35 Burst results for "London"

Craig Welcomes Danny Talwar, Head of Tax for Koinly

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

01:46 min | 10 hrs ago

Craig Welcomes Danny Talwar, Head of Tax for Koinly

"Ladies and gentlemen, I've got the pleasure of having Danny here who's the head of tax Australia full coin. Of course, we've done a lot with kindly in the past and it is the platform that I use to essentially bring everything together so that we can actually get our records and make it work. And what we want to be doing today is just discussing a few of the tax environments here in Australia. Of course, for different jurisdictions, there will be different laws and whatnot. But thanks so much, Danny, for taking some time out of your busy day to have a chat with us mate. Yeah, thanks, Greg. And it's great to chat. Yeah, look, if anyone's got any questions throughout, this is, well, we're going to be going for about 20 minutes half an hour. We'll keep it short to sync to the point because I believe you'll find a London after this, aren't you? I will be next week. No worries. So look, just to kick things off, I think one of the important things that people have been asking me, of course, this year we have seen Celsius go files for chapter 11. We've seen FTX Australia file as well for something similar and in different jurisdictions, BlockFi. We've seen the losses of Luna. There's been an awful lot of events that have had people make some fairly sizable losses. So I think maybe to kick this off, it's to maybe differentiate administration and loss and how we can work that in to tax filings HDL. Yeah, definitely. And I think it's a really important time to be discussing this as well, because it's only really after the fact that a lot of people realize, well, is there anything I could have done that could have helped me in this situation for tax purposes and often there are steps you can take along the way to make sure you keep good records and so on. So yeah, definitely a good time to talk about it.

Danny Australia Greg Luna London
The FCA Proposes 'Synthetic' Dollar LIBOR Rate

Finance Magnates

03:56 min | 3 d ago

The FCA Proposes 'Synthetic' Dollar LIBOR Rate

"4 a.m. Thursday, November 24th, 2022. The FCA proposes synthetic dollar libor rate. LTP GT the UK possible to our finance magnates dot com's financial conduct authority target quite blank what it caught foresee 8 5 8 5 41 5 zero four four four 8 two one four 8 C 5 5 F 7 one CB two 8 6 one class quarter skin dairy term quote financial conduct authority FC alt tag proposed the publication of a possibility that finance magnates dot com sliver quad target quad blank white it quote 91 70 C 5 5 at four C 9 two B 5 8 6 two 6 7 6 6 two F four F 8 8 one class quarters main term quote till I be all tag settings of the U.S. dollar until the end of September 2024. Announced on Wednesday, the UK financial watchdog is promising to allow the publication of one. Three and 6 months synthetic lebor settings for the U.S. dollar LTP GT LTP GT, the latest announcement of the FCA indicates that the proposed schedule that finance magnates dot com institution out for exquisite west and Atlantis labor bank marked target quad blanquet in all publications of L IB oral tag is at the end of September, 2024 dot LTP GT LTP GT, the FCA, which oversees lebor, scraped the usage of the. Controversial lebow REITs in 2021. Though the publication of most of the lebor REITs for foreign currencies ceased on December 31st, 2021, only some U.S. dollar settings will continue until 30 June 2023 dot LTP GT LTP GT the U.S. dollar synthetic Tahrir coifs without finance magnates dot com to deliver quite target quad blanc what will I be all tank proposal came and lying with the regulatory estimate of 70 trillion of outstanding dollar libor exposures beyond June 2023. The FCA has specified that synthetic rates are that finance magnates dot com institutional Forex cost financial firms to drop synthetic Clyburn bust alternative target quad blank for use in new contractual tag, but are quote intended for use and certain legacy contracts only dotted a temporary deregulator. Came up with the apostle data capables lebor sittings last year in November as a temporary measure. Initially allowed only for Sterling and yen, the synthetic lebor sittings are calculated using a forward looking term version of the relevant risk free rate sun you for Sterling and ton of free yin dot LTP GT LTP GT the three synthetic yen lebor settings will cease at the end of 2022, while the one and 6 month will die ref cops will doubt finance magnates dot com institutional Forex cat a permanently ceased synthetic Sterling Liberum March 2023 quote target called blank world synthetic Sterling lebor settings attack will cease in March. 2023, the three months sitting for synthetic Sterling libor will be allowed until March 2024 settings are only a bridge to appropriate alternative risk free rates, not a permanent solution. As such, market participants should continue to prioritize active transition and focus on converting their legacy contracts to risk free rates as soon as possible, quote the regulator stated dot LTP GT LTP GT the London interbank offered rate lebor was once the most important number in the financial services industry. It measures the cost of unsecured borrowing between banks. However, the reputation of lebor was tainted by the manipulation of its REITs by several banks. Many traders were charged and penalized for their role in this mass Forex market rigging dot LTP GT. This article was written by arnab as home at WWW dot finance magnates dot com.

FCA U.S. Lebow Reits UK Lebor London Arnab
US Intellectual Property Office Grants Full Patent Approval for Rewarded Video by Verasity

CryptoGlobe

00:36 sec | 3 d ago

US Intellectual Property Office Grants Full Patent Approval for Rewarded Video by Verasity

"8 a.m. Thursday, November 24th, 2022. U.S. intellectual property office grants full patent approval for rewarded video by veracity. London, United Kingdom, November 23rd, 2022, chain wire veracity, and open ledger ecosystem designed to provide rewarded video services and prevent advertising fraud, announced today that it has received full patent approval for its rewarded video system and method in the United States with international priority. The patent approval represents veracity most significant milestone in protecting and

U.S. United Kingdom London
Bill Federer Shares the Story of Squanto

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:52 min | 3 d ago

Bill Federer Shares the Story of Squanto

"One of the stories that we have to include is squanto. And if I have a few minutes, I'd be happy to share that. Continue. So the pilgrims were religious, but there were other groups that weren't and they were pirates. So Spain had a monopoly on the new world for at least a century, and they had gold from Inca Peru and portobello Panama and they take it to Cuba and ship it and these Dutch and French and English pirates would raid the gold, but they would also sail up the coast of North America. Lure unsuspecting Indians on board, lock them below deck, take them over to malaga, Spain and sell them into slavery. So one of the Indians that was captured was squanto and the story is he was purchased by some monks in Spain who gave him his freedom. He hitchhikes his way across Europe, gets to England. He's there for a dozen years working, learning the language and the family finds some business that takes him to Newfoundland, right? A fishing type outfit. And then he gets the boat to drop him off at Plymouth, Massachusetts, only to find his whole tribe is dead. They were wiped out by a plague, William Bradford writes that three years earlier, a French ship was shipwrecked off the case, the coast of Cape Cod. Sailors got ashore, Indians never left watching them and bogging them, till they got the advantage killed them all, but three or four maybe sport with them worse than slaves. Anyway, one of those French men must have had an illness and the Indians didn't have immunity and it wipes out the tribe. So sort of in a reverse sense had squanto not been captured in kidnapped. He most certainly would have died. But squanto is living with the neighboring wampanoag tribe and then that fall is when the pilgrims show up. Half of the pilgrims die the first winner. They wouldn't have survived another year. Spring of 1621, walking into their camp is squanto. And you can just picture the conversation. I mean, he's in his loincloth and he goes up and he goes, oh yeah, you guys from London, I used to live there. You know, oh yeah, the pump down on war street or St. Paul's chapel. He goes, oh, yeah, yeah, I know that place. And then he says, oh, this place here, I grew up here. I know this place like the back of my hand over that hill is a spring. And William Bradford says he taught him how to catch fish. He said, you know, that they weren't successful, but he says, don't use salmon. They spawn this river. It's going to be packed. And then he taught him how to plant corn. They said, we tried it. He goes, no, you got to dig a hole, put some fish in, then put the kernel of corn and cover it up. The fish decompose fertilizes the soil. You have a nice harvest. Bottom how to take the corn and put it in a pot, shake it and make popcorn, right? And then he taught him how to go down to the riverbank squeegee in the mud and catch eels and clams and lobsters and then how to catch beaver skins. It took 40 years worth of beaver skins to pay off their debt for the boat ride,

Portobello Panama Spain William Bradford Indians Squanto Inca Malaga Peru Cuba Newfoundland North America St. Paul's Chapel Plymouth Cape Cod Plague Massachusetts England Europe London
San Francisco Will Give Free Money to Transgenders

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:19 min | 5 d ago

San Francisco Will Give Free Money to Transgenders

"San Francisco's transgender community will receive taxpayer money from the city's newest guaranteed income program mayor London breed announced Wednesday. The guaranteed income for trans people program gift, they are great. No. You got to give credit where it is due. Acronyms, they have a genius for acronyms on the left. Gift guaranteed income for trans people. It certainly is a gift. Uses taxpayer dollars to provide low income transgender San franciscans, a $1200 monthly stipend for up to 18 months to quote, help address financial and security within trans communities. We know that our trans communities experience much higher rates of poverty and discrimination breed said in a statement. So this program will target support to lift individuals in this community up. Why will it only be for 18 months? What happens after that? Extend it for another 18. Of course they'll extend it. San Francisco's other guaranteed ink. By the way, whatever you pay for, you get more of. Just a little law of life.

