18 Burst results for "London Philharmonic Orchestra"

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Of us as being louder in that year. So mono sound shoves all of those sound waves through one channel. Everything is coming out equally through each loud speaker. Stereo sound, however, changes this up varying the amplitude or volume of sound in each channel and creating a different effect. While ADDers demonstration indicated that there was something interesting with producing sound using different channels directed at different loudspeakers. That was just the tip of the iceberg. Alan Dour Bluhm line would advance the art considerably. In the 19 thirties Bluhm line was born in 1903. He became an electronic engineer, and he worked for the famous Abbey Road Studios, where he pioneered advancements in stereophonic recording. According to an anecdote told by Alan Bloodline son Simon Bloodline was at the movies with his wife watching a film and he remarked that were a blind person to go to the movies. They might struggle to follow what was going on because the sound was all coming from loudspeakers in mono. There was no way to detect through hearing where people were within a scene, and that got him into thinking about developing a system that would allow sound engineers to record and reproduce sound. So that had More localized effect. Action happening on the left side of the screen would be represented by sounds emanating from loudspeakers on the left side of the theater. Likewise, action on the right side would be paired with an appropriate amount of sound coming from the right. Each speaker might produce some of the sound but a different amplitude so that while you might get a little bit of the right hand sound from left hand speakers, the levels would be lower and the overall feeling would be there. You're in the middle of that sound, and it would enhance the experience of seeing a movie as well as help out those who are visually impaired. Follow what was going on, he would receive more than 70 patents for his various inventions related to stereo sound. He created technology to record process and reproduce audio in stereo. In 1934, he oversaw a stereo recording of the London Philharmonic Orchestra at the Abbey Road Studios. Bloodline also pioneered the Bluhm line method, which would use two microphones mounted at a 90 degree angle with regard to one another to pick up directional sounds in a recording environment. Bloodline also figured out how to create a stereo groove and a record album back in those days. These were made from shellac, but they would later be made from vinyl. And when I think about that I'm astonished. I mean, the way a record player works is that a stylist or needle fits into the groove of a record. That groove causes the stylist to vibrate and those vibrations transmit to a transducer, which turns the vibrations into an electrical signal. And that signal then goes to an amplifier, which boosts the signal strength, which then goes on to loudspeakers. And powers them so that they can reproduce the original recorded sound that create the groove in the first place. It's the edges of these grooves that caused the vibration or the wiggle of the Silas. So how does one record stereo sound to a physical disc with a groove? Well, imagine a groove that slaloms back and forth in a nice, even path. So the waves along either side, the groove are a physical representation of the original sound waves that were recorded. Usually in a mono record. You would just see that these waves are evenly distributed on the left and right side. It's like they're in sync with one another. It's just a nice, smooth curve. But what if you wanted to record stereo? Well, you could have it where the left side of groove on the right side. The groove actually different. The wall on one side would represent the audio recorded in one channel and the wall on the other side. The groove was for the second channel. So with the proper equipment, you could play this record back and the stylist would vibrate in a very specific way. It would be detected by two sensors connected to the stylist. And these two channels of sound could again go to specific loudspeakers, a left and a right and then you get stereo playback. It's pretty incredible. Listening back to properly recorded and processed audio would give the listener the sensation that they were actually in an acoustic space would feel as though you were standing at the spot where the microphone had been mounted, and that the sound you encounter is just as if you were present at the recording session. When we come back, we'll learn a bit more about stereo recording and editing and will also learn why the Beatles who also made famous recordings at Abbey Road Studios. Concentrated on creating mano records for a long time, even though stereo had been around for decades, But first, let's take a quick break..

Alan Bloodline 1903 1934 Simon Bloodline London Philharmonic Orchestra 90 degree Abbey Road Studios second channel two channels two sensors more than 70 patents one channel Bloodline each channel Each speaker Alan Dour one side each loud speaker two microphones first
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on podnews

podnews

03:10 min | 9 months ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on podnews

"Jilani has powerful friends presidents bill clinton and donald trump. I just wish her well. Frankly hunting jilin global original podcast global the media. Entertainment group prevented a podcast commissioning. Partnership with denso's story lab they're ray content investor producer and distributor operated by advertising agency. The first podcast to be produced his hunting jalen her story about jilin maxwell it'll be presented by jones. We need in his first project since leaving the bbc. Paul bane have announced podcast wellness week a week. Daily panels and speakers about mental health meditation and a positive mindset from november thirtieth events. Free to watch live pod. Smooch is a new service allowing podcast is to have one place for that. Episode's merchandise and sponsor links megaphone now appears to support vast her method of allowing multiple third party companies to serve ads on podcasts nineteen and their support in september. A write up of the recent podcast day online highlighted. Some yougov studies into podcasting. Saying the bbc sounds the most popular podcast app in the uk. That app only includes podcasts. And a handful of third party the winners of the portuguese podcast awards were announced. We've the full list to which we've added. Podcast hosts as well. Congratulations if you're one of those winners pods claims to recommend podcasts. Specifically for you and allows you to keep your existing podcast player. Alana source now has been announced as the new head of marketing audience development for podcast one. And how discoverable is your podcast. Headliner has released the podcast. Discover ability greater a free tool to help. It gives us a score of ninety percent marking us down for not being with a cool kids on instagram. And podcast news. The piper is a new drama from something else for the bbc. A modern take on the pied piper fairy tale stars thames in auschwitz and a soundtrack by bat for lashes. Natasha khan the corona virus. Radio ideas awards took place yesterday. Two podcast awards in there the best podcast creativity and entertainment when to bbc. Radio four's comedy podcast. Now wash your hands while the best podcast long form. Storytelling went to the spanish language. Post scandal lose from podium. Podcasts produced by longtime pod news reader. Francesco is a sweetser. All of the witnesses links from our show notes now newsletter. Today race at work is new from the harvard. Business review you can hear leaders from business and governments trace their personal journeys with rice equity and inclusion and learn from their mistakes and their triumphs and the london philharmonic orchestra has launched lp offstage exploring the lights of castro musicians. Covers everything from how to keep your instruments in working order to life on the road as a classical musician.

