39 Burst results for "London"

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:58 min | 48 min ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"You just heard there from Christian Malik of JPMorgan out of the London team at a Europe Tom was the path towards one 25 on Brent next year one 50 thereafter But people have engaged with us on that interview in the last 24 rounds Thank you We appreciate some of the incoming views on all of this Tom but ultimately what underpins that view from JPMorgan is spare capacity at OPEC plus The market consensus is something close to 5 Sebastian talked about it It's actually about 4.8 His view is that it's something closer to two That's a big spread 2.8 million pounds That's a big spread What Kennedy added value for you John and the 9 car yesterday in me as well on radio And you mean very clear that there's some real complexities here and the shock was what the U.S. and Saudi Arabia maybe did or did not do yesterday that led to that move in oil and the real surprise from the Russians for that What I would set up John into the weekend and the reading here is the idea of a JPMorgan Francisco launch a bank of American others looking for higher prices and very lonely as Deutsche Bank looking for a markdown here under $60 a barrel from their hydrocarbon team If I can't speak for Jeff carry and the team over at Goldman right now Lisa they've seems to be that we priced out too much demand Priced out too much demand out of the forecast of the back of the omicron variant and we did it really quickly You think about that Friday last Friday a 13% move on crude just like that Look at the eye And when you look at a lot of the heartbreak prognostications each wave of the COVID variants have actually led to less of a disruption right And I think that that might be something that edifies Jeff curry's view Want to build up the price section for you go and get to the economic data in about 41 minutes 41 minutes away from the payrolls report 5 50 is the estimate coming into its TK futures up 5 advance at a tenth of 1% Yielded a basis point on ten to one 42 91 but you know the theme this week the curve is flatter two year yields higher ten year to lower This is a really nuanced Bloomberg terminal right now folks and particularly with strong Swiss one O three 94 is strong Swiss That's big news for SMB And as John mentions a curve flattening off the vanilla curve the two tens some of the other curves showing that angst is all John what I would go to is a two year yield and to watch it at 8 30.6250 Back 360 65 last week We've brought back on four with that conversation about rate hikes I'm looking at two tens Tom back at 80 basis points Basically where we started the year It's a full round trip January out of December Green on the screen the vix from a 28 into a 27.23 which is a good time to drag pretty Gupta in here with a chart and pretty link the equity markets into this jobs report I do We're looking at the dynamics between the two essentially how much of the stock market is really driven by what you're seeing in the economic data And there was a time when poor economic data was a good thing for the markets because it meant that fed support only wouldn't stop dropping your hand I should say But our chart of the day today really shows that correlation that dynamic and for our radio audience it really is that buildup that you've seen in the last couple of months essentially that good news in the economy is actually good news in the markets And that's really just been a dynamic for the last couple of months in this post pandemic era It's a red zone green zone chart and all you got to know on radio is there's a whole bunch of red away from this correlation and all of a sudden boom the correlation flips Why Right Well because you start to price in those rate hike bets And that's really started really after the summer in particular And today is going to be the first real test since that Powell pivot about whether that trend actually stays or whether we go back to that bad news is good news dynamic Critic this really goes to the tech stock area Basically interest rate sensitive are they And the view on that has shifted right People saying that actually they can be a bit immune to rate increases because their businesses are so strong They generate so much cash people will still stick with them What's your sense of how much there is this knee jerk response to the potential for higher rates in the tech sector Yeah Lisa tech wear so many different hats And on the one hand it is extremely sensitive but on the other hand it's also functions as an inflation hedge in the fact that it's just so big We were talking about Apple yesterday with their supply chain issues and their demand issues At the end of the day they still have a $190 billion on their balance sheet extremely low corporate credit rate lines that they could draw up on and buy back So it's that kind of dynamic that makes essential essentially some of these big tech companies in their own league separate from large cap companies broadly that can also eat those inflation In front of the question do you want to guess non firm payrolls out to three digits Like do you want to go on a survey 550,342 or are you going to go more specific than that I heard it's 5 75 is the number to go for Really 5 75 Does she know the cameras are rolling John I always think it's high risk to put out a number but the median is 5 50 So surveillance way We never guess these reports Noted That was a joke 5 75 from doctor Gupta We'll see how that does today John I'm looking at the two ten spread and maybe that's the doctor of the street and we just got in here at 70 Hello Tom 5 50 is the median 800 to the high three 75 the low Lisa everyone Throw in darts Throw in darts with a blindfold on But here's the weirder part of that is that which aspect of the labor market reports can even matter right I mean we're going to be looking at wages Are we going to be looking at participation rate Is the headline number going to be the one that matters John Honestly I'm not sure if we see the participation rate move meaningfully that could be more important than the headline We want to see the participation rate move meaningfully So that's what the Federal Reserve's weighted all year for It just has not developed You have that kick higher as we reopened and it's just flattened out over the last few months I agree it's a social statistic but I believe I heard from Alexander Morgan Stanley She's not that focused on it given the gyrations of this pandemic economy The fed was focused on it They seem to be less focused on it now Tom almost exclusively it was mission get back to where we were I don't know if it is anymore We're back to where we were in Nebraska I just looked at Wyoming 4.1% unemployment rate They're almost back to February There's different stories here John away from X million of people still unemployed Until you've captured the political divide and that political divide lease has been playing out all year down in Washington In fact for the last two years I wonder how much the political divide is what's coloring the conversation on inflation considering the fact that this is a hot button political issue I also keep going back to Ellen's etna's call that if there is a significant pickup in only crown viruses that actually does virus cases that actually does impede the economy that that could actually lead to a sooner rate hike This is a total shift with respect to how important the labor market is versus inflationary pressure John what's secretary Walsh's call I'll ask him Tom at not good His call is thus passes wrote legislation Let's have some form of fiscal stimulus And let's create jobs I mean it's totally removed from a lot of the Wall Street analysis So I think it's fair to say this administration wanted to run this economy hub They wanted to do things differently to what we've done in the past This Federal Reserve is starting to go on a different direction We're pretty well aligned for the last year And I think that's true anymore Tom No That's going to be kind of the core of the issue that we have when we have this conversation a little bit later this morning I've got to try and tease that out of secretary Walsh So you're good at teasing it out you know I'm not a plant at all You know you know it's I'm already into my surveillance nap by the time you're talking to circuit Thanks I appreciate that I think it lies on air I'm blooming both radio at the same time So I'm.

