off switch. We don't see it overnight. Maybe on the ten year possible thirteen you might so I think yeah. Hydration sleep and sunlight really the three key things to go back to it is mimicking a natural environment in unnatural world. It comes back to that back to basics with the right like modalities or help from the right angle from the amazing technical well that we've created and using the Easter to bypasses problems. Thank you very much. Welcome link them. Interested in finding out what you'll health like you. It's jump on our website, WWW dot body shorts performance dot com and click on take the test. It will take you to a short two three minutes test. And at the end of that, you'll get a scorecard and a free thirty nine patriot. Poor based on I six signals sleep, mental health, energy, body, composition, digestion, and fitness. And if even joy this episode, please think of someone you could really benefit from the content and hit not share button, send it across to them. And of course, don't forget subscribe and leave his rating and their review. Thank you very much for listening.

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Interview With My Original Mentor - Part 3 of 4

Marketing Secrets

26:49 min | 8 months ago

Interview With My Original Mentor - Part 3 of 4

"WHAT'S UP, everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the marketing secrets podcast. Today you are ready and prepared I hope for. Part three of four part series had a chance to interview with my very first mentor Mark Joiner, and what's cool about this is in the past I've had a chance to interview mark a lot of times, but it was the first time that he ever interviewed me, which was kind of Anyway it was a huge honor to have your mentor asking you questions about stuff and so. Like I said in the first episode Mark was my very first mentor online someone who? Men have so much respect for him. So grateful for him and his. Contribution that helped me to figure this out and I hope you enjoy part three of our four part series with my very first mentor Mark Joyner. So the big question is this. How raunch brewers like He didn't cheat and take on venture capital for spending money for own pockets. How we market away lets us get our products and our services and the things we believe in out to the world and yet still remain profitable. Batted the question in this podcast give you the answer. My Name's also Brunson welcome with marketing secrets. Okay. Thing third thing things. So I think the reason why people are trying to grow the company that hit ceilings like I. I struggled this I got stuck between one and three million dollars a year. The deck couldn't break that ceiling about how hard I did and what I realize is click funnels the first phase of of the business was like. There's hyperactive cut like I said customers, which of the easy ones, right? Like they get it the early adopters they figure stuff out and those are the customers are already there waiting to grab him and I think most companies that's as far ever again in fact, I've been geeking out on the book crossing the Chasm Right now and there's like five different, right? The innovators, the first ones that's where most people's businesses get to the innovators, and that's that's the way stop bright. Second phases like the early doctors but these people aren't. Like. The phase you have to learn how to create a customer rally. I clicked on the Internet marketers. It funnels like sweet. I made and came in they got clicked early adopters. Right. But then there's after that was done like like we ran out it was like the row they ran a road. Also, we've got all the Internet marketers like, okay. Now, what it was like okay with to create customers which to change our messaging, create our friend and price like they do things. When some comes they? They don't come with the desire ahead of time they listened to the message also, it's like, Oh, I need a fund like if you look at even strategically, the DOTCOM secrets book was to get the early adopters people understood funnels were like here's a how Iranians my strategy funnels. We got him in an expert secrets was like, Hey, do you have tower like you get it? Do you have ideas or advice or things you can make money with right? You can share your advice like like Oh. Yeah. I do is I cool. Will you need a funnel to get that message out for marketplace? So we we created customers from you know from from these people and that's the second phase and I don't think most people ever gets that were there in the phase of creating customers are getting the low hanging fruit early adopters and then that's the business and they hit the ceiling never get past it and the next phase is like, okay how do I create customers how to create the desire? So they they will come from where they are incumbents phase. I feel like just for my standpoint we just finished we're kind of end of the early adopter phase and we're now making the leap to the early majority which is. which me this is like the big my big challenges crossing the chasm talk about later if we wanted but that's next Phase I'm in most people never you know six years to get the point where we're done with that phase moving to across the chasm, which is scary. Any citing that four kind of what I want to end on actually. Were Twenty quick here this is a very interesting Eugene. Schwartz lesson that I think is quite apropos to what you're talking about and you remember the audience awareness scale, right? So he's got two things in their the audience sophistication scale, the audience awareness level, and the audience awareness level goes all the way from like Problem Unaware, right? So actually should put yet. So Problem Unaware. So imagine you know you got a guy. Who is living in the aboriginal Bush and he even know that there is such a thing as phones and you're like, Hey, here's an iphone. Well, he's not even aware that he has the problem that he doesn't have a phone right and then you got guys who are problem aware and then you've got solution aware and then it goes all the way up to most aware right which is like a guy who's like. All have to do is tell me that there's the new iphone coming out. I'm. Camping out. I'M GONNA be in front of iphone store for two weeks. So I could be I write. So as Russell, was was changing he was dealing with guys who were you know sort of like. Solution aware and sometimes even problem aware. But as he was expanding as marketplace, he had to of reach out to these other areas. But also understand that as you go across the whole spectrum, this area is almost always were the biggest money is, but it's the hardest market to talk to because the messaging is so much more. The Patent. East each step in that like it's because people like how do you shifted I? It's it's the words. It's like language. I remember Dean. Grassi, what's called me on days like this is the weirdest thing. At my wife's hairdresser, the hairdresser talking about this thing called Click funnels and he's I 'cause like you know what else has ever done because my hairdressers talk me your company right now but it's like. If I walked to hairdresser like you're on a final. For my hair like how does that work? No, we we had to speak differently to those audiences. We go further out to different audiences. We change our language patterns because which speak to them in a way that they understand, and then we and then we bridge the gap that we take them through a bridge that helps said like Oh that means funnel and this is why you need that thing as part right so much. You're not even GonNa know what a funnel is. By the way, another really interesting book people can read. So sort of like a spiritual sequel to break through advertising was one written by some of the is a high level Inter Gora called great leads and they talk about, yeah it's actually parents book and it shows you six different ways to talk about those different audience to talk to you those different audience awareness levels very, very good read for people on. Okay now. So this one is. I know I WANNA get into your to the thing that you talk about about crossing the chasm i. think that's a nice one to end on here on. And actually because I I wrote it as your plan to reach the billion dollar level and I. think that's kind of the same question. Really Right. Before we get to that I, want to ask you what your three biggest. Personal lessons were in this journey in this entrepreneurial journey, and you can even talk about some of your sports stuff too because I know some of that applies. So. What would you say those are? Man I was able to begin with. Entrepreneurship building of businesses like the best personal seven or eight. Like. Shove in your face and it gets bigger and bigger. And you've you're there or you go broke. Yeah it's. It's tough. But was cool about business you. It's kind of like a lot of friends who are having their first baby right now and I remember our first came in. You've got five kids now. But when the first companies still made the dating shows up, you're freaking out Austin Bay comes out and sits there and sleeps eighteen hours day you're. Just sitting there like. Isn't that bad you know and then as growing and growing and and what's interesting is that your capacity to handle a baby grows as the baby grows right now I've got my twins are fourteen years old and it's like man they stressed out teenagers are so much harder but it's like they came out of if they would came out fourteen year olds crushed us we'd been destroyed and we're prepared right but the capacity to handle the problems grew as as as the kids grew and I think I look at like the stuff I deal with a daily basis right now six years ago would have destroyed me like I'm so grateful that. I had six years to grow in capacity to handle the stuff like. I mean it's it's ridiculous. But that's why businesses so much fun to in exciting some. Was the question again. The three biggest purtzer lessons that you've learned along the way, and again, this could be from your sports career funder parenting and from your entrepreneurial journey because I think they're all related. As you said, you know business is the best personal development seminar you can possibly. These things are not unrelated they're all. It's all one life right? You know and things that I learned in the military definitely applied to my life and business and I'm sure things that you learn in the sporting world and in parenting also applied to business as well. So the so it sounds like the first one is that you had to learn how to grow along with the challenges because the the challenges are not going to get easier they're actually by definition in life going to get more difficult and I think what? Let's be really frank and blunt with everybody listening look we all age people we all age that means that based in to the formula for life itself is increasing difficulty. No matter what and if you think you're going to insulate yourself in some bubble. You know everybody has an entrepreneurialism say well, what's going to happen is is I'm GonNa make a whole bunch of money that I'm going to sit on the beach slipping umbrella drinks you're GONNA go away we'll just what's going to happen. You do that and I tried their here's what happened. I got fat sick and it was I became this horrible disgusting person that I was not proud of and I was GonNa die if I carried on with that path, this is the way the universe is designed guys it's designed to continue to get more difficult and to challenge you more. Would you would you agree with that hundred percent unless you unless in some people not because they like they came and they go and they sit watch TV and they just like, I am going to tap out in the sedate themselves to to like to. Hear the you know the the voice, the call rivers, it's like pulling your because. I. Think all humans have I think it's inherent from our crater that there's this thing that I pose us to WANNA do more. We wanted to ask you you and like we have this thing and. Promote the majority of people they the data, right? They say with TV with Ryan alcohol pornography never is like t to get that noise out because there's pain with that like. Man It is painful to walk out a I'll tell stories ties the second one, but but we about a year and a click funnels and and You know this is all of our first Rodeo Lakers todd's first time building this big and all these things. And I remember we first build it. He's like he's like, I'm pretty sure that. You know the does it will handle about ten thousand customers. We thought maybe I'll take a couple of years and then a year or ten thousand customers and sure enough like about a year. I, think are happening like the site and go down for half an hour and they get back up and then they always problems and all these these things and it was just like. So, much stress and I remember I got asked to speak in London on to talk about click funnel. So my wife, my kids, my family we floated fly to London Zoo, the land, the airport a get out I'm trying to get my phone connected and get card nervously gets in my phone is just like like on fire from like and it's all these people who I knew and they thought they were my friends but Zeus Click Click phone down and they were. All new. pitchforks route you're ready to kill me and my happening, and so I remember I his todd I'm like what happens we've been down for two hours he's like we can't figure out. He's like if if we're able to recover from this then. I, don't know something. If I was like. We. Win if and I'm like. Oh my gosh like. I. Don't even have to deal with this and I been there been there. We're in a car taking kids the hotel and they're like outside from London I might stress. Now I don't know what to do and I get hotel and we're talking and still down on facebook. Everyone's like little death threats. It's crazy how crazy people getting in. and. And all I, wanted to do is like. I'm a Mormons. There's not many things that we can use the date like go get some ice. States. In. That moment is just like I just want to hide. I don't think that's the right. I'm not. I. Don't think it's the right thing I think I, need to talk about this. I should like act like it's okay because it's not like I get. Inside so to our facebook group at the time. I think he's the Arcadian they pray find it but I this video from the hotel room and I was like. Click slows down and is not acceptable and I I am pissed myself on this my team raw pissed I wake this is not okay and like I just went out like all my sites I'm losing money you're losing money I understand it's not fair to us off. Just own it publicly life threatening and and it was scared I'm like I don't know what can happen McKee prize, but we're doing everything we can and I it is not acceptable and I am so sorry and we're GonNa fix this in and I just lead with that in a facebook live pipe bomb is out like I don't know if we're going to fix his like. You know and luckily amazing team back home they're they're killing themselves. You know it'll be it'll be good chapter in the book someday. Everything went on, but it took eight hours and they got it back up and Murphy then it was got stable and then we're. What's going to be the damage from this and the fallout and I remember Graphs they're like many people signed up and we will leave just you know numbers in in man during that little thing like our number of cancellations almost non noticeable like. And I just like I I if we went the other way around and hid behind it. Wouldn't trust a WHO knows how they would happen and that was such a good learning moment for like we can't hide behind lake in today's world like we have to come out. And and so that was a year in and then luckily. From that in other departments who came on like Ryan Montgomery who came in helped stabilize things and figure out all these things and and You know it's it's been pretty stable since then but like you those things. That you learn don't hide like it. Don't today and I think all in all aspects. That's like a lesson don't. Like soon, coming hard like man, your brain's going to be looking for a million different ways to say no or I don't WanNa go no no, no, and like met everything good always comes from going to the eye of the storm pushing through it and you even the pain vice a date or Check out. It's going to be good but it's it's not even subtle to the wife. So Dude it's funny. You say that I was just shooting a video about exactly that about how everybody is kind of opiates themselves these days you know through the dopamine of social or you know whatever it is I mean everybody's got their their drug of choice. Now you know again I mean you know your named a lot of you know binge-watching pornography, actual hardcore drugs I mean. There are people now there's so many people that are hooked on fence and ill gained and heroin combinations and I mean it's just a really ugly cocktail of what's going on and I want to kind of interject and maybe posit what I think other third lesson is for you. Let me actually going to ask you a question were you raised in Mormonism or did you choose to convert I was definitely raising it but I also had a very definitely point where I chose it. You know there at least for me for I. Think there's always a time when the storm comes in. Yeah. Decide what you really believe. Definitely had that. So yes and yes. And I say, I I would just kind of hypothesize that that played a huge role in your personal development because you guys are not allowed to involve yourselves in any of those sedation methodologies, they encourage a very morally upright life and I have to say being a veteran of the military intelligence community actually got to know a lot of Mormons because Mormons go out there and they get their language trading as missionaries. So there are a lot of Mormons in the military intelligence community and I gotta say like almost all of the Mormons that I worked with were really solid dudes who are like just you know genuine sincere people who wanted to live their life correctly and Legitimately wanted to be kind to people I. You got people like Bill Maher out there. You know saying all kinds of really nasty things about mormonism you know on it a cult and stuff like that. But my experience with Mormons has been nothing but very positive. It would seem to me that that your choice to to really even though you were raised in it to to decide to take that on very seriously must have also been very pivotal for you in your personal growth hundred percent i. mean you think about that I didn't go on a mission for two years for the church and like. Nineteen years old. This is typically for most people at the time. When you're in college, you're partying drinking. You're like I, think about yourself and you go out and Mike. You can't give yourself a you name tag was literally I was elder Brunson my name is gone like I'm ready to you know you're out there every serving other people during typically the most selfish time someone's life in for to your. Look at things when you come home now so people like I'm so grateful I mean money at. Emission. Who knows what happened like? We both have friends that made a lot of money really young and it destroyed him. So it's like Oh. Yeah. Definitely. Super grateful. That had that Lens to you know just. Lens of of learn how people before yourself, which is you know unfortunately, most people have that opportunity commission, you're forced into it and you learn to love it. So if Or funny for me I went through I was you know even though my family was Catholic you know I was Kinda raised around atheist agnostics. came. Sort of what I would call now apparently spiritualist but over time have become more and more rigid in that I've explored you know all of the different world's religions and. You know the one thing I haven't decided yet. If I'm going to settle in any location I, still need to listen to your you know your Mormon apologetic. Video that you made I'm super curious about that need make a point of sharing it because I mean, I'm open to it. I'm open to it, and when I see people who are living a life that represents genuine service for other people I have you ever heard of this Guy Father Gregory, who has this thing called the homeboys bakery and he was getting and basically what he does, he takes these kids who were. They were in prison and he gives them jobs at a bakery and that helps teach them how to be decent people. And I saw it. I. Help them get choked up when you hear about something like that because when you hear when you see somebody living their life that way and when you know what the cost of living your life, the other way is it makes you really take those things seriously and even the religion gets a bad rap because. There's a lot of crazy stuff happening organized religion there. The notion that sin you know how do you want to label that destroys your life is an observable phenomenon man I mean. You can see it when you do all of the things that you're quote not supposed to do in all of the religions of the world tell you not to do a lot of the same things and when you see what happens to people who live their life that way, and they think they can get away with it right and then you see what happens to people who live. There and I'm not I'm talking about people who were you know like the week or I'm trying to be a nice guy way to manipulate people. That's that's a bullshit thing that some people do right I'm talking about guys who are like Hey I'm GonNa make myself a strong person and I'm GonNa do good in the world though when I see people like that that that is the path. We all needed walking down in the more of us do that the better the world's GonNa be. Yeah I had someone. Recently told me. Like, learn about like my beliefs and stuff, and just like must be really really hard and then as I looked their life and has like the path they they've gone on not to judge Moore or make that seems so much harder like. I Dunno like. Maybe. Maybe. I'm grateful for the path and I'm gonNA stay on it. So. Good for you dude, I I'm I'm blessed to see your example because you know you're yet another person I can look at and say, Hey, here's a guy and your life is harder than my man your company is doing way more volume than my right. Now you have kids demand. You do all these extra things on top of it. You know and I'm like man I, WanNa learn how Russell is managing all of this stuff you need because I mean you're younger than. I am but you figured some things out that I haven't figured out I WANNA learn that and I'm a Moron I, don't learn it right I mean this. This is where the Eagle listen this has to come in if you want to be better and better and better. If you WANNA truly achieved great, you gotta be really strict with yourself about what you can and can't do. So let's let's kind of tie this up now with this crossing the chasm thing man, this is You know I don't know if this is something they could be covered briefly because I imagine it's going to be a pretty complex thing. But what can you say about that? Yeah and I'll place with my thoughts I don't know all the answers yet we're on your now. And it's it's fun though because it's like for me. It's been interesting as garments journey to immediate ties back. Last question is well, but like. You know an all tight exports wrestling for a long time like I was it was me I was the all sorts of wrestling was my thing handrails I loved it, and now that I'm older and I've got kids now as my kids Russell and like it's it's hard to transition from all star to coach is really painful ex only be like they're doing things Ryan like it I it's really painful and then eventually like for me my kids there by twins third year wrestling. This is so rewarding 'cause except when working on the finally getting to see them get their handwriting actually felt better than my own Henry's which is weird 'cause like it's been the. Life giving my Henry's. Business was similar because like the first two years of click funnels like I was the all star like they people how was Your Fun Ability Mike? It was me I bill the finals I really cells present like todd was June software I was doing everything else and I was the also like I'm doing webinars and flying around the world speaking I'm doing syndrome hands getting raised over and over and over again and start growing start getting harder and harder for me to to handle that right and I remember three years ago. It was I was like the spot where like the pressure so much I'm just like a breaking point. I don't know what to do this. And I end. I remember where I was that it was some other conversation but the thought the park. My head is like you have to transition from being the all to being the coach. At, the time had hired a couple of people and they would go they'd copy formula they build a funnel for me and the do it and I felt like it was like Michael Jordan like you know there are people who. To shoot a shot, he's actually grabbing his dunk on them. Right at first. I was doing that like my team would come in they make all the stocks I go to I'll rewrite it and fix it all on an all-star likelihood. I am it was holding me back them back and everything I was like. The transition to to be the coach, right? So I was the second phase was like. It's I it's hard but now I'm looking my team team meetings. So good make their producing stuff in they're creating without meat site and it's like, Sydney, like now they want something like that like. It's like it feels better getting your Henry's when your teams do now it's interesting. You've got a model really quick I just WanNa interject from wrestling. You know I mean Dan Gainesville was kind of seen as the greatest wrestler of all time, and then he was now is Kinda universally recognized as the greatest coach of all time as well across all sports right I mean I you know there are very few people who would deny Dan Gable. Is the best coach of of any sport of all time right? Aren't they think of how many people like making the jump from that? How many great athletes never become coaches? You know what I mean it's it's a it's an and I think she a lot of is ego. It's it's it's been really hard for me at both coach, my kids, and then coaching the team might there's this ego thing you're so I can do it better or whatever it's. Hard. And so anyone can make that transition from from all sorts of coach I have so much respect for him because it it's it takes a lot. Because I. Tell You ego battle is probably the one that's the that's the battle right? Ego. Kinda. Drive you that pride drives you so much is. It's the fuel initially it's the reason why I want your hand, raise the Eagles, the driving force initially, and then it becomes the thing that holds you back in the next phase. Right what. You're such a great friend over you know you're stirring. Her. Gene is of the design of the universe right? It's like every time we think we've got it figured out it's like no. You don't 'cause. Whatever designed this whatever you're causing allergy of the universe is call it God or whatever is. Infinitely. Smarter than you are and it's going to come up with so many ways to trick you and keep you off balance that every time you think you gotta dialed in, there's going to be a new challenge. It's GONNA come up. You have to you have to love that it's beautiful, right? When keeps life interesting? It would be so dull without it. Yeah. So so much fun. Russell again and really quick I wanted to invite you to join Arguably the best thing that we've ever put out inside to click funds community and it is a challenge we call the ones challenge everyone in their business in their life their one away from something some you guys one fun away from quitting your job and he has one frontal way getting more impacts. Me Is run away from growing your company to the next level and so we created this challenge to help you to create. And launch your first or your next funnel. No matter where you are in your business on this challenge is going to help understand the strategy was in tactic to understand all the things you need to be successful your funnel. So our recommend you do right now is stop everything positive side you go online and go to one funnel way dot com that's one fun away dot com and join the next challenge challenge starting in the next few days. So go get started right now one frontal way DOT com.

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#390  Paul Feig, James Mangold