bbc london philharmonic orchestra Natasha khan harvard head of marketing Francesco uk auschwitz castro
Global to commission original podcasts

podnews

03:10 min | 9 months ago

Global to commission original podcasts

"Jilani has powerful friends presidents bill clinton and donald trump. I just wish her well. Frankly hunting jilin global original podcast global the media. Entertainment group prevented a podcast commissioning. Partnership with denso's story lab they're ray content investor producer and distributor operated by advertising agency. The first podcast to be produced his hunting jalen her story about jilin maxwell it'll be presented by jones. We need in his first project since leaving the bbc. Paul bane have announced podcast wellness week a week. Daily panels and speakers about mental health meditation and a positive mindset from november thirtieth events. Free to watch live pod. Smooch is a new service allowing podcast is to have one place for that. Episode's merchandise and sponsor links megaphone now appears to support vast her method of allowing multiple third party companies to serve ads on podcasts nineteen and their support in september. A write up of the recent podcast day online highlighted. Some yougov studies into podcasting. Saying the bbc sounds the most popular podcast app in the uk. That app only includes podcasts. And a handful of third party the winners of the portuguese podcast awards were announced. We've the full list to which we've added. Podcast hosts as well. Congratulations if you're one of those winners pods claims to recommend podcasts. Specifically for you and allows you to keep your existing podcast player. Alana source now has been announced as the new head of marketing audience development for podcast one. And how discoverable is your podcast. Headliner has released the podcast. Discover ability greater a free tool to help. It gives us a score of ninety percent marking us down for not being with a cool kids on instagram. And podcast news. The piper is a new drama from something else for the bbc. A modern take on the pied piper fairy tale stars thames in auschwitz and a soundtrack by bat for lashes. Natasha khan the corona virus. Radio ideas awards took place yesterday. Two podcast awards in there the best podcast creativity and entertainment when to bbc. Radio four's comedy podcast. Now wash your hands while the best podcast long form. Storytelling went to the spanish language. Post scandal lose from podium. Podcasts produced by longtime pod news reader. Francesco is a sweetser. All of the witnesses links from our show notes now newsletter. Today race at work is new from the harvard. Business review you can hear leaders from business and governments trace their personal journeys with rice equity and inclusion and learn from their mistakes and their triumphs and the london philharmonic orchestra has launched lp offstage exploring the lights of castro musicians. Covers everything from how to keep your instruments in working order to life on the road as a classical musician.

Jilani Entertainment Group Jilin Maxwell Paul Bane BBC Jilin Denso Jalen Donald Trump Alana Source Bill Clinton Natasha Khan Jones Instagram UK Francesco Harvard London Philharmonic Orchestra Castro
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Backlisted

"In a way that can be no absolute equality. Between any two people it's always this little struggle for Mostra of some sort. The woman is women is fool of different types of marriage isn't it? The mickle thwaite saw this sort of ideal couple but I said traditional marriage it goes back to. The form that works where demand has got both finally brought in the money and keeps the woman and her sisters and Disccan work and loads of other marriages which are disastrous their absurdity disastrous some of them I mean I love the one who? Has To leave his family in tune because his his wife conned understand his jokes and he's going mad with trying to explain himself. You're off the air and he finally just can't do it any longer, and there's the other one goes into the lunatic asylum because he got you into woman go on about the servants. It. It's full of these but I think there's something deeper and actually Who had whatever it is? There is this little undercurrent difficulty in all human relations. A. Want to feel old. That that was sad. Would Elgar? Himself conducting the London Philharmonic Orchestra in Nineteen thirty three, his for strings that was first performed publicly in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three. and has probably just been on the problems in fact. So Simon could you just tell us a bit about? Guessing 's career as a novelist. It's intense for twenty to twenty five year period. Isn't it? Indeed? Yes. As he said, he's tremendously. Prolific novelist he writes very quickly I've Seen One kissing manuscript way clearly, there's not much time for going back and revising he he puts the stuff out because he's suit of money. And needs the. A need such income as noble writing get so for the eighteen eighties is one of the great writers of of the Working Class. So demos the world of fall into that. into. That period where he writes with I think both honest sympathy and honest revulsion. About. The cloth. Guessing as being a writer of the of the lower middle class on the great break at the end of that period is the. Is the death of his first wife, the the working class woman the. The the former prostitute who whom he marries up I. There's an extraordinary passage diary where he writes about the experience of going to see her her dead body in in her lodgings. Often, which he he goes abroad. Travels comes back and becomes the great brighter of the of the middle class particularly the middle class where he he writes novels like in the Year of Jubilee, the old women and also novel, which to me is his masterpiece..

Simon Working Class London Philharmonic Orchestra Guessing Disccan Elgar writer
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"So somber way. Today is the 15th anniversary of my father's passing. Not gonna get all emotional about it. But I want to say, Keep that music Roland Candle. I want to say, Frank. Thank you from Facebook. By the way, I remember your dad, says Frank. He and my dad played on the Campbell soup softball team together for a number of years. Good memories he up? Yeah, Frank. You're right. That is so cool that you remember that. Yeah, Pops loving your pops. We were talking about the crest Theater a minute ago and such great memories. I've seen wonderful shows. They're sure many of you as well have seen great shows of the crest and looks like some people would like to share. Some of their thoughts about the Chris and I'm all about that here on a Friday night. Thank you for tuning in and being willing to share some of your crest thoughts and memories of this great theater. Little open again. Soon enough, we hope Mark's driving tonight. Joining our show mark IPad. How are you? Good. Thank you. So the loudest show I've ever seen, and I am a musician, so I've been to some loud ones with seven dust at the crest. We are too loud for the crest, if you know what I mean. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, they rock they wrong? I havejust told memory too, but not from the crest. To Ah Jethro Tull concert in 72. I think it was And it came out and they played the victors. The brick album. And the London Philharmonic Orchestra played up popped up behind him, and.