John Jpmorgan Christian Malik Europe Tom Jpmorgan Francisco Jeff Carry Jeff Curry TOM Gupta Opec Lisa Tech Deutsche Bank Sebastian Saudi Arabia
The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:26 min | 2 d ago

The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

"Crowds. Then around 2013 to 2014, I started to notice something change. And gradually, audiences became more and more sensitive. Not all audiences, but mainly audiences, audiences inner London, in central London, particularly young people. I started to notice that jokes that used to do quite well, then you used to say certain words and immediately you could feel the audience sees up. You could feel that there was attention around an audience when you broke certain topics. It was just, even if you dealt with a topic in a very sensitive, a very fun, a very playful way it didn't matter. You could feel the tension starting to come in. And then, obviously, everything exploded when Brexit happened when Trump happened. Then a narrative came in that if you voted for Trump, if you voted for Brexit, you were stupid, thick racist, white, all of these things, which they all lumped in together and then that's when the real divisions happened in comedy. And that's when I saw comedy becoming more woke, becoming more illiberal, becoming more intolerant. And it's progressed and then obviously we are where we are now. So that is my story with regards to trigonometry. And by the way, we started it in 2018 as a reaction to all of that because we saw what happened with Brexit with

London Brexit Donald Trump
Fresh update on "london" discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:41 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"To you live from studio one here at Midori house in London. I'm hanji tuck. Coming up, we have the latest from Austria as the resignation of the country's former Chancellor, prompts a fresh national political crisis. The era of Sebastian courts is over. But for all his faults as a politician, his time in power will have a lasting effect on this country, and its politicians. Plus, we take a closer look at Sudan's never ending transition to democracy, and the battle for control of the French Republican Party, and then monocles Andrew Mueller offers us his madcap assessment of the week's stranger stories. We also learned that carmella Harris vice president of the United States had bought a saucepan over at right here on the briefing with me Andrew tuck. Well, we begin today's program in Austria where the countries conservative leader Sebastian Kurtz has announced that he is leaving politics. Kurtz resigned as Chancellor in October, but his decision to quit politics altogether leaves a power vacuum at the heart of government at a time of national crisis. Monocles Alexi karolyi of has this report from Vienna. The era of Sebastian kutz is over. Funny should happen on the same day that Angela Merkel was having her military farewell. The two didn't.