The Empire Film Podcast

1:36:13 hr | 1 year ago

#390 Paul Feig, James Mangold

"On the Empire podcast this week. We have our engines with James Mangled. Talk about lemon sixty six. Everyone's reaction action. The movie is Oh I know what this is just to our car ad within. We know exactly how it's going to add and I'm like well I couldn't give less of a shit about the cars and it doesn't end like you. I think it does and Chat Sensor with Paul Fig to mark the release of his new movie. Last Christmas I loved the script so much and there was like Oh and the ad bonuses. We think we can go live in London all all this and the usual movie news reviews nonsense on the only movie. PODCAST that has received a sonic the hedgehog style makeover and now looks fifty percent less horrified. Hello I'm Helen Harris and I'm once again stepping into the enormous clown shoes of Chris Hewitt who is so unaccustomed to taking leave which he did last week that it actually made him ill so I'm afraid he is now home with the Lurgi and we wish him all the best for speedy recovery. And in the meantime the PODCAST is mine. Oh I am sorry. I'm here hello. I'm joined by two colleagues of such lethal cutting. I is our west winger a man who insists every single single morning that young man bring him the finest muffins and Bagels in all the land and calls every single vessel from which he drinks the Cup of glory. It's James Dyer. In fact drinking from Cup of Glory. Yes it's funny like my my. My introductions have never ever evolves from the West Wing that's that's essentially into no although I will say Helen it's the Keg of glory more than the Catholic Lord. Wow I'm drinking from the Cup of glory but I like to think Josh Josh. Lyman will always be drinking from the KEG glory. Well he is a lot better than new. So this is in a frat boy we also have with as you may have heard him. In the backyard's I'm a woman who such enormous fan of the Lion King that his stay doesn't start until he's been to London Zoo. Hoist a baby animal. Whatever into the air until for Rock and wait until all the other animals bow? Did you know that so it takes him hours sometimes this is true. He doesn't even deny it. Must be zookeepers if you've been wondering what's going on it's definitely nice so yes we're here at least we don't have the LURGI. Are we Lurgi free. I'm lucky free free now. This is good Hurrah okay. Hey well done us for clean living in washing our hands lots. Shall we have a question. Sure let's during Helen. Okay so this comes from Carl Jackson. WHO's on twitter at Carl from wolves and he asks what other Christmas songs would you like to see turned into films? Obviously this week sees the release of last Christmas which does feature last Christmas Christmas by one and other music George Michael and Williams. What other Christmas songs to we want to see ooh Hertel New York. The old is already a film right. Is that story though. Oh God no no what you mean is a you know homophobic and what. I don't believe it is now. I think the film L. Mississippi is fine. I mean it's not fine. It's terrible but isn't homophobic that I'm aware of okay. This is the songs been canceled. The film has not been canceled. The Pharmacist roundabout word in the song has has been cancelled and song has not been canceled. Played though many more like it doesn't get listed because it was a bit. There was a big hall. Wasn't that sounds cancelled what what would use okay. Let me let me bring a Christmas song. Say I have to so one of them Santa Baby as a sequel to the boss baby. No I'm thinking I'm thinking actually the sequel to the Christmas chronicles. Because hus what I'm imagining will happen at some point own firm. SANTER CO assault senator baby which means that. What Kurt Russell is turned out? 'cause like Santa Baby and someone's trying to seduce sexy Santa Kurt Russell into giving them presents. I was super with you but super sexy sons Kurt. Russell turns NHS into a baby. Though it gets better it gets veteran so super sexy Santa Baby and because of that Goldie Hawn on Mrs Center has to step in to save Christmas really. It was just engineering to get. Because who wanna see that Goldie Hawn Asante do wanna see Goldie Hawn and Santa but I I feel like we are missing the potential of the song because apart from the name I feel like it's not a very baby centric song. Did you know by the way that that song has a sequel. So what there is a sequel called this year teenager. You're still acting like the song about babies guys. You need to get past the idea that the song is connected to baby. There's a sequel recalled this year sends a baby also by the case and it basically genuinely you can look it. Up is The story of how all the gift she got the previous year turned out to be rubbish and she needs new replacements. Placements wrought the world's most entitled Christmas Song Never Sons. A baby is a song where she's basically trying to seduce Sunday into giving her an enormous amount of some very rich presence. Diet for me that is genuinely a film that I think somebody should make an I would like see if they have because I think that could it ended up being a porn film Helen. No I don't think it would have to. I think you just need a sort of you need to kind of Marilyn Monroe fifties kind of. I've been a good girl this year. I just know and we need to sort of bad Santa Crossover well Lula Gilmore's gang fuck me scientific Santorin. I just don't need that in my brain. I just feel like there's a way to do this. I feel like it's a dying with love kind kind of Marilyn Monroe gentlemen FRY belongs Kinda thing. The could sort of work. I'm not saying I've ironed all the kinks yet. I think it could work. Okay Sir my second one. I'm still working out the particulars on once. Isis settled on this title. I'll be home for Christmas Bing. Crosby awesome okay. So stay with me but I'm thinking this opens up on the former COP in prison. Wrongfully convicted talk. You flavonoids a gritty students. There is one month away from getting out of jail talking to his family. In one of those things promising the heels they home for Christmas is going to be home for Christmas togas. This is why I took his two daughters tenure water. You'll be home for Christmas. One month later day he gets out. Is Christmas Eve. This and that is how how the media began thinking too low. I think it should be a sequel to the wages of fear. I mean it's all be home for Christmas or bits of meat will be smeared across the landscape. Like it's that's that's the level. You should be pushing this up now. full of Christmas spirit there. Well let me think what other what other I just wanted to say if anybody is listening to this any Hollywood producers the mind twenty percent the twenty percent the little the little drummer boy. I'm thinking a love. Actually spinoff starring Thomas Brady sangster's character right you have to. You'd have to see you a youth him that we D H Him. That's no problem. I think that could work. Santa Claus is coming to town well. That's almost certainly porn Komo you fatal. Probably so is uh-huh Mary's boy child coup drama about a woman could marry here. Okay moving on from that Jingle Bell Rock. It's the rock climbing jingle rebels sign. I couldn't be more. I have my own suggestion. One of my favorite Christmas songs and I'm not kidding is called Maliki Makah. Ah which is a Hawaiian Christmas song. which was recorded in the fifties as a standard? If you hear it if you look it up you will find. It's kind of spelled like it. Sounds Melika Kalikimaka and it is great. I don't have to go with this but I think it's important that I go to Hawaii for Christmas to research is so a Hollywood producers. If you're listening if you're not sure by giving I'm on twenty percent of your next film give me. I don't even need twenty percent. I just need the budget ago. So why for Christmas and research my undoubtedly hit navy. I'm saying if we don't want to be constrained by songs in which just pitching Christmas movies to Hollywood would. I'm just saying Christmas. Fallen Jerry Butler I. Who can we get to record? The theme Chin like Adele Dowell singing. Christmas has fallen. Kinda work right. I think she'd be up for it. I mean celine. Dion did a dead pool song so which is great by the way a great song is better than the most bond songs on this is. I feel like we're onto something here. I feel like some of these could be actual films. Made probably are in development developments. Wouldn't they making like three more. No as many things least off falling and one of them has to be Christmas and that's terrifying in London's fallen angels. Jews have already fallen. That sounds like a Christmas movie. Um Sort of it's a wonderful life isn't it. Yeah it's a wonderful life to angel has fallen uh-huh Colon Donna. Just don't have justice ringing a bell trying to get all the angels backup. That's an wonderful so we don't need more Christmas movies because we already. We have the perfect Christmas movie. Which of course love actually really? I feel that at that point. We can just retire until you're going to say well that was mainly if your own personal benefits reach across the table and I as I have stated before but I will say it again because it needs saying every year. I don't mind if you diehard is just. I just don't think it's clever originals. Pointed out a guys so just FYI. I love actually is certainly a film that happens at Christmas that I mostly like I think most people like bits of it. Everybody lies Amen Thompson bid known I on the Bill Nighy bits on the bill. Nye Bit's okay. Those are pre. Yeah uncontroversial uncontroversial. The rest is a little bit more a love every minute of it with the sole exception of the Kris Marshall. We're GONNA plotline is. It's just a tiny bit of the end. But that's the only part of it that annoys me. I can even deal with the Currently under Lincoln thin creepy as it is now. Yeah she couldn't did do better in that whole thing about that is not so much that he's it's a little bit me too ish but also. His friend entrusted him with photography at his wedding and he fucked it up. Yeah it's terrible isn't it if you haven't seen love love actually we've just given you a whole Lotta spoilers. It's been a few years. I feel like you should have seen it by now. Okay so Hollywood call us. We're waiting for your goals and ready and willing to make the greatest. I think Christmas movies that have ever been made in the meantime while we wait for the phone start ringing. I think it's time for an interview. We have to great writers this week but but since we just talked about Christmas it seems only proper that we start with poll fig he's a comedy genius behind bridesmaids behind freaks and GEEKS ghostbusters spy. I want a sequel over the all spin off Jason Status Character. I need more fires literally. The best film is evident. Spy is is really a great film but this week he brings us last Christmas. Smith's which stars Amelia Clark Yes her from. Game of thrones as a Christmas Shop Elf whose life is in and I think it's fair to say a complete toilets like Ostra disarray. Until that is she meets very handsome. Man Who's played by Henry Golding and I went along talked and find out more about the film. Now full disclosure. I forgot to press record until halfway through our first question so there aren't any friendly greetings at the beginning of this there where they just got slight. Does it just begin with you apologizing Nicole Kidman interview from Ostia. I just I just quietly you know we just did it just before the first question but I didn't actually we didn't him the only completely honest with you on the recording. This can we started going to be honest with you. I'm an idiot. I hope so anyway. Apologies for that but trust me he was a very pleasant man. There where pleasantries. I just didn't record them and here is the first question enjoy so Emma Thompson came to you with this film. Is that right. Yeah yeah she just dropped in my inbox about a year and a half ago. Because we're supposed to. I was supposed to direct the movie late night with her. Yeah and So we got together. There are a few times and kind of talk about the character and just really hit it off and major major league then when that didn't work out because of scheduling we stayed in contact going. Like what are we gonNA do. Where we we love each other so much we have to do something together? And then yes. The script shows up that I didn't know if she had just written it. Or whatever and then I find out that you know they'd been eight years in the making. I mean the minute I read it. I was like I'm in like where do I go. I mean if you can work with trump some work with Emma Thompson. Gosh Dame Emma Thompson can we. Yeah she wasn't he was supposed to be in the movie I mean she was producing it and then he had written at CNN. I always had the writers my movies on the set with me all the time so it was like you know you'll be with me the whole time and she wanted to be and then I was something going like well. How am I going to explain to people that I had any thompson on the set the entire time and she's not the movie you gotTa play the mom? She's like well. I thought about it but I don't know if it's a good idea and it was like I'm telling you you will be great and I'm not going to not let you be the the movie spectacular. What is Emma Thompson? Kind of glomming herself down for Christmas movies like because I love actually as well. That's a lot less glamorous that she actually he is. I mean that's what I love about. One of the many things I love about Emma is there's no vanity that would hold her back from doing a great performance and being all about the character and and she's playing characters these movies that happened to happen to just that is their thing. They're real life people who are having problems and sort of you know that's the point. They are are in their life. And I think it's so great but you know then you see late night. She's all clammed up gorgeous. So it's the mark of a great actress to just be able to lose themselves in the character so much that they don't really care ear how they present themselves and I think that's wonderful. Oh absolutely and she does look incredible in in late night. Young suits US exactly everything. So does it tell me about the rest of the casting Amelia. I think he'd met a while back. Is that right. Yeah like four years ago. I'd had a had a meeting with her just because she was in town when I was in la and that was a big fan from game of thrones and it was was Kinda curious what she was all about. You know because I expected her to come in very serious and STOIC. Like she's not an actress and she was this wonderful evil bubbly. Funny Person Just couldn't get over funny. She was yeah. You don't get that from gave me turns really at all. She's she's great in it but he has a place so contained in stoic back in and once I find out that somebody's funny I become obsessed with wanting the world to know that they're funny and so I left that meeting going like okay. I've gotta get her comedy and I was writing something at the time that was trying to write her into. But I didn't wasn't happy with the script itself so a couple of years later three years later when I read the script. It's like this is the one because because she can be a great actress and have all these great scenes jails we funny do physical comedy and was always London. Set this one. Yeah which is one of the other things that drew me to to it. 'cause you know I've been wanting to shoot a movie here forever and my wife and I've been wanting to live here forever. It's funny because I was just about to sign a movie that would shoot all in La and my my my wife going like well she goes. That's fun for you but for me just just my life just continues on as normal you know because we do have fun. It's fun to movies on location. Even though the Stresa making movies is always wacky but But it's just nice being somewhere you know it'll be paying for and you know when I read this. I love this so much and there was like. Oh and the AD bonuses we. I think we can go live in London Henry as well because I think you had to kind of wait for crazy rich Asians to come out. Were you worried about that being successor. That's going to be make. No I knew because my wife had seen Joe. We were friendly with John. Chew because when I did disciplined favor I called John Because I wanted to hire Henry just because I liked him I saw his online real of when he was a you know travel show host and thought he was so great then called John on like real and he's like Oh yeah he's great so because of that. We became friends with John In. My wife has always been obsessed with the crazy rich Asians books books this so great and so he let her come to an early screening and she came back for that going. Like this movie's GonNa be huge. She was just like fire about this thing so I was like. Oh well you you know because I read the script is like this is perfect for Henry but nobody knows who he is yet. That like the studio didn't know who he was bringing them up. Kinda like haze going to be in this. They'll let you okay. Yeah but let's try ready get so and so and this other famous personally okay so it Kinda bided my time until it opening weekend and then we went through the roof and I was like hey remember that guy. Henry talked like no we love him. Cast him was like okay. We've always been huge friends. You're my goodness there's also I'm not giving any four. There's way here but there is also a scene in the movie where he does a Little Sean Connery James Bond impression. Now have you included that specifically so you will look like a genius. One day when he is cast upon all I can say is Henry. Golding should be James Bond. It's nothing has been more clear in my head than when you see him especially when he's in a Tuxedo or whatever it's it's no that was just it was a joke that was in in the script already and it just felt right and then you know we've thought it'd be funny to have him try to Sean Connery. And it's you know in the Greg wise was on the set kind of coaching him. How to do the accent? There's very funny outtake. That is is on the DVD. And Blu ray of him trying to do a longer version little line and just really falling apart and it's very very funny but we kept it in. It's it's cute. He just bought. It gives you a impression of cleanliness. Exactly there you go right. Henry's economy via Henry. Yeah there is. There is a tiny show of Greg wise in the in the crowd Andrew originally too quick for me to notice and yet did you have any problems with that ice skating in them because you know. Can everyone ice skate. Well I mean. Amelia wasn't a great ice skater but that was nice because it's all about her not being able to escape. Yeah but you never want to get somebody on the ice and killed themselves either so that would be a downer. Yeah exactly but she's she's so good at everything but she you know she used it it to her advantage on. Henry is an amazing ice skater. which is so funny because I actually thought Melia find? Henry can skate having grown up in Singapore. But then you go like. Oh Oh well I know we do a lot of skating there and then he lived. You know he's obviously groping in London too so he was just used to used to skating and I was so surprised that he ah so good at it. Because I'm a lousy ice skater. But they actually reconnected with and I was out on the ice with them the entire time. Because we're doing so much stuff. Going around them with the cameras was that I had to have my monitors. I was like skating around behind the camera. Try Not to kill myself. But it's fun to be out there with them and also we had L. E. Palley all to ourselves which was magical. I mean that's the greatest feeling the world when he goes something like that and just like. Hey we're here I would just kept putting on my skates and going out there and skating around inventing reasons why I had to be on the is. I've got to ask now. Do you have to have like are there. Are there cameramen who have on their CV that they can ice skate. Is this a thing that will have listed as one of their skills. There's something going. Oh so so can skates what happens to them. We pretty pretty much put on a sled. Then have our grip department with these spikes on their their shoes going around. But then my DP John Schwartzman could ice skate too. He was like a hockey player so he and I are out there like skating around and you know because he's always John always is there would with like a balanced board kind of right off camera kind of sending Nice warm light and reflections up into the actor and actress phases. So it's good so he was very funny. There's footage I think on the the DVD -s kind of skating around who that while they're doing is lovely love. Scenery alternate kill ourselves. This whole group of people around the really. I literally like out of a job. And also explains why everyone looks so sort of dreamily. Perfect Yeah Yeah. Well I mean judge workman's such a genius cinematographer because a lot of these outdoor scenes in London. He wasn't able to do much lighting. Because when you shoot like on Regent Street or any of these populated related areas the rule. Is You have to be able to clear everything you have off the street in like a few minutes in case there's an emergency it makes perfect sense so you can't always be condors is an all these you know lights all over the place so John I was like we have to go out with my light meter and see if we can even do this movie. Because we'd had to shoot a lot available lighting but he came back so excited because he was on Regent Street. You know with just the those Christmas lights. Obviously I think we can pull this off. Bringing a few battery operated lights and just kind of augment with that. But I think that's why it looks so pretty because that natural light all the colors come out then you know if you kind of overlaid it I feel like everything kind of gets. It's kind of homogenized -vely in this gave so much depth and color and in in warmth I just love it and I mean that scene where they're in the Christmas Shop Alma College decorating the trees having that conversation that entire scene is lit just by those the lights on the tree so gives that kind of coup bricky and sort of glow Dr Barry Lyndon via these cameras. We shot on these eight K.. panavision cameras and they're just amazing. I mean there's there's so light sensitive live but also so beautiful. We wasn't seen. There's one scene when they're talking in the bedroom and the only take. I had that I really liked that. This woman exchange exchange. They have was in a big wide shot and I was like I want to be in close on them. So we're like well it's eight K.. Can we and so we blew this frame up so big. I like to turn this wide shot into this tight to shop and you cannot tell. It's amazing so I'm a big Fan of Eight K now. I do want to ask ask about that same. Because you're one of the few writers who has come to London and showed a film here and not have people living in palaces the fours which was impressive that is a Brixton. I think that was a that was brick lane. Wasn't it Yeah Yeah exactly. It was a bricklayer. Yeah which which actually Henry used to live on real life. Yeah he's lived on Tom. Street read was crazy. Yeah I hate that whole thing like everybody lives beyond their means. And they're they're down on their luck with this enormous place. No I really really. It was important to us to make sure that we have made this real. You know because it is. It's a story about like real people and also about how everybody's you know the melting pot that London is and all the things that people are going through and how you live and where you live. What happens to you in live? It's all part of that part part of the authenticity of who you are. And so I don't I don't like to have any false beats. Even though it's a movie that is you know has a fairy tale ish element to it. I just want the trappings to be fake. You know I think the the interactions can be kind of heightened or it can be more dreamy or a little more. I don't know Oh movie Ish than that. But I I want the trappings to be real at least for movie like this and you do have the the fairytale side of things as well. I mean Ah I do WANNA ask as well about the Christmas shop. Run by Shell Ios Center. I want every single thing she wears in this first start but I mean Michelle. Yeoh has not norman castle of comedies in her career. Why not I mean well? That's the thing but again this for me. It all comes from this. I always like to meet people you know like I don't necessarily that's like auditioning people in big stars on additional them anyway. But that's what I always anytime. I can have a meeting with somebody and not a meeting a dinner drinks or something then and you can really icy who they are and then I go like oh I want that person to be on the screen on his show the world. I want them to have their misconceptions that I had blown away by the way I did. Because I'm a huge Michelle Yeoh Fan. I mean I I love you know. I'm just as a movie nuts. And in all the martial arts and stuff so we've watched for years and years eighteen years and I had a big crush on top of yes so gorgeous but then Henry. We're shooting simple favor when ladies like. Hey you know Michelle's in town we're GonNa have dinner with her. You WanNa come as like Michelle. Yeoh exists you know 'cause there's certain people just go like well they're not real. You know now is i. I'm I'M GONNA have dinner with Michelle Yeoh really nervous too. Because I didn't know what to expect in them who she's GonNa get you punch me I don't know and I show up. She's the most wonderful warm person I think I've ever been. I couldn't get over at the minute. We sat down together. I think we were best friends and thirty seconds. It was just like connect with somebody and we had so much fun and then we just became obsessed with. We gotta work together. We have to do something together but I kept going. I want them to be funny. I'm GonNa Make Q.. Funny saying I'm not funny. That's all she'll say like I'm not funny. I'm not funny I hate to tell you you are so when I put her in the movie like you know even during it she's like I'm not funny as Michelle. Stop saying look. You're getting his audience so it was you know again when I see that side of somebody and nobody else sees it and I want to put it onscreen and I actually very much appreciate her commitment to ridiculous Christmas decorations. Because I am the person with Christmas robot on the tree. You know it's the The Fun thing about Michelle is she loves Christmas. She's obsessed with Christmas just the same way that Santa is. Yeah so honestly when she she was worried when I you know when she read the part. We're GONNA kind of be making fun of it and also kind of having her be somebody who has like a a because we always the store is always described as having so much like crap and and you know just like like in bad taste kind of stuff but she was really worried because she was like I love Christmas and I also don't want to be portrayed as somebody who's like ripping off people. It's no I totally get them. which I don't want that either? We're GONNA have weird stuff and we're going to beautiful stuff in there and it's because those stores are that and you just find out you know when you you do something like this and you're doing set dressing or seeing the interesting. There's so much the nothing that hasn't been made into a Christmas ornament. There's no noun in the English language that is not a Christmas ornament one hundred percent like sometimes things just because I've never seen them before but then I'll see ten of them the next year because something everybody's making like McDonald's fries. We the every every food item is an ornament crocodiles with pom Poms ornaments shared with the pump. The movie so that's is going to be my next thing. I knew definitely an what are you working on. I heard rumors about a monster movie. Is that yeah very written my first draft of it and I'm really excited about got it. Yeah it's for universal. Where my deal? Is You know. So they've got this old. The you know the Classic Monster Catalog and Yes I wrote this thing that I'm very excited about kind of based based on a there's a couple of side characters on the movies that I'm bringing into the actual thing but then creating characters around them or out of out of them if if you will and so I I'm not talking about who they are yet but I'm very excited about it because I'm such a fan of James Wale. Those older like the Tod Browning movies which they just had. They were scared but they had a good sense of humor about themselves but they were not parodies. You know so. This isn't young Frankenstein Stein. Which is brilliant? This is more you know I mean bride of Frankenstein to me is just the touchstone. It's just it's such a weird great movie that has like comedy beat Zimet and weird stuff in these extreme characters but then it's scary. That's what I WANNA do. I want to bring that bag. Amazing are you talking sir. Period sat or kind of modern. altern day there's a whole thing going as well as someone who also has a bride of Frankenstein Frankenstein's monster Christmas ornament. I approve my really good. Well listen best of luck with count come with say again. Quite frankly definitely going to Christmas movie. And that's the whole point of them right. I never never again thank you. I appreciate that. and which ones do you watch. which ones do you go to the wonderful life on this? My I have to can't be Christmas. Watch that Love actually miracle on thirty Fourth Street and die hard of course the classics. Yes thank you very much all right time for some movie news so What has been happening this week? The can only be one place to start this week and it is mcklusky okay. So I haven't the Disney plus. I haven't watched this yet but I'm aware that there are new four K.. Yes versions of the star wars films true and greet. Oh says MC clunky did so Disney plus finally. It's long away to debut happened or they're not in the UK and indeed a handful of other terrace which we might be getting them until next year but in the US and elsewhere Disney plus launched. Amanda Laurean arrived to mixed reviews and the original star wars film specifically episodes one. Two three four five six and seven and row Guam who all appeared in four K.. Hd Are Dobie Moss else which had never released had lost yet I in Solo have been released you hd but the others happened so that's a really big deal. Everyone was very excited. However however it turns out that George? Lucas blesses little tinkering. Socks has still been fucking about with star wars and he tinkered with a little bit more before he sold Lucasfilm to Disney. So this was done a few years ago. It's twenty fourteen and twenty two thousand twelve even twenty twelve. So he saw did it in like train someone some of that he's tweaked the dosing again and it's been sitting there waiting to be seen for those years. It has finally dropped. We've now seen and he has simply changed it one more time so to give you some in some some clarity on this. Obviously Veasley Rideau shot. I know you killed greed and any in the world acquit him. Him on account of preemptive self defense has absolutely he was to be shot he was about to show first Jalan go away anyway. I'm show agreed it's ordered. Were real happy with it. No one is having Hong George Lucas however did so when he did the nine hundred ninety seven special editions he tweaked it so the greed I shall I then when the DVD came out in two thousand and four he changed again so the students first but they closer together and then when the BLU ray came out they shoot a basically the same same time. Enhance Elliott has a little weird. CG Dodge thing was fucking now in the four K.. Version they shoot at basically the same time. Still still dodges. The scene is a little short few frames missing of greed falling now before he pulls the trigger for reasons known only to Himself Look Sahara goes mccloskey and that is his final word. So is this like somebody said this is something in hotties. Well I would argue. That greeted probably speaks. Rhodium a not haughty. He's mistaken wrong but I just assume he's eroding anyway. Apparently SA- Bulga says my clunky and apparently it means means something that you're about to meet your end or something. I don't know if that's true or haven't bothered to look into it but I can say the greed emigrants Mike and that was the word that launched a million alien means this week. mccloskey is now every film. It is now in everything you can't. You can't swing academy Internet without hitting a Funky. Who's one of those things I the twin indications popping up on my phone and see McConnell what is going on I just ignore it then one lot the one for this? I need to find out what this is. And Yeah this is why not kidding turn off notifications only drive you man. What's the best part of this? I like to think is our very own Ben. Travis never one onto let my clunky lie called up. Paul Blake the actor who played Griego and got his. Take on clunky gates. Oh my goodness I mean it turns out and this is absolutely true. He found out about it because BIB Fortuna texted him and said McKay and he was like Babe. What you doing man did was like check on the Internet? Does he call. They probably know Fortuna Texted Credo to tell him about MC clunky. I'm for that alone and in need all the other many things he has to say about this go to empire Dot Com and read bends interview with Pope. Like about MC clunky. It is glorious amazing. Yeah this name is made me laugh. I'm actually wondering whether there are other small tweaks to be found in the films as well because people have noticed that I understand why because Ashby mess around with more than any other place. You'd look I imagine there might be other subtle changes because I remember when Star Wars when the Three hundred came out on bleary. We reviewed them. But we made me review the extras because we didn't watch the films. Because he thought his family millions. I am therefore we missed new which is obviously horrific inside the liquor shops. At the end of the Djeddai when Veda picks up the imprint. French fries and on the shelf he now uses the same news that you hear. Revenge of the fifth on that again is horrific to watch. George George what we need to talk. Please stop please but but actually what you want from not to stop you. Want Four K.. Versions let's be honest of the original Kadewe. You and you've got to think now the Disney and Fox and they could legally do this they clearly going to cause it's surely a license to print money get a license like since two. Well exactly now I mean you can like people have on the snap have acquired thirty five mill- print scan them in a couple of different people who've done really really painstaking restorations of the of the original prints and released. Those shows illicitly in four K.. So they are available but other than that the official way to get the unedited ones is fire a DVD release which was limited DVD ROM. That ran I want to say two thousand six but they came bundled with the original versions but in classic George Lucas Style. It was a a big fuck you to fans because he deliberately included them the not in five to one. They're like Stereo surround. And the knock cleaned up tour letterbox there really grainy and it was his way of saying in. Hey you want the originals. This is what they look like. Isn't there a laser discs. There is dysfunctional swap. But then I mean who owns this. I'm betting they'll do that. When this guy will come out and blew the whole set? I wonder or I wonder whether they'll want to release the four K.. Special editions as they are and milk VAT and then once people of Bo Bo is. Maybe I think there's one thing left to do. Let's do this. Who knows in a physical media to an extent that it would be worth their while to do that? I don't I don't know I feel like there's a generation of star wars funds might like fucking boy I'll tell you so if Disney plus subscriptions start dropping off this. Did you see the numbers. So they released the numbers for for Disney plus. And I don't have in front of me in a comment but it was something ridiculous nine million subscribers on day one so it is a reason. Yeah I mean the day. It's yeah they'd had a bit of a thorny I I think the only down note for them because my clunky is good for them like it's fun for them but aw I think the man delorean's reviews have been quite scathing. So I didn't know whether that bodes particularly well but But then I think I've read a couple of us who said that. He picks up after episode one to episode two and three apparently pretty good. But I haven't seen I'm trying to know go cold Turkey and just jelly pilion trying to just ignore and mutant. All the stuff is good luck with that. Yeah I know already gift circulating of the final scene of the episode so you can't really avoid that head in the sand for now for those of us in the thirty first of March smart. I mean it's just rude isn't it. I understand it's business. Necessarily I mentioned at the top of the episode but there is a better subject trailer. Are we happier yes we are he no longer looks like like nightmare fodder. I mean April's horrifying I. It was it was. It was if it's quite uncanny valley but it's definitely uncanny. Ah He had human hands and weird sexy legs and it was just an his face was no and now he looks like the game character. which is I think a good move not to mention? That's trailer was soundtrack by gangster's paradise for some reason Julia got to do with sonic the high school you'll have to do with dangerous minds. Didn't really yeah but we should give a shoutout to Tyson. He sues the guy who led the visual effects team. Who came in and did all of this is really really the impressive honestly edition to the sonic looking better? Jim Carey looks like he's having a lot of fun when he's on four Green Batman forever vibes. No good thing. Yeah he had. He was funding Batman forever. I've got time for about some a limited number of Homey threw me kill me but not so much this Li- I enjoy a blue speedy hedgehog of the next person but carrying particular on. This feels like he is. He is firing on the absurdity cylinder which I do not I don't know or the other kind of comedy or the third comedy but you're willing to sometimes they'll either fourth Audi only Mike Tyson quite specific specific. We had a very very long conversation this week. About why you'd dismiss parks and REC is being the comedy of embarrassment. The office and I had to explain it. Some length isn't that that's true so maybe I should give that chance because I always thought it was from Sharman comedy which is which is the type of company. I truly truly cannot sit through parts and Bekker's on my Komo wants to get out of my own succession and stuff like that watching never parks and REC is comforting in joyous John. Just pick me up you need after successions so it's perfect. I'm also in slightly painful news. The joker movie has now passed a billion dollars at the box office. So that's the thing that happened. Well you know what Unity Heavens Enjoyment of film shall we say was limited but There was enjoyment enjoyment. That it's dumb that well I mean not. I'm not surprised in the anything. Attached to Batman is obviously going to a certain amount of attention. I think it's the it's been very successfully marketed as the comic book film for people who think they're above comic book films and I think that that has worked enormously well for them and obviously continues to do so. It is still for the record a comic book movie. Your children just like the US marvel fans it just has the trappings of intellectuality. That you so crave do you think Jimmy is the comic but movie that Moscow says you approve essentially does literally release it so if I were a cynical person. I'd say that you know discussion unfed into that billion dollar box office quite well. I don't think he's that cynical I don't think he is but Jeez it didn't hurt that film's box office. which book success stories more surprising to you joker venom? Venom van is inexplicable inexplicable. It isn't objectively terrible film and everyone went to see. I can only assume they left morose disappointed in cheated leaving joker they did go and see her and I slept that they saw the trailers right like it looked terrible in the trial is what it is in the trailers and yet people alighted to eighty fuck off with all being said. I am intrigued about Ventoux and circus and circus. AH IN CIRCUS. We Trust I. I would think that venom to Mike ultimately be a decent fill with them. There was there was potential. There you could see some the thing that could work the kind of more absurd moments. I'm sorry James. But they wear the more absurd moments I she worked really well and so maybe if they lead into that in this equal then they could be really owned something. Just I have eminem back on the soundtrack but I'm I'm also you can explain to me the importance of mark. Wahlberg apparently joining uncharted. It wasn't he at one point going to play Nathan Drake and now he's playing sully now is name. LG mental elder. Yes so like he's he's you know he's not a spring. Chicken seems like a slightly but any of this is young this young Nathan Drake so he has to make sense Tom Hall Yeah. He's a spring chicken so so so I mean I guess it works in that regard but again I'm I'm not honestly and ultimately what it comes down to is. I'm not on board for any uncharted film. That doesn't feature Nathan Nathan Fillion as Nathan Drake and ultimately I will be moved from that position so watches. I Love Tom Holland. I'm not there for this. Did you watch the Youtube. It's amazing and I love it and they should stretch the over now and a half from release it on the honestly. I won't ask her sally as I recall. Yeah Yeah I won't believe this movie's getting made until I know this. Meet the press. Release the day WANNA filming. I start because how many different situations it's just gone was connected for actually quite a long time one point so oh I should have a say while we're talking about video games. Someone needs to make the movie of death stranding so this is a game I thought deaths surrounding trending was the movie of deaths Toronto. I mean it is a little bit so this came out swimming. This goes it'd be lost weight went so this is a game where it's delivery is the delivery simulator which features reaches Gammo del Toro. Who ran a character who die Hartman and then Edgar Roy who pops up for no reason to give apostle to deliver and also him from walking dead a yes and also has been readers who drinks a lot of monster energy drinks it is absolutely bat shit in a level? I don't think I've ever encountered in a game before. I like my video games but I've never had watched a few of us of this game and it seems like you're walking from a to be a lot and that to me is very boring play. It is literally deliver. You have the delivery. Pack Doc was kind of on your back and the whole mechanics of the game are. Can you deliver these boxes from A to B without falling over. I I can't see myself. I've I've watched a views and I and I've seen politics on social media but I'm this like I know I feel like when Gamma del Toro asks you to deliver a box folks to someone on the other side of the mountain. You just do it. Are you going to ask. What's in a little bit? I would be worried. That's all I'm I think. I want to see this film making also in news this week. Paul Thomas Anderson has announced that his next film will be a nineteen seventies high school movie. I heard this and and I just started having flashbacks to like. Richard Linked Glider Saurav dazed and confused kind of movies. But Paul Thomas Anderson Making a good movie. The new movie is well. Actually the tourists good new movie from Paul Thomas. Anderson is always good news. So I'm still here for. I'm just like what why seventies don't know we'll find out we will Very good news. Also the Little Mermaid has find her prince. Eric it will be Joan. How're king who you will? Of course remember from from little women not that one the TV one from a couple of Christmases ago. So the one who isn't Timothy Chalet but who also played as I remember Lori in that film I'm not sure to be perfectly honest. He's handsome enough to play Prince Eric. I'm not sure I ever who in the world is handsome enough to play pin Prince Eric. So I'm willing to allow him in. He seems like a nice young actor fair enough given foggies been saying things this week. Please tell me it's not about anything. Well he did respond to the Martin Scorsese anything diplomatically. and kind of like well. Everyone has a different view of liquor. We've done we put our characters against civil war fucking we killed off of them and infinity. Walking okay yes I am. I think points but more importantly he made a comment about S- Disney plus which incensed a lot of people. which was that you will? I'm not understand the full story of the Msu unless you watch the Disney plus shows. I mean not spend obvious for a little while. Yeah I feel I feel for some of the I wonder whether like wander vision. Feels like something that will be a nice diversion. But I don't know that that's necessary unless it tees up your multi madness but I feel like it's I think it does I. Ah I mean or ties into the release. This feels a lot of people were like. Oh you know if you watch marvel's agents of shield he won't and it's like no really tuners it but but then because they were always on different judge Moore wishful thinking on our part than anything else because there was just. It was never possible to plan those shows around the marvel movies. That was why the events of Captain America the winter soldier came such an unwelcome surprised they dealt with it very well but there was no no way that they were going to be able to kind of lead on that so you might have something like that where things happened in the movies have repercussions in these shows. I don't know how much will we'll be going the other way because you still have to make the movies work on. Even though he said this and it makes sense for them to say circus. He's trying to feed the base and he wants to be to Disney. Plus but I would be I mean it would fundamentally bad filmmaking if you made films that didn't make sense without having watched TV show. I don't believe for one second he would entertain that. Will you get pops a deep understanding and background ground knowledge from having watched it. Sure why not but I don't think is going to fettes. Any one character have had lots more back story. That will have meaning two hundred percents in the same way that you get more out of for example watching silo if you've seen Rebels and clone wars. Because you understand this sort of mall legs thing his evolution as Garretta. Yes the adds more to it. Do you need to have seen it. No of course you and I think that's very much the case but that didn't stop the Internet from burning foggy in effigy for trying to make them. Disney must be day a ending in wine. Speaking of burning effigies. Just finish up. Limb House is making a new Christmas and announced this week there would be a PG thirteen which had people incense because Oh my my God. Every horror movie must be an hour the Internet because the Internet. I'm an actually the filmmakers of come back and go no. This played really well with sort of teenage girls quite frankly and we want them in our audience we welcome them into our audience. Why wouldn't you want them to have an introduction into horror you idiots? They didn't say that last bit free wheeling there but I feel like that sentiment was underlying it so that's happening and apparently the word from their screenings is good. But I don't know for sure so and so I think that's most most of it anything else for news for you guys hours just going to say why talking about Mc you Some Disney plus can clips have been released online assuring a little bits and pieces from what if also showing the new redesigns for Bucky and Falcons cap costume. which I like far comes costumes but actually prefer his comic book costume to? This isn't really cab. There seemed to be like somewhere halfway in the middle. This is the costume is the concept that we've we've seen is closer to the animated series then the comic costume as mightiest heroes. Event as my desserts is available because counting by the way Checkout how so I enjoy it but yeah I check out Falcons coming book top costume. It's much better. I am Becky we lamenting the loss of his half uh-huh four two although in the animated. Or if you will that we've seen he's got his head back. He's fighting Zombie cap and you can do that without emotion can also. I mean I've had this discussion with them before. I have an objection to marvel zombies almost entirely because they made Wolverine Ambi- which I don't think fits his healing factor January. That's my principle. Objection to the entire unstoppable Zombie. Because because he has not amandime skulls you couldn't shoot him in the head true. I'll bet through the I will. Maybe through apple glad I could help so I have a question about funding in the winter soldier. Okay so you're the Falcon right and cap comes up to you and says it's time and gives you showed in your life dude. I've got fucking wings one. How am I going to do with this? Like he has no superstring and I feel like counts. America works with the PHEONIX. This shield is an accessory. He was because he's a super soldier. You give you know Falconer. Show needs just a dude with a shield the man. Dan Has Wings down grading to hold a shield. He's not stay has the wings wings can use the showed. While he's he's not going coming to you we'll take that shield totally doesn't obey the laws of gravity like we know that is because caps super strong. I think you know you you give it to you. Give it to to Falcons lift expertly to before Zuma Talk Yeah I'm enough alienate anyway. Adamant isn't heavy. It's like Mafia refunds brain eum Helen. Sorry by brain. NEOM isn't heavy. You'll find. It's like myth real okay. Sure say that was a Geeky level thing. I'm by the way. The roosters are making a film but the rivalry between Marvel DC. But it's a documentary. Yeah that should should be interesting. I mean there might be objective lick. I'm sure they will. They will objective and I'm sure they will have great people from both sides. Yeah I think it's time for another interview. I'm we have a real treat for you. The director of land sixty six if you're in this country or if here in America the director of Ford Versus Ferrari shavings banks title. It is a better title. Apparently was quite hard to clear with legal in this side of the pond. Is James Mangold. So he has had an incredibly eclectic career so far making the likes of girl interrupted Kate and Leopold leads. Logan of course ten to Yuma. He's basically done every genre going. And so it was perhaps only natural actual he would come to the world of films about men and room talking about cars that you don't have to like car racing to like as myself in. Chris went to talk talk to him in London. Recently and find out more about sixty six. So James Michael Welcome standpoint podcast. Thank you for coming in with a lament sixty six six or four versus Ferrari. Do you have strong feelings on the title of the US versus the UK. This was one of those movies. Where in a way? It's the most unfortunate thing is we never landed on a title while we're shooting and so then it becomes a bit of a free for all upon release with each territory. You know the biggest problem you have is that well one of the reasons I think it traumatizes title the British press so much is that usually the UK title in the USA title or the same easy but all the other territories for. I've never had a movie where like girl interrupted. It isn't called girl interrupted in France. It's called Lab la silence or in Spain not the same in Brazil. Different ingredients different in China's certainly different. So so the real trauma is just why two titles in English speaking territories and the only answer. I can offer you as it's kind of it's a group of factors one is that apparently apparently for the Ferrari is not something we could call it in the UK because of trademark press. Laws are here than there where you're not allowed to use trademark that at the company who owns it hasn't given you permission to use in a title and so clearly I mean I think ultimately Ford. We'll get good things out of this movie as well Ferrari but but I don't think either company was in a position when I wouldn't even show them the movie yet to Give us a pass. trae yeah beyond that. I think there's also through through much of Europe of feeling that everyone knows Lhamo and in USA. I think one out of twenty people would what Lemond is so. There's that the educational factor as well also at once. You want to call the film the Mon you have the film Lemond deal with as well so is that why is sixty six and then the title certainly. I don't think we could call it exactly the same thing I wouldn't want I wouldn't have wanted to although if we're real about it. How many I mean? Maybe you're very specific audience. There's a hell of a lot of people aware of films like La Mama Grand Prix but so many of our right. Yeah Okay but the but. The reality is among the current cinema-going generation those movies. You know you're talking about one in fifty people who des. Yeah yeah so I mean this film's been kind of on your radar. I think since Insp affor- The wolverines right I I was not only on my radar but when I got the script to the Wolverine which was right around the time Darren stepped off it when I was on a meeting at Fox trying to get them to let me make this move but it was they still had. We're working on a different package with director and different actors and it was kind of locked up in that and I was just a Pirate Trang steal something so it was made clear to me. I didn't know that of course I don't go normally flying in and trying to steal other directors films but but I just read a script and S- in what's happening but the struggle with this film I think has always been the natural fear in our modern age that there's no one over twenty twenty five. who goes to the movies anymore and that it's an expensive proposition to make a film like this and without you know pe- character That is a known draw. Aw or a kind of property that is known draw to a very specific base of audience. You don't have a guaranteed return on your dollar. I mean for many in your audience. It's the simple reality studios. I wouldn't call them evil or good. They're just kind of impassive in the sense that they have a very simple role. I think William Goldman I put a finger on it which is the assume your movie will be Shit and and and which is not unreasonable because as directors and filmmakers we don't Batta thousand so they're putting their money on the line they assume you're going to make a mess and if you make a mess. Can they still can. They still sell a mess. And so with a superhero theme or known character victor or an hour an ongoing franchise they can actually do the estimations of whether this film will be a success. Even if it's shit and that that way A. F. I succeeded making a good one. It's just gravy. It's cherries it's it's it's all the better but you know if you get down to it when you're buying a house and you inspect inspect the house. Your House. Inspector is wondering how the House is going to hold up. In the rain now the household up after landslides. There's a mudslide or how much of a fire danger your house is is so clearly even our own lives. We buy things assuming that we can't think less of the studios for assuming the worst because most of us in our decisions if we are to survive in this modern world don't make all the decisions out of Romance We make them out of some realism. About what dark shit could have. We're trying to plant say you're trying to play. We're trying to survive survive. So how do you how do you kinda hedged for that. Is that part of getting like this amazing cast because this is a it's an embarrassment of riches. Well thank you. That's they are I. I am honored by all these actors who joined US particularly not only in the leading roles. which which you can imagine a really attractive but even in the supporting roles there's just a wealth of talent and your questions like interesting because on one level? It's not like you go. Oh well my movie topic is much of a draw so I eat better than shit actors you know you. Don't yeah you always trying to get amazing cast but the but the fact is that whatever it was about Jazz John Henry script the topic the world and and I think what drew me to the material was never racing. I'm not a big racing guy on what drew me were the great characters everywhere. You looked whether you're talking about Enzo. Ferrari the Henry Ford. The second were much more interesting than on the surface to certainly ken miles and Carroll Shelby who are unique and dependent upon each other and really unforgettable characters to all the creatures who inhabit the and the and the engineering world and the way they're all interconnected and competing eating with one. Another I think was really attractive to actress. So let's let's say for example that pre wolverine you had got the green light on this movie and you had snatched away from let other director Jim it strikes me as you could still made it with with Christian Bale and Matt Damon only have eight years ago. Yeah sure yeah different different actors in mind. Yeah no I I. At the time I was stocking it. I didn't even have actors in mind. I just had in mind trying to get my hands on it because I felt it possesses. I mean this project. Roger kind of possesses everything. I'd love to do in the current climate of film. which is it seems to me? I love to work on the big screen and as long as the world's leading me work on the big screen. I'm going to work on the big screen. It's a big screen story. It's a story that justifies the movie going experience not only In action but also so the style of the period the the look of that period the recreation of this kind of innocent romantic moment in sports before the world was taken over by television and sponsorship and when these characters were kind of mavericks cowboys in a way themselves and there was a kind of magic to the way they were risking risking life and limb without computer models or a risk averse abilities to build these cars. You had you just put your lives on the line. All that was so bloody interesting to to me but what. I was really trying to answer in your question. was what makes it the kind of movie I love to make as I miss these movies. Meaning I miss. When the David Leans of the world were making pictures and there were movies that were for? grownups were adult films with adult characters. Having real life problems paying their taxes holding their family together staying afloat fulfilling their dreams and that the problems of the characters in the movie weren't oriented toward an audience of thirteen year olds and and that we've all gotten so used to it that we've actually kind of disconnected and connect. You know when we watch movies. We kind of I mean I even think on the level of folks who do what you do we all just put on our thirteen year old. Inner Self Hat and absorb the film through the prism of kind of our younger selves. And that but I do you think there's a hunger and it's answered when you see certainly the success. I felt with Logan more what we may see happening right now. With joker and other films. There's no reason we can't can't combine fantasies and ideas with adult themes because that's what cinema has always done. It's just that the audience on the business model level has so shifted toward children that every film has to be kind of maintaining this foot in each door. I love to make films for a whole family. I love to make films accessible for everyone. But sometimes it'd be nice to see an action picture that wasn't idiotic or the didn't didn't build its characterizations on that of a pin. I do think that the characterization in this one was great and the balance of action to carry it to work into you know men in rooms talking saints which which I tend to love if they're smart man and get ready so there's things at stake and even though it's talking or kind of chamber piece there's something thing at stake I mean. Everyone can't be watching the crown or or fleabag or all the other amazing pieces we see on Netflix or HBO. Otherwise is that I mean. Even game of thrones mostly chamber pieces of brinksmanship between characters. So audience is clearly have a thirst for that and those are adult pieces. Isa's I mean. Game of thrones as an adult piece. So what's frustrating. Is that the theatrical movie. Experience has been somehow infantilized in however over. You'd say it adolescent is while the cable or television streaming experience is aiming itself squarely at US thirty plus year olds. Who Don't leave the home anymore? So this gets me in a twelve minute. Roundabout way to making movies like this as an effort to kind of sustain the original film as a theatrical trickle event not just the small independent original film that may play for three weeks in art and cinema but a movie for everyone and when we use the word characterization it sounds like some cod liver oil. It just means these characters you like or interesting who surprise you. And and who have something new to say you know and they do like continuous continuous spoilers. But you know I did not see Ken. Miles developing the way that he did not see Carroll Shelby that he did. That's that's the thank you. That's the point and in many ways I saw in our run up with the movie before a lot of the press had seen it. Everyone's reaction to the movie is. Oh I know what this is just just to our car ad within. We know exactly how it's going to happen and I'm like well I couldn't give less of a shit about the cars and he doesn't end like you think it does so it's like this kind of it's just is that plus I'm always amazed. They never say that shit about marvel movies and it's absolutely true. So the the the reality is that everyone assumes the worst assumes will we'll we'll lean into every trope and everything will end up with every fanny getting padded in a way that is that is obvious or stereotypical and I my whole all attraction to this story was from the moment. I I read it almost ten years ago. Nothing turned out the way. And it's interesting that far from being a car rod this points to some real problems in the corporate culture essentially a Ford in particular a Ferrari maybe to a lesser extent and it felt like there was maybe a parallel the way that certain other big businesses that you may have had experience with certainly. It's I identify hugely with these characters. In the struggle to make a car is not much different than the struggle to make a movie movie. You know I'm not trying to level lame at anyone in particular. I don't think it's about blame. I think these are the forces of our world culture and this is in the mid sixties. It's kind of turning point as corporate culture is taking over But you know Ford Manufacturers cars for working people affordable cars Ferrari manufacturers cars. No one can afford except the very rich or racers so they want. It's really the story of a battle between kind of working class manufacturer trying trying to get the cool or acquire the cool of an aristocratic car manufacturer and that to me in itself is interesting because it speaks so much to all of requests I even find Ford's quests sympathetic in that they feel dumpy and dumped upon but they're not even the same realm is for our referring out to make money in fact he's going bankrupt it's a Kotei ask journey of just making the very best bloody thing he ever can in fact if anyone has similarity in the movie it would she can miles and Enzo are similar characters. Because it's kind of a they don't care or think about tomorrow. They're just in pursuit of perfection action. And that's a really beautiful for me in artistic metaphor but also kind of romantic sentiment that I wish more people had today. Yeah yeah no absolutely and By I love the fact. You're saying bloody lots. Is that just totally. I'm like when the Clintons go to the south or the. It's I've been here a couple of days so it just starts to I. Also families of describing an apartment is a flat and so I I'm I've completely give me another two weeks. I'll start with an accent. Oh my God brilliant brilliant fully anglicised. So we're making mcdonagh. There's an image as I go very far so throughout your career. You seem to. You've you've always made left turns as a director. You're the guy who drafted cop land but also kate and Leopold Guideline David also three ten to Yuma. Non Lewis Films are the same but do you see the Matt. Similarities is something that that drives all his movies for you. Yes first of all. It doesn't have to be thematic. It's kind of my I love. I'm making movies I wanNA see and the everytime I jump on a movie. It's a two three five year experience developing and making it and I'm also trying and to develop myself you know billy wilder went I mean he made one comedy or comedic slightly comedic film in his first sixteen and then it is mostly known now as a comedic director. I've only made ten films. So Howard Hawks made westerns and comedies. And it's only a very newfangled situation that directors are so clearly branded as a teller of one kind of story or another. I don't think Sam Mendes should be reduced to only telling or making one kind of film having said that I also think that. I'm always in the quest for intimacy or a kind of naturalism or emotion. And I can only scribe Dr. This is the universal thing for me that if I'm making a romantic comedy I wanted to be one. That's a little less that honors all the classical movements but is a little a little less of a product that there's a little more of a handmade feel a little more loopy a little more personal so for me whether it's cop land or it's Cain in Leopold orients three ten to Yuma or girl interrupted this unites all of them together for me that I'm always after this kind of the ultimate special effect. Thank you would which is acumen thought recorded and each film teaches me something for the next and I think I suffered offered a little for this in my early years directing because it's so much easier when guys like Youtube can put me in a box because then it's easier. It's also easier for me to get hired. They become the master of Rural Cinema. or I become the the the new master of comedy or I become the new master of horror I get anointed did something and then I get lots of offers and material and books come my way all along those lines but when you're kind of a lifesaver variety pack you You you As a as a creator it makes it a lot harder for anyone to figure out what you are. You don't end up. As an honest many lists because no one's making lists of all around utility players. There may list of of the best in a certain category but I feel like I've reaped the benefits later in my career now where I can make any kind of movie next meaning unlike some of my peers. Who are now kind of locked in a prison of the brand that they built? I can make a musical. I can make more picture picture I can make A. I can make a intimate indie style. Movie I can make a drama. I can make a war movie and the doors are shut to me because the ground were. I've made aide enough successful pictures of different stripes. That people have confidence that I can handle. Whatever it is I choose to make and can I say one more thing about you know when I first started like most directors starting out? You just want to be a great filmmaker right and that makes you tight because it's like you're every moment moment you're shooting has to be bloody great has to be great and you're trying I'm also using bloody to replace a fucking am. I okay okay. Well then I'll just do fuck you want everything to be fucking great and it makes you tight. It makes you really really tight on the set. Everything is so precious. You feel like your career hangs in the balance if you don't make your great opus if this isn't as good as Fellini or or Antonioni or or or John Ford than your washed up but it produces a kind of paralysis at least for me of stress and and when after a first couple serious movies or movies where you had hopes of you know like I did in cop land or getting honored in different ways my actors did on girl interrupted. You suddenly make a movie like Kate and Leopold and we'll there's no way I'm ever going to any awards show or being held in the Pantheon for this picture and it produces this relaxation. Yeah it's like Bruce springsteen recording Nebraska on a cassette machine. You're just alone with your material. You don't have the stress you don't feel like you're GONNA have to get over some limbo bar of perceived excellence. You just try. I make the best movie you can. And after making identity and Kate and leopold coming back to quote the serious Oscar picture with walk the wine fine. I was really amazed. How much more relaxed I was onset? How much more playful would have better director? I thought I was for having made movies with a lighter touch touch where I learned. How sometimes really good things can happen on set when I'm not squeezing the orange so hard? Yeah well I mean for the record I would absolutely let me see James Mangold musical. I think that would be amazing. I mean according to. I'm Debbie. You're working on them well. You're linked to by eight different things I think at the moment. Can you tell us what's next to you know you can't. I can't not only because I can't but I can't because I don't know I literally working on about eight different things than just seeing what happens to feel right for the next moment All of them I think will happen. I think they're all really great. I mean I'm in a great place but it's about which script feel strongest. The the right cast assembles and feels right for the time. It's a really tricky time in movies and I think that you need them to play or work for an audience just to come out and see them and I WANNA make sure we're offering something. I think things are going to get better but I think it's really tough right now so I'm trying to make sure we do things that also also get seen just very quickly the force I love that Book Domains Lewis Book and you are attached to that. We've got Franken. I've been working away on a draft radio. I'm not writing off anything and you also said you a that each movie teach something to take the next so what it logan teach you going into dilemmas city. Six Will Logan Tommy of anything a confidence that my own taste can sell. I really had my seatbelts is fastened for a wholesale rejection by fans given. I mean not only did we challenge the kind of normalized marvel tone completely -pletely top to bottom and not only. Did we leave threads hanging and not even deal with our connections to the quote universe But I took for good measure in writing the script a couple shots at the comic world and out of love. I love those movies as well but I felt you know. I inhabit the character character that I'm writing about what I work on film and in the case of Logan I think it's the ultimate craziness when fans are like wisely wearing his uniform. Guy Like Logan would never wear era fucking uniform. He hates being a superhero. Why would he be walking around with like with like a trademarked outfit on it? It doesn't make any sense. I'm trying to make this character real and this guy doesn't like being famous. He doesn't like being a superhero. By what logic would he in the morning after a coffee and a bathroom trip go to putting on a trademark outfit with a with a logo. Go on it for the team. He is part of but all that angst on my end got out in the movie and in a weird way got enjoyed In good nature. It was being offering him but also in the reality. We were creating a lot line in his scripts which was put out there. The CG city destroying succoth on now passed into legend. That is well. It is what we feared. And what I even found that the pressure on me when I was making Wolverine would there's this kind of logic about the action and how often the action should occur. And how the big the action should be. And everything's gotten very programmed and I think one of my great regrets is two degree that sometimes the twitter verse and the Hardcore Fans Fans of these medium. Actually play into the way they've been marginalized people think they need to be fed. Certain things to be happy and then when they aren't Fed ed them. The audience does go nuts and improves the marketeers right that they've achieved a formula and we just have to keep making this soil and green and everyone will be happy and that I really think the reason we love comic books. Those that is the love Comic Books Not Comic Book Movies but coming books was at the Jack. Kirby's made things the new they didn't draw last year's silver surfer. They did draw last year's fan for they didn't Superman was reinvented. Seven Times to the point where they had to create a golden and Platinum platnum and or whatever universes they had to to account for all these reinventions and remaking that filmmakers are bound to this kind of idea of festivities this connection to one another only reduces to making episodes in the world's most expensive television show as opposed to really exploring cinematic. Louis what can be done in to any need agree. Marty's recent comments the headline in Empire refer more to that. I think making a generalization. All movies are all any movies is extremely dangerous addressing because there's great shot happening marvel. There's great filmmakers working for them. There's great filmmakers working on Star Wars universes and other sequels and originals all sorts of stuff but whenever we get into an assumption and a feeling you get sometimes from some of these films that they're more about selling you on the next movie the One you're currently watching or on a kind of product line or that's where I start to detach and start to wonder whether it's quote cinema or just marketing on the most galactic scale where where things some of the attempts to ape the marvel model have fallen down because of that. Because it's been so nakedly about yes ended up a universe. You have a story to tell you. Also what I think. Kevin Feige Marvel had been really smart about is that in most cases they don't see I don't think the superhero hero film as as they make comedy or they'll make us a kind of a bridge over the river. Kwai or a kind of the last. The you know They'll make they'll make a war picture or they'll make a kind of force kind of guns of never owned picture or they'll make a comedic heist movie but in each case. I think they assign just like we did with. Logan is a western kind of war. you assign a kind of genre to your film. And then allow these well-known characters to exist and explore that genre as opposed to assuming the genre itself is just create a big villain Hira famous British person to play them. Give them a costume. That doesn't look like the last movie and we'll please the fans fans have everyone reassemble slightly tweak. The outfit so that bag scenes like yours can do stories on the quote new. Look and on and on but it's like the real fun in those films that came from guardians or came from ant man or some of the great moments in in the avengers movies is where we're the film's embraced. They're kind of roots in war. Movies and Hercules Achilles pictures and heist movies and the lineage goes back further than six years. Yeah James Mangold. We could talk all day but sadly European snatched away from us. But it's been a a pleasure pleasure guys. Thanks always look forward to seeing you in the next mystery project Khalil's and say all right time for reviews which was this week brought to you by the lesser are l.. And the person Adam driver so let's let loose with with the L's first. Let's talk invite about the man's sixty six. Okay let's do it. This this is as you have said James Mangold film about Lemond the twenty four hour race in. Yes you guessed at nine hundred sixty six then. I'd just rather shit together. So this stars Matt Damon as Carroll Shelby the famous call designer behind the Shelby Mustang among other things and drive a Ken malls play by Christian Bale who's sort of a volatile l. call driver who's enlisted here to take Ford up against Ferrari which at the time was unthinkable because dominated that race in the lemond twenty four hour in and not just six story by the already of God. It from there is that Ford is the plucky underdog. Arie is the behemoth in that scenario. Yeah so yes. This is an interesting one. I really wasn't sure I was going to like this filming is I am not big fan of racing I just if I thought a twenty four hour is just is my idea of living hell and yet and yet this is really compelling and it's carrot. It's a lead like Ken. Malls bail is brilliant small. He's volatile. He's off his fascinating about how we get screwed over by four and and you know how he approaches. All he's a he's a really interesting sting kind of person who's got his own demons to deal with. It also is one helluva driver. And then I think Matt Damon has already get your sort of charismatic car. Designer who's also trying to navigate AAC managing miles but then managing upward to the head of Ford. And then you've got Josh Lucas as a eleo baby who's kind of folds number two. Who if I have to say of every character in this is the one that didn't work because he's almost sort of a sort of cots out? Corporate Goon fell. I'll be interested to see how close to reality historial. Waylon is because I felt like Hollywood embellishment to me but it's not a short film two and a half hours long. which in some ways makes us on amount of sense because much as it is as an endurance race? The film is also a bit of an endurance race. And by the end of it you feel a lot lot. You've been driving for twenty four hours but even though it as long it is also recruit. It is really. It's it's a lot of men in rooms talking like there is a lot of that. There's lots of men in college driving. So that's like I don't care about car races like I'll tell you I oh and I find this film fascinating anyway is about. Corporate Culture is Bureaucracy in in an interesting thing like it's looking all these different forces that Kinda collide and get in the way of themselves. It's not just manning car versus other drivers it's manning car versus corporate overlords August company politics. I is all these sorts of elements and even down to the fact that they have a problem with the car that the brakes keep overheating. And then it's the legal wranglings of whether or not it's technically within the room to remove the whole brake assembly mid race. That doesn't sound very interesting but actually in the context of the film. It's really good and also you. Should I know that this film has a habit of cutting fairly regularly to John. Barren tells Lee IACOCCA. WHO's another car legend? Just having reaction shots has so so many reactions wasn't feeling he's like dress. Like don draper has reaction shows every five minutes. It's amazing about this. Their head of marketing is the fucking punish. He's also built like the fucking punish so the head of marketing looked like he could literally tear anyone's head off while he's sitting this morning at them and I early enjoy bass boats on that. I thought it was fun. I love Jonbenet and finally I think he should be in everything so I had this conversation online with Hollywood. We religiously saying this should it'd be a condition of your film. Being up for all is at least five minutes worth Jones reaction shots spread throughout the film. I mean randomly. I wanted but I completely agree. I had from me and we actually watched this eight. AM and any time. He'll fully engrossed in the movie at that time of the a day. You know that this working and I was really into it and the bromance between bail and Damon Kaya. This is great at one point they fight and it's just that the wife life with the play the play by Katrina about frustrating for her because she doesn't get much to do doesn't know pointing she's also people from outlander right but she that she just watching them for a very very funny. I really enjoyed and mom this little predictable but I was really into it from. I'm enjoy them. He puts on. I say doesn't excellent plummy accent. He sounds a lot like a peaky. Blinders for most of the people were thrown by. But it's a lot of fun even if it is like the race unnecessarily long that's possibly jury and then we gave it four stars which is a very strong recommendation agree sticking with the letter L. Let's talk about about our other director interview this week last Christmas. So yeah last Christmas Milk plays cates. Who what's the job as a now? The London store owned by Michelle. Yeoh and his name is literally Santa whose name Santa. Yeah I like that touch. Yeah and as we mentioned she's in the downward spiral but then she meets golding. And and that brightens up her life. That's fair the aren't with this. One is forgettable fund but fun all the same. I think clocking building a very charming together and Clark is really likeable. In this movie she has to carry most of it on her shoulders and she does that very well. Golding does a bond impression at one point in the movie. That's that's not going to do anything to quieten down. Those rumors and I one thing would like to see building. Ethnic Promvonsga Craig is done in the role I liked Emma Thompson who also wrote the movie. She's very funny. As case Yugoslavian mother and the movie also has a few things to say about brexit. which is initially jarring to me but they circle back to a couple of times and ends up being quite effective? I agree with ten percent of what you just said. which is my dominant five highs in that Emma Thompson writer and she's great and I had so much goodwill going into this because I I love love actually saw softball for? Let's be honest Shit Christmas movies with Emma Thompson and I love Emma Thompson so anything anything she wants. You think it's got to be great. The problem with this is a hits. All the schmaltzy notes someone actually does but while she is awesome on every level. She isn't Richard Curtis and it's not the writing for this just wasn't up to it for me also and this is where I'm going to scream at the Henry. Golding was fucking absolutely terrible. This no entirely early by his own fault because his character easing credibly bland unto dimensional and from the little bit annoying and quite condescending. So I think he's problematic. I think he's under under served. I D- I don't agree that he's condescending because I think that is character actually She's like I'm homeless. Well his a homeless shelter though. I volunteer you like. How is that helpful helpful Henry? Well no I think he's. I think there's a little bit of almost tough love there. which is weird? I think it's more film about her getting her shit together than is about the Roma. Oh my I think. That's why some of the romantic scenes feel off. Did you nothing. Genuine cannot remember a quote unquote romantic movie. Where the leads have had show little title chemistry as to almost repel each other? Whenever I feel that it's Khomeini the O? I just shot it. I was like if there was close to kissing. ooh feels we'd like in. Their devoid was so not romantic with so little chemistry. This looks like watching a brother. Kiss Assistant Star Wars and I just didn't I I just didn't feel the love at all and his bond bitten is cringe-worthy as if you are going to palm is no and a half now and the one thing I will say for this I thought Media Clark is this film's saving grace. She is so charming and so likeable and even now sometimes she doesn't have that much to where we're at Thompson. Kasama saw the bits in this there moments in this genuinely funny so I think it's not like Zuma's for me it's here. I missed great stuff in this. And there's less good stuff in this. But I think Clark elevates the stuff that she has hey good really good. I think we'd like she's full into an unfortunate rottweiler. She was crying gamma threatens and most of the other things. She's have been Paul. I'm starting to think maybe that was it. Maybe she can only do the nearest Doug Marion in this. I think you know what she has. Chops as a comedy actor can see her getting great roles off the back of this. The thing thing with this film really as severe two things safe for Thompson because high characters Gr and Save Michelle Yeoh who is literally the best her wardrobe. Yeah in her. One Liners Thompson writes. Brilliant one liners and Yo- delivers them perfectly. And I think the subplot all of the up law is genius and when an talk about it in detail but when you get into the reason why she's called Santa that was my favorite Rifkin the entire show here so there is stuff to like him this but I found. There's a lot of stuff to hate in this as well. Well and all of it is Henry. Golding sorry Henry. I'm sure you're not in this. So three stars then for last Christmas which is recommendation mendacious. Obscene star is a gift. Let's take his own b break and let's talk about little monsters which is a new Australian film film which stars Lupita Yongbo as a kindergarten teacher. Who takes her kids on a class outing? She's lovely. She's wearing a fabulous yellow dress. She Shing takes him on a lovely outing. She has a Ukulele with her all his right in the world. They're going to a petting zoo at a farm and then a Zombie outbreak happens. So what did we think of little monsters. I enjoyed it but but there's about so alexander England plays Dave and these another contest trying to get his his shit together and he has a nephew who he's trying to help out and he he's he's really going on the class trip to try and get with the teacher and he's a character who for me doesn't deserve what he gets by the end of the movie and that was an issue for me but I still did enjoy this movie I think the Taylor swift to the titans of really funny I of her sons in my head by the end of the movie and I would recommend it but with caveats I I think is really cute. I mean you're right so Dave's character is awful and he is his fixed on Miss Caroline. So I think you're meant SEC- assure love interest developing there but really he's he's he's nowhere near her league. She is incredible we should also mention Josh. Gad is in this he he plays a sort of kids TV presenter whose Teddy mcgarrigle I believe is his name gray. cartooning terrible human being. It's is on B. Movie. I leave it to you. Imagine what might happen to terrible human beings in this movie but it is really inventive. I have not seen a Zombie movie. That focused on tiny children before. I'm very much enjoyed. That and I very much enjoyed the fact that Lupita Yungas Miss Caroline acts like a teacher through. She keeps counting them to make sure everybody's there she keeps everybody's spirits up. She worries worries about juice boxes. And you know snacks toilet breaks and things like that. She's just adorable and also for miserable and it's a heck of a mix so I did would really enjoy this. It's very funny. It's a very funny movie. Although there is a lot of blood and Gore as well we gave this four stars. It's a good week. Isn't this week wraps up the portion brought to you by the letter L. Let's talk to you about the portion brought up by the actor Adam driver and we'll do the report I because I feel like we're going to have much more to say about my story so the report is the story of Senate staffer a US. Senate staffer done Jones whose bye-bye driver who is set by Diane Fairstein the California senator. WHO's played by Annette Benning to investigate the use of torture or enhanced interrogation by the CIA in the aftermath of nine eleven and so he spends years on this report only to find that it threatens never to be released once he's finished comes to us from Scott Z burns? What what do we think of this one? I really liked it. I think the the second half is much better than the first half I think partially because the beginning of the movie that starts off with the people who are charging ahead and drive his car to do this you have two main too emotionally of neutral Get emotionally involved that way and then sort of unsurprisingly. By by the time the second that's awesome out. He's very much emotion involved. Once that happens. The movie gets a lot more interesting and on the driver's incapable of giving a bad performance and once once that AH emotionally starts to kick in. I really became invested in the second. Half was really is with great. Yeah I think he's good at showing that gradual development as well. It shows him going going from you. Know he's he's passionate about. The law is passionate about doing the right thing. But he's not particularly engaged in this topic above all others until the time goes John and then and then this gigantic report. He's he's compiled threatens never to be seen within the first exposition dump. We should say as well. I mean it has has to be a film by people talking. That's I mean you could say the same about the man I think I feel like. It's it's an this is another. You know films all about people in rooms talking but it again. They're incredible people playing interesting roles. So you're kind of willing to allow it but yeah I think again. I'm drivers is phenomenal. I feel like this is the film. It's GonNa get lost in the shuffle this week but even if you don't see it now do look for it. It is a really heavy hardcore. Look at a horrific episode in American history very and an indeed. You know Britain's implicated as well in in terms of extraordinary rendition and stuff like that. But it is. It's a really really fascinating film and a really rigorous rigorous feeling look at it subject matter so we also gave that one four stars. What frigging week? Oh my God and it's only going to get better because now we cut the other other either driver movie of the Week Marriage Story. From Noah Baumbach Scarlett Johansson and Adam. Driver play a couple Nicole and Charlie an actress and director who are married and who are breaking up. It's Marital Bliss and movie poems makes you feel good about your relationship you know. What a genuinely weirdly weirdly does give you a weird sense of hope for love? I find this really. I find this ultimately very life affirming coming in a very strange way I can entirely But I think it's an extraordinary film. This is a really even-handed handed look at both people in the in the marriage and both are decent. People both are trying to do their best for their young son. Both are also trying to do the right thing for them. So the the issue is that Nicole's been offered a job in La. She's going to take this job in. La The first time. She's maybe made aided decision entirely for herself. In the ten years of the marriage. Charlie is still based in New York. That's where his theater company is that he is devoted to where his career is and yet they have this son. Where does the son live? Who Does the son live with? How do they balance this life? Can they do it. Amicably without any lawyers involved left or is it necessary together. People involved in some way on. What will be the implications if they do so? It's dealing with some. I think it's fair to say enormous issues right now. I thought this was incredible. And Yeah you you said very even-handed and initially when I came out of the movie I was very of not very slightly skewed towards Scotch But the more I think about it the more I think you're right is very family. Even that's a tricky balance to get right. But Noah Baumbach does the performances are just out of this world. Believe I'm you know I mean for for all all of jokers fault say I have declined also most advantage okay. but Joaquin Phoenix in. That film is great but at the same time. If I don't drive does not win. Best Actor Arthur this. I don't know what we're doing because he is on another supernatural in this movie on top of everything else that we know he can do very well and I can apparently Singhvi well which is just unfair? Almost but he is great. Scarlett Johansson is great. It's just messy and war and human in all the waist knowledge. This devastated by. It is my second favorite movie currently of twenty. It's very high up in my top ten as well. I think it's an extraordinary film. There are also other great performances formed. We should mention Laura dern does turn up as a as a divorce lawyer that Scarlett Johansson Consults at drivers character ends up talking to lawyers played by I and all in Alda. And they're both amazing amazing characters as well. There isn't a bum note in this film. I have to say it is just when the banks. It's also funny. It's sad it's funny. It's warm it's terrifying it's upsetting. It's a loving it's hating. It's just everything else is a great Randy Newman score to. Just yeah one of the easiest five star ratings. I will arguable movie. which is what we did? We gave it five stars and that is a heck of a recommendation so for those keeping score at home we have last Christmas on three stars which is recommendation nation. We have little monsters the report and the man's sixty six all four stars and we marriage story on five stars. If you don't go to the cinema this week there is something wrong along with you with the best in the world get out there and see stuff and what a week I mean. I'm driver must be exhausted. I don't think we will see him in another big film for a long go. Hey must be home for the duration. Wouldn't you say joins us. He won't be back in cinemas with no no. There's no Adam trauma films I can think of No not anytime soon. Now I think that's it so anyway Great Week for cinema. Yes Marty Yeah so do please get out there and enjoy it now. Just sort of personal podcast note. We should say the were actually bidding a fond farewell this week to our producer. Jane and he's been with us over the last year. She's moving on to pastures greener and hopefully a lot less chaotic than we are and considerably. More Professional. I would never voluntarily inflict us on anyone. Thinks cruel and unusual punishment But Jane Long. It's been absolutely pleasure having you. You'll find her work on other great podcasts. Like girls on film so yes other more professional and polished productions and she will be missed here so thank you very much and that is it then for this week's NPR podcast. Join Join US next week. For More Film Related Fund when we will hopefully have Chris back from his Lurgi if assuming he hasn't died of manfully and we'll also be joined by some people from frozen to witch people in particular. Did they want to build a snowman. Helen not the question. Well it would be going into the first time in forever. We have frozen people on the PODCAST. I believe it is Jonathan Groff and Josh Gad so they should be. I think he'll be in sort. I like happy go lucky Kristof mode or do you think could be in really really serious mindhunter mode. I think he'll be or a really terrifying. Blend of the a two or completely flamboyant kingdom of third or Nerdy Seymour from that show prefers. She's currently starring in mode. Well I remember. He went into D- twenty-three three. He did They did one of the ensemble frozen to songs on stage that is holding for mindhunter. I've literally divorced men flex freaking me the fuck out well well. Let's find I by tuning in next week to the Empire podcast until then. It's goodbye from Amazon piece by James Michael and yeah well I've got you here. Do not forget to download the pilot TV. podcast where this week we will be reviewing some TV shows. But more importantly. I am making Terry Watch an episode. Soda Farscape yes. Well actually this is second we met. I watch one and she didn't like and so I'm refusing to admit defeat on making another one. Well a wealthy yet this. Ah this is going to be timing okay. Goodbye from me. I'm off to pitch the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The idea that every single film Tom to be nominated for an Oscar should contain at least five minutes worth of John Barren tall reaction shows. I think it's a no brainer so to find out. Thanks very much bye.