crest Theater Frank London Philharmonic Orchestra Roland Candle Jethro Tull Facebook Mark The brick Campbell Chris
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"This episode of classical classroom is sponsored by maestro classics. They're the creators of stories in music, which is recorded series that they made for kids and families. It's one more than fifty awards not to mention. General Adoration from the people who listened to it. If features the London Philharmonic Orchestra, and it takes those musical stories, and and it brings them to. Life is one of those things where kids learn while having fun without actually knowing that they're learning. There's an activity book that goes along with it. It's a whole thing. Maestra classics just announced a brand new recording in this series called Bach in the organ. It's all about Jesse Bach. You may have heard of on this very show, and it tells the story of his life while talking about the pipe organ, which ps back in the day was the most advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed. And you can learn more about this album. The rest of the series Maestro, classics Dot Com and. For it, you could also save seventeen percent off of your order by using coupon code classroom. Now, back, to, my conversation with Orleans. And I think we were talking about what piano students learn after the beginners stuff when you reach that echelon, where do you? Where do you go from there? There are so many different schools of thought in music like everything else. musicians disagree. You know like everyone else. Musicians disagree on just about everything including pedagogy. And there are different schools about how do you? Just, you just sit down and. Pet GEOS and due to spend most of your time doing exercises I've always been of the belief that that stuff is incredibly boring, and that is not a good way to turn people on. It's wonderful at some point and there as a teacher, you kind of have to know when that moment is. When Okay my student now can handle handle some of that slightly more tedious stuff in order to get these fingers in a better shape. but yeah, it's not necessarily the best thing to start out with those you know I think. For some it is, it's really depends on the personality, but there are so many short pieces by like some of the Chopin preludes that he intended as teaching pieces, or later on some of those etudes that he for the more advanced students very much intended those etudes to teach students how to properly use their hand and had to really. Extract from the piano. Kinds of colors and sororities that he could tell were there and that most people weren't getting. What's what's your? As as a person who is an official pro? What's your favorite stuff to play? What what do you enjoy playing? At the moment I, I always say what I enjoy playing. What I'm working on and I've been very lucky with that in my life. Is that the repertoire so huge that and I've been so fortunate to be able to choose a lot of the time. What I play at the moment? I'm obsessed with two slightly different things in certain ways. They're quite connected. One is the Piano Sonatas of Mozart. Yeah. You've been doing so much work with Mozart stuff for a while since I I. Have Yeah I've I've just finished recording last summer I finished recording about two thirds of the Sonatas, and I'm planning to record the the other third in the next few months. And you know those pieces. He wrote them, so the pianist. Not at that time was not really a public peace. You wouldn't go out and perform it for your audience. You would perhaps performance in a small intimate salon kind of thing in somebody's home. They were mostly used as teaching pieces, so he was using them to teach students to develop their technique, and also to teach his students about composition, so because of that combination that he was both using them as teaching pieces and as compositional teaching. Teaching pieces, and because you know in my in my humble opinion, Mozart was the first artist you know not to have been diagnosed with Adhd, but he should have been. would get kind of bored easily with what he was doing. And so the wonderful results for us is that the eighteen sonatas he wrote are completely different, and they try out completely different ideas and techniques and forms and way of putting things together, and they're filled with so many melodic ideas. I used to have a professor at Columbia when I was doing historical musicology there. Would say about material that he would throw in everything but the kitchen sink. Melodic point of view, and it's totally true in every Sonata like the guy is so many ideas. He just can't stop himself..

Mozart Chopin London Philharmonic Orchestra Jesse Bach Adhd Maestra Orleans professor Columbia official
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Were his heroes we were his heroes because we were following through on what his father would want to but did Nathan senior ever divulge any information to Nathan junior that is a good question Nathan junior said that he didn't now I don't know it but what what what we have stories that he told other people about that his father was directly involved it but it did and that we could never get nascent to tell us what his father might have told him but the whose credit Nathan did give us a number of witness leads that turned into information so you know we we were laid to get what we got but the Duncan correct me here I don't believe he ever told us that his father gave him the information about Roswell no that is correct and that the very thing his father a true officer to the very end in in in many ways protecting the family and we're late junior was a practice Tom describes any with a concert pianist he played with the London Philharmonic orchestra on a number of occasions and so you solve that his son we called blood had you know other talents and and and certainly had a great reason to be protected from such things there is the crash of a flying saucer New Mexico in nineteen forty seven all right let's grab a quick call here will go to what Wayne in Tacoma Washington Wayne welcome to coast to coast AM hello thank you thank you very much to have wait while I went the end of the call with the with the famous aroma from America will like that candidate anyway the question is there's two different descriptions of the material what I hear and one is you know you cannot bend over the sludge hammer yeah I don't know we're talking about different material or not within the craft and then the other one is it's memory metal you could fold up in your hand you know and the center of the from like a pack of cigarettes oil and that would pop right back out the way it looked to be our yes there were several different types of the material that was recovered most of it I think the the most numerous part pieces were of the so called memory metal that you just described it's been watered up in your hand it felt like you didn't have anything in your hand then you would open your hand and we unfurl itself and it was like thin like a pack of who's you know this is the tinfoil you get in a well I don't smoke but I I I I'm told that there's a there's little tin foil in cigarettes packs something like that but the thing was you couldn't cut it you couldn't burn it you couldn't scratch it you couldn't permanently the format now anyway which is go back to its original shape without a without a crease there there were stick thesis that there were not the memory metal but is it you know like I guess it was the outer shell of the the craft with the same properties other than you couldn't watered up and folded it pulled up in your hand but there was stiff but took the fifteen pound sledge hammer to it they couldn't then it would just the the sledge hammer which is bounce off and they put an acetylene torch to it you couldn't Bernard who would even stay cool I wouldn't convert you wouldn't conduct heat and there were other things that the the Marcel's called members they were look little light beams and they had these embossed the symbols on them right this is and they were purple in color as I recall but they were symbols of the you know because nobody knew what that was a language or what what was that and stuff like that the other interesting thing was there was a fellow by the name of William Ennis who worked in the hangar where all this material was brought in to that the base and he came to dawn on me one time when we were down to Roswell giving a talk during festival he said you know I was in the hangar he was a military guy and there are I can tell you there wasn't a moving part owner and all the wreckage there wasn't a moving part and I want you guys meeting guarded me if you ever find out what made that thing fly let me know and unfortunately he passed away I guess a year or two after that so what made us I guess the store is still a mystery but that my own feeling is it has something to do with the memory metal and I'm not quite sure what it is and it certainly it wasn't a it wasn't a craft that depended upon lifts like are you are you know regular aircraft depends upon lift and either propellers are jet engines or stuff like that so I don't know if thought is Donna has anything.

Nathan
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"What his father might have told him but the two is credit Nathan did give us a number of witness leads that turned into information so you know we we were glad to get what we got but that don can correct me here I don't believe he ever told us that his father gave him the information about Roswell no that is correct and that the very thing his father a true officer to the very end in in in many ways protecting the family and work late junior was a practice Tom describes and he was a concert pianist he played with the London Philharmonic orchestra on a number of occasions and so you solve that his son we called blood had you know other talents and and and certainly had a great reason to be protected from us such things there is the crash of a flying saucer New Mexico in nineteen forty seven all right let's grab a quick call here will go to what Wayne in Tacoma Washington Wayne welcome to coast to coast AM I don't want him thank you thank you very much to have Wayne all I went the announcement from the call of the city with the famous aroma from all America I feel like that candidates anyway the question is that there's two different descriptions of the material what I hear and one is you know you cannot bend over the sledgehammer yeah we're talking about different material or not within the craft and then the other one is it's memory metal you could fold up on your hand you know and this sends a from from like a pack of cigarettes oil and then it will pop right back out the way it looked to begin with yes there were several different types of material that was every covered most of it I think that the most numerous par pieces were of the so called memory metal that you just described if they're watered up in your hand it felt like you didn't have anything in your hand that you would open your hand and we unfurl itself and it was like thin like a pack of who's the you know the the tinfoil you get into well I don't smoke but I I I I'm told that their day there's little tin foil in cigarettes packs something like that but the thing was you couldn't cut it you couldn't burn it you couldn't scratch it you couldn't permanently the foreman anyway which is go back to its original shape without a without a crease there there were shift basis that there were not the memory metal but is it you know like I guess it was the outer shell of the the craft with the same properties other than you couldn't watered up and folded it pulled up in your hand but that was stiff but took the fifteen pound sledge hammer to it they couldn't then it would just the the sledge hammer which is bounce off and they put acetylene torch to it you couldn't Bernard it would even stay cool I wouldn't convert you wouldn't conduct heat and there were others that things that they the Marcel's called members they were look a little light beams that and they had these embossed the symbols on them right this is and they were purple in color as I recall but they were symbols of the you know because nobody knew what that was a language or what what was that and stuff like that the other interesting thing was there was a fellow by the name of William Ennis who worked in the hangar where all this material was brought into that the base and he came to dawn on me one time when we were down to Roswell giving a talk during festival he.