Midori House French Republican Party Andrew Mueller Austria Carmella Harris Andrew Tuck Sebastian Kurtz Sudan London Kurtz Alexi Karolyi United States Sebastian Kutz Vienna Angela Merkel
Face masks again mandatory in England amid variant spread

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Face masks again mandatory in England amid variant spread

"Facemasks facemasks almond almond tree tree again again in in England England amid amid a a corona corona virus virus variants variants spread spread new new measures measures to to combat combat the the new new Omicron Omicron variant variant have have come come into into force force in in England England with with face face coverings coverings again again compulsory compulsory in in shops shops and and on on public public transport transport and and travel travel is is returning returning to to the the UK UK let's let's also also take take a a PCR PCR test test on on self self isolate isolate until until they they receive receive a a negative negative result result previously previously they've they've been been able able to to take take a a lateral lateral flow flow test test and and there there was was no no requirement requirement to to isolate isolate the the reintroduction reintroduction of of banditry banditry facemasks facemasks brings brings England England closer closer in in line line with with the the rest rest of of the the UK UK Scotland Scotland Wales Wales and and Northern Northern Ireland Ireland we we could could not not relaxed relaxed coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions as as much much as as in in the the don don since since the the summer summer Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma London London

England UK Northern Northern Ireland Scotland Wales Ireland Charles Charles De De Ledesma London
Fresh update on "london" discussed on Forever35

Forever35

00:39 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Forever35

"And then they're essentially rescued by this. These people called the saw que and then through various means of planet science. They fall in love with aliens. And. Jori is an actor's skeptical, but she's following. She's here for this. You're still here. Yeah. Basically, these are alien human romance books. Period. Okay. Now, there's a lot of great stuff about it like conveniently they can still procreate. There's some flags I have about it like conveniently everyone has heterosexual the aliens and all the women who have landed. So like all the male aliens and the women who have landed on the planet are all into each other. You know what I mean? Like there's not a few gay aliens or gay humans, come on. Now I haven't finished this series. There are 22 books. I'm on book 12. I read 12 books on vacation in this one series of alien human romance. Okay. The best part was after I texted you this you responded with what you were reading, which was very on brand for you. So I heard about these books in the forever 35 book club, Facebook group, a great Facebook group, which has provided me with many excellent book recommendations. I'd never heard of this series. And I was intrigued. It is called the rivers of London series. So, of course, when I heard this, I was like, this is we are living our best lives. We really are. And so I was on vacation, reading rivers of London. Literally reading so many of these books. I think the best way I can describe them is it's like grown-up Harry Potter as a biracial detective. In the London police force and is it does it take place in current day? It takes place in present day London. But there's a magical element? Yes, this. This policeman, the. He's not a detective. He's a constable. He is a practitioner of magic. And all of the cases, I shouldn't say most all of the cases have a magical element to them, that he and his boss are the only two people in the police department who deal with magical cases. So they get called in. They get called in when there's something they're the experts. Yes, exactly. And the rest of the force is a little skeptical of their whole vibe and of the fact that there's magic, but they've seen the results. Anyway, I've been enjoying them. It's funny, like I feel like a lot of series kind of go downhill after the first couple of books, like almost like the authors like run out of steam or something. Well, it's hard to kind of sustain a world and keep discovering new stuff, right? Totally. But I think this is one of the rare series that gets better with each book. And how many are there total? Great question. I wanna say there's let's see. One, two,.