San Francisco London
San Francisco Launches Transgender Guaranteed Income Program

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:56 min | Last week

San Francisco Launches Transgender Guaranteed Income Program

"Story out of San Francisco where they are planning on giving transgender people. I have this story here in my fingers, ladies and gentlemen. Transgender citizens of San Francisco are now eligible for $1200 a month. Now, there are a couple of there are two big bombshells in the story. First of all, that there are going to be giving transgender people $1200 a month for the next 18 months and it's your money. So if you are a straight person, let's say you're a heterosexual. Like, well, grace is still on vacation, but Kyle is a good heterosexual person. Straight guy. And Kyle, you may be hard up for cash, but you would not be eligible for any of this money. What if I identify? Well, I'm going to get to that because I'm going to take you through the checklist, and that's a good question. What if you identify? But here we are, ladies and gentlemen, and we'll use Kyle as an example in just a minute, because I actually have the program application for this nonsense. And you better get ready because this is coming to your neighborhood. Mayor London breed says the program will provide economically marginalized transgender people with a guaranteed income. And again, if you're a straight person down on your luck, you need some cash, you don't even have a place to live. Well, tough cookies. Because you're not eligible. But if you're confused about your pronouns, you got a shot at the 1200 bucks. But here's the other bombshell in all of this. It's not the fact that we're creating some sort of a socialist communist style government in San Francisco, where you're going to be getting a specific amount of money from the government for doing nothing. And by the way, this is no strings attached money. That in itself is a bombshell.

Kyle San Francisco Grace London
 Kevin Spacey to face 7 additional sexual assault charges in UK

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Kevin Spacey to face 7 additional sexual assault charges in UK

"Actor Kevin Spacey is facing more sexual misconduct charges in Britain With the latest Britain's crown prosecution is charging Kevin Spacey with 7 sex offenses that are all related to the same alleged victim in incidents between 2001 and 2004 Spacey now faces 12 charges overall in the UK He has already pleaded not guilty to charges he sexually assaulted three men between 2004 and 2015 when he was the artistic director at The Old Vic theater in London He's got a court hearing on December 16th on the new charges

Kevin Spacey Britain Spacey The Old Vic Theater UK London
UK court: Arrested man is US fugitive wanted on rape claim

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

UK court: Arrested man is US fugitive wanted on rape claim

"A judge in Scotland says a man who spent almost a year fighting extradition to the U.S. is Nicholas Rossi a fugitive alleged to have faked his own death to escape rape allegations The suspect was arrested in December 2021 at a Glasgow hospital where he was being treated for COVID-19 He denies being Rossi and says he's an Irish orphan named Arthur knight after seeing evidence including fingerprints and tattoos a judge is told Edinburgh sheriff court he was satisfied that mister knight is indeed Nicholas Rossi U.S. authorities say Rossi had been charged in connection with the 2008 rape in Utah a full extradition hearing is likely to be held next year Charles De Ledesma London

Nicholas Rossi Glasgow Hospital Covid Arthur Knight Rossi Edinburgh Sheriff Court Scotland U.S. Mister Knight Utah Charles De Ledesma London
Police detain man after eggs thrown at King Charles III

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Police detain man after eggs thrown at King Charles III

"An anti royalist protester has been arrested after hurling eggs and vitriol at King Charles the third and Camilla the queen consort as they walked in the northern England city of York Oh Video footage shows several eggs in motion and smashed on the ground none appearing to hit the royal couple who continued to greet crowds Then several police officers could be seen grappling with a man at a crowd barrier Britain's PA news agency reports the man had booed and shouted this country was built on the blood of slaves as he was being detained Other members of the crowd had tried to drown him out by chanting shame on you and God save the king Charles De Ledesma London

England City King Charles Camilla York Britain Charles De Ledesma London
Johnny Depp Will Be Known by the Picture Amber Heard Painted of Him

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Johnny Depp Will Be Known by the Picture Amber Heard Painted of Him

"It's gonna be tough, but you're gonna have to try and forget how great he was and Donnie brasco or Gilbert grape or Edward scissorhands or Ed wood or plenty of other films. Now he's gonna be known for what amber's testimony said and her pictures showed and that is a guy who has drugs for breakfast. We've seen the pictures, passes out in his closet for lunch and then beats her up for dinner. How long before you can forget that he used a tampon applicator to snort Coke, or that he sliced off a part of his finger because he thought she was fucking Billy Bob Thornton, and he used that finger to write whore and whatever else on a mirror in the bathroom. He's also the guy who pissed all over the floor trying to write even more hateful words, oh, and did I mention any blue is $650 million fortune. How could we all forget that? And on top of all that, you know, wait, could at least walk away believing that it was amber, whose shit on their bed. Remember that? That's what Johnny claimed. She should on my bed. Well, now we've been told, no, no, it's most likely dog shit from boo. The yorkie. The judge actually said, this is why it's so insane to have court in London. The judge said, boo had an incomplete mastery of her bowels after she had accidentally consumed some marijuana. If that was important to you, who shit on the bed as any type of redeeming fact that you can get that now. Even the dog was shitting on Johnny.

Donnie Brasco Gilbert Grape Edward Scissorhands Ed Wood Billy Bob Thornton Amber Johnny BOO London
Jerry Foltz on Broadcasting LIV for the First Time

Fore The People

01:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Jerry Foltz on Broadcasting LIV for the First Time

"You've done, obviously, PGA's for, I've known you long, long time. Nationwide tour way, way back in the day too. LPGA a long time. Different kind of broadcasts. This is streamy live. Have you ever done a live stream broadcast ever and was it like complete anarchy? Everybody's starting at once, that type of deal. I mean, what was the main difference when you guys started? Were you pretty nervous? Like what the hell is it about to go down? Yeah, well, when you're 60, you're talking about live stream, it has a total different need. Usually means what happens in the middle of the night. We showed up in London now, granted if you guys remember back then. It was talked about in ruby, then all of a sudden they announced a schedule and they announced we're going to play, they didn't even announce a field to the week before, and they threw that together in no time at all and going to London with 5 weeks notice to stage a golf tournament and to put it on TV. It was such a huge endeavor. All of the equipment all throughout the UK and most of Europe had already been all the TV equipment was promised out to other shows. So they put this together in a bunch of 40 or 50 cubicle thingies these little tiny trailers that you see on a construction site as an office. And made this work and made it sing. It was interesting to say the least, I'm working with a number of thebe. I mean, most people I've never met before. Absent the camera guys and the technicians, a lot of whom in the industry I'd known for a long, long time. But the people behind the scenes of people in the organization have lived, I had not met any of them. At all. And all of a sudden, I wasn't there. I was nervous since I've ever been.