Nathan
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"This episode of classical classroom is sponsored by maestro classics. They're the creators of stories in music. Which is this recorded series that they made for kids and families? It's one more than fifty awards not to mention general adoration from the people who listen to it it features the London Philharmonic Orchestra and it takes those musical stories like brings them to life is one of those things where kids learn while having fun without actually knowing that they're learning there's an activity book that goes along with it. It's a whole thing. Meister classics just announced a brand new recording in this series called Bach. In the organ. It's all about Jesse Bach. You may have heard of on this very show and it tells the story of his life. While talking about the pipe organ which. Ps back in the day was the most advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed. And you can learn more about this album and the rest of the series and Maestro Classics Dot Com. And we're it. You can also save seventeen percent off of your order by using coupon code classroom. Hey musician types. Are you still flipping sheet music pages while I respect your retro hipster lifestyle choice? I've got something that might just change your mind. It's called Encoder in K. O. D. and it's a subscription service Allah spotify net flicks for digital sheet music. And just like those services it gives you access more content than you could possibly shake a stick at. I don't know why you would want to shake a stick at it but you couldn't because there are literally thousands of easy to find pieces of music in their library you can check that out at encoded dot com by the way with these digital scores. You can Markham up just like your beloved paper but you can also do cool digital things like create your own sheet music playlists and share stuff online. Are you intrigued will download the encoder today from your APP store for a free trial? That's encoder in K. D. In Kota. We should talk about lots of other. My Gosh based off that we can talk about you can gets done a fair amount because as I mentioned it's not impossible to put on The roles are complicated. But vocally you know even some younger singers able to sing these roles. And if you have a decent chorus and a good orchestra you can probably play the music in it. Some of the other big Russian operatives that got and then model of French grand opera bigger and bigger and more glorious more challenging probably the biggest Russian offer. The does get done quite a bit as far as good enough okay. We're good enough which I think is. I don't know why but I feel like it's a funny thing to just call a story or an opera. Boris good enough. It just sounds like you're saying like Robert Johnson Mike the Opera like you know So so okay. What's the story behind? Boris good enough. The plot of this Pushkin play it becomes an opera by modest Mussorgsky Russian composers. The plot is Basically ripped off. Shakespeare can adjust read. The complete works of Shakespeare in French translation. Got Excited by that road. This chapter from Russian history kind of like a chronicle history like a Shakespeare Henry. The whatever part seventeen and it's a little bit Richard. The third meets Macbeth. We've got this tyrant despot thrown. Who's that sir? Who's murdered children on his way to the peak of ultimate power and then we watched him slowly get eaten alive by guilt over the course of either four or five acts depending on how you do. The opera is opera. A little bit scalable. The last time we did it in Seattle we did. It's the slightly smaller version which is only like two two and a half hours as opposed to the one that goes on for four hours or so So the central character essential that operas either this base role were good enough. It's our who has done bad things but we don't actually see him doing any bad. You just watch him disintegrate. It's amazing amazing role or people usually say actually the principal character. Boris is the chorus and they represent the people of Russia. Because they're in lots and lots and lots of different scenes all over the place. They're beggars there boy. Ours in the Kremlin. They're starving people in the forest there. People in the streets of Moscow and things on the most amazing music is interesting that you said that it was it was scalable does sort of their sort of like modules or something that you can serve way was created was kind of strange for small. Pushkin wrote this play produced first of all it was censored immediately own. That's right well. He was supposed to what I read was that he was supposed to basically like before. Publishing anything It to the czar like the actual czar and then the czar would say okay you. Can you can publish this or not. And this was after his period of exile. This was basically like the deal that he had to make with the government to be allowed to roam freely and and so anyway. But he didn't do that with Boris. From what I understand. He didn't an I think he's just like publish it or something like that. I may have my facts wrong there. He published reports of theater piece and it was never actually performed during this. Time is my understanding. Yes so I mean it's one thing to write a piece but it's another thing to actually get a theater and in this case it was it. Would've it's kind of unperformed able like way too many characters and know how to do all this costume changes. He didn't have all of the practicality of writing for the theater yet but he wrote this When the play was eighteen twenty five so right around the time of the nudes are coming back and welcoming him. Back from exile in the opera was first written in eighteen sixteen nine most Missouri Ski. Who was sort of a semi-professional composer in the rejected? It absolutely under for Mobile. Forget it we can't do this. It was a theater that was mostly used to producing Italian operas and Missouri's. He was one of these people who are like we're Russians. We don't care about. They were presented Labor going to do my own way and somebody's suggested him basically okay. The reason they rejected your operators. There's no female voices in it so Ed's chicks he wrote it and he wrote a whole lot more scenes for Sopranos Knows an which you get a lot in Russian opera control toes ladies with really deep voice and resubmitted and then they sort of tried it? And it didn't work very well. Eventually Missouri excuse friend rimsky-korsakov Reort Castrated the whole thing and made a version that then caught on and then was performed all of the world and only in the last couple of decades gone back and said okay. Thank you renske for salvaging. This we don't need anymore. We're we're capable of listening to the real thing but you can do either the the first version which raw and doesn't have a whole lot of ladies in it or you can do live version with more sort of femininity and before you can do the whole the whole the full meal deal. Which has this long sequence where a minor character goes to Poland? And his big ballet. It's fantastic music. Love scene in Poland doesn't have too much to do with the rest of the plot. It's like a real team effort like look to actually get this thing made eventually Sir. Typically team efforts. Yeah but I mean like like to have actually gotten it To to a point where it could be performed where anyone would want to perform in you. Know like And interesting that that he had to add chicks to it. Best Music and Boris Funny. It's a funny situation. Boris I would say is probably one of the best offers ever about politics about the real real rural exercise political power which is your tends to be. In an sixteenth century. Russia was mostly a guy kind of thing so Amazon was really interested in that and that dynamic and roads fantastic scenes like the female character that he adds Princess Marina of Poland. Turns about to be this completely demented power-hungry Lady Macbeth Type Lady. That's why he can get her in there so she sings a love scene. But it's one of those things. Where are you guys actually in love or you just manipulating each other? Because you're going to be the key to getting your bigger goal of Algebraic to yourself. How a couple in the worst way? I vaguely remember seeing a movie made of this. Ah Boris I think I think it was. Boris I remember it being really creepy. I don't remember a whole lot about it but but Yeah I mean if you I don't know Macbeth is sort of your happy place. And the music and spectacular. Macbeth gets done all the time. Because you know it really really works on stage and we know it's it's disturbing so this is Is Worse Missouri. Isky whose name I can never say. what Let's we should hear some of the music from that one. You've got an eclipse well. Yeah let's listen. We listen to a little bit of a chorus music from Boris Godunov. Because as I mentioned of course is one of the one of the principal characters and then also We should probably listen to a little bit of Boris himself. Unplayable chloride clip of the tenor. Who's the guy who's gone to Poland? Seduced the Polish princess. She gives him an army. Basically that you can come back. In and clear out. The rest of Boris's administration the chorus at this point and the opera following him. He's supposed to actually write on stage on horseback very few productions. Actually Jesus because there's a lot more going on and some of us don't have room for stable backstage the you guys do. I've seen this table. We didn't actually have a horse when we you know we didn't. We didn't even do the scene the last time we did. Boris and Seattle this. We were doing different version and didn't didn't meet but it's great music as he leads his charge. Okay the whole population marching on Boris's capital.