London Henry Golding Disney US Emma Thompson Helen Harris Greg wise London Zoo James Dyer Kurt Russell Kurt Christmas Bing Hollywood twitter Goldie Hawn Paul Thomas Anderson John Sean Connery James Bond
Care homes blast Boris Johnson's "cowardly" comments; and why it's still safe to go the pub after three shutdowns

The Leader

13:24 min | 10 months ago

Care homes blast Boris Johnson's "cowardly" comments; and why it's still safe to go the pub after three shutdowns

"Thank you for listening to the leader. We're here every day at four PM. With News, analysis and interviews from one of the country's most trusted newsrooms subscribed to make sure you get us every day, and we'd love it if you rated and shared us to now from the evening standard in London. This is leader. Hi I'm David Malls Land Audits. Johnson's being called a coward by care homes, but downing. Street is not backing down instead what they're doing is saying the what he said. How to completely different meaning, as I never happened, which is ironic considering one of the charges against the prime minister's is trying to rewrite history. Our political editor Joe Mafia on the fallout from the peons claim that homes didn't really follow KUNA virus, procedures and Three of these pugs mentioned that tracing the customers air in touch with people who came in. woundings not only that they've immediately shut down then not taking the risk. Go London editor David. LS after three pub shutdown just days after reopening. Will it shake the public's confidence? Take it from the Evening Standard's editorial. Call Them. This is the leader the whole thing pick up the newspaper or had two Standard Okuda UK. Slash comment in a moment. How the government's apparently claiming Boris Johnson didn't really say the thing everyone heard him say. Only. Care, homes and COVID nineteen for months. This has been a story of what was done. What wasn't and what should it be? Accusatory fingers have been pointed at a government that said to a failed to protect workers and those in their care. Now Boris Johnson appears to pointed one bag saying we discovered a too many homes. didn't really follow the procedures in the way that they they could have, but we're only lessons the whole time. The National Care Forum says those comments are hugely insulting. The chief executive of the community. Integrated Care Charity says the PM is cowardly. Editorial call him says the government needs to start accepting. He didn't get everything right. When the prime minister tries to. Away his handling of corona virus. He immediately crushes into trouble. As he has done by claiming that, too many care homes didn't really follow the procedures. With the result that thousands of people died that piece of shameless buck-passing has rightly attracted the scorn. It deserves. We know Britain's response to Corona virus went wrong. We also know this isn't all the fault of politicians. The scientific advice at the start wars uncertain for instance other countries have seen the crisis hit care homes badly to even ones with well-funded systems such as Sweden, but it is no good the PM blaming the homes they will let down and. At some point, the government will have to start accepting that things have gone wrong over the last few months, but make it virtue of its determination now to get them right. Well, political editor, Joe Murphy is here. One care home provide as accused the prime minister of an absolute travesty of leadership. Is the government surprised by about? Don's wads have been taken. I think the government is surprised at all, and it's reaction. Today is not rolling back on the prime minister's comments. They're leaving them hanging there. Instead what they're doing is saying that what he said had a completely different meaning as I. Never Happened, which is Ironic, considering one of the charges against the prime minister's is trying to rewrite history in a more favourable way here. We Have Alec on a meteorology this morning. Saying the prime minister said something that is totally different to what he actually said. The prime minister said too. Many homes didn't follow procedures properly. and Alma, says the prime minister step full support for care homes, and nobody really knew what the best procedures were. Virus could hide under the cloak of his invisibility of a symptomatic symptoms, but that strategy doesn't seem to have worked at least with care homes themselves. He's been branded cowardly as we've written in the headline on the front page of the Evening Standard Today. There's been a torrent overnight continuing today of really quite hurt feelings from care home bosses. who have after all shouldered one of the biggest burdens of the pandemic, which is they have lost their residence and. If you work in a care home. That's like losing a member of your family because they do work very closely. These figures in a list these are real people. The you get very close to an account home town. Of course able say feel A lot of sympathy for this view that they were the poor relations of the whole pandemic people who didn't get the same quality p. p. e. as hospitals built, who didn't get tests and who were really forced to to do very close up work with less protection than a lot of headdresses account using kid this. Though a quite a short lived row because she soon, AC is going to be in the Commons tomorrow making more announcements, and that'll take over the front pages. Won't it way? We'll take over the front pages for day, but it's not this. Business is not gonNA go away for two reasons. One is that gives Dharma as probably got his list of questions written nail based on the extraordinary comments that you referred to by mark, Adams, of one of the care home charities, or he could choose comments by lots of other people, but you said cowardly travesty of leadership is another. And secondly, because at some stage, probably towards the end of the pandemic, the promise to will announce a public inquiry into it. and. As things stand the great sort of. Outstanding event of the pandemic of. Mistakes or wrongness in the response in not necessarily pushing blame here. Is the tragic death toll in care homes so much greater than everywhere else. We tried to KUNA elderly people, but for one reason or another we ended up catling them and twenty thousand, possibly thirty thousand died as a result of that. Next thing about clubs in the country there are tens of thousands something around sixty pounds. Trump's but to say that three of come out threes, not safe night. Is it really go London David Alison why it's still safe to go to? The pub has three shutdown just days after lockdown was lifted. The Vase of England came back to life last weekend. As landlords welcomed customers back after months of lockdown, this was the atmosphere in open air venue in Brixton, but for three pubs, the joy for patrons and Publicans alike has been somewhat short, lived the Lighthouse in Burnham on sea, the Fox and hounds in badly and the village home in Gosport have all had to temporarily close after customers tested positive for coluna virus, leaving extent, Go London editor David Alex joins we David. Will this worry the industry at all? I think that will be some industry justice. Justice that will be some in the public to do this. Warning sign, but I think for the industry they'll take. It is a heartening sign that their colleagues agree being attention. All three of these pugs mentioned that tracing the customers. They're in touch with people who came in and they put out warnings not only that they've immediately shut down, then note taking the risk I think that's a really important thing him. Stay away from this. It's not as if three pubs would discovers to said they had heard on. We're trying to get away with it being. Run because I think from older people that are expected to. have an Oscar threes. They realized there's not really second chance they need to get. This right stage is a risk that we got back into town. which I think for the vast majority of people listening the won't go so. If it would happen would have an enormous impact on. The third largest employer in the country when you consider some skit launched. Not that has own guy in fact. I mean potentially dictates. Took a wonder to a couple of bars on Saturday in east London just to really kind of have a look around because it was quite historic day, I wanted to see what it looked like. And I was surprised that in one of the balls I walked into almost immediately grabbed by the arm that the entrance by someone say no. We have to have your name. We have to have your mobile number. Just in case something happens, and I got the impression that everywhere was taking everything quite cicely. was that reflected across the rest of London too. So interestingly I was in Soho and of course people have see countless leixoes streets being background. I'm always in public being street the French House right famous. French was busy, but as I came in I. Know some people not coming in? There's no table. Why don't you come back a little bit and I was like okay. They're observing. People came in lots of regulars in that. It's not gonNA. Place people caring for hug stuff night. elbows if they were doing that a tool of them, you're saying certainly see you, but I really can't. And the tables were distant sound. That was hand sanitizer for everyone. And the respect for people space cut is a key priority for for the workers that popped into a restaurant at the end of the evening, just in further up other roads and I said to the guy running out. Have you actually been taking addresses? of course like I have to anyhow twenty-five covers. Something goes wrong. Here needs to get in touch with everyone who was in and I was really impressed because of me when I saw those guidelines. Come Out Bikes actually. It hits this, but I think again. The idea that they really don't want to get this wrong has meant many restaurants and bows are actually really. Doing it properly. And comparatively given the number of bars that opened. At the weekend. Is it surprising that only three have now closed down? Yeah, I mean. Think about hubs. In the country. There are tens of thousands something around sixty thousand jobs, for of course, no oldest new arguments, but to say that three have come out. Think that is such a tiny tiny figure that it does really need to be taken into account. Of course, it makes a good headline. Hubs have to close immediately. Then you read three. Threes no cigarette. Is it really? As far as I have not heard of anything from the countless thousands wrestles every up either. I, think when you consider that together. I think it really says something about the fact that most places worth line. You'll the attitude of London daily? What else is the to do? That isn't going to. Feel if you won't scare out. There are other things do the London Zoo is for water they restrict. GAUDENS. We have some galleries acting ozzy commercial galleries. Walls event the National Gallery is leading the way this week. which I think is fantastic I was in cinema actually on Sunday? I went to the every management constance on another huge TV at alone but I didn't think just seeing it on a big screen would be such an impactful experience. It was strangely moving just to be there with other people. There was A. Sense of excitement people having girl scripts, and really just enjoying being out there on go. It really is. An idea that we we've just missed being out with other people you know. Of course. Everyone was sat two seats away from each other oldest off again, wearing them. Almost everything was delivered betray. You want having too much context. There is lots now. That is across London and I think that following that guidance. Quick cash as well. You can get more ideas for what to do whether. It's the public, not without go London site. You'll find that it's standard. The COULDA UK forward slash go, and that's the leader. We're back tomorrow at four PM.

prime minister London government Evening Standard Boris Johnson political editor editor David Malls David UK National Care Forum London Zoo Joe Mafia Vase of England COVID chief executive Soho French House David Alison
The New Masters: The 2019 Sobey Art Award, Part 1