Lpga PGA London Ruby Golf Europe UK
LIV Analyst Jerry Foltz on How He Got Involved With LIV

Fore The People

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

LIV Analyst Jerry Foltz on How He Got Involved With LIV

"How did it get started? How did you become the guy who announced in London? How did that conversation start? Long, long, long story, but essentially they first two people they hire to take care of the broadcast. From a technical standpoint, where the producer and the director, they hired the producer that JJ knows quite well. And you met him, John. His name's Keith hirschman. He was the guy who originally was the very first producer at golf channel. Basically invented all of the, all of the coverage that you saw in the first 15, 20 years at golf channel. And he was in charge of it all, and including hiring and developing the on air talent, if you will, or lack of talent and like this, but he was there. And we had talked a number of times and he always assumed that I would say no that's and he was right. I would have. Because there was so much anti noise out there. And you hear only one side. You tend to believe so much of the of what is being said. And then one day I was kind of sitting there just thinking about big picture thinking about the future moving forward, I turned 60 this year. You know, how much longer do I want to work and how much more do I want to keep going down the same path? Which I love doing the LPGA as you guys know. And I called up and said, one night, I go, I'm listening. And the very next day sitting in this very chair, I got on the horn and a similar call to this with James Watson and will steger, who are two of the brightest people literally that I've ever met in TV who are reinventing the will and the wheel in terms of the way golf was covered and we sat there. We talked about it. They answered all my questions and made me feel comfortable about something I knew nothing about. And including all of the questions that are continually raised throughout social media that I'm very comfortable where I stand on my moral ground. In that regard. And I said, okay,

Keith Hirschman Golf Channel JJ London Golf John Lpga James Watson Steger
'Bubble barrier' among finalists for Prince William's prize

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Bubble barrier' among finalists for Prince William's prize

"A British royals supported initiative Could help stop plastic from degrading oceans Prince William the heir to the British throne has unveiled the fineness of the earthshot prize a global competition aimed at finding new ways to protect the planet and tackle climate change One of the 15 initiatives in the final group is a bubble barrier that prevents plastic waste from reaching the ocean the 5 winners will be announced next month in Boston and they'll receive $1.1 million to develop their ideas and scale up their projects Charles De Ledesma London

British Royals Prince William Boston Charles De Ledesma London
 UK delays Northern Ireland vote to restore power-sharing

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

UK delays Northern Ireland vote to restore power-sharing

"Northern Ireland elections aimed at restoring the region's power sharing government had been delayed until January Efforts to end a stalemate over post Brexit trade rules for Northern Ireland collapsed last week triggering a legal requirement for the central government in London to cool new elections for the regional assembly despite initial expectations that the vote would take place in late December Northern Ireland secretary Chris heaton Harris who refused to confirm a date as it holds talks with local leaders

Northern Ireland Regional Assembly Central Government Secretary Chris Heaton Harris London
British PM to go to COP

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

British PM to go to COP

"British prime minister Rishi sunak has reversed an earlier decision not to attend the UN climate summit in Egypt Cenac's office had previously said he was going to skip the talks which start on Sunday because of pressing domestic commitments including the closely watched government budget statement expected to be announced on November 17 but sunak has now tweeted he would be attending the two week gathering because he says there's no long-term prosperity without action on climate change Soon acts earlier decision to miss the talks has been criticized by many including his climate adviser Al Sharma Britain currently holds the presidency of the conference of the parties and hosted the climate summit in Glasgow last year Charles De Ledesma London

Rishi Sunak Egypt Cenac Sunak UN Al Sharma Britain Glasgow Charles De Ledesma London
Ships sail from Ukraine despite Russia suspending grain deal

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ships sail from Ukraine despite Russia suspending grain deal

"Ships loaded with grain have departed Ukraine despite Russia suspending its participation in a UN brokered deal The UN says three ships carrying just over 84,000 metric tons of corn wheat and sunflower meal left through a humanitarian sea corridor set up in July The corridor brokered by turkey and yuan has been seen as a breakthrough that would ensure Africa the Middle East and parts of Asia would receive grain and other food from the Black Sea region during Russia's war in Ukraine Russia has cited allegations of a Ukrainian drone attack against its Black Sea fleet in announcing over the weekend that it was suspending its part of the grain deal Charles De Ledesma London

Russia UN Black Sea Turkey Middle East Africa Asia Charles De Ledesma London
UK minister under fire for calling migrants an 'invasion'

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

UK minister under fire for calling migrants an 'invasion'

"Britain's interior minister is facing criticism for describing migrants crossing the English Channel in small boats as an invasion Home secretaries used the term while defending conditions at a processing center for new arrivals where some 4000 people have been held in a facility intended for just 1200 She'd referred to small boat crossings as the invasion of our southern coast and said illegal immigration is out of control Immigration minister Robert jenrick quickly distanced himself from her words Critics accuse rathmann of deliberately worsening conditions at the processing center by refusing to book hotel rooms for asylum seekers Charles De Ledesma London

Britain Robert Jenrick Rathmann Charles De Ledesma London
Michael Lawler: Most Voters Don't Know Sean Maloney

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Michael Lawler: Most Voters Don't Know Sean Maloney

"If he's spending all this time trying to elect other Democrats how is he spending enough time in his district You know it doesn't just happen on election day They have to spend years working on that Well that's been his problem He's been gallivanting across the globe He went to Paris Geneva and London only a few weeks ago to raise money for Nancy Pelosi in the DCC And he has really not spent too much time in this district And on top of that with redistricting having taken effect 75% of this district is new to him So most voters don't know him And I'm coming out of rockland county which is 42% of the district and born and raised there I've lived there my whole life my family has been there over a hundred years Nobody knows him over here And so this is not your normal situation where incumbent has a big advantage And I think as he finally woke up to the fact that he has a real race just two weeks ago he has now been siphoning off millions of dollars from other democratic congressional electeds and candidates across the country to try and save himself but it's frankly too little too late

Nancy Pelosi Geneva Rockland County Paris London
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"People often ask me this and I just say that I work 7 days on Daniel Fletcher and then I work 7 days on favorite cheese. So somehow I'm managing to fit 14 days into each week. But in terms of feeling inspired, I think there's such a contrast between the brands, Daniel W Fletcher is very much inspired by my own experience and kind of my personal life experience and the things that I like and it's very much me. Whereas favorites got such a rich archive and history, the collections almost design themselves because when I go to the archive it just feels so inspired straight away because there's such incredible things in there that that is an identity that we should never be reinvented. It should just be pushed even further and I think there's so much to go on that it's an absolute joy to design for them. It sounds amazing and it sounds like you can move between the two seamlessly. Just two end, obviously London fashion week is happening and there might be a little bit more of a somber mood this time around, but how do you feel about the future of British fashion and London fashion week? Now that the world is open again buyers are back to London. Do you feel optimistic? And you feel that British fashion will be able to uphold its reputation as one of the most creative boundary pushing industries. Absolutely. I think if you look at the talent that has come out of Britain in the last even just 5 years, there's some really brilliant names of that, the likes of Craig green and Wales bonner and Molly Goddard, like these designers are people who I think will be around for years and years and years to come. The new kids coming up now, the likes of like a chat low, for example, Connor Ives, like these are people who are breathing new life into British fashion. I think there's such a great hub here for new brands that I'm excited for what the future holds. That was the designer Daniel W Fletcher there, speaking to Monaco's fashion editor, Natalie. We'll have more from this year's event later in the program. We stay in the UK capital now where London design festival is in full flow. The event is celebrating its 20th outing this year, and key to those celebrations are the happenings at the V and a museum. Here, a glass blowing studio has set up shop in the central garden, allowing visitors to experience material alchemy up close. To find out more, this shows producer, mainly Evans, caught up with the cofounder of Canadian lighting brand bocci. The Canadian polymath began by explaining exactly what was going on in the courtyard. We are reconfiguring some molecules. In my fantasy, we are melting antiquities from the V and a's permanent collection. But that's just my fantasy. I was actually not allowed to do that. So we are melting other antiquities. Last once in copper ones. So that the form of these things is changing in the hands of these glass blowers into a glass shape. And then liquid copper from other melted artifacts is poured in. Here's the momentum. So the copper has been poured into the glass form and so far that temperature is close enough that everything seems fine. The coexist nicely together. Very soon. They'll start contracting at different rates. As a result of cooling and then slowly slowly you'll start seeing first one crack and then another and then all of a sudden you'll see this kind of explosive shattering of the glass away from the copper. And then after some more time passes, a copper has had time to completely cool. A little bit taking out of these boxes in place in that tray over there. And from there back to the exhibition area at the Santa Ciara chocolate. So if you have patience now to observe it, it might be a minute or ten minutes. You'll start seeing it crack. But I won't hold you to. Please be captivating, even though, again, it's kind of almost like watching like an egg hatch or something. So there's a nice story about transformation here because first of all, consider the symbolic and emotional associations of these objects, they might have had different lives in the hands of so many different people. Melted and then formed into a shape. That shape is destroyed to make another shape. Anyone coming along to the B and a you can see this process happening in real time. So just now I've seen another piece shatter off this coffin of a vessel here. Tell me about that process and why it was key to have that on show. I think that the artifacts as interesting as they are. Are not really the project. The project is this sort of choreography that you see here of molecules and humans manipulating them. That's the project. And so it was very important for me to not show a finished piece, but rather to show what I call the performance of the work. I see myself as a symphony conductor, and these are the musicians. And the same piece of music can be played by a different musician and sound completely differently. Totally different emotional quality. And that's the case here. That was important for me to have that contingency available for an audience to participate in. We've been working with copper and glass for about 5 or 6 years, and all that time I struggle has been to try to coax their coefficient of expansion of the two materials together. In other words, to change the recipes such that they expand and contract it exactly the same rate. And the intent there was to try to have metal forms that are glassy and glass forms that are metallic. To have one take on formal characteristics of the other, to have the materials make forms that they were never conceivably be able to make on their own. And that's been the project for 5 years. With increasing sophistication and complexity, but any good thing implies its opposite. So here I decided to reverse the relationship to make the coefficients of expansion vastly different such that the two could coexist but only for seconds before they reject each other in this dramatic way. Okay, so here you get to observe the ceremonial melting of an artifact. So imagine if you will, that this was procured from the permanent collection. There it goes.