Boris Lady Macbeth Boris Godunov Poland Boris Funny London Philharmonic Orchestra Missouri Pushkin Seattle principal Jesse Bach Shakespeare Moscow Markham Russia K. O. D. Robert Johnson
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"This episode of classical. Classroom is sponsored by Maestro classics. They're the creators of stories in music. Which is this recorded series that they made for kids and families? It's one more than fifty awards not to mention general adoration from the people who listen to it it features the London Philharmonic Orchestra and it takes those musical stories at like brings them to. Life is one of those things where kids learn while having fun without actually knowing that they're learning there is an activity book that along with it. It's a whole thing meister classics. Justin announced a brand new recording in this series called. Bach in the Oregon. It's all about Jesse Bach. You may have heard of on this very show and it tells the story of his life. While talking about the pipe organ which. Ps back in the day was the most advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed. And you can learn more about this album and the rest of the series and Maestro Classics Dot Com and wait for it. You can also save seventeen percent off your order by using coupon code classroom. Yeah Hey as you and I were talking about earlier. The other thing about Pushkin is that he was like this revolutionary because like Russia they had a great writer. They haven't really had a somebody who had been a voice in Russian about Russia away the really cemented the language and made it a literary language is. Is it funny because in English? We take this for granted because we've got Shakespeare who hundreds of years earlier made English into this extremely powerful organ expressing everything imaginable. But there's a lot of languages where you you know you just language is just a useful thing to get around your daily life. You don't have to exert it to consider the complexities of all these characters and these dramas or the philosophical ruminations e sometimes get two in poetry but great writers take a language and figure out how to how to how to make it that flexible like elevated in To to be a a tool of art in a way yeah again as I understand it again really speaking Russian. That's sort of you know. Learned enough so I can figure out what our character on. Yeganeh saying various points in there but his his Russian is actually pretty simple. Everybody in in once you understand. Russian you can understand Pushkin and it's the deployment of it. That's where the geniuses that he's using really really ornate loftier language. It's just go right to the to the point more clearly and more succinctly and I think that's what I loved about him so much was that it was like language that you could make cozy up to. There is nothing sort of alienating about it at all. It's really simple language. But there's something about and it's not pompous high-flown or ornate. You know in that period a lot of poetry. Let's face it likes to kind of likes the zone voice. Person Never does that. He has a very strong voice. It's very clear but it's doesn't have much of an ego right. Yeah it's just sort of their in service of the story in a way but that does something really lovely to it where it's just like you as the reader very easily fall into detailed as being told we should get to some of the details that are being but I you told me about the opera and how they were going to perform Eugene Oregon. I got really excited. Because of course my love of Pushkin but then you told me that Pushkin apparently not only inspired the opera Eugene Nagin but like a booth Gillian other operas like basically everything he wrote. Somebody tried to turn into an opera. Right he kind of the. I thought I had a pretty comprehensive list of all of the operas based on Michigan and then the new things keep coming out with more work that I didn't know about which is kind of crazy dozens of operas based on Pushkin. He wrote a lot but he died at thirty eight. So there's not that much. Unlike his his books all fit in a like the collected. Works of Pushkin. It's not hugely long but every single every single thing has been turned into an offer at some point and then it wasn't just opera. It was painting and film and Other artists ever since and I would say probably you may know more about this than me but in the Russian literature that all of the Great Russian writers who came later in the nineteenth century tall story of war and peace and skis. You're off people are kind of writing in forums at Pushkin started Yeah and which is is just amazing to me. He is like he. Sort of sprung a geyser like Up through the ground come bubble in crude and it but it was all right and And shut dead in the dual thirty eight Fruits of discovery. Yeah Yeah like. He never knew he just had a had. A messy life and stuff is actually as himself not only is the dual the pivotal scene union. Where does this all this fate of? What's going to happen and sure enough? It works terribly does. Also one of the most important carries an Eugene. Yagan is the nanny. Who's this really gossipy? Old Lady. Yeah in the country estate who runs around? Yeah refers to all of the stories that she knows yes then so long. Since since I've read this it's like it's it's like it's all new to me so well let's let's back up just a little bit so so. I think we've sort of conceptualize who pushed him was and the fact that he like inspired so many other works. We should hone in on some of the operas since you know what we do on the show if our listeners you do want to go and explore to start with. I don't know we can media page but you can find out a little bit more about this because we can keep going on and on and on you know that pushing was part African. I did. Yeah I read that he He was related to an African Lord or something like friends who was captured. Enslaved sold in a market in Istanbul and taken by somebody to the great who adopted him sent him to college in Paris and then it became sort of a Russian nobleman but had been born. We think Cameroon. Although it's a little unclear exactly where the guy came from crazy pushing was really really excited about this and proud of his African heritage. Used it in this votary and started writing. A story called The more Peter the great about his great grandfather he didn't finish it. But that didn't stop somebody from trying to get into an operate in nineteen sixty one then that opera still out there all right everyone. That does it for this episode of classical classroom. Be sure to tune in for part two of this two part Pushkin podcast extravaganza in next episode. We get to the music for more classroom. Go to classical classroom. Show DOT COM here. Oliver episodes forever leave us a note. Find links to our sometimes attended to social media and even make a financial gift to the podcast. Don't forget to subscribe to rate and review US wherever you listen. Thanks to the home of classroom. King. Fm where we just moved into a new building in half to take off our shoes at the door. Because we're fancy like that. Now thanks to the birthplace of classical classroom Houston public media thanks to Jonathan Dean and Seattle Opera for their help in this episode. If you're a fan of opera I encourage you to check out the Seattle Opera podcast on Itunes or wherever you listen to. Podcasts is really great and Jonathan. Dean is hilarious. Thanks to the official hannitized or of classical classroom. Honda's handy sand. It gets rid of germs. It makes you smell like a dying bouquet of flowers for some reason. Thanks to me for saying words but most of all. Thanks you for listening. We'll catch you next time..