Ideas

54:08 min | 1 year ago

The New Masters: The 2019 Sobey Art Award, Part 1

"This is a CBC podcast every artist. I know and I'm sure all the artists toby we all exist with a pretty palpable sense of financial insecurity. I trade that for total freedom so I get up every morning and I go to the studio so I can't really ask for any other Kinda life. I think I la welcome to ideas deciding to become an artist can be a daunting career choice if one wants to pay bills. That's what makes the prestigious art award so meaningful for artists. The annual award offers not only major career Bruce but also generous cash prizes to Canada's rising contemporary art stars for whom art despite its financial risks is a call. Making art is making art is important. Making art is a mystery and and a lot of generosity hopefully artists hired and it makes me cry. Why I it's just like It's like digging into yourself till like plop it out on the table and I think that's definitely not easy and trusting your intuition while you do it and using this incredible language of the senses today part one of the new masters conversations with the finalists of the Twenty Nineteen Sobe Art Award ideas producer. Mary link interview the finalists at the art gallery of Alberta in Edmonton where the Sobe art award gala was held and where the winner was announced in this show. You'll hear from two of the finalists. Dorsey Wilson Representing Atlantic Canada and Nikola Danny Representing Quebec. His inciteful art tackles complex. Societal problems such as income inequality so in light of his interests did ask his fellow finalists to consider sharing the awards top prize of one hundred thousand dollars of course Rogers. What Glenn has fellow-finalists decided in the second half of the show? But first off Darcy Wilson talking to marry link. We begin with a little background from Mary about a fascinating. Little known nineteenth century zoo that inspired Wilson's art project north. America's first zoo opened in eighteen. Forty seven in. You probably don't know this. Few do it opened in? Halifax Nova Scotia hundred acres on the edges town that lasted for twenty years and yet with its closure. It's sort of disappeared. I'd never heard of it and I grew up in Halifax as to the artist. Darcy Wilson. She was also unaware of the zoo until she came across a mention of it. Deep within the Nova Scotia Archives and this discovery letter on an artistic exploration of the evolving and often troubled relationship between humans and nature. Her art project is called the memorial list. It began in Twenty fifteen it continues to this day. It includes sculpture drawing still photography video and performance. Her work slightly whimsical. Beautifully made moving and thoughtful. Here's my conversation with the Sobe Art Award finalist for Atlantic Canada. There are C Wilson. Very important and evolving. Our project of yours is called the memorial it began with a an accidental discovery. Which I just love in the Nova Scotia Archives. Can you tell me about that? He had absolutely. I was researching for a different project. The artist in residence at pleasant park at the time in Halifax and just tell people from across the country. What point pleasant. Park just briefly point pleasant park is sort of a tip of the Halifax Peninsula that is now preserved as Parkland. It was actually one of the original sites of the settlers steady to be cleared however it was just totally inhospitable. And I believe there wasn't a good so too pothole drinking area and it was just so close to stormy seas anyway so the settlement moved farther down the Halifax harbour and now it's just a really beloved park in the city so you are working at the park. And you were in the archives one day and yeah I so. I was researching because my project that I was doing was to hold a public memorial service for the wildlife that had been extirpated from the city limits since the arrival of European settlers. And I really didn't know where to begin. And so I I literally just went to the Halifax card catalog. At the Nova Scotia Archives and started looking under wildlife. Like what's going to happen just under W and there's nothing you know and I just sorting through and just drifting through aimlessly and under Zad Zad and suddenly zoological gardens popped up and I just thought. Oh that's weird what what's happening here. And then I started. Just I mean you can be descriptions on the cards. They are just this little little snippets of a story started emerging if these early zoological gardens that opened in the city of Halifax in the year eighteen forty seven it was ones with electrical garden. You have one major garden called Andrew Downes Zoological Gardens that predated any of the zoos in the United States including Central Park. And so it. It's what's incredible is that you know you're from. Halifax you lived in the neighborhood. This is right at the by the arm. Which is a little inlet from the harbor and it's now a rotary for a lot of cars and everything and instead of suburban in the background. I grew up in. Halifax you up. I never heard of this before as zoo. The first zoo in North America in Halifax no in the eighteen. Hundreds said no one's ever heard of who is. Andrew Downes the person who started this and and describe it. Andrew Downes was a naturalist in Halifax Victorian naturalist his. He actually originally trained as a plumber. His father was a plumber I know and he began this sort of small collection of sort of small menagerie and he was really just passionate about the natural world. He was passionate about natural history and he began this enterprise just up from the northwest arm. In the what was then known as the Community of Dutch village he started with a little cottage. That sort of a small amount of land slowly expanded through municipal grants and provincial grants. And he was I think he was a bit of a businessman as well So it really became this kind of incredible space. What I find fascinating about this do is that it. I mean yes you have. There are smaller animal enclosures. You have birds of prey housed indoors in the AVIARY in cages. I mean they're really awful aspects about it by today's standards of course on I actually on a side note. I find zoos really complicated. I'm not a big fan of zoological gardens. I exer- fascinating to me. But I always feel the. There's something so sad about the animal in captivity but then he was also working to make these grounds as natural as possible so heat for example and this is in the eighteen hundreds had huge roaming fields at the top of of the grounds for the elk and Moose and the Caribou so he had some things that were right and actually very forward thinking. There weren't a lot of exotic animals at the zoo. There were a lot of regional animals. So anything that may live in the area. There were seals there were like. I mentioned Moose. Caribou there were ALC- rabbits there were mink bears etc. But then there were also the no. There was a monkey who were exotic birds. From all over the World Andrew Downes was a corresponding member of the Su Logical Society of London and he was part of this bizarre international trade of animals between these countries of the Commonwealth. And it's really fascinating. I visited the Zada Sal to do better research for this project is to see you know what sorry of the Zoological Society of London. And because I've read a newspaper articles on the archives that he was a corresponding member NAT. He'd secured all these specimens for his do that. He was shipping specimens overseas. And you kind of have to wonder like is this is true or these local papers or talking him up. How much of this is accurate? When you're saying he was shipping. He was taxidermist. He stopped a lot of these animals that you loved. That's part of what I find fascinating about. The story is that you have this contradiction in his work. There's extreme care and a desire to nurture nature and yet he is actively he's he was an incredible hunter. She was a capturing animals from the wild and housing them in his property in habitats he constructed for them within their natural habitat and then he was of course Mounting big trophy specimens by big game wild animals. That a lot of soldiers or sportsman in the area were were visiting and touring through Nova Scotia and then they would bring their bounty to him and he would tax them. He estimated that he mounted over. Eight hundred Moose heads in his lifetime and tons of tiny little birds and so you you find out that he's this member in London and you still. He's still unknown. He's still this. This this is existed. And then you find out. He's incredibly famous that his work is throughout the the world especially the Western world for natural history. Museums you find his taxidermy. He's little birds stuffed birds everywhere and other other items. Yeah well it was. I shouldn't say items are animals are sentient beings. He was a really exceptional taxidermist with a sort of a focus in ornithology so according to accounts of the era he was you know every major Western institution had animals that are specimens that he had procured for them. But it's actually I found it really challenging to find those specimens today so I was searching. I mean you can do a lot of searching now through these sort of digital databases and I tried to find specimens that he sent overseas and I. I really didn't have a lot of luck. I found three bird specimens through resum s a bird skin at the Smithsonian. Why was he so famous Fax Not due to denigrate my own hometown. But why was he so famous and amongst these museums? I think he was really quite good at what he was doing. And in some ways I mean his skill was really incredible and I. It's so Delicate and crisp and he really was able to achieve a sort of sense of life. You selected to represent the province at the world fairs of the air and he did win a couple metals as well and so he was on this international stage and and was was very successful. But also this this really was the first Zoological Gardens in North America since the arrival of settlers the Aztec Empire at the royalty had private zoological gardens at the Palace but this down zoological gardens were different because they I mean these were the first Zoological Gardens in North America dedicated to the study of nature and to bring people closer to the natural world in urban centers. What's weird a zoo? The downs zoo that is open at the edge of the city center was in an area of bit of wilderness released so this differs say for example from the London Zoo which was a big influence for downs because the London Zoo. In an urban center with this mandate bring people closer to nature. But that wasn't really necessary in Halifax so I find this particular zoological garden. This very uncomfortable end A tragic story in a lot of ways I mean the the desire down desire to take the wild animal out of its natural habitat to recreate a home for it within its own ecosystem and to try to exert control through his own desire to know have a connection through his own desire to nurture nature. There's something is totally missed. He Complete Leagues Missed not understanding of the wild animal through this process and to me. It's it's failed interaction. And it's a symbol of this sort of ultimate disconnect from that early settler end this really incredible ecosystem that had been there for a building for tens of thousands of years. He could have just walked in the woods. Seen what he what? He hadn't zoo in Not The polar bears hit polar bears. Right I think it is. Yeah so he. There was a polar bear on the grounds that was shipped from Labrador Vice steamboat when it was a cub and then it grew up in. Andrew Downes property but it was just so it was not. They weren't able to tame him like he was so wild and kind of written accounts call him ferocious and he was actually then boarded onto another vessel in the city shipped to Pisa Italy to reside at King. Victor Emmanuel the seconds garden of acclimatization. So this this is. It's the ultimate. It's just so bizarre and so it's so sad to think of the journey of animal and and and others McKee also procured Moose for the same garden of acclimatization and deer and elk. How did he disappear? How did someone? When was the eighteen hundreds right this? How did how did Andrew downes disappear from our collective narrative while Andrew Downes was? I think it has something to do with this sort of chapter of his life after the Halifax sue and so what happened was the zoo closed in eighteen sixty eight I believe and because Andrew Downes was recruited to manage zoo in central park in New York City and so she actually closed his zoological gardens. He put all of the animals and the enclosures and objects us to care for the zoo in put them up for sale and invited the city to his grounds for one last sort of picnic and then he and his family packed up they sold the land and they moved to New York but when he arrived there had been a mistake and no one is really quite sure what happened. Something went wrong and he actually got there and he. He didn't get the job he wasn't yes oh he was a big mistake and he had basically sold everything and he moved back to. Halifax. He wanted to purchase property back but the family that had settled in they. Were you know they just settled in? And they were quite happy. They didn't want to sell him the land which is understandable and so he actually bought an adjacent property and tried to start the zoo again and it didn't really work out. I mean it. It took a long time to build the sue. That was there before and when people were when citizens were visiting to to check out the new grounds. It just wasn't as grand as it had been. Yeah it just sort of fizzled. And he couldn't get the monetary support and then he had to close that up as well so much statement of in. This is what you sort of explore. I don't mean to say what you're exploring. You have to tell me. But of man's dominion over nature of dominance over nature and that we forget that we are ourselves our animals and that we are not at the top of the pecking order that were part of this big universe he added. That's it and I think this colonial understanding of nature. You know there. There is no connection to nature. It's it is your rate. It's about that control and domination and it's it's so wrong. It's so sad and we're still kind of unpacking it today and I think that's something in my work that I'm trying I. I know that my own understanding as a participant in western culture and descendant of European settlers. And at this you know in Canada like I. My understanding of nature began under that umbrella. And it's something that I'm still trying to move away from and find a different a different connection and also question you know can. Can I have a meaningful connection like I think I can but my body is really tied to this sort of legacy? Dursey has been working on this evolving. Art Project Moralist for five years. Now there are many elements within this project. They include her delightful portrait of Andrew. Downes an intricate sculpture of the zoo itself. And there's also a particularly moving series of photographs. The photos are taken at different famous natural history museums and they show Darcy. She's dressed the persona of a nerdy researcher in a white lab coat standing in front of a taxi during animal at the museum. The twist being. He's holding an IPAD with images of where the animal came from. They once roam free before being killed and stuffed and awkward poses for Urban Museum goers a striking example of the disconnect between man and nature. What happens for you emotionally when you walk in this persona This character with the IPAD. What what is it like in terms of? How do you feel the connection of the soul? These animals if exist number in poetic but do you feel these teams at all. That were that we've stopped in put behind glass at once. Ran Free. I think in some ways I do but then I'm also aware that these are sort of the shells of animals and these are animals that were taken and fabricated to make them seem lifelike That's fascinating to me to take this incredibly complex living being from the wild and to kill it and then to stuff it to make it look while again or to make it look alive. And it's the glass eyes are really important in that process to give you that. You know as the viewer to give you that connection to the animal but it's all false and so it's it's a complete illusion and so when I enter those spaces I do feel I find those spaces are so sad. I see the loss like the the absence of those animals. It show still. It's so still. Except for all of the the people in the wildlife halls were laughing and giggling taking photos and exclaiming how beautiful it is there again exists that disconnect between the sort of the past these animals and nature and yet then there's the joy of seeing the animal in that close proximity but then the animal's not they it's completely absent in it's it's fabricated interactions. I Find Wildlife. Halls are so uncomfortable that there. I'm sucked into the beauty and yet I'm I'm I find them so horribly sad and I like it when I like to go in when it's incredibly still doing that photo. Shoot that you mention. I was really lucky to be able to enter into the space when nobody else was there to take the photographs and there is a very different interaction than because it. I think that it's in those moments that you you do kind of sense the presence in some way and I don't know if that's the presence of the the the former animals are or if it's just I'm responding to the taxidermy but it there is this really. It's a charge emotional space and but then in that performance that you're talking about it is sort of like performance. It exists only in that brief moment of documentation snapshot but the performance. You know to go in to do that and to stand there and to hold the IPAD and then I visited those sites and I took the photographs to bring to those museums. There's it's a long process to get the images in to You know get the IPAD unload them on and then go and travel to the museums to present this image. But that's also like the act is kind of cruel right because that. I'm sharing an image of those animals original home with with the animals in the wildlife gallery but the animals are they can never leave the wildlife gallery and they can't go to their original habitat. It's not possible so there. There is a sort of a cruelty in it so so explain this again. So you're in. This character needs photographed. And you're going up this this pseudo historians slash scientists. And you're going up and you sort of lab coat with the IPAD. And what are you showing sake for example what you show the polar bear behind the case the taxi during polar bear? What what are you showing on the IPAD to it? I'm showing from kind of it's an image of snow and ice taken sort of at a northern point of Newfoundland looking across to Labrador and so looking across at the polar bears original habitat and then I fly to. That photograph was taken at the Museum of Natural History in London in so I traveled to see that Baron that location and then I showed the polar bear the ipad in the image in this sort of and we look at a lot of the ways we interact with nature. Now is through the ipad or the computer screen the Internet's rate. I wanted to kind of change that a little bit and then to bring this image of the animals original home into share it. Share my tourist photo with with the animal but it is a little delusional. Like in a way like it's it's it's a performance and it's at one hand. It's sort of a kind gesture and yet it's also very unkind. Heard us to come forward also in terms of what's happening with biodiversity which what's happening with climate change so. I've been kind of going back in time to look at some of the earliest examples of this misunderstanding and misguided way to sort of attempt to control the natural world because I. I really think that we're still kind of rolling from these early. These early missteps. You know when we look at what's happening in the world now there is absolutely still a colonial understanding of nature. And it's it's sort of. It's sort of wire in this mess in the first place and I think as an artist. It's such a huge topic to unpack and I'm kind of just getting little bits but for me feel this overwhelming weight from it. All and I feel this overwhelming sorrow and I think that's something that when I go back to these narratives lake these early zoological gardens and this this man who really tried to do what he thought was a good thing by. There's a lot of. He caused a lot of harm in the process. And it represents this misguided ideology Mike going back in and looking at that time I mean I I see it as I really see the Soro in it and I'm wanting to kind of tease out that emotion in I think I'm also I mean to me the memorial is project is it is grieving. A loss connection. I want the project to be like this sort of like memorial to a lost connection to nature and I think that's something that I find really fascinating about the research. The zoo is that Andrew Downes actually called the zoological gardens a memorial and he called himself the memorial Est. It's it is written written. I saw I written in a letter that he's written to the Legislative Assembly petitioning for more funds and but it just really rang home did he. He was almost sort of viewing nature or at least the nature in his face as a sort of memorial and as something that is gone. I guess I don't really understand why I'm not sure why I'm only guessing to why he called himself that but it it really rang true for me and so the whole project is called the memorial EST and the hope is that it is the sort of I mean communities really powerful tool to kind of help us process what's happening in the world and this is my interpretation. I like for me. It is hopefully bringing out some of the emotion from this lost connection or sort of failed connection and something a failed connection that is ongoing today. You're listening to ideas on. Cbc Radio One in Canada across North America on Sirius Xm in Australia on our N. And around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas you can also download ideas on the CBC. Listen APP or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Nella today. Part one of our series the new masters conversations with the finalists for the two thousand Nineteen Sobe Art Award. This annual award is the most prestigious for contemporary artists in Canada. Top Prize is one hundred thousand dollars on this. Show two of the artists in this competition. Darcy Wilson Representing Atlantic Canada. From whom you just heard in the first half of the episode and now my name is Nicaraguan. You and I represent Quebec. Here's his conversation with ideas producer. Mary Link Nikola. Your art is not only deeply intriguing and fascinating. It's also very much part of the Zeitgeist in that. Your art pieces in part deal. With an explore issues like income inequality the growth of the point zero one percent economic structures. That aren't working for a great deal of people these days. Why did you choose to make art about this? Well actually didn't really choose to make art about that. It's more that progressively what was interested in which was basically how society is organized in structures and systems of always been fascinated net and gradually. This led me to look into like structures of power in general which led me to the economy. Which is inevitable because everything runs on daughters and whatever so as a guy who makes arts and makes paintings and make structures is interested in architecture and all those things what can I do like. What's my role in? What like what is relevant to do now is making yet another painting a relevant thing to do and I have doubts. I mean even is having an art career. Irrelevant thing to do it. Giving those circumstances I also have very serious doubts. You know if I look at like the cultural power of instagram or Youtube or whatever and you compare it to art you know a little shift in the algorithm of Youtube or instagram probably has more cultural impact. In a given year than L. Newseum exhibitions worldwide combined. Right so I guess like where where I started to question that for me was when I began to see like okay. So if I keep going on the path that I've kind of traced for myself which is you know. School residencies work Super Hard. Tried to the best possible work and not think about economic system in which it takes place. Where does that lead me? Okay I want to discuss this more and I wanted to do like a narrative arc and come back to it at the end so I want to work through some of your pieces. I because I think this is where you're leading two so first off. Let's talk about a really great multidisciplinary piece called the time of work. And can you describe it for me to tell me it's goal? The idea was basically. How do you create an art market? That does not run on money. And what else can use them money and so what I did is I contacted a bunch of artists that I knew or knew little or whatever but like you know from very serious. I'd very well known artists like BG alcohol represented Canada. The Venice Baniel who graciously accepted. Admit a work for the project and other established artists like the the David Elliott and many others so everybody basically took a work and offered it for project. Fifteen or sixteen sixteen total. Yeah and everyone evaluated how much time it took them to make the work and so somewhere like you know thirteen hours forty seven minutes and thirty seconds somewhere like about twelve hours so it depended and then I made a catalog with those work and their time value and then the public was invited to spend the same amount of time as it took to make the work inside this cube with the work and to acquire the word by spending that amount of time and they had to do it without any tool of communication worker entertainment so no phone. No book no nothing. They were like this big huge cube that that that had a curtain and a plant in a chair and and had like a podium for the artwork often like a painting and then people around could watch them from outside. They didn't close the curtains and they're just sitting there. You contemplating. Yeah and they so. It's the public space so yeah people could go in and see it but also I don't want it to be kind of like an animal in the cage older cartoons that a person could close the want to and also I didn't want them to force them to look at the work so they had a chair and he could go to look at the word but it could also not look at work so it was more to just spend time with the work without any obligations however we gave the people pencils and paper and encouraged him to note. Whatever came to mind and pretty much. Everyone left a pile of notes usually about ten to fifteen pages and it's interesting because you know we're used to read staff that's been titled. Computer when the longer used to read manuscripts knows right and you could really feel the time pass in most of those notes and it was really fascinating idea was that I didn't want to do like a time bank where it's an exchange of quote unquote productive time. Like we know somebody will be like well exchanges this work against like my services as a lawyer or this or that. I wanted to be just time. I see it as like time as a metaphysical resource for mortal people. You know we. If YOU'RE A multi billionaire thousand dollars is nothing for you have plenty more. Giridih boards everything to you but time is quite an equaliser Every human only has so many hours to live right. So if you did a cates save fifteen hours of your time to just be in Cuba to work to get it. You spend time with. It's so regardless of what you do with the work after that you you did spend that amount of time with the work and so I was interested in how that's not a better or more fair or whatever type of economy but it's a different one that we usually don experience and it made people who would normally not be able to acquire artworks. Be Capable of getting those works. This is just an aside. But how long was along person in the cube as sixteen hours so the work they were given were usually not like major works because eighty yardages couldn't afford to give such a work as needed to survive and he decided to whatever and also to cube is relatively small. It's about eight feet by eight feet by eight feet. So that's Gail it's interesting scale but it's not like you know you can't a big work in it so this other works were between the shortest one was forty five minutes. The longest one was sixteen hours but people didn't have to want shot off. They could leave as they wanted had a timer and they were just like stop the timer and started again and the the we asked them to wrote as they checked in and out so that an contract that were given to them into the artists. Things were clear like you knew that. The person spend derive amount of time like you know in good faith and they couldn't hire somebody else to sit there for them. Nobody tried another piece of Nicholas work. That is quite thought. Provoking has called vertically integrated. Socialism is a combination of various media. Including what looks like an architectural model of a condo. Building that would fit on a table is meant to be an artistic summation of class structure albeit when it was shown in a church. Bruges Belgium during art show. One person one very displeased person thought it was a real project about to be built. Okay so let's move onto another piece of yours. That really intrigues me. It's called Vertically Integrated Socialism. That one Can you can you describe that piece for me? So the idea is. It's a building that comprises the whole social hierarchy so it has multiple levels edited. The idea was how do you include the entire like social architecture of essential in a single building? It's like a sort of condo project with different different floors and different people can afford different floors. But keep going. Yeah it's basically that right at the idea is imagine a building that encompasses the full the full spectrum of the sole of social classes as seen in Los Angeles and so it goes from the homeless to multi millionaire and it's the challenge of design. But the idea for me was like living in Los Angeles. You see all that stuff right like I was working as an art instructor for a rich collector. And then I would take my Volvo and drive down to skid row and go to my studio orders like thousands of homeless people crashing on the sidewalk literally with the rats and having a place to go to the bathroom or whatever so the social contract could not harsher but then when you look at like urban development in California you see those new developments in a desert all the time when you're driving around but what they do is funny to pick you know the middle class. And then you buy a big chunk of land the flatten. It put something like gas station a Walmart. A few restaurants like three hundred houses. That are all the same so I thought why would it be like if you imagine housing development that includes that actually the full spectrum and not only what you imagined developer? But you know what society as we know it looks like and instead of doing it as an urban development actually also did that but vertically integrated socialism was to try to compress that into a single building and the results for me was was interesting in doing it was how awkward it makes you feel because it's like regardless of where you're at it just puts reality in your face right so okay so the the ground floor. The level is free. You WanNa live there right. The the basements underground level was called the includes DVD level and has a sixty four micro apartments. And you can just get in for free if you want to. If it's available and then on the ground level you have the dignity apartments that are a bit bigger and are big enough for a small family and then you have the parking lot for the upper level residents and above it have the respectability level which are big nice apartments. And there's only four of those so that the ratio is like sixty four tiny apartments sixteen dignity apartments parking lot than four respectability apartment. And on top of that. You have a giant phantasm stretches over five stories that's called the exclusivity level and so you multiply by four the number of apartments at every level and you divide by four as you go up and the idea was that it's kind of an economic theory where the bottom. It's actually socialist because you could get in for free. And whatever profit is generated by the building is redistributed to all residents according to how much space are using so if you have a tiny apartment move in for free because there's no demand you just move in and you get a little almonds from the building for nothing so basically you're you know you have kind of room and board but if you want to move up to a better apartment you need to be more than whoever's there to kick them out and take over so it's like you know basically a straight up. Free Market Libertarian less affair capital structure. And as you move up you need to kick out more and more people so you create inflation at an insane rate so and the higher you go the more the more people Beta get out. The more to building generates profits because the money keeps turning in but it's also cooperative so the building is always redistributed only within the building so the building generates millions of dollars. Whoever's on top is going to have basically half of it and then he kind of trickles down and there's also there's another element of the billion called avoid. What was that devoid sort of the subconscious of the building? When I when I drew it it was kind of scary pyramidal building and then I thought it's. It's a bit too irrational. And we went in. I consulted with a bunch of people that I knew who are in architecture theory. We discussed like temples and all sorts of existing structures. Where weird things happen within a society and how takes form in architecture and I decided to create a void in the center of the building. So devoid is like. It's like this empty space. That goes from the very top of the building to the bottom. So if you're at the very bottom in the basement you can look up towards the sky. And you'RE GONNA see every floor up to the top of the penthouse and anyone on the floor can look upwards or downwards into void and independece the penthouses wrapped around void and it has no access to devoid no window and door. No nothing except when you get out from the very top floor you can walk into a small hallway outside on the top and then you have access to a catalog that looks down into the void. So devoid becomes very creepy subconscious of the building. Where if you are a person independence? You have these crazy luxurious penthouse. But your house is built around this void so you cannot forget about it. So the whole building was kind of. I was really trying to embody the perversion of the existing system economic system. In a way that just makes everything more explicit than it is but this is not simply a morality tale about the vanity of mainstream. Is it no I think for me? It was more a tale about how I'm trying to make sense of. What is the morality of the systems within and is it even possible to have a morality? Like the it's not like I have a clear answer to how replace capitalism right like who does like the last time anyone heard. Someone proposed a clear. Coherent vision for wet could replace capitalism. I mean it's really really really hard and So my idea with this project was not to be like. Hey Look at how wrong says it was to create a system that is complex and realistic in a sense that the density of the information in the system is high like you can really imagine all sorts of different scenarios and get into it into that world but then you realize that the system is actually better than what's actually going on in Los Angeles so it's kind of perverse disgusting system but it's better than what's taking place in many places so then how do you position yourself in regard system. Do you see well. This is gross. Or you're like well I don't know right. It's like so it's kind of being like. Do you accept this terrible thing. That is still better than what it is at the cost of having to accept your own hypocrisy you know it's like so it kind of creates a very complex moral tale at least for me and that was. That's what I was hoping to get across when you first showed this piece. It was in Bruges right in Belgium and some people took it seriously right. They thought this all. Here's a new economic model. We're going to have these condos and this is how it's all going to work and they didn't quite get your this Swiftian. Someone referred to it this Johnson's fifty and that you are being sort of somewhat ironic. And they didn't get your beans Sardonic actually and so people thought. Oh yes so. Did PEOPLE INQUIRE. Wh what are they going to build this? There's one percent who called my gallery in Montreal was outraged. The person was a very very conservative women who is anti immigrant. She imagined that her beautiful city of Blues was going to be invaded by people from all economic classes. And I was shocked like hey that she could believe that I was actually building the thing and be that like of how she read it. I was like holy crap like that women is out of her. Mind that because you had done this pitch you also part of the. Aarp's do you do this at a condo pitch about Buying a Condo is that is that what? How did she misinterpret? Things I didn't do a pitch is just the information that gave the Organization of the of the triennial was ambiguous. It was about a project. That was a fictional project but it wasn't explicitly written. This is a fictional projects. I think he just took it literally and took the step to call my gallery at to try to reach me and I was working with a guy like Dan who who advised me to tell her to make a formal complaint to the city of blue so that they would stay in the archives of the city forever but I mean I didn't want to be dishonest to her so I just told her I was. No it's an art project building building. That would actually be infamous but for very different reasons. Talking with Nikola about his art is thoughtful reflections on such things as income inequality couldn't help but wonder if he considered asking his fellow finalists to share the Soviet Art Awards. Top Prize of one hundred thousand the runners-up don't walk away with nothing. Mind you they get each twenty five thousand. In fact a month later. After our conversation the Soviet awards gala the four finalists for the British equivalent the Turner Art Prize did just sat. They asked judges to view them as a collective and not pick a single winner. The judges agreed in the finalist shared the top prize a forty thousand pounds. But when I was talking to Nick Lot this subversion hadn't occurred yet. We're sitting here at the art gallery of Alberta in Edmonton where the Soviet award gala is this year the winners go one hundred thousand dollars and the runner ups the the four finalists remaining finalists will get twenty five thousand huge amount of money. Instead of this competition it must be kind of. Surreal for you here. You are looking at money and then this vast sum of money sort of dangling in front of you yes the well the amount of money I mean. It's all relative right like in the sense like I'm already regardless of what happens. We're all winners here. Because we don't usually have twenty five thousand dollars falling on us like this. I mean at least for me. It doesn't happen there. Is this thing where there's five of us in one. We'll get one hundred twenty five thousand but actually mathematics make kind of make sense. I think the goal of the bay is is basically to put art on the map in a way as to concentrate attention of the public on one person so that people hear about artists as well as opposed to just like I dunno hockey players and politicians also in terms of the amount. You know like I was interested in comic structure is of course and so there's a thing called the prisoner's dilemma. Which is a famous Problem where you have like two prisoner that get arrested and the police told them individually if you tell on the other person we caught. You're going to get less years imprisons if nobody tells on. You. You're free to go but it's unlikely because we're GONNA make better person to seem deal and if the Eberson tells on you're really going for it you know like you're gone for like forty years or something and so. The police makes his tells to Prisoners. So it is obviously to both of their advantage not dell on anyone if both of them could talk to each other they would just say hey. Let's just not talk. We're free to go but they can't because they don't they can talk to each other so both of them avid incentive to talk against each other and it is also not in their advantage. So if you imagine maybe we can talk to each other. We were hanging out and we and and I discussed it and so the thing is imagine we all talk to each other like. Hey you know what screw this prize. We're all GONNA share the amounts and the same amount. But if we did that would be really disruptive for Soviet kind of irrespectful but also be together you divided into five. You have forty canes that have twenty five. It's not like it doesn't make such a big difference and at the same time you think if one winner got two hundred thousand and everybody else got nothing then. I think it would be really meaningful to do that because the system would be really unfair but actually I think that giving twenty five thousand to each of the finalists in one hundred cases of the winner is actually a pretty fair way to do it so we all kind of agree that yeah it makes sense. I mean it's you bring this up. Of course I brought this up and now the people that they shifted their seats. And well you know no no no I mean I didn't bring it up as a serious point. I just mentioned the prisoner's dilemma. Talked about it as something that I was thinking about. I was like you know what let's do this. I was just like you know discussing it because if something that we're probably all thought about and I think it's a good thing to discuss. Wisely did not make the the difference so large of four people. Now want to go back. I'm going to go back to where you sort of. We're starting because your your question about being an artist and so you said that You WanNa go from you. Know strictly representing systems namely economic actually creating functioning ones. And you said that you want to use the income you get from art sales and perhaps also from your sobe award. I don't know to and I quote Long term development of non monetary economic systems. How's that going well? Basically I'm trying to create a NICO's an ecosystem for my whole practice. That makes sense to me and I know that since the dawn of time you know while let's say since the renaissance painters always depend on kind of delete in the wealthy to make paintings. Because if you're going to spend three months making a work obviously there's no way you can be yourself and live and not sell that for large amount of money that I could afford myself or any middle-class person say so I have to accept that certain extent because I love painting it. I WANNA keep painting but that's kind of participating in something that I bet is obviously not what will make the world a better place so I'm trying to use the money that I'm getting from the sales whenever you know whatever is I need to live but then whatever profit I make when I make a Prophet. I WANNA use this while I started to use it to fund research and development for Those kinds of systems that I am imagining and the thing is this is kind of vague and abstract and hard to talk about because it's mainly research and then I wanna make a practical experiments in the next year or so and the idea is I need to. I'm trying to like attend. A bunch of conferences meet people and now the next thing to do is I need to hire programmers and mathematicians to help me create algorithms to experiments some of the ideas that have been having discussing with people and it takes money and it takes time and it takes. I mean it doesn't really fit into an art career. You know like people ask me about that. It takes me like half an hour to even get into what I'm trying to do. And then it takes half hour to explain what? I'm not crazy. It's it's challenging and I constantly have shows that keep kicking in that I you know I'm not gonNA stop making shows either but it exhibitions our time demanding and you know super time consuming and so as this project and it's hard to do both at the same time but it's kind of what I have to do. So the idea is I keep making the work that I love paintings installations and all that and I use the money generated from that whenever there is some to afford myself the time to work on the other stuff and then to pay programmers mathematicians and everything that I'm will need over the next year and then the next following years I'm an artist working a like not along with dementia people but like. I don't think that I can make a huge difference. The only thing that I think is that if nobody works on those things the difference will never happen right so I just think that like a lot of systems of oppression have been addressed for example gender discrimination over the last say century as been like crazy revolution. Imagine if you were to drop in seventeen hundred and say like hey you know what it. A couple of centuries patriarchy would be not over but like you know it seriously overrun things would change will look at you and laugh right and if you look at a lot of civil rights issues. Artists have participated in really changing like giant paradigm. The nobody thought it was possible to change. And But Somehow Economic Paradigm in which we live has not been challenged in review longtime. Maybe it's because it's not so interpersonal districts. Split of exploitation is not like me telling someone that they can have that job because of the color of their skin like that's not what's happening with capitalism. It's more like my phone is affordable for me while some child are working on it and China and I don't see them and I don't have to think about them right and so I think maybe because it's it's so abstract and global and diffused. It's very hard to pin down and people deal with the urgency of what they have to deal with in the moments. I don't know that. Just maybe a speculation that I'm doing that why it's not being addressed more directly more. Broadly but I personally feel this is something to do. And like worse case scenario nothing will happen but at least we'll make a little bit of noise and hopefully other people will get on board and already some a lot of people are Nikola. You have a brilliant mind. Your art is incredible and you have a good heart and I'm happy that you as an artist thinking about those things so so thank you for talking to me. Today was a pleasure. Thank you so much. You're listening to part one of our series the new masters conversations with a two thousand Nineteen Sobe art award finalists tonight. You heard from Darcy Wilson and Nikolic. Ghani part two airs. Tomorrow night you'll hear from the finalists and low and caboose Yak as well as the winner. Stephanie Combine to see examples of their artwork go to CBC DOT CA slash ideas. Ideas can also be found on facebook and on twitter special. Thanks to Josie Dilawar Brisebois Clermont Lama and Sashes Suda of the National Gallery of Canada Catherine of the art gallery of Alberta as well as I do say and Rob Sobe of the Sobe Art Foundation Technical Production Danielle Duval and Pat Martin web producer. Lisa you so. This program was produced by Mary. Link senior producer. Nikola Look Greg. Kelly is the executive producer of ideas. And I'm Noah I N for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Halifax Andrew Downes Darcy Wilson Canada Mary Link Nikola North America producer Alberta Atlantic Canada New York City Los Angeles Edmonton Central Park CBC DOT CA Quebec Halifax Nova Scotia Nova Scotia Archives Andrew Downes Zoological Garde London Zoo
Rich Lennox: I came from a culture where I saw big ideas transform businesses.

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

39:49 min | 1 year ago

Rich Lennox: I came from a culture where I saw big ideas transform businesses.