Daniel W Fletcher Daniel Fletcher London Craig green Wales bonner Molly Goddard Connor Ives Monaco Natalie Britain Evans UK
"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"And you were saying that if I wanted to stay high up with a good view that I could stay at the top of The Shard? Yes, the shangri la hotel at the top of this which I did not know. Yeah, it's a great option if you want that spectacular kind of awe inspiring jaw dropping view for sure. And if you don't know what The Shard is, look around the skyline of London, you'll probably figure out which is the sharpest looking thing on the south bank and that's The Shard. Versus the pickle shaped one, which is the gherkin. It's not the names are not that hard to guess. Excellent. One thing that makes you laugh and say only in London. Oh. That

shangri la hotel London
"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"And it is in shortage in the old town hall, so it's cool atmosphere because it's in this old kind of historic building. But the chefs, the chef does really amazing things with either simple produce or things that are a bit different or inventive or creative, the presentation is nice and service is great, and it all feels very casual while still being fine dining, dressed down. I'd say. Another restaurant I would say for Indian is tie abs. It is in the east end in whitechapel. It's very no frills, but a classic Indian restaurant and the food is absolutely delicious. So that's somewhere that I would say. If you want a really classic London experience and really good food, definitely try that. And then. For pubs, I would say my favorite is the Holly Bush and Hempstead, which is the neighborhood I was talking about in North London that I absolutely love. And I used to live nearby and go there all the time. And it just has a great ambiance in the winter. There are fireplaces. You can cozy up by in the summer. It's just a great atmosphere. You can sit by the windows and it's got this Warren of rooms that feels very oldy worldy and it's just very classic British and classic London. One thing that you would not recommend in London, people on a skip. I don't think there's anything that I wouldn't recommend. My usual thing is what I recommend is focusing on what you like because London is so big you could drown in it. And so it's more don't get so caught up in trying to see everything and do everything that you don't end up seeing what you actually want to see rather than this place is overrated or that place is overrated. Okay. Favorite museum that no one's ever heard of. I would say the sewn museum, Sir John soane's museum. I think some people have heard of it, but it's I am not in that group. It's barely central. It's not too far from the holburne tube station. And it is a kind of on a square in some old townhouses and it's a one man's collection that he amassed during his lifetime and then they turned his home into a museum when he passed away. And it is an amazing collection of everything from art to antiquities. There's a sarcophagus in the basement. It doesn't have a sarcophagus in their basement though. It's true. It's true. It's very in Vogue. But yeah, the actual architecture of the house is amazing too. And it just feels like this great little secret, and the museum is free.

London Holly Bush whitechapel Hempstead North London Favorite museum holburne tube station Warren Sir John soane
"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Such an icon on the skyline. So it's a fun thing to do. It takes about a half an hour. You definitely want to pre book tickets. And you just go around and slowly up and slowly down, seeing the different views of London and along the Thames. Well, in London is not. There are some tall buildings now, but so much of it is shorter than the London Eye that you can see for quite a while there. Exactly, yeah, with the exception of the city and canary wharf where there are a lot of skyscrapers London has a pretty low skyline. So the London I definitely gets you above most things. Right. Cool. And then you walked further east. What are we going to come to next? Exactly. So next you can come to some of the main buildings along the south bank. You get the royal festival hall. You get the National Theater. And then those areas often have street performers or festivals outside or Christmas markets in the winter. So that's just a fun place to walk around and just see what's on. Okay. I have not been to the royal festival hall. Oh, that's great. There are a lot of good shows on there. Okay. I've been to the globe, which we're coming up to in a bit. But I was going to say, yeah. And we're two. So from there, you can keep walking east and that's when you start to get towards things like the globe. You get towards Tate modern, which is one of the most famous art museums. It's also free entry. So a lot of people just pop in and see a few things taken the views so you can go see the views from the top and then head out. Or you can spend the whole day there if you want to. And obviously the globe then you get the theater performances and the history as well. They do tours there, even when there aren't performances on. You can just tour it to see what it was like in Shakespeare's day. Obviously it's a recreation, but it's original was like in Shakespeare's day. And then from there you get to places like borough market, which is one of the most famous food markets in London. And that is a great place to get lunch or a snack or just wander around and take in all the different delicacies that you can find in broad market. And do you have a favorite stall and red borough market if we're going there for lunch? Oh, goodness. I usually go to a different place every time, but there are really good stalls for things like burgers. There's risotto, there's seafoods, there's paella, whatever you want, you can find it there. Okay, excellent. Yeah, I've gone there after work. I worked for a short period of time at timeout London. And so spent a few weeks in the city there. And even after dinner, even after work, it was a nice place to go over and grab a bite. Yeah, that's great. Okay. And then where to. So from there, you get pretty far east and you can start going into a part of London.

London royal festival hall National Theater south bank Shakespeare Tate
"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"london" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"If I got my bags back on the road I'm heading out there and I'm ready to go look at real good in my passport oh no amateur traveler episode 813 today the amateur traveler talks about museums and markets and parks and indoor graveyard William the Conqueror and William Shakespeare as we go back to London, England. But maybe not maybe not to the day welcome the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen, let's talk about London. I'd like to welcome to the show Julie from a lady in London dot com and you can probably guess what major city of the world we're talking about, we're going to talk about London again today. Julie, welcome to the show. Thank you. And what is your connection with London? I'm originally from California as my accent might reveal. See, I don't think you have an accent at all. Because I'm also from California. I have lived in London for 15 years, and I moved over there in 2007. After quitting my job in San Francisco and just getting a Visa and wanting to see where life took me and I started the blog right before I moved and it's been my full-time job since 2010 now and I obviously all about London and travel all over the world. Excellent. And why should someone go to London? That is a great question. And the answer is there's so many good reasons. I love London for the history.