Pushkin Jesse Bach London Philharmonic Orchestra Maestro Classics Dot Com writer Jonathan Dean Russia Russian Seattle Justin Oregon Eugene Oregon Yagan Cameroon Yeganeh Shakespeare Eugene Istanbul US
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"This episode of classical classroom is sponsored by maestro classics. They're the creators of stories in music which this recorded series that they made for kids and families. It's one more than fifty awards not to mention general adoration from the people who listen to it if it features the London Philharmonic Orchestra and it takes those musical stories and brings them to life is one of those things where kids learn while having fun without actually knowing they're learning there is an activity book that goes along with it. It's a whole thing. Meister classics just announced a brand new recording in this series called Bach in Oregon. It's all all about jazz. Bach you may have heard of on this very show and it tells the story of his life while talking about the pipe organ which. ps back in the day was the most advanced advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed. And you can learn more about this album and the rest of the series Maestro Classic Dot Com. And we've for it you. You can also save seventeen percents off your order by using coupon code classroom a have you heard of Coda. No well settled in. I have a story to tell you. Once upon a time musicians used paper sheet music paper was the stuff made out of trees. You'd you have to go to a sheet music store by the sheet music and they only accepted coins as payment in order to prove that you are worthy of the sheet music. You'd have to perform forum for the proprietor. Who would deem your performance worthy or not in decide whether you got the sheet music but then came the future and the service called in Coda? You just download the APP. And then Kinda like spotify or net flicks you pay a monthly subscription fee and for that you could access to tens of thousands of titles titles and millions of pages of music and no more paying in coins 'em performing for the proprietor bonus up so download your free trial of in Coda that's n que. Od from your APP store today..

London Philharmonic Orchestra spotify Oregon
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Five(ish) Fangirls Podcast

"I think he later on down the road a few more of the soundtracks that he's done are going to be at a to the in short supply and shore. Well and it's I mean it's kind of it's it's kind of interesting You know with a because you know he said he he. He only did the first three Harry Potter. Yeah Ah But you go and watch those those later ones all of you know the composers who followed him up. You can hear John Williams influence. I guess I mean because it comes down the same thing through all that and even then with with man delorean where You know it's a totally different composer totally different score but yet and I'm listening to the music there and you know it. It should be a different different different composer different style music. Just because it's a different sort of story even if it is still in the Star Wars universe you can still hear or those little bits of little John Williams Q.'s. Going off in there so it's not like always not doing star wars anymore. They're still find. You know being influenced by him. Yup Yup as and that's that's the thing you know for her are have someone like him be so prolific that as the more generations of composers. Come along and start. Asserting themselves as as the next generation that he can the e you will get that influence which you know there's only the Yet whether you're talking film music or popular music or really any kind of music of course at the end of the day. Even someone like me who can't read Sheet Music Save. Your Life knows that. There's only so many many notes and so many different ways you could arrange those notes So you're GONNA get a little overlap but it's the the people that find the ways to take those combinations do something different with them whether it's tempo or pitch or whatever you know Or putting different chords together in different ways In that Yeah we still get as much as John is done. Just his body work and listen to Yo Go on Youtube just put in best of John Williams and you'll get all sorts of playlists and mashes. Are you know videos that people put together and it's all a lot of it. Just it screams on Williams. He's got this feel all to his music. Each film is distinctly different like Indiana. Jones is obviously definitely different than jaws is definitely different than home alone. They're all they're often the same guy and they still feel like Mike Kim Right and I think that's what got filmmakers now in film composers now are realizing You can you can be influenced by composers John Williams but you can find the make eight those late motifs or whatever and some of some of done that you see that in other Other film franchises. Obviously things like the Lord of the Rings Trilogy which you would think that would be John Williams score but it's not it's it's it's it's It is it is the London Philharmonic Orchestra among other things but that's Howard shore Who is Actually not a whole lot younger than John Williams a decade or so apart in age but You know he's got his his own. Feel that you can. You can hear that in like like Brittany you mentioned talking at some point the 'cause like obvious to spill Bert Williams. That's a A combination that we we've come to to Come to know right. But then you've you've got something like a Tim. Burton and Danielson is another combination that Yeah Yeah Danny off. Man has his his own distinct feel for for his for his his scores. so Obviously having late Motif isn't necessarily appropriate for every refilmed out their bought for the type of movies. At least John Williams does it's very appropriate A good a good chunk of time. having different scores for specific characters locations. So listen to everything I know about. It's going to. It's Kinda hard to talk about a music.

John Williams Bert Williams Harry Potter Indiana Mike Kim Right London Philharmonic Orchestra Jones Burton Howard Danielson
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"This episode of classical classroom sponsored by maestro classics. They're the creators of stories in music which is recorded series that they made for kids and families. It's one more than fifty awards not dimension General Adoration from the people who listen to it it features the London Philharmonic Orchestra and it takes those musical stories and brings them to life is one of those things is where kids learn while they're having fun without actually knowing that they're learning. There is an activity book that goes along with it. It's a whole thing. Meister classics just announced the brand new recording in this series called Bach in the Oregon. It's all about Jesse Baku. You may have heard of on this very show and it tells the story of his life while talking about the pipe organ which. ps back in the day was the most advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed. And you can learn more about this album and the rest of the series Maestra Classics Dot Com and wait for it. You can also save seventeen percent off of your order by using coupon code classroom. Aw Hey musician types. Are you still flipping sheet music pages while I respect your retro hipster lifestyle choice. I've got something that might just change your mind. It's called in Kota in K.. O. D. and it's a subscription service Allah spotify net flicks for digital sheet music. And just like those services it gives you access to more content than you could possibly shake a stick at. I don't know why you would want to shake a stick at it but you couldn't because there are literally literally thousands of easy to find pieces of music in their library you can check that out at encoded dot com by the way with these digital scores. You can mark them up. Ah Just like your beloved paper but you can also do cool digital things like create your own sheet music playlists and share stuff online. Are you intrigued and will download the encode APP today from your APP store for a free trial. That's Inkatha in K. D. in Koto ooh now back to my conversation with John Luther Adams about his piece become desert..