"The over sixty two million decision makers on link Dan you're able to connect with the right business leaders who are relevant to your company, and with linked in edge you can make sure your messages are getting through to those relevant people. Try for yourself. Linked in is offering a free one hundred dollar linked. Add credit to launch your first campaign. Simply visit. Lincoln, dot com slash magic that's linked in dot. com slash magic terms and conditions apply. You're listening to math and magic a production iheartradio. When I arrived, sales were running a very promotional approach to meeting jewelry, and it was a simple truth. A man ever go down on his knee, put his hands had here. Look Darling. I got you a deal. Stop doing that doesn't mean the value is an important, but the brand has to mean something more than just simply bashing out jewelry at prospects. I am Bob. Pittman welcomed this episode of Math Magic from the frontiers of marketing. On this episode we have someone who's made his mark one of the toughest sectors retail, and he brings a wealth of experience and insights forced the CMO of macy's rich Lennox. He was born in the UK -tary kit he studied animals in college, worked with some big cats at the London Zoo for a year, but wound up in advertising instead he joined J. Walter Thompson right after sir. Martin Sorrell took over and went onto a terrific career in the agency business that got him the US. He was on the De Beers business and probably. Probably knows as much about diamonds is can from there. He moved onto his first CMO job at Zales and eventually to macy's where he has created adds that even Saturday night live has parodied the ultimate mark of success. He loves horses and rugby. Welcome rich. Thank you. There's a lot to talk about but I. I WANNA. Do you and sixty seconds ready? Yeah? Do. You prefer veer wine. Twitter or Instagram Instagram New Jersey or new. York New York us or UK US oh. We won you over twenty years I think it's about time, Kentucky Derby or Belmont, Almond, country or city, country, lions, or horses courses about to get harder secret talent, staying calm under Fara thing favorite city Florence smartest person you know. My Dad was probably the smartest childhood hero Chuck Yeager. Historical idol probably Nelson Mandela, proudest career achievement I think the tunnel is probably my practice career achievement to date routers personal achievement. Vote to Lewis by. One of my favorite quotes is. Courage doesn't always rule sometimes. It's the quad voice at the end of the day. Saying I will try again tomorrow. Who would play you in a movie? Probably? Shrek Shrek with an English accent here for that first job. Consultant I hated it I was terrible. Okay here's the last one. What did you WANNA be when you're growing up. I wanted to either be in the military or I wanted to be a vet. SORTA described my career as a sort of bizarre series of accidents after that I never really imagined myself working in corporate, and certainly not behind a desk and here you are here, I am so with that. Let's get going. Let's start with macy's. It's really an amazing historic brandon retailing and I think it's probably the only retailer with those really big consumer franchises. They're actually embedded in American culture. macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. macy's fourth of July fireworks and really the Big One your flagship store at Herald Square here in New York. You didn't invent these which you inherited them. When you took the job, you look at those things. How did you think about them? The first thing you think about as a marketer is wow, they're amazing. The macy's Day parade is sort of unique in the fact that it's not something that macy's rights check for. It's something that macy's built. We have a parade studio engineer, the flights near the balloons. The vast majority of people who are in the parade are all colleagues and friends. The first thing you do you begin to understand the tradition. What is it that makes it so powerful? Powerful and makes it so beloved by America three and a half million people on the streets of New York fifty million people, spending a very important day with their family, watching it growing up in rural Mississippi in the nineteen fifties and the nineteen sixties every Thanksgiving turn on the TV, and that's what we did. I think that's true today. As it is for a lot of America, it is part of their Thanksgiving tradition, and so my role within. The parade and the fall work and operating around Herald Square is to constantly ask very talented group of colleagues. How do we moved from good to extraordinarily good? How do you think about what brand permission you have to move it? I mean they've got to be some limitations. I suspect you. It's some of the boundaries somewhere in something that. How do you think about that? Your challenge is how do you evolve, but main true to those core entries that are debate into the bronze? Bronze DNA and Sally when I was doing that with to business, it was something I was very very conscious of I was running a campaign that was. Bryant is one of the top in the last hundred years. A diamond is forever. You were seeped in the brand's DNA and over time, and certainly at macy's in the last three and a half years you begin to get an insured, if grasp for what is brand, right and ward. He's pushing the boundaries a little bit. But every so often you sort of have to flirt with those boundaries and I. think that's what makes it fun so when you first started saying okay, let's think about this or this. Is Scare people. Yeah, I, think so. macy's was a company of the run a very successful retail model for a very long time retail marketing model I hope was to come in and create an environment where established people stopped the new people doing. DOLPH staff and the New People Stop, the established people from doing the same old stuff, and that's a very powerful combination. If you can get it right. But absolutely central to being able to create that dynamic is building trust with the teams that you're listening to both sides, and you're not just going to blow everything up and that you are highly appreciative and respectful of the work that has come before you. My job is to carry the torch further. You and the entire macy's team had been very aggressive in literally spending your time looking through the windshield, not obsessed with the rear view mirror. How did these institutions like the parade and fireworks and Herald Square play into that plan. We run a complex model, really designed to sort of engage customers to move them into acquisition, and then to get into purchase, either on the e commerce platform more in the stores, but right at the center of it we have these amazing properties that really are huge acts, abrupt generosity. The fact that macy's puts on a prayed for America or America is a hugely generous I. We don't charge anyone any money to come and see it. I've always said to people. If you can begin to win the initial highground around bronze, a lot of the reengineering, we've been doing a macy's is moving from a transactional model to a relationship model part of our relationship model is making people like you as Bryant and listening to them, and having conversations with them as opposed to just bombarding them with messages, and the best examples of US engaging with the public in really a noncommercial way. Is the parade the Fourth of July fireworks? You're in the middle of many transit. macy's and we touched on a few of them here and I want to get into that but i. i WanNa rewind the young rich. Let's Talk A. A little bit about being military, what branch of the service by the way was your father in? My father was in the Royal Airforce. He was an odd combination, because at the time in the royal airforce will, though he trained as an engineer, they decided that it would be a good idea to allow some engineers to fly planes, so they could get into them to see what was wrong with them. They don't do this anymore. Because it's too expensive to train pilots, but because of that he spent time actually flying, Fox jets was amazing, and then after a couple of tours of duty transferred back to being an engineer, so I spent three his my life in Sweden. Threes freezing to death up in Yorkshire being moved around the country, it was an amazing way to grow up. I was very very fortunate to have that being a military kid. Does that make you different I think say military people are amazing. They are all about service. It's sort of abuse you with a sense of the importance of the team and Esprit de Corps, and even though I wasn't in it I was sorta immersed in that from a very very young age, and the other thing is you become very flexible because you move literally every eighteen months to three years up until I was nine I was moving. Moving and then when I was nine I went away to boarding school, which makes you self reliant? You came of age in the seventies, and you paint the picture of England in the seventies that era. It was a tough time. You had Thatcher you had the cul strikes you had the unions was tearing us apart, but despite it all the English have an amazing sense of humor, an amazing sense of resilience everything is always understated does matter how bad it is. Everything's with understated and bad has been a thing that is very much in my DNA anything from that stage of your life that you use today. Absolutely, I spent the majority of my east playing rugby, which I loved I always can tell when I worked with people whether they ultimately played in team. Sports or individual stores is color how people play because you're in such a pressure cooker in these schools, you have to learn to live with people. You have to learn to be accommodating and to be collaborative. So off, you go to university stories a right. You wanted to be a vet I did. And where did that come from? I just love animals I've always loved animals I grew up with labradors, and I grew up with horses in England. There was a famous series cool James Hera which was about a your Chevette and the the sort of trials and tribulations. It was wonderful series. It was a really romanticized view of what being that wars, but the result was in I spent six weeks, treating ringworm fleas, and not romantic. It I realized it was actually quite a lonely job. That wasn't the type of person I was what in your university years? Shaped you the most. And it stays with you today. What you gotta understand. His British university was very very different to American University in British University, you essentially teach yourself. You turn up too late shows. You have a couple of Utah Oriels a month. My professor would recognize me if his life depended on. Just do what you want to do, and we'll give you a set of exams at the end of the if you pass them, you get there and if you don't pass them, you fail and it's really sort of entirely up to you. But what undoubtedly shapes me? It was my friends of friendships. That I made so you spent time the London sue the big can. Yeah had to be some. That's probably a podcast and itself. Yeah, what did you do working with the cats well hard? My zoology degree in my final year was to do a dissertation, and I was specializing in behavioral studies and really quite cheekily irate to the head of the Zoological Society at London Zoo, and basically said look I'm really interested in this phenomenon called stereotypical behavior, which is how animals exhibit and relieve stress in accounting environment. How do they really at manifest lot through the pace patents? When you're seeing an animal walker, very repetitive Patton around its panda is a symptom is highly stressed and what it's trying to you think about it. His get normality with polar burs. You'll see them weaving. Weaving their head, so I got to spend three days a week for about nine and a half months working with a young Lana school to Anika who is in Asia. Law They? They were trying to integrate into a pride of African. Lawns lawns are amazing, and they also beautiful when he see them up place now. I want to jump a little bit. It's time for us to get your how I got started in advertising story. Okay, you join J, w. t just after Martin took over and begin to build WPP and really was a big shift in the advertising industry as a result of that. Did you feel like you're at the beginning of something big shift? I joined. Jada bts an account planner, which is basically a business strategy or Brian Strategist at the time. Jay Wt had a rule that in order to be in the the account planning teams, the bronze stress she teams. You had to have ten industry experience, either as a marketer, advertiser or media person, and then the guy who stepped in to run the department after Stephen King had left Stephen King is like a legend in the advertising industry. He basically invented the discipline of account planning in the UK. Guy Who David Baker basically decided. I'm going to see if I can train baby plumbers, so I was an experiment. My cell phone of a really good friend with the first junior baby planners that they ever brought into trained from scratch. Did you prove it worked or fail? Well? I think my friend proofed. It works I. Think let's put it this way. I didn't mess it. It up so much that no one else ever got the opportunity, but my colleague that was brought in Lake Mary state went on to be very very talented planner, and when I came into Jay. WBZ They sort of looked at me and said look. We could put you an account planning where we can put you in account management, so I did my first five years. In, Account Planning and then I transferred to account management. How did you get an advertising? How'd you think of it? It doesn't sound like you had any interest in it in high school or College. And why did you pick up a magazine and say yeah, that's me. Appetizing came out of university and I thought I was going to go into the army into three S. short-term commission as luck would have it. I kept damaging. My shoulder, which meant I couldn't take up the short on commission that I was being offered. As a stop gap, I joined a company in London. There was a consultancy and didn't really like that very much, and my sister is a graphic designer, was spending a lotta time in and around ad agencies and said to me, look, you're either GonNa go off and try and be an investment banker. Wish you will hate or what you get towards the Matt Agencies. It was the simplest the. Time advertising was amazingly fun joining Wbz in the late eighties. It was like arriving at the end of a really really good. You realize that they had been one hell of a massively fun party, but it was sort of waning down and I think that's what Sorrell did. Sorrel came in and took is amazingly creative companies, but not really very well run companies and put lot of professional discipline into them. How did you learn advertising? Who taught you? Some of the best marketing strategies brains was sitting in the data to account planning discipline as I arrived people I F. Jenkins and Bernadette knocks unbelievably talented brand strategists. Every lunchtime they used to sit in the open area and we'd eat sandwiches and I would just sit there and listen to them. Talk about brand strategy. It was like a PhD about how do you create compellingly differentiated bronze? And how does strategy and creativity play together? What's the insight? And how do you then find a compelling expression of that inside in order to bring those brands to ignite in? In customers minds knowing you as a marketer. You still use that today. Yeah, they sort of ingrained it on me I was incredibly lucky to train that way. A lot of people come through marketing. They do junior brown management tool. They do junior account management, and it's this so much process work in doing that I go injected straight into the strategy side of it, which looking back home was just. Just incredibly fortunate place to start. So how did you wind up at the beers and diamonds I did seven years Jay Wbz London, operating across London Europe and this was a time when jaded London I think was right to the top agency in the world. The Daily Mail used to do the talk. Ten favourite campaigns in England Jada bt had seven at ten. It was ridiculous, but I always had. Had this really huge desire to go to New York. Come and work in New York, so I went to speak to Chris Jones. who was the worldwide head of Jada? obt At the time, immensely talented individual, and said to him I want to come to New York and he said okay. That's very interesting came back to me three weeks later, said actually. We wanted to go to take care. I spent two years of my life and take care of. It was an amazing working on what a working on Warner Lambert. WanNa Lambert was the largest affiliate outside the US Japan. I really wanted to two years because I didn't want to sort of become a fall eastern. Asian expert I wanted to come and work in New York and when I came back, Christine set me I. Don't have a job for you at the moment. But is just started working with Ben Consultants, and they need someone. Has This O'Brien strategy within that part? Would you want to do that and I said sure, but it really was a parking strategy. It was like until another big global, Jada. Bt Account came up I was about thirty, one, thirty, two at the stage, and I spent nine months working with De Beers, and I was walking down the corridor one day, and there were white CMO NCAA stopped me in the corridor, and said the individual who runs the Neo Corporation has just resigned. Would you be interested in the job and I spent sign me up I Austin think if I hadn't walked down that corridor, Ma'am what would have liked being. Just. Hold on a second because we've got so much more to talk about. We'll be back after a quick break. I am Bob Pippen back when I was starting out, there was no link. It was hard to find contacts recruit talent and network, but that's all changed with link den linked and can help you speak to the right professionals at the right time as you probably know, time and place is everything especially marketing, but in today's age of million messages per minute and not enough hours in the day. How do you really catch people's attention? Fortunately, there's a simple way with over sixty two million decision makers on link. Link Dan you're able to connect with the right business leaders who are relevant to your company and linked in Edge you can make sure your messages are getting through to those relevant people. It's not just about awareness either linked then. ADS are driving traffic and engagement whether that's visits to a landing page registrations to an event are downloads of thought leadership content, because with precise targeting small businesses can speak to the people that matter. For yourself linked, Dan is offering a free one hundred dollar linked in credit to launch your first campaign. Simply visit linked in dot com slash magic that's linked in dot. com slash magic terms and conditions apply. I'm Bob Pittman hero math and magic. We understand that if you don't know your numbers, you don't Know Your Business and the question for any business owner out there the one that might keep you up at night second guessing your decisions is. Are you confident that you've got the right numbers at your fingertips? Every business decision ultimately turns numbers. You can't make the right evaluations and the right decisions if you have the wrong numbers, or if it takes too long to get them. In fact, that's the problem that net suite by Oracle has set out to solve. Net Suite by Oracle is the world's number, one cloud business system, but the full picture of your finances in one place and real time right from your phone or your desktop, so there's no more guessing no more worrying that what you don't know could hurt your business. Nets week gives you visibility and control. You need to grow with confidence without net suite is like driving your car. We know speedometer, fuel, gauge, or like flying a plane with no instruments, and as a pilot I can assure you. It's impossible. The fly an airplane by the CDC pants. But with net sweet, it's night and day difference all of a sudden you can see everything that matters and unlocked serious growth. Did you know that net sweet was the world's first cloud business system, and after twenty years over eighteen thousand companies right? Eighteen thousand companies run their businesses on that sweet. That's because next week. Customers growth three times faster than the S. and p. five hundred, and so can. Can you so go right now to schedule your? Free Demo and receive your free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits at net sweet dot com slash math. It's time to quit flying blind, and unlike growth for your business with net sweet remember you can set up your free demo and get your free guide today at net sweet dot com slash map. That's net, sweet dot com slash bath. Welcome back to math and magic. Let's hear more from my conversation with Lenox. Tell us about this. Of a diamond is forever campaign, we talked earlier about the parade fireworks. You've got, Herald Square you can either be afraid to touch them. Or you use them and it sounds like you touched. A diamond is forever campaign. Talk about it and talk about how you managed. Persuade people let you do that and what? The impact was the Biz really amazing organization in a very unusual organization, because essentially it was a group of miners. She used to a group of marketers, so they digging out of the ground. And enable persuading people that they needed it, and all of that was done in a jv venture with South Africa and Botswana. Namibia, so the company that was really quite ahead of its time in terms of benefits and working to make sure that it's a natural resource was benefiting both the country and being commercially successful. When they asked me to come to America. The US market had stalled. It was essentially growing on. I think about two percent a year. At the time. Fifty percent of the world's wards diamonds were being sold out of America. said that was pretty scary. I can remember being briefed by the worldwide seem to beers. Guy Called Steven Lisa. He's Mensa talented is brief literally was. We don't think the US market. Market is going to grow much more, but don't screw it up. Your job is not a blood up. But when I got there, we started to look in a dominant forever is an amazing campaign, but what if we built big product stories that went underneath it, and what would those products stories be? We started to engineer products wealthier than campaigns. The best example of that was the past present future. Indepth Research with consumers. We actually hypnotize men. I, Kid, you know. We kept asking people in quant. Do you agree it's a good idea to give your wife and anniversary gift? Yes, I do. Eighty percent of men agreed with that, but only tempts memorizing actioning on it, so there's obviously quite a big gap, so we go really fed up with this gap between what they were saying. They were actually doing so what we did is we arranged hypnotize a group of of men and literally one of the exercises. We had them days. We had them. You'll looking out over valley. Imagine that valley is a vision of your marriage drawer pitcher, so all the people who had given diamond jewelry you had green pastures snowcapped mountains. Clouds and the literally some of the guys you hadn't. We have volcanoes rivers sharks in them. It was absolutely fascinating, but what that led us to do is say look. You can't fix marriages, but what you can do is find a very good articulation of what men want to say, because men really on that particular and what we found women wanted to hear was I love where we've been a love where we are and uncommitted to our future that translated into the full your posture president in your future, which then translated into three stone diamond ring, which by the way was fantastic, is rather than selling one diamond. You're selling the Ray. I'm was even more fantastic because it was easy to manufacturer, so we essentially went on a roadshow with the trade, and basically said look. We think we go get idea. And they said No. We've been trying to sell three rings forever. They didn't work and we said well. What if we called it? Hospitals and future and ran this advertising campaign behind it and they went. Oh, that's interesting, so we did it. The trade aligned and it became a billion dollar success literally within three months of launch. It was unbelievable. To me was a good example of how we stopped being marketers, and what we became is sort of like cultural engineers and product engineered to basically carrying. Okay, there's a need here. We can build a solution that we can market the hell out of it, so let's talk about another solution. I love market expansion ideas right hand diamond rings Yeah Scuba that turned. Turned out to be what about a three billion dollar business? Yeah, every time who came up with that idea I mean it sounds like a risky idea. That was a really interesting one. Because essentially minds are unpredictable things. One month they'll be producing lots of large rushton's that cuts one currents, and then they can suddenly start producing a whole load of little diamonds. The bears. Basically, we're producing too many small diamonds, and we needed to find a way to create some market velocity underneath them. Someone had the really revolutionary break-through observation. The women have to Hans the left hand. Be about commitment marriage, and the right hand could be an expression of the individual taste and who I am. When we initially went to business that we got this idea, we're going to make the right hand about self expression. You can by itself. It's very design intensive, which is great because that will use lots of little Stein's. A lot of people thought it was heresy. They were like hey, on them in a diamond is forever. It's all about love women buying rings. This sounds ridiculous now, but you know we're dealing fifteen years ago. And? There was a lot of nervousness around the idea. So of course we the sensible thing we went and spoke to women and women went debbie ridiculous I can absolutely reconcile in my mind that there are tons. Of them. There were dominance the voter self expression. That's a great idea. Let's do it so on the simple premise of torch your customer Dane go in with preconceived ideas. That was a really good example, and then the creative team came out with his really really good idea of women in the world razor right hand. It was a beautifully crafted campaign with great product that really it was still pushing an open door. That's a great case study for market extension. Let's go to case study for transformation turnaround two thousand nine. You make a jump. But this time as the client, your first CMO Jobs Zales you had fourteen consecutive quarters. A positive comparable same store sales growth until sales actually was acquired in two thousand fourteen. How did you do it? Mean this is your first time in the lane now which you're the client, your make the calls. What did you do well? Firstly I was high bar, really really talented the fear Killian, just an enormously talented, generous, smart leader that makes all the difference in the world and second. If you're going to get involved in turnarounds, you have to be good in a firefight. You have to be the type of person who actually runs towards fas rather than away from them, and you've got to have that sort of combination of arrogance and naievty arrogance that you can succeed where others fell and naive. You can succeed where others failed. There's a very talented group of people. who were brought in to help? Fix a very beaten nut company, but at the end of the day, the sort of the core of the Brown was still ever we started to do things really simple things and I took a lot of the lessons from the bears back made the transition easier because understood the category when I arrived sales were running very promotional approach to making jewelry, and it was a simple truth and a man ever go down on me, put his hand and said here. Look Darling I. got you a deal? Stop doing that doesn't mean value is an important, but the brand has to mean something more than just simply bashing out jewelry low price points. I was very lucky in the fact, the Theo absolutely got on board with that very quickly, a chief merchandising officer. You'll Honda onboard with that very very quickly. Was a case study of a small company. It was about two billion dollars. It wasn't big. In real trouble, but a team of people coming together again. We're GONNA. Get this done and we're gonNA. Get this done because it's not just about share price, but it's about people's mortgages and he's about car payments. There is a responsibility here as a group of leaders to get this right for the people that work for us. Seventeen thousand people that were sales, and one of my proudest things is the first year I was there there was a fairly significant ref, and then there was never one of so we got it right. What sales allowed me to do? Not just be a marketer about brand engineering about business engineering. It was about team dynamics. You spread your wings a little more. Yeah, you jump from this category. You're comfortable with being the CMO at toys. R US for two years one insights. Did you get there that you still keep with you today as a marketer? Toys R. US was an amazing brand and I had some really talented people working at it, but it was laboring under a debt that and that was just crippling, just absolutely huge and I think it was sort of victim of the acquisition models that were developed in the early two thousands, which made a lot of people a lot of money, but left the companies that were stunning, really really struggling. I've been in the jewelry industry in the diamond industry for about fifteen years with two bears with sales on what I needed to prove to myself was that I could take the call marketing skills as a CMO and transferred them to a catch grave. It was about. Plastic and IP is so I went from talking to. Donald supplies to Disney or Hasbro. Mattel, and I learned a lot of good lessons. Some of them were very useful. Some of them would don't do that again. Those are usually the best lessons they really are, so we're back to. macy's yeah, two thousand and sixteen. Yeah, you're in a new CMO. Yeah, you made some big changes early on. Can you describe them? Talk a little bit about the big successes and also talk about some of the things you tried. It didn't work. When I joined macy's I was sort of the first external C.. Suite Harvard Boston in a time. macy's been enormously successful as a retailer I mean they were putting on. Astronomical growth rates right up until about fourteen to fifteen, and they've been doing that by running a very high frequency promotional transactional model that was really the absolutely central core of their marketing model. And what we started to talk about was this isn't the old model was wrong. It's just it doesn't work today, and it doesn't. What today because the media landscape is changing, so we call the same model. The media vehicles that we need were beginning to falter underneath them. If we were going to run that same model consumer's shopping habits are changing profoundly, so we need to invent a new model said we go to get out of the transactional business, and we get into the relationship business and that. That really then said okay. WE'RE GONNA design a of marketing model that's predicated on building, strong customer, relationships and looking at CLV rather them. What was the last transaction that you did? Then? Lots of things flowed out of that we had launch our own loyalty program. At the time we were part of the AMEX sodium around plenty, and we had to exit that and Launch Star rewards program. We had to start not just offering things that allow price. We had to talk about our product editorial authority. Reinforce the fact that macy's is got good stuff so that when we put it on discount that pools harder and when we put it on discount, there's a model where our best customers can be constantly engaged Bri, the brand, and then sort on top of that we had to blend in the prayed, and everything might not make it sort of work together. One of the things I love about retailers. The marketing ecosystem is so incredibly complex you have. Have a high frequency promotional model which change weekly you then have loyalty model and a credit model lead into a product authority in a brand model with coop, running right through the middle of it and e COM Demont antics on the other side, so what that does is, it creates almost like a Rubik's cube of decisions that you have to flex between in order to get the optimum balance in your marketing models, and that Rubik's cube flags based. Based on the cycle that you're in that year. The Rubik's cube position the works of Black Friday looks nothing like the Rubik's cube that you're running for full national spring fashion, so it's SORTA endlessly fascinating ecosystem to try to get that perfect of calibration, which of course you never succeeded in getting the hallmarks of your career seemed to be big ideas transformation, not afraid to take a chance. Probably many things don't work, but as you say you learn. Learn a lot from it I. Know It's gotTa be scary to the people there. You've alluded to it a couple of times here. What kind of culture is necessary? What can I culture? Do? You have to build within the marketing group? And what can I culture? Does the company have to allow those things to happen well? I think the role of CMO's today is to do two things. You cool maths. Magic I call it the art of persuasion. And the author precision talking. But what CMO's also have to do is they have to be able to talk to their Piz the C. Suite, particularly the CF, Ncfei, and translate what marketing is doing into business results. You have to be able to explain how you are driving marketing productivity, and the investment decisions that you all making across complex media, ecosystems and complex marketing to US in order to make sure that every dollar we spend his returning as highly as it possibly can, and you have to be brave and. And those decisions, because I don I many marketers today, if any who are getting budget increases, which means that you've got to bring analytical teams and data science, and all of the things that allow you to make data driven decisions around your marketing decisions, and then at the end of the day you gotTa is you can have the best targeting in the world you can have the best decision and you can have the best personalization if you have good ideas to put through them. You'll minimizing impacts of this campaigns. I forget who said it, but it's absolutely true. The best way to make a smaller budget work harder is have bigger ideas and I. think part of that is because I came from a culture where ideas will absolutely king and I saw the power of big ideas to transform businesses. I'd like to get some insights. What is different about being on the client side from being on the agency side? You've done both successfully agency side. You have a responsibility, but you don't have the same degree of accountability. I also think agency side the shear breadth of marketing disciplines that now in play the involvement, marketing and Ad Tech. CMO's and senior leaders have to be such really really good generalists now. Creativity and production of content is a very small component of what we actually did is a very important component, but it is a small component. House I changed what you look for in an agency partner. That's a really good question first and foremost they have to be capable of creating big ideas that just have the ability to go. Wow I never thought of that. That's fantastic and the relationship discipline to push you when you need to be pushed and listen when you're going. Oh I know what I'm about to do is a bit off, but bear with me. There are methods in the madness that I think. Is really good account management skills? You have to be able to push on people, but at the same time support them when you work with the good account leaders, they are exceptionally hitting. If you could give some advice to your eighteen year old self thinking back looking back, what would it be? Don't worry so much. Take risks and I think one of the things I'm. Proudest in my career is I have taken so risks. I've done things that people said to me at the time were best silly. Foolish, what advice would you give for somebody who would like to be a CMO of major brand like you? CMO's have to do two things. Sultan Asli, they have to be for want of a better word, really a cheerleader within an organization, and they have to be able to be very quick learners and editors. They need to be able to come into a room. Add value to a conversation that they have not necessarily been portal. You've got to be fast enough on your feet. Really good understanding of brand management, really good understanding of consumer, insight, generation, and a really good understanding of how you work with creatives to edit good ideas, and then really good understanding of media and investment decisions so. You've got to chase breadth of experience, not just depth of experience, because the role is sobral now, and has so many disciplines within you'll never going to be in the master of all of them, but you've got a pretty good working knowledge of most of them, and then you find people who are subject matter, expertise and you. figure out a way to work with them in a way that empowers them. We always in math and magic with math and magic shoutouts. You've seen a lot of marketing and business folks. Who is the best one on the analytic side? The math side of the marketing equation. People like Terry, prue, you were really at the forefront, really beginning to develop the marketing mix models that we all now take for granted. Give us the best now on the magic side the creative. There's some campaigns that I absolutely admire the amazing old competency in a night when it first came out with just is that amazing boot that score bevery rate about the origin of the just stood idea back. Campaign was what I wanted to get into advertising. Rich. You've got a great story. You tell it well. Accent helps thanks for joining. US thank you so much well this montage. Or if you picked up in my conversation with rich one. Don't be a marketer. The cultural engineer at De Beers rich saw opportunity to help men do a better job articulating the feelings, so he created a Prada three diamond ring and a campaign past present future around it to talk to your customer out preconceived notions when richest team talked to women about their desire for self expression, it led to a whole new product, the right hand diamond ring, which became a cultural phenomenon, not to mention a business success. Three ideas are still king as rich says you need data to translate marketing in the business results, but without big ideas behind them. The data's useless. Just look at what he's done at macy's. Thanks for listening I'm Bob Pittman. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic a production of iheartradio. The show is hosted by Bob Pittman special. Thanks to sue Schillinger for booking and wrangling are wonderful town, which is no small feat Nikki Detour for pulling research bill plaques and Michael as our for their recording. Help our editor Ryan Murdoch and of course Gale Raoul Eric Angel. Noel, mango and everyone who helped. Bring this show to your ears until next time. Time and place is everything especially marketing, but in today's age of a million messages per minute and not enough hours in the day. How do you really catch people's attention fortunately link Dan can help you speak to the right professionals at the right time. Try for yourself link. Dan is offering a free one hundred dollar linked in AG credit to launch your first campaign. Simply visit linked in dot. com slash magic. Terms and conditions apply.

macy America engineer Bob Pittman Dan De Beers Martin Sorrell so. macy London UK New York Herald Square America London Zoo Jada bt Bob Chuck Yeager Nelson Mandela Twitter Zales
The Great Escapes, with Life Death and Taxonomy (ep. 117)

Your Brain on Facts

33:10 min | 9 months ago

The Great Escapes, with Life Death and Taxonomy (ep. 117)