London Chris Christensen Julie William Shakespeare William England California San Francisco
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Senior to say are in bally's latest house concept on region street in london. I suppose house concept. Yes started in milan. The idea was to create a new. I suppose vision from in terms of retail environment and how it was going to basically work across other stores around the world and how they could become more localized in every space and destination that existed. So there's some common threads that run through it but then also something that makes it unique to the city. It's i mean. Can you tell us what those common threads are. Yeah i suppose to start with what you can see around. The perimeter is how the bali store design team started working with a terra cotta. That was actually inspired by original founder. Valleys of town in terms of the roofing. And so the common threads a lot of it is around turco copper detailing you might come across the flooring. South actually assis- toronto flooring which was inspired by a swiss hottest acapulco play he was specialized in pointillism. So that's how you see this kind of like good structures flooring with the trump no and then the the red marble building up so muck and then on top of that actually you can see. Some of the rugs are also inspired by cleese work. Can you tell us how you start to to bring london into this space. Yeah sure so. Well i guess the foundation of the concept. Excuse the pod Is london clay. So it's like the straw which runs underneath the city and has led to lots of innovation. It's kind of allow tunneling for the underground forbes backs grids hamstrung tried to pass through and then kind of this iconic london brick which has been created from this klay itself so lots of architectural references like kind of come into the space self. We wanted to highlight london as city of innovation and particularly within sustainability. If you look at the moment like of kind of materialists innovation is actually coming out of the city itself. So we wanted to kind of tell that story within the store. And that's why we kind of reach out to james shaw to work alongside him and to collaborate with him on some pieces to exist. Within the space james is kind of at the forefront of waste innovation. I suppose he takes as plastic and produces these beautiful sculptural pieces and we thought that would be a great story to tell within the store and kind of two. I guess highlight the innovation. That's happening in the city of london. What was key was trying to get a little bit of a contrast between what joe mentioned in terms of looking at some of the traditional architectural elements that we brought in from. It's from clay or from the kind of brick perspective so when we were looking at what kind of materials to work with. James shaw basically stood out because the forms that we're looking at and the way the way he achieves this is actually working with these waste plastic pellets. He runs him through this kind of extrusion to alexa. Post and heats up you start adding pigments to start achieving. Some of the color palettes that we wanted to work harmoniously with the rest of the store as he feeds waste pellets and the dye. It starts basically creating these long extrusions. That are still malleable. Because they're still warm. And so we start forming and he starts creating these beautiful sculptures beat from the actual fixtures through to the book ends or the product risers as well. And so yeah. It's flooded creating something that despite it being technical material that's obviously made trying to be more circular by using waste and and giving it a new lease of life. It actually started looking very organic as well. And somehow you have this kind of contrast that works with other organic elements like the more kind of sharp hard lines break or the more forms type of rammed earth bellies a swiss brand. I know it's celebrating. One hundred and seventy th year. This year we talked about that. Offline so i guess. The house concept comes from milan. And then but we're talking about a swiss brand and that link between switzerland and the uk. Can you tell us how you who these two countries together in space. That was always a real discussion at the beginning of the project. And we did lots and lots research into this swiss british connection whilst doing that we really looked into. I guess swiss and british artists in particular jam. W tanner who was born in. London raise in london but was obviously well nine for his landscape and nature paintings. He exhibited his work when he was fifteen. Just stones from hair at the royal academy painting with the river thames and throughout his career he became really besotted with swiss landscapes and he spent lots of time made numerous trips and traveled around the country and he was really interested in the alps and this lakes and what was quite interesting was he managed to turn what will kind of considered at the time to be. These jacket desolate quite harsh landscapes into something quite ethereal and beautiful so i guess to create some some accent contests in the store. We brought in some of those contrasting weather inspired colors from times paintings in switzerland. This beautiful you can kind of feel that it's it's very soothing. Almost like being in the in this swiss country so when when you step in here i mean. Hopefully it's It's a journey that basically encourages more tactile discovery as well. So of course surrounded by incredible products with incredible craftmanship as well and so we needed to create environment that which facilitated journey that also felt very well crafted felt also disruptive to a certain degree and like you mentioned before when know. We're looking at some of the details of some of these materials. You feel like you wanna touch them. You wanna see what it's made out of and that's what we hope. I suppose if 'volkstaat curiosity in in a.

london James shaw bali store milan bally turco cleese toronto james joe switzerland tanner river thames royal academy uk London
"london" Discussed on The Gerry Callahan Podcast

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on The Gerry Callahan Podcast

"This is the gerry callahan. Show i got my answer. I have my answer now. Been what i would say when they love when they mask. Police a cost me as i walk into the grocery store. I go to this whole foods. Believe it or not Near where i live there and there's a guard at the door and he wears a full gas like world war. Two looking thing gas mask and he makes sure you're masked up that's his job and he loves it. He's loves it stopping you. I didn't even know i went. The other day. Didn't realize they've implemented another mask mandate so he grabbed me. Sir you need a mask. And i know they obviously do it on airplanes and do it in restaurants. Now you gotta weigh your mask as you walk to your table then you take it off and leave it off and you put it on when you go to the men's room and you take it off when you obviously science completely. I understand the sideline. Yes makes all the sense in the world but it is a pain in the ass. So i have decided from now on when that guy the grocery store the hostess or even flying an airplane and getting on a plane. I'm going to say. I don't need my mask i i'm feeling the spirit. I'm feeling the spirit. I don't This is the new the new Exemption exemption if you if you are somewhere that requires a mask obviously. It has zero to science. We all know that it's just show. It's just control thing but we all learned. I think yesterday. From the mayor of san francisco a complete wack job which is no surprise. Let's be honest. Every mayor in every big city is some radical nutjob. They all allies. Aoc they'll big bernie supporters. They all the you know. They're driving their cities into the ground. The cities are full of filth and crime and it just chaos and the san francisco could be the worst but anyway now we see one of the reasons why we get to meet the mayor of london breed who implemented a mask mandate and then violated at a eddie concert and not even a concert like a musical performance. That looked kind of intimate. It looked like a small club and she was saying you know she was there watching the performers and she'll she'll she'll list we'll play she'll list them because this balance when you're seeing a really really good musician when you really like and you feel the spirit. You don't need a mask. I wanted to ask you. Jerry does this. Oh yeah i mean. I was feeling the spirit the other day when i went to see. Jason is bull but they still made me wear mask. They check back seen cards. It was hard core. Jason is bill sadly said to as a big liberals big pro vaccine guy pro mask i and pro control the government control over our lives. Kinda guy a huge abortion rights. Guy just made a song with his wife about abortion in. Sing it the show. I went to thankfully but What do you know what it is. What is even sound like abortions or good like that. It's a to be honest with you. It's a great song. Unfortunately it's about abortion It's called it's it's him and he and his wife. I think they did it for a cause but i think it's called the problem. The problem go away yes. I'm tim. mcgraw has a song about abortion to. He's another tim big country star but he's unfortunately a liberal is a few liberals in in be honest. I've said this. Before if you're going to limit if i put every musician every band a regroup To the political test. I'd be you know a mike. My my my pandora or spotify would be you know ted nugent kid rock and the gatlin brothers. And that's it but you can't limit your i to be honest..

gerry callahan san francisco Sir bill sadly bernie Jason london Jerry tim big Guy mcgraw tim gatlin brothers ted nugent
"london" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"I got tired of that And i decided to unite the identities of at alex. London was better node So i decided to just lean in and own it and be like you know what i'll unite my personality. People will figure it out is a little demagogue because some of my best selling books were as the alexander. London so i think for like business. People looking at sales records to track or numbers and stuff. How many copies should we order wealth. Less alex linden so bist alexander will. I don't know that stuff. I'm sure i missed that up for them somehow. But that's not my job. So i don't care but yeah it's confusing but ultimately unjust. I said alexander landed off to go disappear into the jungles of the world and alex liaison to keep understood understood. Can't think i did wonder as i was reading. Battled dragons your previous series before this. The sky bound. Santa obviously does deals with falcons in in a in a society with falcons. Here we're dealing with society with dragons was would battle dragons exist if it wasn't for the sky bound saga. Yes for reasons. That are very interesting about the timing of them. But but i do they are. There's a similar projects aesthetically. They're completely different. The emotional continents Stories themselves are completed over the age group that targeted completely different but there is something with the relationship between human and violent sky beast. That is a very similar relationship That the human animal as weapon relationship is intriguing to me. I wrote a series of military dogs too and that relationships fascinates me because humans do violence for such different reasons than animals do and yet humans often deploy animals in the service of our violence an fascinated by that troubling been. And so. I think it's something that i've been grappling with in grambling grappling with. And then but kinetic falcons basically dragons so connecting with that sort of some of those ideas. Finish playing with or the couldn't have as much fun with in in the skype downs. Aga again do embattled. Rick did into. They did it. Make writing a lot easier because you had already thought about all these descriptions of of wings and flight and things. The opposite made it harder. Because i didn't want to go. Oh my god how many ways how. Many different like slang about slang about wings today bench. And how many different ways can i describe something diving from the sky. And i don't want to recycle everything that i did already images and stuff so it was actually harder had to make sure might be using something more. Sometimes it was just a simple way of describing something up to use this in. This book already turned up. No i used it in completely. Different series But i needed. I couldn't remember blurred so it made it much harder to make sure i wasn't plagiarizing myself and with your because you. I came professional writing as a journalist. Do you find that. They're still kind of tricks of the trade in journalism that you really kind of still lean into rely on as a fiction writer..