London Philharmonic Orchestra Jesse Baku John Luther Adams Oregon O. D.
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

10:41 min | 2 years ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Am like imagining this sort of like steam punk meets. Willy Wonka mad scientist man creating creating these instruments out of what he sees necessity. We very much not just for fun. He wasn't just messing. Awesome ends exactly exactly. He had a sound in his head that he was looking looking for and had to make himself. He's the original. DIY composer wow that I mean that is really diy the best kind of diy where it's like what you need to express yourself in whatever way like literally doesn't exist so you have to create it from from the ground owned up so I you know I I know that that Harry Parche dealt in a lot of what is called micro tones and that's that's kind of is that kind of what you're talking about here well that's exactly because we're used to twelve notes per octave but there's a whole bunch of notes you can hear in between those and there's small that's why they call them micro so between a C. and a C. Sharp on piano the that's it you can only go to the black known above the white no but he es four or five notes in between those would the the thing is that what makes parche sort of difficult. I guess is I'm AH. I don't want to get into the the legacy that he's he's left us. How before we get into the album because you'RE IN SEATTLE. We've got the Harry Parche Institute the University of Washington and at the Harry Potter Institute they have the Parche instrumentarium and they you know groups of people get together to play these instruments instruments and they'll they'll take these instruments to other cities sometimes but but that Kinda brings up the you know though you purchased music is is so interesting and the thinking behind his music assert interesting doesn't it isn't it problematic because in order to play this music that he's left. You have to have these certain instruments like how how does your ensemble get around that are built new ones of of course you did it. At at this point on the planet. There are the original instruments which leaving Seattle. There's my group and we have. We don't have them all yet. We have twenty twenty out of twenty four of the final versions of these instruments and you'll making them one every year. Now I personally am not making the Sawdust I I hire a luth years and professionals but I put the project together and tune them and help redesign them and that sort of thing and I gotTa tell you we're not the the only one after I got started. A German group got obsessed about this a group called Musique fabric and they with huge funding. I'm paying for all the stuff out of my own pocket right right. They got the German government money and corporate money and they built the entire set in a year. It's taken me twenty years to get up to eighteen so I'm still working on them so yeah. Absolutely you have to have the instruments period. I mean there it is. Do you think that this is a weird assigned but do you think that that Parche Amazon's like. I said he sounds like a mad scientist like he just became obsessed with this idea. Do you think he was even thinking about like okay well. How does this music persist. When I'm when I'm gone and you know like was he was he thinking about things things in a broader context or was he just a person who is sort of monomaniacal focused that is a great question. I ask myself that often. I I think the answer is he wouldn't come right out and say it but he wrote a book called Genesis of a music which literally told the story of all of his research research and the instruments how he built them how they're tuned etc etc also from the nineteen fifties onward. He made recordings reportings of his music so he said several times in public. It's not the same as being in the room but this is a document. This is how it's done now. You have to to ask yourself and I'm very fond of saying this. Yes Genesis of a music is a theory book. It's a history book but it's also a cookbook. If you pay the very close attention he's giving you the cues. Here's how you do it. Here's how you make them. So what I did of course was a go over every sentence sentence a in great detail but I had the luxury of living close to the instruments when they were in San Diego and then they they moved to the east coast for a while I I would go visit them and I would measure them photograph them record them and come back and make copies so yeah. I'm pretty sure at some level well you know why else would you all this incredible music hours and hours of music and I gotTa tell you people get obsessed with the instruments of course because they're so weird so wonderful wonderful but you know there's lots of people on this planet that have made weird and wonderful instruments but they didn't make great music for them and that's that's really the cutoff point. It's all about the music everyone I'm taking a break from my interview with John Schneider to tell you about our sponsor this episode of classical classroom sponsored by maestro classics. They're the creators of Stories Communiqu. which is this recorded series that they made for kids and families? It's one more than fifty awards not to mention general adoration from the people who listen to it features the London Philharmonic Orchestra and it takes those musical stories and brings them to life. It's one of those things where kids learn while having fun without actually knowing that they're learning and there's an activity book that goes along with it. It's a whole thing Maestra classics just announced a brand new recording in this series called Bach in Oregon. It's all about Jesse Bach. You may have heard of on this very show and it tells the story of his life while talking about the pipe organ which ps back in the day was was the most advanced mechanical instrument that had ever existed and you can learn more about this album and the rest of the series maestro classics. Dot Com and wait for it. You can also save seventeen percent off of your order by using coupon code classroom. Yay Okay now back to my conversation with John. Snyder okay at your grammy winning guitarist. You're you're. You're classically trained. You have this traditional music education occasion behind you. If one were to look into your biography they would think this is a sane man trained you know Oh in this music tradition so what drew you to this very peculiar music to this very peculiar composer to which you've dedicated a lot of your life in time and money same answer the music when I was studying I've been trained composer as well when I was studying modern music in the late sixties early nineteen seventies all the rage was European Avant Garde serial music and and then all of minimalism started that come in but all of a sudden. I heard this music by Harry Party and it was it was visceral and here's I gotTa tell you it was funny. That's what really got me you mean. You can have humor and music. If you've ever heard piece Barstools holy warriors number to gentleman go to five thirty east lemmon Avenue Monrovia California for an easy he had to five thirty east eleven avenue in Monrovia foreign easy and your ooh and all of a sudden I was hearing harmonies. I didn't know existed for thought. Okay this is this is good and I I basically used to say I fell in love with the music but it was more than love. It was actually I had to obtain. It's basically it's like when you hear Bach and go my God that that French suite is so beautiful. I wanted underneath my fingers. That's the exact feeling about parch and the only way to do it as we sure. Just gotTA. Do It yourself yeah you. You you yourself become a diy so. I yeah like the this some this album that you guys just put out. This is volume three is the final volume in a set or is is it. Is this an ongoing series or were just getting started early. So what what is sort of framing the the volumes like what was are you is all from a particular moment in perches life. He seems like he was a really prolific guy. He was indeed and in fact we've sort of recapitulated his life. I have built instruments in the same order that he did and made the music that he made those instruments. His music was handed around of you know once again he he made a living selling his own. LP's talk about independent it music right this is in the nineteen fifties and then eventually they ended up on on a label called composers recordings inc when it was still the land of LP's now all of those are held by something called New World Records and it's in four volumes of the music that he personally only recorded but we have at least five or six volumes to go at least because he wrote a couple of so. They're not really operas but they are their music dramas. There are extraordinary pieces that that are meant to be danced and that's a whole other side in fact the platter and Percussion Dances and that is a a dance drama. Nobody's ever danced it. We actually commissioned choreography for one of the pieces but the stuff is waiting to be love manifested still and it's not just the music it's not just the instruments people were supposed to move and be well. The word he came up with music should should be corporeal but should be of the body. It should be visceral. It should be emotional..