"In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five on Long Island New York an employee of Frank Buck's jungle camp. Animal Park left a plank of wood across the moat, surrounding enclosure of Rhesus monkeys when he went in. The plank escaped the notice of the. But, not that of a monkey named capone. In an arguable case of nominative determinism, capone broke the rules and escaped. He not only escaped. He took over one hundred seventy of his countrymen with him out of the park and into the woods. As the true cross, the set of railroad tracks the wave of small monkeys chased away a pair of workers and brought the train to a dead halt. My Name's Moxy, and this is your brain on facts. If you've been staying inside as much as possible these past few months. That's a little easier to do now that the summer heat has fully set in your probably anxious to get out to fly the coop as it were. Animals who can fly should be getting out of zoos all the time. It would stand to reason. Though. usually therein enclosures netting across them, or they've had their wings clipped. That's a process of trimming off birds largest flight feathers, so they can't get enough. Lift when they flap which I'm probably going to end up doing to our backyard chickens if they don't knock off the free ranging. Birds generally stay in captivity pretty well, but of course there are exceptions to the rule or I wouldn't have brought it up. In two thousand, five and African Flamingo managed to get away from the Sedgwick county sue in Kansas. A massive search was launched, but The crabs backup singer was nowhere to be found. Until two thousand thirteen, when he was spotted, six hundred and fifty miles away on the Gulf coast of Texas among a flock of wild local flamingos. Bird watcher named Neil Hayward have been able to confirm the flamingos identity by the numbered band on his leg and offered to help recapture it. The Zoo essentially said I'm not even mad. I'm impressed and told the folks in Texas to leave the Flamingo to his new life with a mate who had herself escaped from a Mexican Nature Reserve. Anyone who's dealt with a parrot knows that they're too clever by half, and that certainly applies to Cuba the mccaw a resident of Vancouver's Zoos Parrot Gardens. Even, though the suet taken all precautions to prevent the parrots from escaping, it seemed that the clever girl was hell bent on getting out. On a pleasant Spring Day in two thousand nine zoo staff had moved the parrots to an outdoor enclosure. A little while later, their headcount came up short. The keepers weren't panicked. All the birds had their wings clipped. So how far could you have gotten? Surprisingly are considering. She hitched a ride in an RV. Juba got into a compartment near the vehicle's Engine Bay and hung out for three days before the family in Rv, found her. Luckily they were on one of the more stationary parts of their vacation and had only gone twenty miles, so it was barely out of their way to take what I'm assuming was a very annoyed parrot back to the zoo. Anyone who's watched? Jailbreak movie knows that you won't get very far without stealing a set of wheels. Try to imagine the end of the great escape without the motorcycles. No good. Even one? The Indian spectacle at the Berlin soon knew that. In two thousand and four, he rode a log across the moat, the rounds, the bear habitat and scaled a wall to freedom. Now that he was out, he had to use this time wisely. I stop the zoos playground. Terrified parents rushed their children away while one had a jolly go on the merry go round and went down the slide. After getting bored of that fairly quickly, one wandered off only to find a bicycle across his path. When he stopped to examine it perhaps to assess it for its usability as a getaway vehicle, the keepers who had put it there were able to track him and carry all three hundred pounds or one hundred and thirty six kilos of air to his habitat. And potentially dangerous could also describe a gator named Chuckie who got loose from the Alabama Gold Coast in two, thousand, four with a little help from Hurricane Ivan. Zookeepers hadn't been able to evacuate the gators and the storm surge destroyed their enclosure, setting them loose. Them meaning plural gators, though only chucky got any real publicity. Rapidly due to the fact that he was twelve feet or three point seven meters long and weighed about half a ton. That makes for better copy. Zoo officials weren't as worried about Chucky, going native, as they were of Chucky, going up to people expecting to be fed as he had for the past fourteen. Here's a situation that could get very ugly very fast. Luckily dedicated alligator retrieval team from gator land in Orlando was able to catch chucky less than a week later. Some animals get by with a little help from their friends or even from strangers. Three kangaroos staged a daring escape from a wildlife park near Frankfurt Germany. The name of whom I am now going to attempt to say. The hawksbill shoot par concert. It is what it is taken early vote. They escaped by going under the fence. Thanks to the work of a Fox and wild boar. skippy Jack and Mick very clever names for your kangaroos. Germany made it under the first fence of their enclosure, using a hole that had been dug by a wild Fox. One got stuck there, but to manage to use a second hole that had been dug by a wild boar under the exterior fence to get all the way out. Of those two, one was captured quickly, but the other one gave staff the slip, and wouldn't you know it as usual? There are dozens of articles about the escape and the one ru being missing, but can I find anything about him. Ever been caught. We are so fickle and flighty. When it comes to the news, we will pay attention to and by extension. The news that people bothered to write. Speaking of outside help. Thanks to the folks who have been reviewing the your brain on facts book on Amazon this pleasing the Almighty algorithm so that it might suggest the book to more people. Please keep them coming like this one from Sean one-two-three. I love podcasts because they're like books. Someone reads to me. I love this book because it's like a podcast I'm reading to myself. This book is so full of facts I literally don't even know where to start so I just opened it up to a random page and started reading. The facts are extremely well researched and presented in such a funny and friendly way that you'll want to read it again and again. I'm absolutely enamored with this book. It will be a mainstay on my coffee table. Slash living room bookshelf for years to come. I can't wait to push it on all my friends and family. Thank you. Sean one two three I have a similar habit and I lose copies of my favorite books so quickly that way because I never remember. Who did I forced to read John Dies at the end or smoke gets in your eyes this time. Thanks also to all the supporters at Patriot dot. com slash your brain on fact for helping to keep the show. Going not only did three new people sign up last week. Welcome to Alicia, Lori and Karen, but they all signed up on the same day. When those notifications kept rolling in, you could knocked me over with a feather. I am so grateful to everyone who helps to defer the costs of putting on the podcast and remember that for the duration of the crisis, just going to be a while. All tiers are receiving all levels of rewards. If my gentle listener has ever touched penguin. Can you let me know if they feel as slippery physically as they look? One Young Humboldt, Penguin at Tokyo Sea Life, Park proved to be quite slippery indeed. Known only as Penguin at three three seven, he somehow scaled a thirteen foot wall topped with barbed wire. None of my sources list how he did this possibly, so the other penguins won't over here and get ideas. Over the next few months, three three seven had allegedly been spotted swimming in the rivers that feed into Tokyo Bay but no one could get their hands on him. Three three seven managed to stay on the Lam for about a year before he was recaptured. Zoo officials weren't sure what state he was going to be in when they found him since he'd been raised in captivity, and it had his food provided to him. But three three seven surprise them again he was the exact right wait that he should have been for his age and size, and was in tip top shape all around. In nineteen, sixty, five, a Golden Eagle named. Goldie decided that five years of living at Regent's Park Zoo in London had been quite enough. Thank you very much and made its bid for freedom while its cage was being cleaned. Even in the pre Internet Days Goldie became a media sensation and the public aid up the story. For nearly two weeks while Goldie was loose, people bombarded the zoo with calls and letters, offering unsolicited advice to the animal experts on how to best catch the Rope Eagle. A crowd of roughly one thousand people gathered to watch the eagles, keepers, police, and firefighters, and even BBC reporter attempt to catch the bird. Goldie was caught by a deputy head keeper, who lured it down with a dead rabbit tied to a rope, and was able to quietly walk up and pick up Goldie with his bare hands. Zoo attendance doubled for a while after Goldie was returned. There are no reports of such Hoopla and Goldie got loose again later that year when was recaptured after only four days. Mona stacked. There are sixty species of eagle in the world, only two of which are native to north. America the Bald Eagle, the national bird of the United States and the Golden Eagle the National Bird of Mexico. While he was out he did. What predators do snatching a duck out of someone's garden, and even trying to make takeaway of two terriers. Remember captive does mean tame by any stretch of the imagination. A similar scenario played out with a young male Jaguar at the AUDUBON. Zoo in New Orleans in two thousand eighteen. The Jaguar named Valero got out of his enclosure under cover of darkness, and basically found himself loose in a buffet. The staff found and tranquilized scenario within an hour of discovering him missing the next morning. I'd say probably about the same time. They found five AL packers to Fox's an EMU that had been properly Jaguar word. No humans were injured by the Jaguar. Although the circumstances of the escape sparked a fair bit of concern at what could happen. The Jaguar. Jungle is right next to the children's play area. Zoo officials insisted the facility was safe for the public though they wouldn't say how. The Apex Predator got out to take out every Alpaca that they had. Officials also chose not to euthanize Hilario because he was just doing what wild animals do. For escapes with a bit more sophistication and usually less carnage. We need only look over to the next branch of the evolutionary tree, two great apes, chimpanzees and other primates. Like us, they are able to learn new skills by watching others even when we don't think they're watching. Such was the case with a keen eyed orangutan named Fu Manchu at Henry doorly zoo in Nebraska in nineteen, sixty eight. Keepers, found Fu Manchu and other rang. Tans were out, but they were able to coax them back in. They assumed someone accidentally left the cage door open, so they made doubly sure that it was closed properly. But Fu Manchu escaped again. And a third time. It was after that third jailbreak that something caught the handlers I a little speck of light, a glint off a piece of metal wire that Fu. Manchu was keeping under his lip. Justice seats seeing the staff use keys to open cage boom Manchu picked block. The staff confiscated the wire and made sure there was nothing else in the inclusion. That Freeman shoe could use to try for escape number four. Down in Adelaide Australia a twenty seven year old orangutan named Carta did Fu one better. She had to contend with an electric fence, so she used a stick to wrap the wires around each other to short circuit. The fence before piling up more sticks to be able to climb out. A zoo spokesman said she climbed over those disabled hot wires built up amount of leaf, litter and used branch to climb out of the exhibit and onto the surrounding wall. Carter was only free for about half an hour before letting keepers lead her back in. She seemed to realize that she was somewhere. She wasn't supposed to be and never went within yards of any visitors though they did have. The zoo evacuated as a precaution. Cardis keepers think she might have gotten out to look for her mate who sung who had passed away a month earlier. A silverback gorilla named Kombucha got free from his enclosure. London Zoo in two thousand sixteen, in what seems like a lucky break for him and big trouble for the performance review of one of the keepers. The zoo refused to reveal much information about the incident, but they did say that the guerrilla did not smash any glass or force its way out of the enclosure. And if that isn't code for someone left the door open. I don't know what is. Despite the description of Kombucha as a giant visitors were ordered to take cover in buildings after the four hundred pound or one hundred eighty four kilo guerrilla had escaped. The situation was quickly resolved. Kabuga was tranquilized in return to the enclosure in under half an hour. silverback gorillas are incredibly strong empirically having the strength of ten men. But thankfully Kabuki never left the staff only areas. The only casualty of his escape was the loss of five leaders of blackcurrant juice concentrate that he drank in a service corridor. If, you're researching. Zoo escapes especially those of the primate variety. There is one name that comes up again and again. Ken Allen. It's a bit like the tiger named Richard Parker from the life of Pi. And Tell us all about the escapes of Ken. Allen the orangutan are my friends from the podcast life, death and taxonomy. Things Moxie. This is Carlson Joe from life, death and taxonomy your thirty minutes of interesting Animal Info. We love talking about fascinating animals, and we have a doozy for this one. Consider one can allen a hunk of a man. Actually he was a two hundred and fifty pound male born in. That lived not so peaceful life at the San Diego Zoo back in nineteen, nine, hundred, nineteen, eighty, five, he was named after two zookeepers Ken Willingham, and Ben Allen Kenan. Ben Who saved him from his mother, who is trying to smother. Ken was a nice and easy going ape under surveillance. Aren't we all? But, when no one was looking, all Ken went to work. Even a hatchlings would unscrew the bolts from his cage at night to play around in his nursery before getting back in before morning and reassembling his cage. But that was just the beginning. He was jungle-bound. But. He just didn't other way. One, sunny, summer's Day in June. He climbed right over his retaining wall and escaped. Well, what did he do? He walked around the nearby exhibits, looking at animals and having a grand time with all the tourists before he was led back to his cage. Zoo officials didn't like they can could enjoy the zoo without buying a ticket, so they put a large moat around his pen that was ringed by an even larger retaining wall. But? Do you think that stopped Oak Ken? Absolutely not a few weeks later he climbed the new wall and escaped again, but instead of enjoying himself, he went to the exhibit of another renting named Otis who used to share a pen with and started throwing rocks at him. Now can. Is that how you treat someone? You once called a friend. Later when enclosed with a female ring attaining Vicky, Ken found a crowbar that some zookeeper had left behind tossed Vicky in. She pried open a window to let Ken out. After that he was moved temporarily to an indoor pen with quote, a black and white TV with one working channel. When moved to a new penn. zookeepers would watch him to see how he escaped, but he knew he couldn't be slick around them. So. They tried and I quote guerrilla tactics and dresses plainclothesman. And women. which still didn't work on tricky? Vikian Kenton. The zoo surrounded his new penn with electric wire. which seemed to care? Ken Allen of his freedom which he settled down as a family man. But Psych as soon as opportunity struck, so did Kenny, his enclosures water pump clogged, and his moat dried allowing him to walk across in climate. You Walk Around for bit freeloading off at Pours Zoo even stopped to pose for some photos with tourists without paying zoo for any royalties, which was kinda scummy of him. And when a zookeeper saw, they accidentally scared him toward the lion enclosure, but they managed to get him back to his pen safely. In response, they gave Ken four females to compete with Otis's three to keep him happy. But Ken taught them to be criminals, and as soon as squeegee was left in the pen by window washers to the females. Use It to climb out in escape. They. Fortunately they were both returned safely and eventually Ken got tool for the Shenanigans and his escapades ended. Now. There have been many zoo escape stories over the years, but very few have captured the hearts of the public like Callan. Most containment issues at zoo's spark fear and concern from zoo patrons, but Ken Allen wasn't the villain of his story. The hero. The image of a clever rang a Tang. Longing for freedom was perceived as an inspiration more than a threat. Zeus all their new celebrity as a selling point, and they began printing t shirts that feature the headlines that mentioned the escapist ape. Bumper stickers were sold that read free canal. That's Logan would later become a beer made by the monkey. PA Brewing Company in San Diego. He gained the nickname Harry Houdini for his ability to escape his enclosures. That's H. A. I R. Y.. A group of retirees formed a fan club called the Iranian game. In a lab assistant named Twyla Baker published a newsletter for all the Ken Allen Updates. It had one hundred subscribers. Finally can. Allen became a true folk legend when psychiatrist musician and cool I patch wear David Gerston wrote a song about the genius eight. WHO LONGED FOR FREEDOM? The song called the Ballad of Ken Allen became a local hit while the zoo was capitalizing on Kens legend. They were also spending thousands of dollars to keep him in. The eventually succeeded until he was diagnosed with cancer and euthanized perhaps now Kennel the Harry Houdini controlling. Be Free. Thanks for having Moxie listeners that would like to hear more animal info can check out life, death and taxonomy on D. Taxonomy, dot, com, or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks y'all. Of all the animals I don't want getting out of their cage and adoption Cobra would be high on the list so I'm glad. I wasn't in the Bronx and two thousand eleven when one went missing for the better part of a week. A citywide manhunt snake hunt was underway. Luckily the Cobra had only gone a few hundred feet over the course of those six days. As it happened though the snakes escape was a big topic of conversation among New Yorkers. One person even began a hugely popular twitter account for the snake. The began with the opening line I want to thank those animals from the movie Madagascar. They were a real inspiration. And one of the last tweets from the Bronx Zoo Cobra Account. Oh this isn't over. Tomorrow is going to be big. This is only awakened the sleeping Bronx Zoo. Cobra nation tune in tomorrow. You'll have never seen this coming. Social media plays a part in Zuid escapes as it does everything else these days. And Twenty sixteen the Hashtag. CAPYBARAS watch was trending after a pair of Cappy Barra soon to be known as Bonnie and Clyde got away from the staff. The High Park Zoo in Toronto during a transfer. For those who don't know what a Capybaras is right off the top of your head picture cross between a Guinea pig and an actual pig, the really really cute and super chill. The Furry duo made international headlines and vague the law for nearly a month before they were caught in traps and taken back. Social media can be useful in escaped animal situations by spreading the word and helping find the animals, but people being what they are I e the reason we can't have nice things. Some have used social media to Fabricate Tales of animal escapes. Amidst recent black lives matter protests no less. People aren't anxious enough. In the minds of the trolls who think it would be nifty to also say there are gigantic escaped animals on the loose. A picture of a hippo that got away from a traveling circus in Spain and twenty sixteen was re captioned. Loose on the streets of Chicago. A picture of a giraffe next to two cars, a safari park is claimed to be on the streets of Minneapolis. The Alameda County Sheriff's office even fell for one of these, or at least the person in charge of their twitter accounted. They posted reports of Tiger on the loose. If you see it, call nine one one at ten forty PM. And at ten fifty two tigers are all accounted for it. Oakland Zoo. They checked. Next time, maybe call the I then tweet. Role, dealing the best we can with covert nineteen, but what about the covert nineteen, meaning the nineteen or so pounds were all seem to be gaining, while we stay home and eat lovely, sour dough, bread, and other things that we've made. I have experienced than a lot of people working from home yet. I still cannot resist the allure of the magic talking refrigerator. Who encourages me to have snacks at all hours of the day? Luckily I have smart for life. These are great protein bars snack bars. soups shakes the whole range designed by a doctor who realized with his busy schedule. He was eating increasingly poorly. And the recipes are created by an award winning chef, so brace yourself there actually good especially, if you like crispy is my favorite texture, and almost all of the smart for life bars have a crispy component to them. I'm a big Fan. Particularly of the peanut butter, the lemon and the more you can check out smart for life yourself by going to smart for life. Dot Com toward force, spelled out and using the coupon code. Moxie ten M O. X., I e one zero at smart four life dot Com. Of course nothing new under the Sun Tzu Escape. Hoaxes aren't a modern invention. Another awful calamity, the Intellectual Department of The New York Herald let loose upon the public. So proclaimed the daily graphic on thirteenth eighteen, seventy four. Because on November, ninth seventy, four, the Herald, one of the most widely read and highly awarded newspapers of the time, published a front page article, claiming that the animals had escaped their cages in the Central Park Zoo and were rampaging the city. alliant broken into a church. A Rhinoceros had fallen into the sewer. Forty nine people were already dead and two hundred more injured as the police and National Guard. Her roic tried to fight the beasts. It was a bloody and fearful carnival. The article despaired and the animals were still on the loose. It was pandemonium though nope pandas were reportedly involved. Many readers panicked when they read the article. However, those who did should have read the whole thing. At the end of the article, it stated in literal small print. That the entire story given of is a pure fabrication. So our modern tendency to read the top of something and immediately overreact to it. That isn't new either. The Orson Welles of this war of the worlds scenario was one Thomas Connery an editor at the Herald who confessed to a Harper's weekly reporter nearly twenty years later that the hoax had been his idea. He insisted that the owner of the Herald James Gordon Bennett. Junior was blameless, but many believe Bennett must have at least given connery go ahead. Connery claimed the idea came to him after he witnessed a leopard almost escape while being transferred to its cage in the Central Park Zoo then called the Menagerie. Connery was concerned about the state of the sue and its infrastructure. He Thought of writing a stern column, scolding the zookeepers, but decided he needed something with a little more resel dazzle to get people to notice. A harmless little hoax with just enough semblance of reality to give it a salutary warning. It's how he describes it. The article assigned to one. Joseph Clark to write ran to over ten thousand words in length. For comparison, that's twice as many words as are in this script. It took up six columns on the front page. Will technically it was on page three back? Then? The first two pages were all ads and were more like a cover for the newspaper. Awful calamity, the headline screamed a shocking Sabbath Carnival of death. That is my new band named Dibs. The article claimed the carnage began on Sunday afternoon and continued through publication time on Monday morning. It all started when a reckless keeper provoked a rhinoceros poking it with a stick. The enraged beast smash down its cage, killing the keeper in the process. It then battered down the cages of the other animals who scattered throughout the city, wreaking havoc wherever they went. The author painted on gruesome details, heavy and thick. Rhino, horns plunged into bodies. A Panther chewing on victims head animals, jumping on desperate, fleeing people and dragging them to the ground. The mayor was urging all citizens to stay within their houses or residences until the wild animals now at large are captured and killed. See what you will about Clark. He had quite an imagination. The, article went on to describe a lion and Tiger fighting on fifty ninth street, a battle between a sea lion and a rhinoceros that I would pay pay per view money for Anaconda attempting to eat a giraffe Swedish hunters stalking a lioness down Broadway, a Bengal tiger shot on Madison Avenue, a panther, attacking worshipers inside a church on West fifty third street at a tiger ransacking ferryboat. Clark even wrote out a full list of names of the dead and wounded. If you were engrossed in the article and didn't. Drop it to load your rifle and hammer crooked bits of wood over the windows. You would've read. Of course, the entire story given above is a pure fabrication. Not One word of it is true, not a single act or incident described has taken place. It is a huge hoax, a wild romance, or whatever other epithet of utter untrustworthiness are reader may choose to apply to it. It is simply a fancy picture which crowded upon the mind of the writer a few days ago, while he was keesing through the iron bars of the cages of the wild animals in the Menagerie at Central Park. By the way thanks to everyone who has responded to my offers for free voiceover work I am still offering free voiceovers while I build up my portfolio. Don't think it has to be anything big like a TV commercial. Just a little video on your company's social media. I'd be happy to do. By all accounts, the article caused widespread panic throughout the city. Armed, men rushed into the streets ready to defend their homes. The police mobilized. Parents rushed to bring their children back from school. One grain of salt before I. Continue and it's a pretty big one. Those reports of panicked came from other read competing newspapers. They may well have made the reaction seem bigger or worse than it had been to make. The Herald seem irresponsible, unprofessional, or even a danger to the public welfare. The same thing would happen later after the Great War of the worlds radio play. We've all been led to believe that virtually everyone thought it was real, and there was panic in the streets and people in desperate fear for their lives. In fact, wells repeatedly said during the broadcast that it was fictional. The reports of widespread panic come from newspapers, a medium at the time, afraid of the upstart radio industry, and what it's possibly already for them. So other newspapers across the state, and across the country quickly and unanimously denounced the hoax. The GALVESTON Daily News wrote to be in keeping with this enterprise. The Herald should bribe a keeper to let loose a lion or two upon occasion, so as to bring up that journals prophetic record than it had better recall, Stanley the man who found Doctor Livingston from the Interior of Africa. He is the crack Lion Shot of the Herald establishment and should be at home to protect it. The New York Times while admitting that the animals in Central Park are confined in quote, the flimsiest cages ever seen described the article as an intensely stupid and unfeeling hoax, and printed letters from readers, claiming to have been terrified by the story, they also reported a small angry mob, descending on the District Attorney's office to demand that something be done though charges were ever brought against anyone at the paper. The heralds response was unrepentant, claiming to have been surprised at the reaction. Essentially, it was just a prank. Bro, the last refuge of the truly unfunny. By way of apology, they simply inserted a short article into the next issue titled Wild Beasts Urging that safety precautions at the Soobee improved basically the article that would've been written in the first place. The public was not best pleased with this apology yet. The Herald did not report any drop in circulation as a result of the hoax. In fact, it probably gained subscribers for every subscriber at lost. People, who didn't want to miss the next about of wild nonsense. And that's where run out of ideas at least for today, but back to Long Island the Rhesus monkey escape could have been a lot worse. There were over five hundred monkeys in that enclosure, so the worker who forgot to remove the plank behind him was able to stop three quarters of them from getting out. Monkey sightings were reported from two counties primarily from homeowners, finding monkeys in their yard and fruit stand owners being hassled by Hungary primates at dusk the first evening thirty monkeys returned to their home on their own. The rest trickled back in slowly over the next few weeks after owner, Frank Buck publicly promised a free season pass to the park twenty-one who caught and returned monkey. Remember you can always find the script and the source material at your brain on facts dot com. Thanks for spending part of Your Day with me. Stay, safe.

Ken Allen Oak Ken Goldie Central Park Zoo Long Island Harry Houdini London Zoo The Herald Frank Buck Sean Bronx Zoo Chucky twitter San Diego Zoo Texas Oakland Zoo Henry doorly zoo capone
Bonus: Rats, Space, and Bears

The Ladies of Strange

33:05 min | 2 months ago

Bonus: Rats, Space, and Bears

"Though and welcome we are the ladies of strange. I'm ashley i'm tiffany and rebecca. Thank you for joining us each week. Is we discuss. The history mystery in theory about things questionable odd and eerie ladies will up. This is our first bonus. Twenty twenty one. Where's thurman when you need it. Wow us with the studios easy. You know while we're not there is a therapist contagion which all the ghosts in tiffany's house would have it. Fuck yourself hard. oh i would purposely break into tiffany's elsa play at eleven pm god if you woke up my child first of all death. She'll be fine out bring her ice cream. She'll be completely occupied. Mike shoot me. Not as tight as plan. Everything sounds like it's gonna work out great. Oh this is five so this month back on track ladies. We don't have a theme we said. Let's just do a bonus sips over. Brady bring a story so we did. We did and mine is a shorty. So i'm going to start you off with a little pre-game oh you're just jumping on in there Oh yeah it's short. You won't feel much. But i'm trying a more mini up do it. There's a lot of innuendos there that i don't have time to figure out what. What are you bringing us today. Tiffany we're gonna get our way back machines and go back to fifteen o eight hundred mile. Why because in fifteen o eight in a tune or tun france there was a trial holds where rats were put on trial for eating burly. Are you serious. Yes i am. They were rats. Try over rats on trial for eating barley. Oh right as is that where the term calling someone a dirty rat comes from. I don't think so but came from the plague. Probably that would make a lot more serious but you know logic so there was at a time whenever animals were put on trial which was a common thing. There were a lot of pigs put on trial like whenever you look up animal trials. There's a picture of a pig on stand. But this was a common practice. And there was pope leo the thirteenth. I think xs a ten right. Yes i'm smart. Came up with exer- sims of animals to try and rid them of demons when they were put on trial. Hey jesus did that but opposite then. The bishop of luzon luzon curse creatures. They actually excommunicated them lynch. You know if you're picked does something wrong or if bear bites baby cub by her dog. Wattana worry up here from dog bite. Your kid excommunicated from the church. It's fine they'll stop excommunicate. The bear dog from the church behrman pig. That's probably where you got. So what do they do with cats. Is that why. They made violin strings from them. We watt oh you didn't know that violence in ye olden days. The strings were made from calcutt. Do which is why. I took personal france when a friend once told me. Hey when your cats die you can just have them made into violence during and that way can still hear them talk to you and i was like fuck off sir with the combet that was bad but also kind of So anyway i mean if you heard my cat mail at me which why would you. I edited out of the podcast It sounds roughly like a bad violin so this small town in france was having trouble with the retz eating their barley crops and it got so bad that they were they could barley handle it. Oh my own no. So what do you do when the rats all your crops. Why you ask are you. Suzy are rats. God you put them on trial so when you put on trial. Do you usually have with you a lawyer lawyer. So the lawyer assigned to the rats was bartholomee day chelsea. Nee sure a wikipedia has a bunch of different names for him. But that's the most common one so he took this as like a you know what if i'm going to represent these rats. I'm going to do it right. So the first day of trial the rats failed to appear. Oh my god. I know but showcasing chazan. Jc shazad pointed out that the summons was invalid because his clients were not pack. Animals intended deliver loan. So therefore each client had to be served individually h- lawyer even in the eighteen hundreds fourteen hundred fifteen hundred blau. Yeah that's fantastic amazing. So they're like okay. This is what we'll do we'll post summons at all the churches in the neighborhood than neighboring towns. Because that's where you wit. Everybody we send us your rats. What are they just assuming that the demons that inhabit these rats not only read instructions but will follow them. I guess but shocker. Second court date redstone appear. Wow there's a warrant out for their arrests because that's how that works now not yet because as their lawyer. Jc shows eight points out the unpaved roads and unlit roads were dangerous for rats. I mean there were cats and dogs and hostile. People like their life was endangered trying to get to the courthouse. And if even today if you are some into court but your life is endangered getting there. You have to show like you're justified. Not being there sounds like excuse. That would be used more often. I think you have to feel like your like you have to have like a doctor's note that you are bleeding out to not have to show up type deal that could be iranian. No but were like if your fear for your life because the mobs after you sorry couldn't make it out. There are people watching my house and that can be arranged. Oh boy well. I got hoes. In different area codes. Were all in the same area code. Are you talking. not don't don't put me in. You'll face the area code. Never continue so third court summits happens. Let me guess the rats don't show we have no records. We have what he knows the record. There's no record what happened to the vats. No yeah so all. We know kadam off here. The capital district. The record swim with the fishes. How jesus basically fifteen this guy worked this system and it was awesome and i like to think that the rats got off scot free so i hope they did. I know. I hope they just ran to the next town. Eight their wheat. I mean some people aspire for you know riches or fame or being good at their job. I want to handle something ridiculous. Like that as well as a person like he put his all into it and he was like ha. You guys gave me this crow. Wait i handle this podcast. Oh true but do you do it as well as he did. I feel like i'm doing more. I feel like she is too. But you made a sassy comment. I was just making back. No yeah that was. Deserved retort was desert. Yeah he makes me really happy. And i am very impressed with his ability to say. Fuck you guys. I'm going to do this right away. Ever need a lawyer. i'm calling. jc chassis yes. I know how you handled. The rats died in fifteen forty one but not my jc shehzad. Jc shows a bartholomeo shazan. May i'm talking about the jc shows of instinct fame. Who oh my god anyway. Who's going next before we get angry with raw connect because i started researching mind and at no longer made sense but it will make sense and tiffany's brain. Oh yes because it's conspiracy. Yes yes oh. Can i just say real quick. I discovered today that. I love conspiracy theories when it comes to things like flat earth or aliens or colts All that is fun with all the conspiracy theories going around it real life right now. I've decided that. I liked the fantastical ones and these ones. Outright now can go away far far away again. There's a reason. I like flat earth and not people who tell me. Vaccines don't work moving on conspiracy theory in eighteen ninety nine. Nikola tesla claimed to receive an electrical signal from aliens. Yes which he discusses his article talking with the planet's he believed they originated from mars. And when he says they. I mean like the signals. The signals originated from mars. And that they meant a code. And the code was repeating wendy. Three four originals is a disclaimer. This like bounces all around the place or like the philly experiments. He kind of just have to stay with me. I'm with you in nineteen fifty four. Donald keough reported that he had observed two satellites orbiting the earth to the united states. Air force this was weird. 'cause at this time countries did not have the technology to launch a satellite into orbit for reference sputnik one which as far as i can tell was first satellite to be launched into orbit was launched on october fourth nineteen fifty seven by the soviet union the pentagon denied having anything up in orbit at this time many conspiracy theories believed that donald key hub observed. The black knights cayenne t the batman the black knights. He's the dark night but okay. That's why making the distinction because some of my searches. I was like this isn't even the same thing. Why am i getting review on wbap. Never mind so. Many conspiracy theories believe keough observed the black knight a satellite of unknown origin. And that tesla received radio signals from in eighteen ninety nine. Au who's their time travel or do they think it took that long district beck around day just thanked to people observed the same thing at two different crazy so since nikola there are other reports of weird radio waves being received in my opinion they were probably. Frb's for the sake of argument. We're gonna say they're aliens in february of nineteen sixty time reported that a guy object was spotted by the us navy while initially thought to be a soviet spy satellite. It was later confirmed that what was observed was the remains of an air force. Discoverer eight satellite that had gone astray no. I couldn't find the original article of the time. Magazine just fyi. I i looked. I would have had to pay for antique wasn't about to do that. I'm sorry that's fine. That's fine just further proof that it's aliens so one source. I found say that the dark object was actually a satellite sent up by the united states to spy on russia and by one source. I mean like one person said that. But i couldn't find someone to second that opinion. Just a foyer. Cover conspiracy theories as well as tiffany. Does yeah you gotta put your whole heart into an just believe it without any references or sources and that's how you join a colt but this is the beginning of the black knight satellite a satellite that is believed to be of alien origin. Considering it was not only i discovered in nineteen fifty. Four and by i discovered i mean like i. Visually observed in nineteen fifty four when we didn't have satellites and that the satellite orbits like they believed the black knight orbits rusher Grade which means it orbits opposite the rotation of the earth which again at that time. We didn't have the technology to do again to. Rachel will show up in my dm's if i'm wrong about this but this all points to one very obvious facts aliens. Nasa is covering something up sorta like the moon landing sort of like a lot of conspiracy theories in one thousand nine hundred sixty three and astronaut. Gordon cooper reported to have observed during an orbit in mercury nine however neither nasr's mission tramps gibs or cooper's copies of the same transcripts showed evidence of him making such report suspicious who question. I'd need to lead these. Tiffany in one thousand nine hundred seventy three. Dunkin lunen analyzer. Radio echoes received speculated that they originated from that thing quote unquote in the sky. He claimed the thing was thirteen. Thousand year old alien pro. Supposedly originated from the solar system of the star epsilon. Boy otis. i really hope. I pronounce that correctly because spelled b o o the whom lots t. i s. so it looks like buddhist buddhist but but it's not pronounced that way he also claimed that the echoes said the following. Our home is upsilon boots. This is a double star. We live on the six planet of seven. Check that the six or seven counting hours from the sun. Which is the larger of the two stars are six planet has one moon. Our fourth planet has three our first and third planet. each have one are probe is the orbit of is in the orbit of your moon. So sounds like an alien is communicating of this guy and isn't gobert direction. Oh my gosh. No i wanna go find this place. Now he gave. i'm sure he get You wanna find the black knight that's orbiting around the earth and the move. Feel like if i got really high. Oh it'd be able to find this place they're talking about. I'm pretty sure that people who were finding this were kind of also maybe hot kind of also maybe high Yeah sounds like one of those code puzzles where it's like susie five and had four apples but altogether. There were sixteen. Apple's so what happened to the other seven apples see. Meanwhile that translation of what Luna received to sounds like tiffany trying to explain the philly experiments emmy where she's like over explaining details aren't really relevant. They were all super relevant like this one has force for moons but this one only has one so we're like ours and this one is x. Distance from here and did a different from here. And it's like have you never wanted to throw somebody off your tracks you over details for them to try and process how i live my life however lunen later retracted his statement claiming that he made outright errors and was using scientific methods incorrectly. No i don't believe that the government's trying to keep him quiet But theorists today believed that the meshes he received is specifically talking about the black knight. Yes it makes perfect sense not say it like black knights. Sort of like the black mamba from mega minds black mamba anyway during the nineteen ninety eight. Sds eighty-eight mission photograph was captured that contained space debris elise. That was the official story. Many uses photo as visual evidence of the black knight being. So when you google the black knight does the photo that you see. It is literally just wanted photo of something in space with the earth in the background. The earth happens to be around. That are that is two separate episodes. They're both googling it well. Mine comes up with some that's batman. That's where monty python the black knight. Oo i see well. It shows the black knight from monty python plaque mealy food. I don't know what my cookies are doing. But definitely saw like batman reviews. When i was doing this thing so i definitely see the space debris you're talking or quote space debris you're talking about the totally the black knight for sure. That is a spaceship of. I've ever seen one so the official story as the black knight is actually space debris so many use the photo that you guys just searched as evidence of the black knight in reality. The black knight picture is probably a photo of a thermal blanket that was lost during a va with stange for extra vehicular. Activity was tiffany with thinking. Something else not spacewalking. I mean never mind. But it was the by jerry l ross and james h newman in twenty seventeen. It's believed that recorded footage shows that a rocket again. This is one story. I found a one youtube video on the youtube in two thousand seventeen. It's believed that require that recorded footage shows a rocket that was launched by the aluminum body destroying the black. Oh there's your proof no why would the alumina. Wanna ruin the black knight. We are not here to question what the aluminum does. That's not our place. Stay ads for boating. So remember the initial reporter the black knight in nineteen fifty four says skeptics noticed noted that ki-ho had been permanent noting. Ufo book at the time and the news stories. Were likely you know tongue in cheek and not intended to be taken seriously and more for propaganda and he later revoked. A story anyway But that being said many people many people most of which you're on the internet believed that the black knight's still orbits are earth and that it is of ancient alien descent and that nasa is keeping us from knowing about it Alien race that inhabits the black knight hitch girl up. 'cause i could use a little vacation right now so don't forget about me. Oh my gosh okay. Now i've got another alien to keep on my radar. The black knight or black knight is there any like pattern to these spotting or is it just sporadic. as far as i can tell very sporadic and this one was interesting because it seemed like people took a bunch of isolated instances that weren't related at all and use it to explain this existence of one thing i followed. That sounds about right. Big shot to a fan. Who suggested this to us. Hey like that kudos fan you. I like you kudos fan My topic was kind of suggest well was worse. My topic was shared by a fan in our facebook group. So not explicitly like hey cover this on the show. But that's where i learned about it so our dear friend jacob. You're in the group and yes. I've got his permission to give him a shout-out shared this on one of the many things that he shares their that. Keep us occupied. So i was intrigued. Which by the way. If you haven't joined them on facebook i would say us but a new my facebook along time ago fair. I hear it's hot. it's like the place to be on the facebook sisal. Maybe you should check it is and Jacob is like the ladies of strange facebook guru savant. He is the group he is what holds are group together and he's the heart and soul of it and we love him so shout out to you jake. Tlc are he posts a lot of content. That we appreciate a lot pretty much. And this is one of the details that he posted for us on april fifth a water dates of doing doing your great justice there jacob on april fourth nineteen forty two. A young bear cub was purchased at a railway station in hamadan iran by polish court who had been evacuated from the soviet union. Polish soldiers encountered a young iranian boy. Who had found a bear cub who he believed. Mother had been attacked by hunters one of the civilian refugees in their midst. Eighteen year old irena. Boca wits was enamored immediately by the bear cub. She convinced one of the lieutenants to purchase him in exchange for some persian coins a portion of chocolate a swiss army knife into tin of beef Mazing the basement spent the next three months in a polish refugee camp that was established near tehran and in august the bear was donated to the second transport company which later became the twenty second artillery supply company and was named hold on. I have a pronunciation to make sure it's it correctly. Vojtech o okay which is spelled with the w and j if you could imagine w. o. J. t. there's the southern question question about this. He was donated so does is he no longer with the girl who was enamored with donated to a another group of soldiers so vojtech is a nickname from voight to check. I see you didn't look at pronunciation for that one. no i didn't look up pronunciation. Jacobson it to me which roughly translate to happy warrior or joyous soldier so cute vojtech initially had problems swallowing and was fed. Condensed milk from an old vodka bottle and he as he grew he was also given fruit marmalade honey and syrup and was often rewarded with beer. Which quickly became his favorite drink. Good soldier his name. He later also enjoyed smoking but really mainly eating cigarettes as well as drinking coffee with the soldiers in the morning i've heard of this band saw the spare. It was on a youtube channel. I don't know. I heard of it from jacob but this bear is amazing. Yeah he would also sleep with the soldiers to help keep them warm and enjoyed wrestling with them and their downtime. My god can. I have a bear. Can we have a bear. No no you know three said yes. It's happening. I'm gonna have you guys watch a documentary. You know. if my husband wasn't straight i would say already. How one can keep that much. The soldiers also taught him to salute when greeted or a higher ranking officer. Came into the area. He became an attraction for soldiers and civilians alike and soon became the unofficial mascot of all the unit stationed nearby with the twenty second company. He moved to iraq then syria palestine and egypt while he while in egypt vojtech needed all the refreshing liquids he could find due to the sweltering heat and according to brennan fully and author who helped produce a film based on boy tech's life. The bear would chase after oranges. The men used for grenade practice. All he learned how to break into the communal shower huts and turn the shower on his own which turned out to be a problem because the water was rationed and he would just sit under the shower. So sometimes it would result in water shortages. Which is not good in the sweltering heat of the desert. No but the bears fine. So the the men even taught him to pick up new recreate recruits and hold them upside down by their boots to make them think that they were being attacked and to see how they would react. Oh my god my in charge of the bus. Hey gus and he wake up for a second listen can can you learn how to hold strangers by their ankles as they would react like this no no. He's like mom. I found a good napping spot. Yeah he's in a box. So from egypt's the core was resigned to fight alongside the british eighth army in the italian campaign regulations for the british transport ship which was to carry them to. Italy forbade any mascots or pets on board but he's bear he. Is there bear so they officially drafted vojtech into the polish army as a private and he was listed among the soldiers of the twenty second artillery supply company. He was an enlisted soldier his own pay book rank and serial number and he lived with the other men had to live with the other men intense or special wooden crates. Which were transported by truck open during the battle of monte always say monte cristo monte cassino. Vojtech helped his unit to convey ammunition by carrying hundred pound crates of twenty five pound artillery shells He would carry boxes that would normally require four men and then he would stack them onto a truck go boy this service at monte cassino earned his promotion to the of corporal and in recognition of tax popularity a depiction of a bear hearing and artillery show was adopted as the official emblem of the twenty second company so unless after the end of world war. Two vojtech was transported to berkshire scotland with the rest of the company. They were stationed at winfield. Airfield on sunday wick farm j- which was a village. Apparently soon became popular. Among local civilians in the press and the polish scottish association made him an honorary member. Following the demobilisation on november fifteenth nineteen forty. Five vojtech was given to the edinburgh zoo where he spent the rest of his life. He was often visited by journalists and former polish soldiers. Some of whom would toss cigarettes in for him to eat so he could remember his time in the rb he passed away. December of nineteen sixty three at the age of twenty one or twenty two and at the time of his death. He weighed four hundred ninety pounds and was over six and a half li crap. That's a big and can you imagine him. Just like trump saying around with these soldiers okay. That's a hell of a hazing ritual. I would fall for it. I'd be like i been listing to go fight with this bear. Look i can. He's cool with people. So i could just go like snuggle with him. And he'll keep me warm like right and could you imagine being like the enemy enya like we've got this. Is that fucking bear. Like i'd be so thrown off. And i just i would ask to change teams. I wanna still there. And then he also asked that. I do a quick little shout out to winnipeg the canadian army mayor. We what's and. I did not have a chance to really dive into it but she is a female black bear. That lived in the london zoo and she was rescued by a veterinarian. Had colon and similar back story While he was on route to report to the canadian army veterinarians core As part of an expeditionary force he purchased the backup for twenty dollars at a train. Stop again. They think the mother was killed and the baby couldn't survive by themselves by herself. Excuse me and he named her winnipeg or winnie for short after his home. City of winnipeg manitoba companied him. I've been there to canada. Guess what i've been. I've been to winnipeg. Well it's interesting factoid. You'll learn just a moment that sorry. No it's okay. I got the sassy. Ashley interesting So he followed. He stayed with she. Excuse me winnipeg. The bear stayed with him all the way as he travelled to england and before he left for france he realized that it wasn't fair to this bear to just be like trump saying her around so he left her with the london zoo although her eventual destination was to be at the acid boyne a. s. s. i n. b. o. e. gonna zoo in winnipeg at but at the end of the war. They decided that she should stay at the london zoo because she was already so loved and comfortable there. So in among one of her fans was eight. Mine's son christopher robin who wait wait wait wait wait. Wait wait this beneath p is. Is that what this is week. So i'm christopher robin changed. The name of his own teddy bear from edward bear to winnie the pooh and that would inspire the inspiration for his father's story of winnie the pooh and christopher robin. Oh my god. My heart and she passed of natural causes and her school is now on display at the ogden museum. At the royal. College of surgeons hunted terry ins in london. That was just a quick little side. Note that he asked me to throw in their little win. No that's that's perfect. That was relevant information. Everybody needs in the right. So now everybody knows that winnie the pooh was based on winnipeg the female bear and little baby christopher robin that's amazing and i love it so much jacob your a gem of a human being right yeah. I can't take credit for that one. We love you. I'm just the courier. Speaking of we need to send him a carrier pigeon right yes. I hope this carrier pigeon find l. Thank you greatly for the bear stories. I have ideas. Oh my goodness so. Join us on facebook. Come meet jacob for yourselves. And it's send us stuff you want us to talk about. And we'll probably do it because absolutely we like when you guys give us ideas and if you want rebecca specifically to talk about it senator the instagram or twitter. I won't see it otherwise we can pass along the message and you know there's always the email but we'll go through this in a minute fair her well on that note. We're going into february guys. We got this. it has to look up. Stay strong stay. Strong enjoyed us on facebook and everyone has something that they find odd. Let us tell you why it's not if you have any questionable topics or you know funny animal stories you just want to share with us you can find is at ladies range and pretty much. All things Links can be found on. Our website is the latest strange dot com again. Searching for us will yield results. You'll find us. I promise or you can do it. The old fashioned way and send us a carrier pigeon via email at the latest range at gm dot com. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review. And if you think we're doing a great job in want to support the show just tell your friends about us. We greatly appreciate it and we love you. Keep it strangelove lee's and gu by wanna go. Hi i know. I love her so much.

tiffany vojtech france luzon luzon Wattana ye olden chazan Jc shazad kadam jc shehzad Donald keough Tiffany jacob gibs facebook Boy otis gobert pope leo thurman
 David Attenborough: the making of a British icon