alex linden bist alexander falcons alexander London alex Santa Aga skype Rick
"london" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what cook you. i'm broccoli and thanks for listening I'm talking to alex. London an author of many wa middle grade books but his latest is the start of a new middle grade series called battle dragons. This cyberpunk futuristic world where dragons live among us so great concept we dig into how he came up with this then at the annual here. Just how gullible of a person i am. I have a guest on pretty much. Whatever they say goes unless.

alex London
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"South of lima has launched several natural wines that vary in color from sort of clear reds and rose as to what they've called the sophia loren jr inspired by actress official and the rule free from pesticides. The wine that i'm yet to taste myself is actually served at central restaurant. The time mentioned but something really new for this part of the continent peruvian wine what next galapagos sharply but yes and then also looking to uruguay where i am in my come as a surprise to some listeners but uruguay is a real trailblazer when it comes to high quality wines argentina and chile of course are the ones would big scale production but vignon like got song along the eastern coast here which is entirely sustainable. And where chef francaise melman has. A restaurant have really helped to reposition the country internationally with award-winning bottles. And now actually. All eyes are on china. Uruguay already exports pretty much. Half of audits beef to china primarily very expensive cuts. And so they're now hoping that. Why might be another area to showcase near the chinese where aware in recent years have become big fans of cabin as of champagne as well as other western goods like olive oil. That uruguay produces locally. So so there's a real push from the government here and already on tuesday. The president the kaiapo announced a preliminary outline of a possible. Free trade agreement with china. So you can see the links between the two countries strengthening. It sounds like there is so much happening when it comes to the wine industry in latin america. What do you expect from the future then. Obviously as you mentioned we have the idea that argentina and chile are the countries where the wind comes from. But that's idea may be quite old fashioned soon. Yeah i mean. I think particularly uruguay with this possible. Free trade agreement with china it's really rattling neighbors. And the big wine producers like argentina who make up the medical suit trade block and they don't really like that little uruguay sort of make news outside the club and oversee argentina argentina's going through an extreme economic downturn and they've got a lot of restrictions in terms of what they can export so i think we could see a shift here and particularly in this sort of the tastes and what's on offer. What's interesting about uruguay is they produce wines like albany new. For example that i'm told is sold in all sorts of decent wine shops and in london in some power no and in bigger cities in the united states. These quite specialist wines and really raising the level of what's offered less likely chilean's particularly that have this quite sort of mass produced wine that we find in the knights of sainsbury's fernando about your country brazil. What do you think about the winds coming from there. You have white industry. We do we do. Have i mean it's growing of course doesn't compare to the chilean or the argentine one. But you know eighties grow in one. Interesting thing marcus. There's been a new study. Finally we're having this type of studies because finally we're having quite a lot of consumption of wine last year. Was i think the best year in terms of brazilian drinking wine ever. I don't know if it was the quarantine lockdowns but there. Every time i go back to some power. There's more and more wine bars. You just noticed that. In the past to be honest. Brazilian wine had a terrible reputation..

uruguay argentina sophia loren jr vignon eastern coast francaise melman china lima Uruguay latin america chile albany sainsbury london united states brazil marcus
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"U. for example. You could have gone to franz. You could have gone to germany. Yeah okay but it's the language it is because english. My english is not that well but for the most people and for me. I i understand almost everything so that's easy. France is a difficult language german. Okay that's also something. That's i have no connection to germany and to london. I've been many times in london and my son lives in london now and transport. Of course it's fifty minutes or to play in four hours to train so that's also really easy if there's no covert koby's let's not talk about co which but tell me about what is like to launch a restaurant in another country. Obviously you know you talk. About how important sustainability for you when you are sourcing seafood and also your want to offer great produce. So what's it like in terms of those logistics to find the right suppliers and the right partners to work with. Well you start at the beginning and go girl them and then you go to places and you ask them for a tour through their business. So i went to i think den wholesale and dr the owner or the managers and i asked him. Can you show me your place. And can we talk about sustainability. How are you working with this. And i started to be that in the end of april and so the off months. I found out who i like to go to work. So that's what we do now. We told them all volumes in atlanta similar restaurant. So i- opd ache and suppliers that but monday. Bank holiday chuck. That was a problem. Gross that's difficult but networks really. Well so i know the onus now from the companies where by from i know him personally yoenis. I'm doing this interview right before. You are about to launch these restaurants it is open. Nobody soft launch. So there's not maybe as many people at the moment that's there will be when you open for real. What kind of situation have yet with stuffing this Different problems rinus. Construction was six seven weeks late so we hyatt stuff for early july and then there was no work for them here. So dave find another job so we had to start over one problem and yet a providence. But we it's not easy to find good stuff here because i think because of brexit lots of dalliance spanish people are back home to get some support from home country. Next sunday some really experienced a chef is coming from saddam over here to train the kitchens to train the service and they stay for a couple of months. That's good it was one of two. Id's that was from before brexit to let them exchange people from london can go for a month or two or three months to them from you. We can bring them to london. But because of brexit again. But that's not the problem now so we fixed something. I don't know what we did. So just finally. What do you have for the future. So no that. You've opened this restaurant in london. What's next in the pipeline. Do you have morph going to other countries. Now that's not really at this moment in the picture. Because i we have to have this working really well and so maybe not on this coming in london but i think if we have a really nice place here we can have nice live ourselves. You can have everything. Organized became come over. We can have far. Elaine chair dinner. And i'm saddam. So i was very good so i have to us from you considering that you have almost thirty years of experience sufficient longer until you are in charge of restaurants when people come here for the first time. What should they order. I tried to find out. I i look young..

london den wholesale germany koby franz France chuck atlanta saddam providence dave Elaine
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Of ryan eat with the answer because you can actually not editor for so you have e-trade your aunt. That makes it feel at home like you said the homophobic trends on the table. Now tell me what kind of business lessons can you share with our listeners. Obviously there are many seafood restaurants and buzz around the world but what has made your business so successful. Well that's a question you ask. Shelf ultra many times. But i think to keep the prices good to have the love for the seafood dealer for your teams and be involved everywhere. That's why we have the possibility to open. Maybe ten or twenty because investors are lining up to give money but we do everything ourselves and we like to be involved with our team. I like to note names and we digitize themselves at the rest. I don't know love seafood. I think it's interesting when you mentioned that you want to be involved. Be involved in all aspects of the business. I think there are some people who might accuse you of micromanaging. Yes that's right. They do you totally right. But what do i have to go play golf for something and we have our back office. Who takes gaffe to contracts daycares after legal things and everything so this is hobby for me more. I like it right. Not fair enough. How important is it for you that this place fields starch. I think feel. Dutch is not necessary but the seafood bar feeling and vibe. That's important. That was what we will bring here. But if it's the degraded indus out of dutch. They're famous for their hospitality. And everything so we come from this outta violent near bordeaux of belgium so they know how to eat. They love food and so do we. And that's why we bring all to name. I'm steve i'm in it and the other thing is of course really really. A lot of people from london from uk have been in our restaurants. It's crazy how many people had already interested restaurant off last week. And then they comment. Yesterday there was a guy was walking by. He say see for bra and he asked them so yes. Great pictures sent to my wife. We've been an incident last night. Be at an all the couple. Dancing around seventy dare for the honeymoon or something. Like that day. Rare in i'm saddam have been three days and entry days industry food bar sitting over there and it was just a nice thinks and the recognize me so that was more like oh great. That's amazing. i wanted to watch that. One factor that you took into collins when making the decision where to launch this place. You could have gone somewhere. Maybe a bit easier within the e..