scientist Harry Parche Jesse Bach John Schneider SEATTLE Harry Parche Institute Parche Amazon Parche instrumentarium Willy Wonka London Philharmonic Orchestra New World Records Harry Party Monrovia European Avant Garde California San Diego Harry Potter Institute Maestra Snyder
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

Classical Classroom

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on Classical Classroom

"Third movement has a bit of a spanish flirts with jonathan center that movement was in fact inspired by to shut her down and west the famous run rigo joaquin we protect the distinctive lease spanish this is would i would i personally sort of associate with retired like almost like when i am going to be hearing to protect mr what is it about lesson of where that that that that draws you to it like what what can what about what would you say is unique about his work while i mean i would say that there's just there's kind of there's again this narrative threat that that polls the listener along myself included you know this this this narrative arc is kind of thing that a lot of really good composers i would say not just even in high school music genres but on other things like you know the music of sort of get some well known that i admire the music of a jazz musician patmos seaney at at pats bass you also have very strong narrative so the music is almost telling its own story as it unfold in real time you are all this kind of taken on this journey johnson's music is very much in line the government wants and now a word from our sponsor this episode of classical classroom is sponsored by maestro classics creators of stories in music it's a recordings series they made her kids and their families and it's one more than fifty awards not to mention just general adoration from the people who listen to it it features the london philharmonic orchestra and it takes these these musical stories brings into life kind of one of those things where kids learn while having fun so they don't actually noticed that they're learning to isn't activity book goes along with it it's a whole thing maestro classics just announced a brand new recording in the series called bach in oregon it's all about gs bach who you may have heard of an it tells the story of his life while talking about the pipe organ which back in the day with the most advanced mechanical instrument that existed learn more about this album and the rest of that series series maestro classics dot com end bonus save seventy percent off your order by using coupon.

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This but in italy nineteen ninety world cup fans got this that's channel singing nessun dorma with the london philharmonic orchestra and the story of why that aria has come to be the soundtrack for football italy starts as so many good ideas do with the inspiration of a producer w q x ours james bennett the second wrote about the story and he joins us now james good morning okay so why was that are even apple world cup in the first place yeah so the genesis of that idea came from a producer for the bbc named philip bernie who saw an image of italian soccer player marco tardelli celebrating a goal nineteen eighty two world cup and he just had the idea to pair this aria with that one image of that celebration it was a bit of a risk operas not really associated with the networks broadcasting but the bbc was able to use it for their opening and closing credits for coverage and it just kind of opened up that music too a huge global audience and you call it a weird piece of music to love why is it weird yes so that aria itself and the reason why it's fair centered around this one word venturo which means i will win while that sounds for roic the story behind that that area is centered on this prince named caliph who's arrogant and just a jerk all around and he approaches the princess turned out with a challenge if she's able to guess his name by dawn then she can execute him but if she can't guess it then she has to marry him and so turned out commands everyone in her realm to stay awake and find out the skies name and if they don't do it then she'll have them all executed and so in this aria of course of women is saying we're all going to die and caliph is saying islwyn venturo w ours james bennett the second you can read his essay at wnyc dot org james thanks and venturo walked shallow aretha franklin version showers and thunderstorms today mainly before o'clock italy hot highs near eighty five degrees but then.

football producer bbc philip bernie marco tardelli dawn venturo italy london james bennett apple soccer eighty five degrees
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"It's a done deal and lisa brady fox news president trump in the oval office just a short time ago i was going to wait for a formal signing sometime in early january but that i watched the news this morning at it will say will he keep this promise will he cited by christmas so he did fox's john decker live at the white house fulfilling that pledge to sign the tax cut legislation before christmas the president put his signature on the one and a half trillion dollar bill that cuts the corporate tax rate from 35 to twenty one percent and also reduces rates for individuals at every income level you'll see something on february first when they opened up the paycheck that's what where you're going to start to say it because by signing it now it kicks in for this year with the president said the democrats all of whom opposed the bill will regret their decision but he also promised to work with them on a variety of measures including infrastructure spending in 2018 lisa thanks john democrat still say this tax reform package does more for the wealthy than the middle class the president said today it'll sell itself a worldfamous conductor now caught up in the wave of sexual misconduct scandals fox's michelle pollino has this live and lisa charles de trois one of the worldleading conductors azab several gigs after four women have come forward with sexual assault allegations whoa whoa whoa multiple orchestras have cut ties with the maestro including symphonies in boston san francisco in sydney the eighty one year old conductor has backed out of orchestras new york chicago and cleveland given the allegations three opera singers i'm a classical musician told the associated press that to twat sexually assaulted them on the sidelines of rehearsals and performances and five us cities between 1985 in 2010 lisa angst michelle to these initial announcement coming from the london philharmonic orchestra fox news fair and balanced fox business network up.

christmas john decker white house president michelle pollino assault san francisco sydney chicago lisa brady fox corporate tax lisa charles cleveland london philharmonic orchestra twenty one percent eighty one year trillion dollar
"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"london philharmonic orchestra" Discussed on WDRC

"Wwco waterbury wmmw meriden the talk of connecticut it's a done deal and lisa brady fox news president trump in the oval office just a short time ago i was going to wait for a formal signing sometime in early january but that i watched the news this morning other will say well he keep his promise will he cited by christmas so he did fox's john decker live at the white house fulfilling that pledge to sign the tax cut legislation before christmas the president put his signature on the one and a half trillion dollar bill that cuts the corporate tax rate from 35 to twenty one percent and also reduces rates for individuals at every income level you'll see something on february first when they opened up the paycheck that's where you're going to start to say it because by signing it now it kicks in for this year with the president said that democrats all of whom opposed the bill will regret their decision but he also promised to work with them on a variety of measures including infrastructure spending in 2018 lisa thanks john democrats still say this tax reform package does more for the wealthy than the middle class the president said today it will sell itself a worldfamous conductor now caught up in the wave of sexual misconduct scandals is michelle pollino has this live and we said charles to twat one of a worldleading conductors is obsever gigs after four women of come forward with sexual assault allegations whoa whoa whoa multiple orchestras have cut ties with the maestro including symphonies and boston san francisco in sydney the eighty one year old conductor has backed out of orchestras in new york chicago and cleveland given the allegations three opera singers emma classical musician told the associated press that do twat sexually assaulted them on the sidelines of rehearsals and performances and five us cities between 1985 in 2010 lisa anc's michelle to these initial announcement coming from the london philharmonic orchestra fox is fair and balance.

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