Today in Focus

29:52 min | 1 year ago

David Attenborough: the making of a British icon

"Today we hear all about the amazing David attenborough he was back on our screens h ninety she three and in Opinion Gabby Hinchliffe on why it is that some people are judged to be more likable than others in the late nineteen eighteen thousand nine hundred on white ladies road the BBC studios in Bristol agree proof mostly former public schoolboys they seem to be called Mike Can Natural History in gathered around and they had a meeting and on top of their agenda was who's going to replace this grey head Freelancer David The David approaching retirement three decades ago was David Attenborough who was by then known for three BBC Blockbuster Series on unnatural history but was now in his sixties great job good legacy time to go and play golf in Richmond for the rest of your alive one of the Mike's this meeting was a young producer might gunston and his account of this meeting is that they were looking for the next atom Bro as everyone was saying then and continued to say they couldn't find another David attenborough it turned out that David attenborough was irreplaceable ear replaceable and luckily for all of us happy not to retire e seem perfectly happy to keep going and keep going he's ninety three now and he's back with they never blockbuster series Mike Gunson's now creative director of the Natural History Unit and now when he leads meetings it's never only gender he doesn't awesome won't find another David Attenborough I'm not looking for one from the Guardian I'm Annuschka Astana today focus the making of a British icon so it's pretty cool Patrick for this piece you you got to speak to the man himself David Attenborough tell me about that are cooled in left a message on his answerphone Patrick Burke who is a guardian writer on natural history and he called me back and I missed his cool and he was like hello it's David here I've been trying to cool you for awhile and you haven't got back to me its Sunday evening could you get back to me and I'm sure haven't missed the later calls for him but I was like sorry I missed you cool and he was incredibly open and said come over and we'll have chats and so when anti he lives in leafy Richmond South West London and he likes likes to interview people in his library which is gorgeous building he extended his Victorian Villa and he's a great collector so he has beautiful art from his well his travel around the world tribal art load books a grand piano a great collection of CDs and so you sort of sink into these armchairs and have a lovely chat and he was there on the day I went to see him he was looking pretty much like any freelancer would look who works from home he was wearing a scruffy brown GIAMPA IMPA he hasn't been spruced up for a public appearance or anything he was just working from home on his scripts like any other freelancer okay so there you are sinking into the armchair in this beautiful library opposite David that umbrella in his tatty Brown top and I just want to start from the beginning I mean his career begins early he was born in nineteen twenty six than year the Queen was born there only so to seventeen days apart David being a little bit young gene and I I saw he got to know the queen he was knighted in the eighties and the Queen requested him to be her producer on her. I'm Christmas brewed costs so he was her personal producer for six years and I'm persuaded a one year to drop a rather at clashing acid green outfit for mushroom colored and one so you don't use dressing the queen kind of Natural Hughes and he gave Charles and Diana tour of a BBC studios back in the fifties when they were little kids and he he showed them cocky his cockatoo and he doesn't make a big play of it but he but he's nodding terms with the other oni any sort of global British frigate really who's the Queen of course that year that both of them were born nineteen twenty six was also around the time that television television was first invented Atambua on to study natural sciences at Cambridge and married his university sweetheart Jane how did his career began he heyhoe junior job in publishing he quickly realized that this was not very glamorous or exciting and the Costa Glamorous exciting world at the nineteen fifties was the new wealth of BBC tally so he applied and he got in he joined and he was quickly recognized as a young man with talent his first S. job was as a producer on various programs but he didn't get in front of camera because unbeknownst to him at the time one of his seniors decided that his teeth were far too big for a presenting job this funny isn't it because he's aged now but he was really handsome as a young man he still is but he did have fairly large watch T. you know I've just gave him to check out the teeth and it turns out he always places his mouth for a pitcher okay so self conscious about it how founded on TV while he got involved with trying to film natural history and work out how they could bring it to their screens and he helped devise a you program called zoo quest which was basically a kind of colonial animal snatching I mean it sounds terribly dated where the curator from London Zoo went out with debut a bit to Sierra Leone and other locations and court wild animals to bring back for the collection and they filmed themselves doing David was producer Soundman director director he was everything the crew was literally him and Jack Lester the presenter but then when Jack was taken ill after the first episode which was filmed when they were back in London in the studio David stepped in and did quite good job that is the picture of a very rare bird the white necked Qataris it was drawn from some preserves cans that were sent to the British Museum many years ago from Sierra Leone in West Africa and Jack continued but then he will take any allegation and Jack died while the tragically and ask David got the gig he got the gig presenting it as well as writing and directing directing it by the nine thousand six zoo quest was looking pretty antiquated and David recognized this he's always known what the audience wants thinks I think that's one of the key to his successes and he actually dropped out of the BBC to study at the LLC to do post graduate course in anthropology but he continued needs to make films part time for the BBC and then they suddenly offered him this job it seems to be Outta the blue as as controller of BBC two controller BBC to that is a baked job did you find out what he oversaw and he was there at the time BBC Two had got approval from the government to be the first channel in Britain cintas go in full color so head of BBC One so BBC too was this kind of radical alternative to be but it was also at the cutting edge technology and it's amazing when you look at what happened under David Brain there he brought Snooka to the screens for the first time this being to take advantage of BBC Two's the unique selling point it's the fact that it was color what was to bring the game of which I love so much into the homes of millions of people goes you can't do sneaker on a black and white telly did anyone ever tried to sneak run a black and white tally I'm not sure but anyway confused I it was the man but perhaps more important to macy's bigger legacy is that he oversaw all these great programs these classic Spike Monty Python's Flying Circus Freebie moved down here from BBC One the more popular channel to BBC two of the less popular or more unpopular channel so thank you BBC here knew that David attenborough was not only responsible for planet but all say Monte pipeline like that from that position presumably he was in line to take over the BBC why didn't he yeah and he was often talked about in the gossip columns of the day as being being spoken of as the next director general of the BBC The top job and it looked like that was his almost the taking but I interviewed his son Robert which was fascinating and he says that is his dad was fundamentally quite creative person and was straighted by an office job and all these meetings things and he wanted to go out and have great adventures again and so essentially David decided he wasn't going to go anywhere near the director general job and he wanted to go back to traveling the world making programs and he became a freelance in the mid seventies and he decided that the ultimate subject for a blockbuster documentary was natural history that's was Radi really what he had a grand passion to go and do and say by now in his sort of early fifties still very energetic still kind of young in his career he put his heart and soul into bringing natural history to the small screen the a big hit for David attenborough after he decided not to go down the management path but instead to become connoisseur natural history on television was life life on earth there are some four million different kinds of animals and plants in the four million different solutions until the problems have staying alive this is the story of how a few of them came to be as they are is not the first example of the number we knew unloved today exactly yes nine hundred seventy nine is real turning point in in the history of the BBC really because that's when life on earth was broadcast it was atoms passionate Russian it was his baby he traveled the world three times he spent three years making it he wrote every word in it beautifully written piece of television but it also brings things to the screen for the first time amazing sequences like when he goes into the mountains of Rwanda and meets the mountain gorillas there is more off meaning to understanding and exchanging loans it's an online online at this hearing sense of smell we see the world a David's always had I think and being loved left by audiences for his kind of eased with animals the respect with which he treats them but also he kind of communicates with them quite a natural way and with the Gorillas Ella's in Africa he seemed to wonder into a place where they were busy eating leaves and he kind of laid down in the bushes with them reclined next two of them and began this wonderful piece to camera very natural and sort of whispered he was sort of interacting with them and communicating with them look looker gorilla in the I I'm thinking Oh my God how do I escape say family wow and then we saw so much more of that over over the years and so much more of the sensitivity in his scripting and in the way that his programs talk about the natural earth I mean from all your research from meeting so so many producers and the man himself what do you think he's like to work with this was a slightly boring part of researching at some because everyone everyone came up with the same things off the record I talked to important people unimportant people I talk to people who worked with him in the seventies people with him in the last few years an an everyone had similar stories and the secret sites atom is that there is no secret there is no toxic maybe this wasn't surprised anyone who sort of knows telia a little bit but you kind of team player I think in the TV well data is and he sort of on location he carries the gear and he mocks in and he's always he's cheerful and he's sort of really lucky and every turns up usually a film crews been staking out some may fly in Polish river for two weeks and not seen anything as soon as he turns out the animals seems to appear now it's so nice when you hear someone famous is actually just really nice yeah yes quite unusual isn't it you can't fake modesty can you I think genuinely he doesn't seem self as this kind of big global figures global celebrity e e- mentioned him being out and about on sat or wherever they are in the world not on sat and we've seen that for many years sense but I'm assuming David attenborough himself isn't waiting for three weeks for the perfect that Eh shot I mean we know how much is actually out there yeah that's interesting and it has changed over time so life on earth that was his baby he was kind of their for most all of it and traveled around the world three times until all these pieces to camera and that continued through the eighties and nineties but he is ninety three now he's less fit Anthony Watson with seven worlds planet the BBC series in Antarctica is a time of Pentti when most humpbacks are able to put on the reserves they need for the whole year they actually only flew him out to places he did a piece to camera at the Star on location in Iceland and he did a a big piece to camera at the end in Africa so they use him a bit more sparingly most the time he is providing the voice over the narration and of course all this footage is gathered that over four years by a crew of one thousand five hundred people say at some for himself is very embarrassed when people say what what was it like to see the wildebeest I charging he signed a wasn't there one thousand five hundred people. BBC's pretty rich as Adema has been one of the most famous and influential individuals individuals in British Society for decades but for a long time he was criticized for failing to do enough through his programs to highlight the impact of humans women on the environment tell me about that while this kind of critique of atom bre has grown a little bit over the years and I think one of the first people to mention it was the nature writer Richard may be and he felt that the natural history unit's portrayal of the natural world was missing one important element that the human element and the destruction -struction caused by humanity untypically atom blockbuster series will end with an entreaty to look after animals Kathleen and perhaps sometimes times a program that focuses on environmental destruction but it's not throughout the whole program and and you get the sense of a world where human beings aren't even on the planet planet a planet without us and increasingly people like George Mambi made the argument very powerfully in the pages of the Guardian actually that he felt that they had done a disservice service to environmental education in the country and it was kind of dishonest Mambi I felt that brokered of change things if it spoken out was a deliberate strategy by atom do think it was something that was instilled in atom Bro via the BBC and this as a young man and this imperative that you all political and your balanced and you're not I'm making kind of random polemical statements and and so there's that lifelong training in attenborough I think he felt he also is a scientist in by training he felt he had to try and be objective active wherever that is and and not kind of critique human beings and the impact on the planet and within the Natural History unit the BBC felt that as soon as you become environmental in the EU stop mentioning devastation human destruction and so forth but that you'll viewing viewing figures plummet and I think there is a financial calculation there that they can't attract funding from around the world to pay these programs unless they get big viewing figures his and they can't get big viewing figures unless they don't talk about the environment I'm not critique was decades old in a way through the sixty the seventies and eighties while attention was starting to turn towards the impact people having on the environment and towards global warming do we know what atom Knbr views were at the time at knbr campaigns privately for wildlife massively in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s he eighteen hours and hours of his time with wildlife charities and so on but climate change global warming emerged in the late eighties and to stay silent on it all through the ninety s and he he denies ever being a skeptic but he felt that as a sort of serious scientific each person he couldn't stop pretending he was an expert in a subject abduct he wasn't and he didn't speak out for ages until the change for him and he hates this change very precisely to go into a lecture in November two thousand as an four when he went to an electro by American scientists called Ralph's Aronie we began to see data coming in that suggested trusted that the climate change was going to occur every more rapidly you convinced him beyond any doubt that human made climate change was happening and increasing and Wizar- growing threats and from then on he decided to speak out and he spoke out fairly swiftly after that with some special BBC documentary commenced programs about climate change climate change the truth the facts and say for facing a manmade disaster on a global scale in the twenty years since I started talking about the impact of climate change on our world conditions have changed changed far faster than I imagined for the last fifteen years really now he's been quite outspoken in public but also his programs he's big documentaries have started to tackle this much more explicitly and the real turning point I think was quite recently with Blue Planet to for years we thought that the oceans were so vast and the inhabitants so infinite numerous but nothing we could do could have an effect effect upon them but now we know that were wrong and it's episode on plastics aches and the fact that it brought to mind plastic pollution in such a powerful way that was taken up by everyone the country in tears yeah but it's it's really interesting when you talk to Attleboro because even today he still feels that he hasn't really changed its the public who've changed and he says he was banging on about conservation and on saving wildlife and caring for wildlife back in nineteen seventy nine with life on earth which he did too right at the end of that series and people in those days were dismissed as cranks thanks environmentalists were were cranks and he thinks the world has changed in the audience has changed but I think he has changed to and certainly the natural history unit's big documentaries humint trees have have changed and given the power of atom that we've discussed which is phenomenal is what he is doing enough I think there's two ways of looking at it isn't I think you could almost unquestionably say that atom is doing more than any other single individual to change attitudes of humans towards other species and climate change on the planet I mean what more could you say if he's doing more than anyone else and then of course on the other side the things you've got people saying well he could do more I guess he could have gone out with extinction belly and got himself arrested that would be an incredible story of going around the globe and yet he isn't willing he simply temperamentally isn't that kind of person so one of those young Mike's he was sitting around the table in the nineteen eighty s the one who went on to be successful clearly did persuade the irreplaceable David Attenborough to delay his retirement so far by thirty years and counting he's made his most incredible pieces in his seventies and eighties as you've been talking about another massive hit show on Sunday in his nineties but he is human he can't go on forever does the BBC have a a plan for hill could one day replace attenborough I think genuinely I think they've stopped looking and I think in future oversee the looking for a greater diversity of presenters and many people replace attenborough but I think they are simply hugely appreciative that they've got what this person with such global reach I mean make no mistake is incredibly influential present on the BBC a delighted he's there he's kind of thing but it will say that they've got this talented broadcaster this brilliant communicates with these storytelling skills that have been honed over more than seventy five years and he's he's there and he's keeps want to keep on making programs and he sort of says oh I should be stepping aside and getting the easy ones take my place and things but it's clearly doesn't want to and he's clearly go on for his APPs ills long as he can and his planet earth three planned for three years time at number will be ninety six hopefully really he can keep his health and keep making these amazing programs long may He won't Elena if they want more diversity I'm really good at when new met head did he have any regrets yeah I I asked him about regrets and he only had a regret really really that he said he would have liked to spend more time with his two children when they were young when they were grinding up and I think he feels a bit guilty about being away on all these fantastic antastic foreign trips while they were young but despite to Robert his son and he felt that his dad was tortured about this for no reason and actually he still came I'm home with exotic pets from his trips overseas and they will always happy to see him I don't think he does career regrets I think he recognizes how lucky been blessed he's been he's leading incredibly full life but I think it's

David attenborough BBC producer British Society Adema three years seventy five years eighteen hours seventeen days fifteen years three decades thirty years twenty years three weeks four years six years two weeks one year
How Old is Winnie-the-Pooh?

Every Little Thing

25:01 min | 3 months ago

How Old is Winnie-the-Pooh?

"Hey everybody the yield help line has been ringing off the hook. If you've called. Thank you and i just want to Let you know that the yale team team has been working tirelessly to track down as many answers as we can today. A question from anne hello priva- family recurring argument conspiracy theories type of thing. How old is when he too. I know identifying the age of a fictional bear might not seem urgent but when we started to look into this. there was a lot to unpack. Why don't you start thinking about. It gets pretty complicated yet. Does he saw christopher robin's age. He certainly hangs out with a young crowd. Good morning christopher robin good morning. He sometimes struggles with early. Elementary school skills. Unbelievable forgotten how to code room. I mean on the other hand is the older because many mannerisms point to him being a grandpa living in his house eating the honey doing structures and premier tons of my stomach societies up but also dot weird if chris robin. This little boy has an imaginary friend that a bear that the age for grandma which is it. Is he a cub with an old soul and love calisthenics. Or is he an older man bear. Who's young at heart and bad accounting out. Okay any thanks for coming in. Thanks for having kind of an unusual question. Yeah i'd say so. Tell me the story of how. How got going the first time we asked. I'd say it was at uncle walis. Christmas caroline party about I guess five christmases ago who started it. I can't say i'm going to attribute it to chris. One of the cousins earn he said how old is the and i felt like i could take this question and run with it and so i kinda did which is why we're still talking about it. So that's where where. Where do you land on this old man. Also just like a little bit strange all right. Are you ready to no no. I mean yeah. No i absolutely. Are you sure. I absolutely want to know anne. There's an answer to this question. And we are about to go on an expedition up and down the eastern seaboard to get it buckle up all right who's age birthday come on and that's all you gotta do as food guests sir. I can't guess you get any first. Stop is the carnival. The south florida fair. You and afford. Yeah kinda we talked to somebody in florida. Because at the south florida fair there was a person with exactly the expertise that we needed. Not how old the kids make you feel as a professional age. Geezer ben ramey the owner of the full together here at the fair. We're guessing age weight and birthday month. Thirty forty fifty. Sixty am i get close. Seventy people pay five dollars to play and if he doesn't guess your age correctly within two years or your weight within three pounds. You get a price you one. You don't get your five dollars back. He makes money either way. That's i think most carnival games go. You think you're winning but you always lose for you always lose dot With their three pounds on wait. We're going see us. She'd been snacking today. A seat front yard and that's the best part up. When did you start doing this. When i was thirteen fourteen fifteen i worked a fully of adventure. Well outside of dc and lago maryland which is now six flags. Any ben has been guessing the age of strangers for decades. And these. these are very handy skills. If i'm on a side of dayton side. I'm looking at somebody you know. They lie about age weight. I'm they just fun just happened to be on one last night and and has said Hundred and forty five pounds. And i'm looking at a picture like no way you wait hundred and forty five pounds. I know i can tell the chili's one eighty one nine. Okay what about age. What do you look for to assess age Well everybody say wrinkles is the main thing to look for. But i don't normally look at wrinkles. I'll tell you what i normally look at. When i'm guessing some out his age is the looseness of the skin and the neck area the gel when right. That's the main thing i look at. Yeah so are you ready to get to this challenge. We wanna bring you okay. I don't know what we're doing good. Here's what happened. One of our listeners came to us with a question. it's a running argument in her family. Basically they want to know. The age of a certain public figure whose age has not been disclosed. And so we need your services. I was going to give you a description. And then we'll send you a picture He's kinda rotund fashion wise. He's extremely consistent. He always wears the same outfit hair hair. He's very hairy. Oh wow okay skin wrinkles face. Hard tim hardaway. Tell the facial hair. But let's send you the picture ready for the picture. Yes really but he give you an answer. He did so we played them some voice samples as well. Because i'm trying to remember what his voice sounds like. An i can't even stout round found speaking poundage improve my butt tight when nine. Oh scuffing fluff math. I'm listening to that voice and guessing age we're going into the seventies seventies. Yeah yup and i'm thinking honestly seventy two is what the guests down. so here's a vote for winnie the pooh being an old man known touched the ground i think to i. How satisfied are you with this answer. Yeah i mean he's a professional but he's a professional guess for humans and he's also like he's a professional for humans and not bears. Yeah oh. I am a bear experts. You're just too we need. I'm here to help. Okay stop number two on our journey to figure out winnie the pooh sage. A bear expert. My name is ray win grant. I am a wildlife ecologist at the american museum of natural history. Is it weird to work to have your your study subject. Be an animal that can kill you. you know. it doesn't seem weird to me. I before studied bears. I was studying african lions. You have a thing for this. So i yeah. It's kind of my thing. Ray works in the field. I study a small population of black bears in the western united states near the lake. Tahoe area and this is part of job as aging them. Absolutely we have two guests age. Okay so the first step to getting an accurate age on the bear is knowing what species of barrett is yellow so winnie the pooh. I'm just gonna go ahead and say it is an animated teddy bear and teddy. Bears are named after teddy roosevelt. Do you know the story. i vaguely do. Is this old story about how he was hunting in hunting and came across a little bear and everyone was like great. Shoot it and he just could not bring himself to do it because it was cute and that bear became known as teddy bear and then kids everywhere started getting their own teddy's bear so that bear that teddy roosevelt ran into and did not shoot was a black bear. The other piece of evidence. Is that pu. The character from the book was named after a real black bear Who is living at the london zoo. It is a little bit perplexing to think pu is a black bear. More color is wrong. So it's highly confusing. Black bears in north america come in a variety of shades. Usually they're black but it can be tan or they can even be like a gray color or even a stark white color who do not me. Yes species confirmed black. American news aren't black. Bears like ruthless killers doesn't really fit the bio for winnie the pooh. We can't explain the psychological profile. But i think we can say with certainty winnie. The pooh is a black bear. So how'd you age a black bear. The big thing that we as berry colleges look for is the teeth. The tooth health gives us a lot of information about the age of the bear so as a bear ages their teeth start looking like not so great. Get a plaque build up. Some bears even get to be so old that they have no teeth left in their mouth. Have you ever seen any of the pooh teeth to see him. None i have not seen any evidence that he indeed has any teeth which suggests that pu is old old bear old but other clues point in the other direction. I mean the number one thing is size right. So we know that babies and cubs and juvenile animals are smaller in size He's pretty small in fact he's tiny. He's not much bigger than piglet a baby pig so contrary to what i said about his teeth the spies of this animal would indicate that he is quite juvenile and maybe even A fairly newborn cub. This is so complex. Oh it it just gets more and more complex belly size is also an indicator. Older male bears have built up their stomachs over so much time that they almost drag on the ground. Sound like anybody you know yes our winnie the pooh friend here has the round and voluptuous belly. You know curvy yeah. He's kind of like a beach ball with little twigs attack. I would say like his old head size to body ratio can give you an age. He's got a pretty picket. This has enormous that suggests these young. Oh no then. We also look at things like behavior. He's very playful baby correct. Yeah and i mean we could go on when the has no claws baby nope how old bears sometimes have lost some of their claws over time lost him over time old. Wow quite conflicting. Anne if you were to make a gamble about whether pu was very very old or very very young you'd have a fifty fifty shot home. No she's a professional bear professional and she still fifty fifty. We're exactly where we started pretty much. Where exactly where we started. But that is not where we're ending so the question about poos age. The age is pretty clear. You're telling me there's a definitive answer. Oh yeah i'm so. I can't wait for everyone to hear this and everyone will hear this after the break. This episode of every little thing is brought to you by chase. Freedom introducing chase freedom flex the new credit card with new ways to earn cashback on everyday categories. You love always earned five percent cashback on travel purchased through chase three percent on dining including takeout and three percent at drugstores plus earned five percent cashback on bonus categories but gas stations and department stores find ways to earn cashback at chase dot com slash. Every little thing. Bonus category spending limits apply and you have to activate each quarter. Cards are issued by j. P. morgan chase bank. Na member fdic restrictions and limitations apply offer subject to change. This episode is brought to you by the twenty twenty one. Toyota venza say you're a toyota venza driver and you're passionate about technology. The venza is signed with everything. You need when you need it most surround yourself with the latest tech including available twelve point three inch touchscreen so you can easily access all of your apps maps and music speaking of music. The toyota venza also comes with an available nine speaker. Jbl audio system complete with sub woofer amplifier usb and auxiliary ports plus bluetooth connectivity with standard. All wheel drive a hybrid powertrain and available head up display you gear up in style. Introducing the toyota venza learn more at toyota dot com slash venza toyota. Let's go places. Okay any ready to pick this up again in warm water coffee anything. I'm really good. Thank you okay next. Step on our quest to find poos. True age is sarah. I am dr sarah shay. i'm a pediatrician. In halifax nova scotia and a professor at dalhousie university and she is the top expert in the winnie the pooh branch of academia i. I'm really glad to hear it being acknowledged as a branch of academia I guess i got into it as a little girl. Because i read the house corner in particular obsessively but the thing that makes her a winnie the pooh specialist is that she wrote the definitive academic study on winnie the pooh. It was literally a sunday afternoon lark which went viral. There was nothing else important going on in the world seriously. You know when when something like that is on the front page of international newspaper. You know it's a slow news time right. What's the title pathology in the hundred acre wood. A neuro developmental perspective on a mill. It's basically a psychological assessment of all the characters hundred acre. Would i want to read the whole thing. We were suggesting that the characters might have medical disorders of some type. You know we suggest and that Winnie the pooh himself might have. Adhd noted that there might be some obsessive compulsive tendencies as it has like routines he gets up every morning and does the stretches and he must have honey at certain times of day. He's pretty fixated and he thinks the account things a great deal. Yes so much. Counting yams to number two. A law accounting. A lot of counting piglet clearly has his own problems is very very anxious. So anxious did. Did you hear. This is not the place for a small and frightfully fearful animal. Does she talk at your. So your everybody knows about e or he's got a what we described as a chronic despite mia he's got low fun i wish i could have some yes. So how would you treat your. Do you think well. There's a couple of options we had thought given that he is of course a donkey. That had there been some saint. John's wart growing in the enchanted forest that that might have benefited him There are also obviously prescription medication alternatives. I'm feeling really excited. She sounds like exactly the person to talk to you about this. So i told sarah some of the evidence that we had gathered so far End of our guesses. What were you thinking. eighty eighty. He sees you say eighty he seems quite old to me. No no no. He his catchphrases. Oh bother yes. That's not like a teen catchphrase. Yup but what you're doing. And i understand it and please don't take this criticism but your imposing your very human perspective onto a bear. But here's the thing we don't have to oppose these hypotheticals because the answer has been right under our noses all along. It's in the book. Any first of all. I love any family that argues about how old winnie the pooh is so. You are blessed but the ages pretty clear. Are you ready. Because it's coming on so ready. So at the end of the house at pooh corner in the final chapter which is by the way one of the most moving works of literature. I have ever read. There is a discussion between christopher. Robin and pu in which they're talking about the future and christopher robin asks you a question. Do you have the book by the way. I don't have it here. No this is in my head. You seem to have it memorized. Yes you have no idea how often i have read that book but back to the important very important question of how old is so. Christopher robin is talking about when christopher robin will be one hundred and pooh asks christopher robin how old will i be then. The answer is ninety nine so we know he's a year younger right. Yes so hold that. Hold that fact. Hold that one. I'm gonna try okay. So do we know how old christopher robin is. Not exactly which is where i'm saying within twelve months but here's what we do know. Christopher robin is about to move to a new phase of his life where he will no longer do nothing. Okay okay what does that mean. That means he's going to school. So then we simply have to do the calculation of how old would christopher robin be if he's about to go to school it's going to be somewhere around five so pooped do do you want. Do you want me to tell you. Where do you want to work that out. Just give me a second okay. Case s it. He's four I believe it. I guess she is the professional. She did. Write the paper. She knows it by heart. It's in the book. I was really surprised to. Could there be another answer. well At the end of the house at pooh corner in in that exquisite final chapter we learn that Somewhere in the enchanted forest of little boy in a bear live forever. he is simultaneously. Four and eternal got goosebumps. Oh you know. I want you to immediately. Go get a copy of the book and read the last chapter With a box of kleenex nearby she went to hear a little bit of the story. Yeah i'd love to okay. Let me see okay. So christopher robin pu talking and christopher robin is trying to broach the delicate subject of him going to school and he's trying to explain to. The name might not be around as much anymore still with his eyes on the world. Christopher robin put out a hand and felt for puz pau poo said christopher robin earnestly. If i'm not quite he stopped and tried again. Who whatever happens you will understand. Won't you understand what oh nothing. He laughed and jumped to his feet. Come on where said pu anywhere said christopher robin so they went off together but wherever they go and whatever happens to them on the way in that enchanted place on the top of the forest a little boy and his bare will always be playing. Nice this episode of every little thing was produced by phoebe flanagan flora lichtman catherine wells. Aaron race devon taylor and ian chill log with help from nicole p- asuka and doug baron scored by dara hirsch mixed lie. David herman and dr hirsch goodbye. Hey i'm catlin also debut jernigan and i'm speedy mormon together. We're the hosts of spotify's new morning show get up every day. We're bringing you the biggest news stories and pop culture headlines oh and the conversations you need to be in on okay. Don't worry if you're not a morning person we're doing the work for you so just searched the get up. Hit play and listen up for everything you need to know with a playlist made just for you. Listen now for free only on spotify. A mysterious and deadly virus appeasing cuba out of nowhere. In founding monia some state this virus was planted poisoning pig. That's unconscionable and the cia. Did it or was stunned. These agencies control did the cia. Do it release a virus into cuba. Listening to science best is to find out that science the s france spotify or revie. Get you pods.

winnie christopher robin venza anne hello priva chris robin toyota uncle walis caroline party Geezer ben ramey south florida teddy roosevelt pu tim hardaway poos lago
Tuesday 12 May

Monocle 24: Midori House

21:56 min | 1 year ago

Tuesday 12 May

"I don't we'll be in the United States. As the corona virus. Death toll in that country passes eighty thousand. We'll look at whether President Donald Trump's handling of the crisis could affect his chances of reelection in November will also look at the role of Dr Anthony Faucher who testified in front of the Senate today staying with the current virus pandemic will head next Germany and discuss the role that scientists. They are playing in handling the disease clue. It's all about the infection rate and finally the standard measurements for social. Distancing may be six feet in the US and two meters in much of Europe but in other parts of the world. They're using innovative ways for people to remember how to keep apart. Stick around for the end of the show to learn more about that. Monaco's editors tackle those topics today on the late edition here on monocle. Twenty four hello and welcome to the late edition coming to you from London with me Daniel Beach. We have plenty to get through in the next twenty minutes or so and to help us dissect. What's been jam-packed news day I'm joined from elsewhere in the capital by the Portuguese? Speaking and English speaking of course powerhouse duo of Monaco's car and Fernando. Augusto Push Echo walking both to the show and thanks for doing this Carlotta. How are you faring? Across town I know you've been out for a run in recent days. If you picked up any other obscure hobbies are you making bread. Are you learning another language? How you making do. I know you're working a lot. But what else he up to. I think the very first few weeks of quarantine that's when my culinary skills were put to the test. I wanted to make everything from scratch. Bread Pizza Pastor but now of course. We can't do that every single day. So yeah as you mentioned. I've picked up going for run which is very out of character for me. I do not enjoy it one bit but I'm committed to it. I'm doing their famous couch to five K. So building up over the course of nine weeks and the fact that we're now on the seventh week of lock down here in the UK means. I'm on track to hit my goal by the end of this lockdown. Very good to hear stick with it is my best advice and happy to hear. You're working in the kitchen there. I have only managed to make my pastor sauce which is pretty pathetic but haven't moved onto the bread just yet Fernando. I know you have been out running as well. You've also been providing some great cultural tips as well possibly Monaco's biggest music fan in fact we played a clip of you talking about this year's one off Eurovision format on yesterday's late edition. Is there a particular song? I'm wondering you are turning to during this pandemic. Well I have to say. Revision is helping me a lot. I have to say you know it is your vision week so I have one song in particular which is by Ukrainian Drag Queen. Verka with dancing Losch Tim. By which was the runner up in two thousand and seven I love. The song is a bit mad chaotic. Happy caller foods. Everything that I need right now to be fair. I've been listening to distract quite a few times today because when I like a song I played on repeat thousands of times. So that's my tip for today. Thousands of times just listened to the same song allowed at effect. Well we'll have much more in the way of cultural tips from you in the days ahead and some reviews as well but let us now. Turn our attention to our first topic of the day. And we're going to head to North America in the United States despite many states starting to reopen from Alaska and Georgia Texas and Montana. The death toll continues to rise. It now stands at over eighty thousand to his detractors. President Donald Trump has continued to turn the crisis into a political fight instead of looking to unify the country. The big question now. Will it make any difference to his chances of reelection when the US heads to the polls in November not that we know how people will vote just yet but let us listen in on us? Politics Professor Scott Lucas speaking earlier in the day on monocle. Twenty four this electoral effect. We don't know we don't know at the end of the day whether the trump administration's approach because they cannot deny the deaths they cannot at this point deny that the deaths are continuing at about fifteen hundred to two thousand per day. What they'll try to do instead is blame. Everyone else blame the Chinese blame. Fake News blamed the Democrats. They'll try the same tactics they have over the past few years to get trump into office to keep him there. The difference is this corona virus doesn't know political divides doesn't know Democrat versus Republican and with an economy where unemployment is going to be officially higher than twenty percent soon and unofficially far higher than that. It made me that Donald Trump if the election is held will not you the second term that is regular monocle twenty four commentator Scott Lucas there speaking earlier on the globalist? Let's start with you. You have spent a good amount of time in the US. Running our Los Angeles Bureau end in fact would be there this moment if not for our current state of affairs. I wanted to get your thoughts on this just yesterday. Trump was bickering with reporters calling one question. Nasty not out of character for him and saying the US was doing great. Do you think the president's self-praise and refusal to state the facts will hinder him in November. Or do you think people have made up their minds. A long time ago. I think as usual people are getting used to the fact that not everything that Donald Trump says is one hundred percent accurate. I mean even that press conference that you just mentioned there. He was speaking at a podium. That had a big sign right behind him. That said America leads the world intesting when in fact the United States currently ranks at number thirty two in couvert nine hundred tests per capita just wants the head of Belarus so even just looking at the press conference of yesterday. I don't think trump is changing tone and sticking entirely too facts but looking ahead to the election. I mean it is still quite uncertain the impact this will have a donald trump has said several times that. Malin voting is ripe for fraud and cheaters will take advantage of it but at the same time you know Wisconsin which has a special congressional election this week. Donald trump has been using twitter to tell people to request an absentee ballot. So that they can vote in that way so I think even he has a clue of how this will unfold. Now there are few things are interesting over the past couple of days the latest poll by CNN for example puts fifty four percent of Americans that continue to say that the US government is doing a poor job at preventing the spread of Covert Nineteen. But at the same time the same metrics. Same poll finds that Donald Trump's overall approval rating is about a forty five percent which matches one of his highest points in pulling back to the beginning of his term. So the truth is the upcoming election will be one where I think. More than ever facts will be pitted against you know science and against conspiracy theories we already had a glimpse of that of course in his first election and this idea that experts on matter and that everyone is out to get him and people that send behind him but now more than ever when you have a virus that is decimating the world and people are trusting on experts and on science and on verifiable facts to prevent that and at the same time you have a rise not only in a conspiracy theories and far right extremism and president that refuses to believe in everything that science tells him even the simple fact of him wearing a mask which has become obvious. Donald Trump doesn't do that because either he thinks it makes him look weak or simply. He thinks it's stupid and he doesn't believe in the science behind that which in either case both are dangerous things and when it comes to November whether it is an election or not whether that is happening by mail or in any other way these are all things that will be considered and I think trump still has a strong supporter base that regardless of his stance on corona virus. And how he's handled the pandemic want shake but there's the question to senior citizens demographic mostly affected by this disease that is most at risk and perhaps seeing president not taking the lead as it as he should might start to change some people's minds. WanNa ask you about trump versus the experts in a moment but Fernando first up. Let's bring you in here and I wonder if we could speak about your native Brazil because that's another country with an unconventional leader who has been skeptical of the pandemic. The numbers have spiked there recently. With almost one hundred seventy thousand cases now are some of President John. Ball scenarios fans getting tired of his rhetoric. Do you think or is it. Just cemented polarization. Well some of them are getting tired but funnily enough in the latest polling effing third of Brazilians are still very much supportive. Adjustable Sinatra's very hard. You know to to make them stop doing that. And well tonight is very similar to trump going for the chaotic approach and again another similarity the. Us is the role of governors Because they've been against the president even people that were previous Bowl Sonata supporters. They said you know what we can't do that. And I'll give you an example of this chaotic strategy. That happened today. Actually two things were happening at the same time. Both on Auto Did a decree today saying that James Hairdressers beauty salons are essential and they should be open and at the same time. Our health minister was giving an interview and a reporter was asking. What do you think that rule and he was like? Oh is that the case. So he didn't even consult with his own Health Minister. That just shows the approach. He's taking it and I'm still very much surprised that still thirty three percent of Brazilians Supporting Colorado. Just before we move on. I wanted to briefly touch on the rule of Dr Anthony Fouled Shea who is director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Part of Donald Trump's of task force. Of course he has been giving testimony in front of a Senate committee today. He's been vilified by the far-right and now has his own security detail amazingly. Just how tough do you think his job is these days given? He sometimes says things the president really does not like I think anyone that comes with Donald Trump's firing line and in saying things that the president does not agree. Wed hasn't been a very tough job and is impressive to see someone like Dr Anthony. Fauci sticking to the facts and what is indeed better and best for the country you know he he was talking about how the US skips over the checkpoints and guidelines in this open America again. The the documentary directed to states on the fourteen phases. That states should consider implementing as they allow some sort of businesses and schools etcetera to reopen. He was saying how dangerous it is a free skip over those checkpoints that US might have you know. Risk the danger of having multiple outbreaks He began has all argument today remotely to say by just by saying that the strategic plan that the United States has can be summarized four points the first one being just to improve deep fundamental knowledge that the health institutions have of the virus. And how the disease that? The virus causes impacts humans. The second point being how to treat that therapeutics behind the diagnosis as well and lastly as well Just how effective and developing effective vaccines and this is a point that he has mentioned in the past but it is quite important that people do not move too quickly through the covert nineteen vaccine development process was speaking about that earlier today in his statement about there is also the possibility of negative consequences with certain vaccines that can actually enhance the negative effect of the infection. If we decide to rush through this process instead of developing it quickly of course state governors and the federal government are of course eager to get this vaccine out there in the market so that once people have taken a vaccine they can go back to some sort of normality without risking second infection but these are important details anymore. An important process that needs to be carefully considered now of course. Fauci is emerging as you mentioned for the far-right as a hated figure. But at the same time he's been hailed almost as a hero for people on the other side of the argument. Someone that finally is talking about things in a clear concise way and sticking to science and facts. And I guess over the past couple of weeks and doing the this pan-demic and how it's unfolding in the United States. He has been the closest Americans have had to a stable sensible. A voice that is not afraid to say some tell some of the heart truth while also maintaining some sort of I wouldn't say positively but at least clear guidance. Which is all we could be asking for this point clarity. What a novel idea in deed. Well let us stick with Corona virus but moved to Germany now which is widely viewed as one of the better countries to have handled the pandemic and keep the death rate relatively low as it begins to open up there have been some reports of the corona virus reproduction rate the so called our rate going up. Here's what develops UK correspondent. Stephanie Bulletin told the briefing about how Germany scientists are managing corona virus. The whole that Cork Institute which is Independent Scientific Institute that has been a steering the crisis from the scientific community. They have announced today. Actually that they will now introduce a more precise or more varied are or reproduction number and they are saying. You should be careful in not overestimate the are so everybody especially here in the UK. Now is so focused on fixed on the are measured. But it's important to say that the are that is presented on a daily basis is actually too old so the are currently presented in Germany could be around ten days old. So what they're doing now in Germany's looking also at the number of new infections or people that have to go into hospital with a new infection and then try to find out middle value. That's developed correspondent Stephanie Bolts. And they're speaking earlier on the briefing Carlotta as someone currently living in London. There's been a lot of talking the UK press about this our measure is it fair for the UK government. Do you think to say that. We shouldn't focus too much daily figures because not all countries are tabulating them in the same way not only all countries are not tabulating them the same way but also within the same country you know we. Different cities have different rates of infections and the demographics of a city also can explain difference numbers and even the built environment. If you have places where people are more compact densely living in dense parts of the city. An apartment buildings you will have a higher chance of infection there. Then let's say in a smaller town or in the countryside where people have more space now. People are focusing on this our measure and the daily figures because following Prime Minister Address. Here on Sunday. Boris Johnson. Explaining what that meant it was the first time we had some sort of clarity as well going back to what we were speaking just a moment earlier about how the UK actually measuring the numbers of infections that will eventually decide whether or not to ease lockdown restrictions. Now of course not. All countries are tabulating the same way and it varies from nation to nation as I just mentioned but people are focusing on that because it gives them a bit of hope. Even if as we just heard from Stephanie Balsam the numbers we see today. We'll be out of date the moment we received them. But it's an on a personal level. Adding this people are what are people are looking at to try to understand how much longer the situation would last. Fernando make this our measure as well for someone also living here I have to say I'm addicted in all those numbers it comes to in nineteen and one thing that I keep looking for as Carlotta was mentioned his hope you know. I remember the beginning. It was so depressing. The numbers are rising everywhere in some places it still is a so for example in the case of Germany. The only thing that makes me feel a little bit more relaxed in Germans as well because it's not all about the our number The number of infections dating Germany are quite low. They're about A. I believe a thousand a day so if they are numbers for one it's not a cause for concern at the moment of course if you remains over one for prolonged period of time of course it is but it's different Compared to the UK if our is more than one in the UK is more than twenty thousand factions a day that's a completely different case and that could spread so so yes. I'm definitely keeping an eye on the numbers and looking for the good numbers. away very sad the world. We're relieving when when we hero one hundred deaths. Oh that's good that's better than yesterday. It's almost morbidity in away but that's that's the world we live in and that is almost set for today's late edition but we'll leave you with a lighter story just to finish and perhaps restore your faith in the world. That is what we do here at monocle. Twenty four now. Social distancing maybe normally encouraged using traditional measurements of feet or meters most countries. But that's not always the case. Let's hear from Monaco's Andrew Muller now explaining some of the more innovative ways people around the world are being encouraged to keep their distance. The local government of Yukon in Canada's Far North West has released a series of advertisements encouraging social distancing by suggesting that local at a distance of one. Caribou or two. Huskies apart but more territories could adopt this approach. And yes since you ask. We have been driven mad enough by lockdown to look these things up one caribou length shakes out at roughly four kidnappers in Australia. One and a half springboks in South Africa five Burmese Ferret badges in Burma. And maybe two thirds of Brown in Spain monocle Andrew Millard there. Thank you to our editing team for some excellent post production with the sound effects. There in fact let's play the sound again of the Ferret Badger. Because I do need to hear that one again Fernando first of all do you know what a Ferret Badgers sounded like? Well I have to say I didn't I mean I used to have a ferret as a kid. His name was blue but it's that was not the noise he's to make. I mean this one sounds like a dog drinking red boards. Something like that. But I'll definitely be doing. Some research about Ferret Badgers. Yeah I I loved. Andrew Muller's description there of what they're doing in Yukon. I have no idea what a caribous sounds like or the size of it I have seen many Moose though in my days growing up in the mountains in western Canada and Huskies as well. Of course all the two. Huskies that makes a lot of sense to me to stay away from from everyone else. How about you Carla? What's your social distancing game like when you're walking around outside in London or on your jobs of course I'm tend to take. I don't know maybe I keep the distance of Giraffe to the next person. Yes if there's Ralph is lying down. I think that's the safest I can go for. I did not grow up with any of the animals. We've just mentioned so. I cannot even try to visualize it but I try to keep my distance along the pavement. I'm whenever I go from Iran's I'd do not wear mask because it just gets too complicated so at that point. I just avoid people as much as possible which I'm not sure if that's something new from this lock out or just from my overall demeanor over exercising outdoors. I think I used to do this already before all of this began well to hear it and I will point out if you go by the London. Zoo in Regent's Park. You can check exactly how tall the giraffes are. There's a little measurement both feet and meters on the side of the little house where Maggie and molly. The London drafts are living fun to go. See them sometimes. Keep it apart from each other as well these days. That is it for today's Late Edition. A big thank you to Augusta Echo and Carlotta Rebelo both here in London across town for meet Daniel Beach thanks to our editors as well we Allen and Sam. Mp for more around the clock keep it tuned to monocle twenty four goodbye for now and thank you for being with us.