ryan bordeaux golf belgium steve london uk saddam collins
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Welcome to the menu and monocle. Twenty four am articles hippie in the next half an hour from the netherlands debris soon we visited the seafood bar in london. Soho the first four notes post for the much loved to dutch restaurants group to keep the prices good to have the love for the seafood dealer for your teams and be involved everywhere. That's why the possibility to open maybe ten or twenty also ahead. we have a long look at. What's making news in the latin american food and drink franz fernando. What can we expect today. Marcus oh give you a brief of some very rare brazilian ingredients and also a few news from wine in the region. Thank you for dough. And of course we'll hear edina zone through recommendation to that is all ahead on this edition of the menu here on monocle twenty four. The seafood bar is a dutch family operation with full restaurants across the netherlands. The company has just gone international by launching. Its first restaurant abroad. The new seafood bari's placed in london. Soho offering the same towering seafood pluses. That's brought to the company so much famous home i visited. The restaurants are bitterly to speak to the father of the family. Running the business phones to fisher. He began by explaining how we got into the restaurant. Game after almost thirty years. As a fishmonger well after twenty seven years children growing up and came from university started work themselves and irish fifty. Now you can do to tanks or just go on but that wasn't planned or find not arrive the car younger wife borsch or do something else so my idea was. Let's move to amsterdam. And so i told my wife. Let's move to amsterdam. She was throats. Okay nice so removed from helmet to amsterdam and we sold everything in this out. In months we lived in amsterdam then. But i didn't have enough money to stop working so at think about something else so it took me off year and then i thought okay seafood bar. That will be a nice. Id and then. I started looking for a venue and one in really debate. I think the best neighborhood offense to them outside and era. I started to see for the first one. I built myself totally together with my brother-in-law ducasse three months and then we had a seafood bar like this smaller but similar likeness and be open to restart see for my did go round the world because now here four in the netherlands and now these london restaurant fifth fearful. That's correct. it's fifty one. So i think run restaurant also asked to do because my children came in my daughter studying artificial intelligence and she was ready with that and then she had to wait three months for a new period on another university. She came to me and said. Can i stay with you for three months. Then i help you in. Dc for bar said it's fine. Go over she never left then. My son sold his it company and was going to travel and before he left..

franz fernando edina zone amsterdam london borsch netherlands the netherlands bari Marcus fisher ducasse
"london" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on The Media Show

"It's obviously important factor for you to. Yes i think. If i'm makes a really good point of leveling up the media industry as well as and waiter society i think cam does something. It's always kind of slightly up to the media is the. There's a sense that you have to go to london to make it an hopefully projects like this and like national world on the other projects. We've discussed the chew that we're opening up opportunities across across the country for more badran's and not just people who can afford to spend some time in london internship so really trying to open that up across the uk opening up as well for job opportunities wherever you are in the uk. You would argue absolutely. Yeah i think you've seen you probably not recently across at regional media industry. So many vacancies just allow movement. And i think that is really healthy. It's really healthy. To flat channel five the companies are being a little bit bolder no as publishers as of the pandemic and that does create new opportunities. And i think one of the things. We've launched speak on the apprentice program An air days but really looking forward to bring in new people through food industry training and m people bedrooms again may not be as well represented in the past. So am i think there's a lot more opportunities and it's not perfect over gang lawn. You mentioned your relationship with google. A little bit earlier on to some social media might be seen as a potential rival a problem for some of the work that you're doing But you don't see it that way. A knock and the first thing is to differentiate when we talk about silicon valley's differentiate between search engines and social media platforms. So when we let me look like letting lots of people talk about the argument. Google facebook of kind of eating our lunch in terms of appetizing. But that that that arguments a decade old now i think as an industry he's pick ourselves up and get past that so.

badran london uk Google
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Today. We are featuring a cookbook called sea. Salt and honey. The release that is full of delicious creek. Recipes has three authors nicholas. Chloe and olivia is who are father endorsers so fi morahan. Combs spoke with olivia about the highs and lows of creating a cookbook with your family and how in their recipes. They boots modern twists on typical greek cuisine so he began by asking olivia to talk through her family's links with grease and the island of card amelie in particular. That is greek. My sister and i are half greek. My dad grew up in greece and then had moved to the us when he was in university. Lived in the us for thirty years and parents got divorced all those things and he ended up moving back to greece soon after his trip home. I decided to do my master's degree in greece. And i followed him over there and that's how i got an. I ended up back in greece. Then car the melia was found. We don't have any roots from car. The mealy our roots are from crete and corfu and my dad also grew up in athens but he found the mealy on a weekend adventure and loved it so much. He started renting a house there and eventually moved there full time. It's the place that once you go once you always come back. So i of course got hooked as well and that's actually where i met my husband so i now live there too and has always been a big part of family life. The food is definitely a huge part of our family life. I feel like both my moms and dads side. Our lives were centered around food. Even growing up were together. We were always kitchen in in the garden. Going to the mark. The supermarket was one of our favorite things to do. So food is huge in our lives. We plan trips around food and which restaurants are going to go to try and it's definitely so. This book is showing that in sharing our love for food with the world. When did you decide to write a kickback. As a family this actually it was a friend of ours idea. It was when i was living with my dad in greece. Doing my masters and we had started this great rhythm of cooking gardening and we go out every day to the garden and see what was there and what we could harvest that day and then go back into the kitchen and decide what we're going to make an i would prep or he would prep. Usually i would have. Because i be hungry before my dad. He takes his time with food. Where i eat a lot more often and we just started sharing what we were creating with our friends and sending them photos and one of our friends. Lola was like oh my god. You should write a book. This is great and we kind of looked at each other like okay. Let's ride work at sure what we're doing and my sister was of course on board and that was that it was decided. And what was the process like doing it as a tree family. Obviously he get the benefit of being very close but then who say i guess sometimes that can spill over into disagreement. So what was yeah. I mean of course for the most part. It was amazing because we trust each other. We know each other's strengths and weaknesses. Both in my fending who gain so we feel each other's gaps like with cooking for example. My sister is an excellent baker so she was our go to for dessert recipes. My dad's a master with the guests draw. He's the expert with the clay pot recipes. I'm really good at mixing different ingredients together. We could like play off of each other. Do you think this sounds good. You think that sounds good. No try this or try that so that part of it was really nice. Of course yes. There were fights or family so you fight like family anew yanni screens but then again just like family once. It's out there in done. Everything's over with and you're fine again just like that. So that was the advantage of being family. You could laid on the table and still love each other right after the fight was over and say let's get to the fade. I think lots of people have a sense of what greek food is like. They might think of sutton meats or greek yoga and fatter. Is there another side to greek fade. That you wanted people to find out about three the back with the book we we've taken those. I think traditional recipes and traditional ingredients. Then we've given them our own flair in twist by adding different ingredients or spices or herbs from around the world and adding women infusing them together with these traditional greg recipes or we've taken a dish from say the united states that we love like a pop tart and we've transformed it into something that uses more greek ingredients like greek yogurt for frosting and lemon and citrus. So that was our goal to just take all the things that we love and that we've been exposed to like growing up in different places around the world and bringing it to greek mediterranean food and then giving all a new face to share with the world one of the things. I really enjoyed in the book. Is this kind of attention to detail really talking. Three kind of specific recipes for mae king spice mixes could you. Maybe just talk a little bit about why it was important for you to include those in how you sort of realized that the things that you might take for granted in cooking might come a little bit harder to other people. So we're spices are hugely important. My dad has passed his love spices onto my sister. And i and there's a picture in the book that shows his spice rat that has edano hundreds of jars on it so it was extremely important that we share in play with spices in the book. And what we love about spices so much as you can change just one and you get a whole new taste and flavor to your food and what we want to encourage. People is to play with spices and make these recipes their own. Even say you're missing birthday that day in your kitchen you ran out try another spice that you love at in hardy saw or pdp. We're all about experimenting with these recipes. And we really want people to experiment in the kitchen as well make these recipes their own with the flavors that they love americans. Maybe lastly you could just tell us a couple of your favorite recipes in the bec. Oh i it's hard to choose. But i guess some of my favorites would be the yummy stas stuffed peppers. It's a traditional dish that we've changed the stuffing so it's got a twist there and then i really love papas meat sauce. It was a recipe that was actually my grandfather's and we all the time growing up. And i could eat it every day. It's a comfort food for me and will be a lifetime. Favorite an easy favorite. Is the roast chicken with lemon herbs recipe. Another easy favorite are the feds spreads so those are super easy to whip up. if anyone was in arash. You have a party to go to or something like those are something you can do. Fast and easy. The beaten orange salad is also a favorite of mine that's recipe that's on the cover of the book and they love that one only security there and the new book is called sea salt and honey. And that's all for this edition of the menu. Remember that we are back with a new episode again on friday at twenty hundred london time. That's at me dave. You're listening in los angeles. Meanwhile do check out our menus. Spinoff show feud neighborhoods for great recipes. This show was researched by tyler. Mccall and sufi tombs and edited and mixed by david. Stevens markle's hippie. Once again we finish this program with edina zones recommendation here. Are those guys from athens. With like an eagle. Thanks for.

greece olivia fi morahan Combs Chloe united states nicholas athens Lola edano greg mediterranean arash sufi tombs Stevens markle dave london los angeles Mccall tyler
"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Menu

"Amy. I'm one of the co founders of q collective with my husband patrick q. Is a small plates restaurant that serves modern european food with some south african influences. We came up with the concept three years ago. Patrick south african so we thought it was perfect. I did to bring in some of the south african influences into the menu but his background is more fine dining modern european food. So that's kind of the bread and butter of it but we add south african twists onto the menu. And that's kind of what gives us the identity we have on patrick. Ami's better half. My career started seventeen. My brothers seven years older pretty much the same energy levels as i have so he told me. There's no point in even trying to office dog. So i moved down to cape town pretty much as soon as school started working with my brother whilst doing is of course on the side of that and then just started working in working through a couple of the best restaurants in south africa. Some of them ready up in the top fifty best restaurants so it gave good ground and good platform to work from spent about ten years in cape town and then i moved to london about seven years ago. Started working in clapham for robin gill and sort of was with him until we opened up this venture. Here call kidding. We have been creedy three as a guy. The second site we opened was maki. Koo-do so that concept came across because we noticed that people were arriving early wanting to have drinks at the restaurant before their table was redeem and it was the same. When people are leaving we'd have to kick people out after two hours. Because we'd have a second seating. We needed a cocktail bar already. 'cause we just saw there was a market for it. Just from the demand of the restaurant so the arch unacquainted station became available so we created a sheet cocktail bar. The idea behind it really was to give a westend experience to the neighborhood clientele but to charge neighborhood prices so that people no longer had to go into central london to go out to a sheet kakapo to go on a date night and feel like they were in mayfair or in melbourne that they could literally just walk out of the house and start across the street and most people really go there either. Before or after dinner. I could do so. It lends itself. Well it's like you know they work together. Then we took on the site next door to coup a used to be chinese currency exchange. They approached us and said to us that they were leaving and often if we wanted to take over the lease so again. It wasn't really something that we went out for. It was just sort of presented to us. We came up with the concept. Could little koo-do originally which was going to be a type of tapa. Small plates high counter seating baugh. It was just going to be somewhere where you could walk in and meet friends and just have a bottle of wine and few snacks. And then the pandemic hit and we had to rethink the concept so we came up with the concept of doing a private dining room and gallery space that which launched a few months ago. We haven't pepsi gone out to look for a second or third sites. It's sort of things we just stumbled across and we've heard from our babysitter for example. I laid aside. She used to work and said oh. They're selling up. So and i think it's just something that naturally occurs and looking at the area and saying what would we like to do. Next is something that's enjoyable or something. That's fun khuda. Girl is something. That sort of. I- denies this. But amy that asked me the first time. He opened coup a couple of months. After it opened said what would be your ideal restaurants open. I was like signing. That's bryce i mean. That's a little more firefighters a lot. More sort of looks humble on the plate but obviously still flavorful and in delicious so we thought well. Let's go for it. That's what it's the restaurant that is now the site that obviously lends itself to being a growing doc wooden floors to ceilings old path. So yeah that's it's come. Across having a brian something that slow south african. i mean. You don't need an occasion for most of the time you brian about three or four times a week. It's just you know people prefer to be outdoors of the bear in the hands cooking a bit of meats and some goods over the fire. Think it's just so quintessential south african. it's so cultural. Everybody that lives in south africa knows what it is. They all do it in some form of culturally. You got the white south africans in the english speaking that one way or the afrikaans speaking south africans do it a completely different way. But that's what brings us all together. Is that elements of cooking either fire and being so rudimentary that everybody no matter where you're from what your background is just like everybody has that identity and i think it's a huge part of what i am on the prod south african and obviously every opportunity. I have obviously england's not the best environment to have a bri three or four times a week but we definitely as soon as there are like tonight for example. I'll be having a bright because of the way this great so every opportunity we have. It's a bright to social gathering and that's really why we in hospitality is to host and sort of like have fun with people not necessarily people you know but necessarily just forming a relationship with others and that's what it's about. There's a good handful of south african sort of influence restaurants. You know you got out in camden arts. And elaine southfield wimbledon where you know. There are a lot of south africans living so it would make sense for them to do that but as a whole i don't think people really understand what south african food is. It's a huge melting pot of cultures in south africa. So it's very hard to say that's south. African is you can go. That's french or italian. I think it's very hard to figure out what it is. But it's slowly picking up a little bit more momentum casino. This would like the past two years to more the winds from south africa. Moving over but more so people on getting a lot more acquainted. What south africa's restaurants and dining scene is about office idea for being here with the fact that we used to come out and pack and quite a lot to eat with my brother and we noticed the amount of restaurants that were around here and the demand really. I mean everywhere. We are going out. It was like our waiting lists that we'd have to wait and we'd be going to bob waiting to cool to come back and have a table so you know i saw that. That was a great food. Hub ron hit already in terms of expanding the group around peckham. It's really about the neighborhood. I mean we want to be a neighborhood group so we don't have an interest of going into central london. It's just not us. If we expanded further out it would be harder to have that neighborhood field. Have that family run business. Feel at the end of the day. I think we just really looking into the future and seeing i mean we have a fifteen year lease so we were trying to think long time at the moment. It's hard when you're living day to day with these restrictions. And i guess we just trying to think of in a year's time where will it be. Where will we be so we really didn't want to miss the opportunity because it was such a grey side that we found in love with and we really wanted the opportunity of doing a brian restaurant so we took the risk really of doing that. There's a lot of challenges. There's a lot of challenges that we're not used to. We'll try to keep our head of the water and take every day as it comes..

robin gill creedy cape town south africa patrick london clapham Ami maki baugh Amy mayfair Patrick pepsi elaine southfield melbourne bryce amy brian Hub ron
"london" Discussed on Faffing with Friends

Faffing with Friends

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Faffing with Friends

"Okay. That's probably somewhere close. That i realize there's all it's a two hour bus journey to the actual sensor other than the fencer of london. What is the center of london. Is it left the square because these circuits. Wha what do you mean the center of where are you going. let's go. Let's go to sit in parliament. Yeah that's that's city of parliament. Yeah where's the central london and you know it's it's some some of the many things that you know you come to like appreciate you come to realize about the small small town like close ever knows each other not having a big tangent i wanna go on based on that civic me don't So i remember that one of the things that struck me about coming here was even though it's such a big city. You have so many options in there so many people. You're never really alone. I felt way more even now. I feel way more isolated here than i ever do. When i back in my hometown where i came from because knowing everyone knowing everywhere and being able to knowing like the back of your hand knowing the people knowing that they know you it. It felt way more with less isolating than the london does here. You're like stock in a place really and you know if your friends are too far away they can only see you now and then if you know it's weird 'cause like back there i'd cross the street Their lives my friend across the road from me we. If we're hanging out we literally just walk across the street. Go sit down on our couch. Hang out and talk play games. Whatever here it would be like. We have the prime this a few days ahead of time. We we have to make sure we know where we're meeting. We have to make sure everybody to prepare to make a journey y'all to calculate geographic Exactly it's so much more difficult to just be social and outgoing and that's weird because you'd think would be the opposite city but because of the way it is because though ever lives Different everyone's has to do a lot to get each other in..

two hour london central london one things