President Donald Trump United States Fernando UK president Germany London monocle Carlotta Rebelo Monaco Canada Daniel Beach Fauci reporter Andrew Muller Augusto Push Echo Monaco Europe Senate America
Oven-Ready Deal Gives Britain Food Poisoning

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

45:56 min | 10 months ago

Oven-Ready Deal Gives Britain Food Poisoning

"Hello, a welcome to remain will less than a week from further shops reopening the. It's locked out bit by bit and over the past few months. Britain's have been warned against things like going swimming. It didn't stop seventeenth. Century Slave Edward Colston who took a dip in the river over the weekend. inconsiderate Harrison Johnny this week. All according to Nudge Rosh three members of the Taliban. Britain not how you get. How are you alright, not bad. What did you make of the such? Being toppled by block lies might say into the Bristol Docks Weekend. Everybody seemed remarkably chilled about. It's like. What they did. a YouGov poll, said that thirty three percent of people disapprove of she being removed personally I wholly supported and I did Chia when I saw it happening online. basically my views if some people are more upset by how people protesting rather than why they're protesting than that part of the fucking problem, and it shouldn't have needed to have been a forcibly removed because it should have been done. Democratically by the local authority are very very long time ago. which been stymied by certain interest groups at that? It's like the put. People are not recognizing is that? The the where attempts to remove it through the. Quotes the proper channels, and the proper channels were blocked by people who? represent the local community. Yep an the wording what would replace it and things and apparently? Coo some kind of bureaucratic boring nightmare, but it is wrong. It should have come down years ago. What the argument that while we might have applauded going in the dog coming down that actually not the way to do because what happens. When suddenly the fall right decide. They don't like a statue that you can set a precedent. Overstay that's just to take the full segment. Liberalism doesn't mean being tolerant of intolerance. The they might we choose to offend the far right. I'm sure they. Find the millicent Fawcett Nelson Mandela. Statues offend them, but those figures of never cocktail, the rights of an entire race of people any. Bullshit far-right anger towards as statutes would be wholly without any. Justification and nothing but purchase surgery, but that said I think. That, we do need to be careful because these far-right thugs. Overtly Racist Morons, and now looking for any chance to jump on deceived injustice in order to legitimize the rain violence, but if we to talk about violence and I'm afraid we'd just go to talk about the fact that the violence was started by white people rich male white people hundreds of years ago when they captured black people enslaved them beat them raked. them violently repressed them. Alexandria is an actor. Cook a comes as a luncheon. UNSEE shortly returned to the UK Hell Alex. Our Jake, thank you. Look to coordinating fourteen days when you get off the bridge. I'm not only looking forward to it I demanded. Look it's ridiculous. Of course I'm coming from a from a country that's had fewer deaths through type endemic than the UK has still every day. And from an island, the tests zero cases have been sheltering for three months, but. The rules are the rules. I may not agree with him, but I will be coordinating was over fourteen days. We'll be talking about. You'll huge Kovic story for byline times. Let Nature The podcast. These think that certain parts of our friend day media are GONNA, blame any second wave of corona virus on the protesters over the weekend. Because they media thing you saw was, or they're not social. Distancing all, isn't this. Look every side will choose. It's culprits. No doubt the truth is that in breaking social distancing whatever setting risks spreading the virus now I might be able to find justification. Differences to fixation for protesting the you know. The the violence perpetrated on on black people as opposed to going to the beach, but The the fact of the matter is that both are risky titties. One thing that has become m very clear is not scientific disciplines involved in mapping at pandemic may be unreliable in terms of predicting exactly what will happen next month, but they're really good at sharing exactly what happened last month, so I'm sure we'll know quite conclusively if there is a second way wary to rejuvenate is and how? Her and policing of the Deva's way, fat, saying the contrast in the UK and the very harsh crackdown the United States. You spotted. I think. David on grain, had it. Something called the police firearms. Officers Association tweeting a picture of the sets of images of engine police officers. With, the woods all in a day's work at ten from a selection of fall, right demos throughout the past four or five years we get we get to the point where we've got the kind of US approach of your pick aside at anything. Else I could justify. Your side is justified. I think we already have that to a certain extent I mean. Aminu Taurean Hunt tweeted. How uphold he was that people who pull the police officer for holes in when it transpired, nobody pulled that police officer hose. What did he do? He delete historic night. He double down of course, and that's sort of United States landscape. We're in at the moment, but I do think it's different for the UK because it in the states. Polices almost an extended. Part of the our meal, says something militaristic about about the way to use his guns about the way approaches policing, which is very very different to what happens in the UK, which is largely policing by consent. Basically all agree that you know? We have to go along with the rules so when that breaks down it breaks down in a very different way I think. Also this Ross, Taylor at it's over brexit blogs. Hello Ross, hey doing. Rose as if in a trip back to a gentle time, you spoke with former Toria Mufti parasail this week, or our sister podcast, the bunker daily, and it was just lovely to hear a sensible conservative voice for once. He didn't mince words about this about the new later his own party. Do you think there's any any stirrings amongst the old Tories? Gets on the back foot. A sunny, no place for liberal tourists in the new regime on the certainly no place for. Tourism with any tolerance severe and I think Boris. Johnson has been signaling through lockdown where his priorities lie. If you look at what he's been doing, what is being allowing to happen? It is basically giving complete precedents to opening businesses and getting the economy, going and allowing. Sports that mainly elderly people, due to take place, so it is clear that he's appealing to that constituency, and of course he will try to revive the whole brexit issue as soon as he gets the chance chances well in order to fire up his face. And the plan for all primary schools that was much touted. They're all. Going to pretend class before some that's probably been called off this week, but the zoos are going to open again, so that's okay Do think this government mean bars just a lot of children somewhat. How do you think the government gets the importance of education? Not just for you know preparing kids for life, but also for the stability of of family life because it seems to be treated as An issue of US will. We've got shows up these ball. She teaches rather than we have a lot of children and families St daily with the Nova stress at the moment. No it doesn't add to. And I feel incredibly strongly about this. Anyone for his meal to it, too, will no APPS. It's because certain members of the cabinet were education, boarding schools, and so childcare wins and family was simply not so much of an issue. But it is, it is heartbreaking radio. I have one I have a daughter near six went back on Monday and a sudden yet twos, not coming back and I haven't been able to tell him yet. He's not going back because you'll be devastated or ready. When he saw sister going back, he was in tears and he saw wants to be with his class. He wants to be. Be With his friends and the government has said no six months. You cannot see your friends, and you cannot go back to school, and it makes me just incredibly is foolish. Thought that the right to an education which is enshrined rights was something the government would push ahead of commercial of businesses reopening and I was very very wrong I mean when it comes to opening London Zoo. I look up today If you buy tickets for family four together under zoo, it's one hundred and eighty pounds. That even supposing that parents have time to take their kids to the zoo when they're trying desperately to get the work, done and home school at the same time, it's just laughable. The idea that this is any kind of substitute for education. As the Children's Commissioner has pointed out, we have a situation where kids can go and hang arching Primorac in some. They can even go to the park amusement park, but can they have an education now? It's it's atrocious. I've got this image of Boris Johnson, wandering around London Zoo on his like divorce down Saturday with some kid and thinking that is the way to do it. You know this is a is his vision of family life. You get alternative, Saturday. On this week's podcast what goes around comes around and around and around and around with deadline for an extension fast-approaching Boris Johnson decided to the Owen Ready Dale that he put together was so unfair after all. What's going to happen that we'll take a look at Alex's enormous investigation for byline times on whether the government did or did not follow the sides on corona virus all out after a couple of reminders for navy. Patriot back is if you're listening to this on Thursday the eleventh of June, it's time to explore the bucket drinks cupboard because I'll zoom livestream starts tonight at eight PM. pull out whatever's left off the ten weeks of confinement absence baby sham crammed month. Maybe even some advocaat. That's GonNa Big Louis and join today's panel plus Ian Dorian Unday chef another maniacs, versus the PUNK Cup, or fash. If you haven't registered for the livestream desert, reminder in your inbox. Everyone else if you missed it well. It was great but. The next one, if you back some patriots, and of course you can choose from range of mugs, t shirts and other benefits to such patriot maniacs to get all that plus the podcast early and without any ads. It's the only oven ready deal you can trust. Like snow me so speaking of ready deals, the latest round of the brexit soaks of ended instill an acrimonious messaging again. The has accused the U.. K. Of backtracking previous commitments I'm Britain has accused the negotiators of losing their grip, odd fish slippery book Johnny Hanoch Meanwhile Forrest Johnson shows this guilt bubbled to attack the old brexit ill promise to fix it, which Lee finds out who agreed to the thing in the first place. They'll be for the Hijab Novi. We need to renegotiate this fair Dale. Really just looked like champion breakneck, doesn't it? Do you think Johnson guessing away with this brought? His own deal is about to. I don't think he is going to get away with it. remember this is. Post, the coming scandal and everything with bottled causal on trust in the government on Johnson is falling. And, then musk slipped on. I just don't think that people are going to buy the crap. They come out with now in the same way. They did previously that we've even had like smoke. Compounding it by showing a restrictions apply to appease. We haven't seen Wearing of mosques and social distancing enforced properly in common so Yeah, no I I. Don't think he's GonNa. Get Away with it and the way he didn't and the polls. Cetinje seem to be fairing that he is UK negotiates all in negotiations of what was agreed. Last Jay was just the parameters of the talks. A not daily itself is on account of is unreasonable. Excuse for no progress being made. No excuse to tool because the withdrawal agreement, which is the legal framework rather than the political declaration is pretty detailed of what is expected with regards to progress up by the state. In at least of all the the Northern Irish Parts Co. where we know very little progress has been made in terms of what should be happening, regarding customs and border checks and things like. Like that unless just remember, we were promised an orderly Brexit, we were gonna able to level up the country, and we had an oven radio, and writing in the Telegraph on the fifth of November twenty. Nineteen ahead of the election Prime Minister Johnson said we have a great new deal. Dot is ready to go now. Of course, none of us believed him, but millions did. And so frankly it's time to get into the forensic scrutiny of the detail now. What does this deal mean for insert? Region town sector. Job Bro. Such. The only reasonable excuse for no progress. Having Bait made been made by now of course, a working great big playbook pandemic that has distracted every single government in the world, especially across the e The say I mean what you know. You search in vain for kind of a fully trustworthy voice on on this. is about well. The had both sides showed fresh signs of willingness to compromise earlier this week of Party Bonnie says thou relax. Rules state aid and we have said will accept some tariffs on agricultural goods if we can diverge from environmental and labor standards. That doesn't sound like. Dale really do you think? Is there any element of Colorado? Scores is it chef. I. My hope is that we could see some kind of grand equivalents stale, so for instance may be the EU accepts. That won't necessarily be E- You. Sorry C.! J. Jurisdiction. Over us, but that we will have close alignment say for instance the EU could give us a certain degree of access along as we do not act in an anti competitive manner on the. If we do, they would, of course, revoke it so I think both sides will be exploring some form of interim arrangements that allow a degree of continuation with the status quo, and there really won't be editing. Anyone is expecting any real breakthroughs next week's proposed summit, which is at the moment is being mooted for I think around the nineteenth of June but at the October Council meeting, and that's where we think the big strides will. Will be made, and that is more the real that line on this one at the end of June an also by this something. It's worth remembering that the EU have reached agreement among the twenty seven nine new budget, which they haven't at the moment, and of course the having to put in all of the emergency fund were into that as well as it's kind of hard for the EU side at the moment to negotiate fully with us, because until up, much is agreed. They don't quite know what wriggle-room they've got within a a UK trade deal to sign up to his that that you know they don't quite know. The full scale of what the rest of the twenty seven are going to be asked to contribute to that budget. Rose you've been a unimpressed by the Frost Bonnier a double X. Dynamic, and particularly frost staff acting for us. What sort of job as he done? When also very good I think to be honest, he's being set up. Something or they full guy because I don't think. Johnson has any intention of letting frost. Come up with a deal by himself. He would rather have a deal. That has Johnson's own name on and and I think part of the. Impetus for October now, not even June is basically to rule out any possibility of an extension. which they don't want to talk about it all in. It would obviously be much more difficult than later. It gets if not impossible. And it also means that Johnson can step in, and as it were saved the day and get a deal with his name on it, as far as we can tell about the relationship between frost and Bonnier it is you know to frosty. It is chilling in you. Read the statements that each puts out there. Really as does not a lot of love lost between them. Alex Wolff tone show again in the shape. Love after this weekend. Obviously maintenance in the ULTA consider their role in feeding expectations in Brussels that web more desperate for daily use. Is it actually partly off all the bodies? We Fed expectation probably. Devolve Gang Am. I. It's a good piece. Okay I would encourage everyone to reduce. It makes a lot of excellent point. This isn't one of them. The association is basically it was remain as somehow convinced a block six times, the size of the cave was in a strong negotiating position. As if that is debatable I mean it's nonsense, they e you is in a strong position by verge of both size and the level of disruption. BREXIT will cause. It's a matter for discussion it. It's not something you have to convince others off. It's also has led to great free trade agreements with other countries that you don huff. When exactly ties some four years later to have to point out that losing a big trade relationship is not the same level of market trauma as losing tire fucking framework under which you do old trade so the misjudgement. meanshile mentions in his piece is not about the UK's position, but the UK's disposition. He saying that remain is convincingly you the UK without? act like a same country. But thinking case disposition to the changes weekly. Depending on how bad badly is a cameron or may or Johnson are doing in the polls, and how badly they need to pander to their base, and so that has ultimately been the issue that the agrees political declaration in late twenty nineteen with Boris Johnson that Boris Johnson hails as a tremendous victory at the time and Boris Johnson disavows unfair six months late. So yes, it is like trying to grip fish if the fish is an appeal, and it's in a paddling pool full of lubricant 'cause. That's what that's what it's been. Barney showed frustrated when he gave the press conference after the latest stranded You could see how flustered he was because basically he was saying. It's taken us six seven months now negotiations. To try and get you up to the level of stuff that you agreed last year. And, it's available in. English and it's very simple to read like he he. He you're right. He was at ordinary. What he's saying is the reason we haven't made. Any progress is because we've spent seven months trying to get you to stop from turning away from stuff. We've already fucking agreed. Maybe we should stop thinking of and just think Britain's trawling eight year. I think it is I think that's what it's. It's more like some kind of two year. Olds acting out tantrum night. It's not fair. How come? He got his sweetie and I did. It, so that level of Outrageous juvenile emotional reaction to. That no having an adult conversation that having a what feels much more like a parent child. Instill UK's reliant the notion that ultimately they you will act like adults. This is the worst part is is that we are relying on the idea that you will still try to do its best under the circumstances, but I have to tell you the US dealing with corona virus at the moment and the economic fallout. From that and to have this constantly rotation, it is just as likely to turn around and say right. We tried. Let's now focus on preparing for new deal in July which I think they might do. Relevant few trading emerge between this podcast. The last one is that the governor has effectively dropped its opposition to lower standards for imported food. Particularly, the infamous US chlorinated chicken is said what's going to happen is The impulse will get high chlorinated chicken for instance. We're GONNA a high tariff. On Britain's follows will be allowed to compete suits. Supposedly the markets get assault lake out. How does that fit with the promise of cheaper food? We're GONNA. Impose high tariffs on this. Chlorinated and a whole bunch if they don't actually the first place. Crisis a foam, a market regulator. This just makes me cringe the idea. The idea that you say. To basically knock down non-tariff barriers, but don't worry. We're going to put up tariff by barriers to protect you. I mean. They all add up to the same thing ultimately so what you're going to end up getting is worse quality food for a higher price. It's just a lose lose. And I think what's really interesting about it is the internal Conservative Party was over this. You've basically got lists trust on surprisingly I. Think where she soon knock. On the side of coordinated chicken and making show that that we get lot trade deal with the US. Nasty animal products can enter our market, and then you've got Boris Johnson actually saying no, and you know the report. Swear that this is really being driven by Kerry Simmons. Who is? In an animal rights advocate. Thinks. This is the thin end of the wedge towards a degradation of. The treatment of animals in the UK so. In some senses, an SME that will never be eating any of these products. Anyway, I'm so sitting back watching popcorn, and rather enjoying the fallout between the moreover this year, but what about the rest of us? Now we got to rely on sevens and our decent chase bag. I would come on so base gear trade deal with the US will come down to a fight between Kerry Simmons and dominate Cummings neither elected. But I would like to fly on the wall for that one. Loss artificial fish. Back into the bond was partly blocked from presents compromise on fisheries last week, because member states did, did they? They didn't say it was a hard line on fish, but willingness to compromise types in state aid I mean this. Is this coherent or Bari to balance alleged spinning plates from his own end. Oh, yes, on, tacitly he is I mean and they fish issue is course France which. As big fishing territories, and this is the real deal breaker fish for for. France and to be honest. We don't want to be involved in any kind of fish oil with France. That would be that would end very unhappily. Is! Sort of tactical, grinding away where I don't see much grind going on I, don't think I don't think Boris. Johnson is actually doing very much I. think he's up to his neck. In Corona virus and he's just letting frost. Get on with killing time in effect until he can step in and an unsorted, and it's just procrastination, so no I don't see any grinding to before we move on. We just opened talks with Japan apparently, which is great because the e, you didn't already have the best most comprehensive table Japan at all or anything. How important this this is going to be is going to be spelled as our. Latest. Magnificent escape from the you know. The chains trade with Japan is not by itself incredibly important. The reason the UK is so keen to do a deal is because if we did deal with Japan, we will be more likely to get accession to something called the comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for trans-pacific partnership which would mean that we might be able to. To do a deal to join this partnership trade partnership that has eleven, Pacific, nations, in which include you know Canada and Mexico places like that, so that's why the government is keen to do it. In terms of what Britain wants from it, it wants preferential treatment for our financial services. It wants also a preferential access for all textiles, so we can. Basically, export, Bush. high-level push fashion to Japan that is the aim Japan on the other hand wants us to get rid of all contracts with the you already did. The day already did so. We'll see where that goes. Now, let dopey say that. Alex has been idle whilst Mickan US during May. He put together absolutely enormous full thousand headpiece for Bilan. Times headlined the Lost March. How the UK government covert nineteen strategy fell apart, and it came out last week. We urge you to read it me. Shed it on. We will reach out on social. Media Alex looks at the Government Mantra that we have taken the right steps at the right time based on the best scientific advice and he finds that no, they didn't am Alex. this is clearly going to be the stuff republican queries in years to, but what were the key missed milestones that you identified the key turning points that led us to we all now. It's not so much missed milestones as mistiming than tyrod respond so at the UK had plan K it was a shitty plan. I have to say by the way which is why no other country had it, but we had a plan and the one thing everyone agreed on was the timing of. It was critical and we got the timing wrong, nobody a bit, but by a lot, and instead of ditching the plan or jumping forward to the bit of the planet, corresponded to the right timing way decided who were going to plow through the plan, anyway, just in a compressed time, so we did seven weeks worth of measures in ten days, giving everyone, the impression of panic, which was right the government, wearing panic in that second half of March which is not a great thing to do in a health emergency, so that was A. Of Discipline on top of everything else. It was just a disaster from start to finish I. Mean when you still in the middle of a massive event lightness. It's often hard to spot. What really matters is things fly? PASTULA's in a major events, and as you say an impression of panic while you were reexamining a list of through again. What struck you new because we've been read about this every day all day continually. How smug everyone was in all honesty. How incredible I mean going watch the A. Gun, what's the briefing of the said of much? You can find it on Youtube. The briefing of the of the third of March was basically the first briefing that Johnson participated in after the First Cobra meeting, he attended. Just do Ripping Ping smugness about how much better Britain is going to do everything compared to those Pesky, Chinese and Italians it was coming out of every poll of all three people involved and I think it costs thousands of lives in the end. Of the absolutely infuriating squash the SOMBRERO line. Now, I think that was either. The ninth of the twelve I think that was the twelfth. Of March discussion some line, but on the side they were already talking. Willie was old. They talked about was pushing the peak into some months, and then the graph for it, which was the whole base of embarrassing, appear to think of the twelve and so that was the idea that we're going to intervene so surgically. We're actually going to manage to manipulate the cover of the pandemic in push it three months into the future. I mean saying it now seems so mad. Considering, how many unknowns were involved? You know that they were going to get. It's going to get the timing so right now. They're gonNA catch these thing just right on the upswing enough to squash it and push forward not too early not too late. They were GONNA hit it. Right Dead Center. Crazy attitude at a time when a safety first. Strategy would have been much better like Greece adopted like Slovakia adopted like Finland. Norway like. In many ways Austria adopted I mean were countries that didn't have the time. I'm the were hit pretty early by this thing and didn't have the time to adopt a cautious strategy that were landed right in the middle of it. But there were countries that had time and Britain was one of the countries that had time to to choose its response, and the responsive chose was to wait until just right the right time, which seems crazy in retrospect. And you also mentioned Barschel's Madeira Communications Get Harry. Describes how? Johnston's Tennessee I think. The goal is to set the bar quite high to justify the state getting involved in people's attention lives. All I mean. We look at a an instance where kind of ideology is effectively killed people. I think we're looking at a combination of stuff. I I'm not in Boris Johnson's head. Thank God. And I didn't know what. Precisely he's so he sold. Prices might have been but one senses that there was a drag on the policy that the scientists will get together and go. Fuck this thing's going a lot faster than we thought. And then they had to manage the prime minister into agreeing the next. And the next of after that so. You know he's. He's tendency I think was to be incremental. Rather than saying right. We have to knock everything down and Whether that on its own cost lives whether the mistime coast lives who knows it was, it was a great piece on the Today Programme on Wednesday morning. That looked at. The DNA sequencing of the virus as it exists in the UK today, and they found that the idea that this thing started from a patient zero in a sense and spread out. was actually completely misconceived. What they found is that they were dozens over little outbreaks all over the country coming from all over Europe and the World Ashley, and which makes it very relevant why we didn't plausible is back then now. So. They thought they were dealing with this. One flame that will develop into fire from one spot. When in fact, what they were dealing with was was effectively. Dozens of people had gone ran the country with a toward setting the curtains on, Phya so you had you had to five that was spreading from every direction. That's why the timing of it so wrong. Alex you. You clearly have to give evidence at the trial. Just Vote that of investigative work in an you. Thank you very very much doing it. In it's somewhat disappointing the. Mo- traditional investigative journalists haven't done this work, too. But what hope is there more pixel? That's what yes. But what is the full public inquiry ahead of any second wave with It feels to me. As is so often. The case inquires they happen. No after the event and they're a bit of a whitewash, and you might end up having another inquire. The festival didn't show up and well. You know who well and good I interviewed to making us feel better, but this is so life and death. We need it now, but is there any chance of it? It's an interesting question I didn't. Didn't think there is Johnson a full inquiry while we're in the middle of it I just don't think is political appetite for it, and unfortunately the current government is firmly in charge of parliament MC identikit in it can be forced. However, having said that I think what will happen. Is that at some point? One or more of the scientists involved in sage will break loose and start saying. You, know if it comes to second wave. I'm sorry I'm not going to do the second time. They're not listening to us again and it might be someone quite senior. I occasionally get the sense that Chris Witty is a lot less invested. Than the more Bolshie. Violence so we will see, but I think the way this thing is going to break down. His is through a prominent resignation. Alex how much Impacted the shadow of Brexit half. If you like in the sense that Winona part of the, we don't nays with this as much as we did and. Johnson is trying to psychologically distance ourselves from it. And of course there were early. Early signs from Italy of how bad things could get, but he continued to create the impression that we could take a different path which would be our out, and it will be fine. Maybe because we're an island or something sane like that, do you? Do you think that Brexit? It had an impact on the response. I think I think it had an impact. I didn't think it was that impact. I didn't think it was a I. Mean obviously had practical. Implications we, we saw it. You know with regard to joined procurement of PB and all that sorta stuff obviously. The the gut instinct to say no. No, WE'RE GONNA! Do this on our own stems from the same sort of spring. The brexit flays, but I think what it did. have an impact on was how much the UK's I was affordable and I think that had a huge effect. If you think about it on the twenty sixth of January when the UK go to I. It's first case of coronavirus in the UK. What were we arguing about? We were arguing about whether big bench should bong or no. For Brexit You know an invite zapped was occupying the entire bandwidth of by government media and people watching on and that I think is is a really important thing. Because actually had the twenty six been much slowing us day, we might have been getting a lot more reports about what's happening in Jain in. People might have been more alleged. Brew! We move on. Let's re-empower the listeners with our segment to the barricades every week. One of our regulars identifies 'cause the remain excess. Lose to box on this week. It's is turn rose. What barricades will we be rushing through this week? One of the exciting things about this pandemic to me at least has been the way algae people have suffered not just from corona virus, but from the effects of lockdown and Those of course been in the community when many of the shielding, but also in care homes, and I was really pleased to see this week the scouts or action, encouraging their members to get in touch with Ashley People in Care Homes Care homes and see what they can do because there are many reports of elderly people, just losing the will to live literally because they don't have visits because. Because they're isolated particularly those with dementia, but not only those with dementia, and that is a terrible terrible biproduct office. Knock down and I think it will only become a more more apparent as time goes on in terms of what we can do to get to the barricades. I, haven't done this for one. And I realized at the beginning of this pandemic period. I made a point of calling. People I knew, and just check in with them and finding out what they were up to her. Then life has just got so incredibly busy and frenetic, and I have always out. To offer because sometimes. Mentally Myself on. I need to do that again. Cooling back and I need to say how you getting on. How is it because this is actually? They need that more now so I'm urging you with Neetu colon elderly person that you know. Whether relative or not, and have a chat with him. Dale would mean worse. Food shortages than the food supply chain face with covid nineteen, according to Andrew Opie of the British Retail Consortium partly yesterday. Chris Passer production for Britain during the west of covid. He says full details that flow into the clergy would stop, so he could actually be in a worse position that we were in the middle of West. Pandemic Ross. You think people making the connection between know Dale and. Food insecure. Take the you know. We got through Kovic. We you know we stripped the shells at toilet paper of Pasta. We don't need to worry now because we've done it now. They're not and the interesting thing in many ways about this. Is that the problems? We had with supply and beginning of this pandemic. Due to almost exclusively to panic buying people heard a rumor that there wasn't enough toilet paper, so they immediately rushed out and had to buy toilet paper on the same thing happened with flour with sugar with all the things that they felt they ought to stock up on. And it's going to be different in the event. No deal because it's actually going to be goods. That can't get to this country. Being slowed down a being stopped, and we're GONNA have to change what we eat and how we eat it in order to deal with that. In a way that we have already I mean people set complained about not having flower most the time a lot. People don't use flyer anyway. The shortages were not true. They were at the effect of panic buying. and. Border Making a pizza. It wasn't an emergency. Exactly you could always get pizza I mean you could always have It wasn't an issue very different situation after deal, and we are going to have to get used for example with fish. Let's return fish because you know I would love talking about fish. When we get the situation with no deal where we can't export the fish, we want anymore and the fish. We want to import his to expensive for us to buy. We're GONNA. Have to change the kinds of fish. We each and we're GONNA have to. Eat. Fish that currently. We don't much like eating, because culturally we we don't. Like, herring and so on very few people. She robots anymore consistently. CATS, but It's GONNA have to change and people have not got to grips with how the supply chains are going to change going to change how their diet is going to change as a result. So you said that to demonstrate our dependence from Europe as an independent Costa Latian we're GONNA have to start eating the kind of food that they eat in Europe like roll my pairings. In another related story Apparently we've used up all brexit stop. Follow drugs as well which big farm put together last autumn it out to in anticipation of what we thought we were GONNA have no deal last time according to a memo to government from several industry bodies including the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry. That will be less zero products available in the market to allow for stockpiling the broad range of products. What they? They may have causes fewer Rosaiah big format needs to listen to big grandma again. Nobody is anybody listening to this what he called the drugs that you need. is any this going to get through? No I I think part of the problem is that we've seen the cavalier attitude towards death. This government has so. It's not obvious to me that they'll be too bothered if all of a sudden medical isotopes cheating cancer. Blood Heen. Products Have even been used to treat current ours suddenly get stuck at the border and their shelf. Life expires but they might change the mind if it's about gout remedies. I guess finally. It's been quite nice to see Yorkshire Tea. PG TIPS tilling fall right bogus dot to by the teeth this week at t pigs as well What do we prefer, pinal solid Dorothy or MT? You. saw the yet. If you drink ANTIFA. Donald Trump will prescribe you. With acid suffered nice hot cup of racist Tia's. Brexit Bridge at the end of the show where we build our way back to Europe all of a sudden, there's a lot more scrap metal lath at all to do. With Alex Dre was Yeltsin's brexit bridge. What's your? What are you gonNA put into it and I think. We need some certainty about the status of a you people in the again. You Gay People in the twenty seven. Saudi to bang that drum again, but there's an enormous amount of gray area that came into very sharp relief for me last month and Dino from a couple of British friends. We live in Greece. Also they had executive groped him in that. When overflight stoked and it, it came down to maybe looking at possible repatriation slides returned out that the possible was all matted, so even though I live in the UK, I couldn't. Couldn't get repatriation flight to the Home Office back to the UK and British friends of mine who live in Greece. One of whom doesn't even have anywhere to stay in the UK was literally there just for two days to pick up. Some papers were told they couldn't come back on a Greek repatriation flight, because they were in a British pounds boat in that just brought into really really present tens the hypotheticals about what happens. With this huge legal gray area for people and body, so that's going into the bridge bits of clarity. Yeah excellent at that is show for the week. Thank you to panel Alex Knowing Ross now. It's time for our theme. June Damon is a monster by corner shop on effects to all our latest Patriot bacchus. For me to Jenny. Johnson Matthey Drake Amanda Holloway Pooling Walsh Kevin and A. Happy? Alava Rope Davis Rafe Gwendolyn birds. Windmill spin me right round Michael Hayward in Stephen mccray. Hello, this is arlene foster here. Just pop went on to say we thank you night to Alison Broin Jonathan Henry about thoroughly lake use the force leg Adam core on Richard how? Vitally a massive shell for me to have a Jones James astonish Louis Ferreira Alice. How knock-on scale I'm Bob Wilson and on remaining was produced and presented by Harrison with Russ Tayla Miami Smith I'm Alexandra. Production, scripting was by me recent. The assistant producer was Jacob bold maniacs. Muscles production.

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