Jori London Facebook Group Harry Potter Facebook
Omicron brings COVID-19 vaccine inequity 'home to roost'

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Omicron brings COVID-19 vaccine inequity 'home to roost'

"The the new new coronavirus coronavirus variant variant Omicron Omicron is is bringing bringing cozied cozied nineteen nineteen vaccine vaccine inequality inequality home home to to roost roost the the emergence emergence of of Omicron Omicron on on the the wheels wheels desperate desperate and and likely likely futile futile attempt attempt to to keep keep it it at at bay bay a a reminders reminders of of what what scientists scientists have have warned warned for for months months the the coronavirus coronavirus who who thrive thrive as as long long as as vols vols parts parts of of the the world world black black vaccines vaccines the the holding holding of of limited limited to to cope cope with with nineteen nineteen shots shots by by rich rich countries countries doesn't doesn't just just mean mean risk risk for for the the parts parts of of the the world world C. C. ng ng shortages shortages it it threatens threatens the the entire entire globe globe faxing faxing expert expert Richard Richard Hatchett Hatchett says says the the bar bar received received a a ruthless ruthless opportunist opportunist and and the the inequality inequality that that has has characterized characterized the the global global response response has has now now come come home home to to roost roost Charles Charles Taylor Taylor this this month month London London

Bay Bay C. C. Ng Ng Richard Richard Hatchett Hatch Charles Charles Taylor Taylor London
Fresh update on "london" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

00:45 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "london" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Europe

"Can't believe headquarters have in London I'm Caroline Hepburn with this Bloomberg radio business flash At the moment European stocks are kicking out a small gain this Friday are by two tenths of 1% travel and leisure and energy top sectors gaining in what is a tentative market that acts up by three tenths of 1% Italian bonds up a basis point right now these to be present pristine Lagarde are speaking just early this morning and increasing interest rates is unlikely next year She won't hesitate to take action to combat elevated inflation as soon as it becomes necessary How much credibility is there for that in the view of traders certainly we were speaking to pretty big opinion columnist Marcus ashworth earlier this morning saying that the credibility is somewhat lacking for central banks right now especially when it comes to the fed with the power with drone power having moved to a much more hawkish tone after a gaining his second term In terms of U.S. years that we tried at one spot four 4% for USS on the ten year a fairly flat U.S. futures at the moment negative for the S&P 500 and NASA even features partly down a tenth of 1% The Turkish Nero we've been tracking it falls yet again we had that red hot inflation number from turkey out this morning all up 3% on WTI food features $68 44 and as for the dollar right now are potential 1% That is a good idea business flash and the latest in terms of the market.

Caroline Hepburn Marcus Ashworth Lagarde Bloomberg London U.S. FED Nasa Turkey
The Salvation Army Now Embraces Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:31 min | 3 d ago

The Salvation Army Now Embraces Critical Race Theory

"For decades I think even as a young kid when I would walk into the supermarket or some place and there were these individuals in the special outfits with the special hats with a bucket of red bucket the Salvation army Take a Protestant Christian organization Doing great works and I figured among the least controversial the organizations out there have never heard anything negative or political from them And so I don't need the government to tell me to redistribute wealth When they're out there if I go into the store I always put a $20 bill in there come in put a $20 whatever it is Same with the Boy Scouts the girls got whatever But these institutions are dying Not all the boys and girls in the Boy Scouts and girl scouts and their parents many of them are so earnest And out all the people ringing the bells for the Salvation army but the Salvation army now is an institution Has been corrupted Great sight trending politics but this is really everywhere Eric Thompson Salvation army once white donors to offer a sincere apology for systemic races What was founded in 1865 in London England is both a Protestant Christian church and international charitable organization a Salvation army has now embraced critical race theory

Salvation Army Eric Thompson Protestant Christian Church England London
UK plans new measures to combat omicron coronavirus variant

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 d ago

UK plans new measures to combat omicron coronavirus variant

"The U. K. has tightened up credit restrictions off to finding two cases of the new Omicron variants of the virus British prime minister Boris Johnson explained the fears of top scientists and the government is does appear on the chrome spreads very rapidly and can be spread between people who a double vaccinated as a result Johnson's government has imposed new measures to slow down the spread of the new variants will require anyone who enters the U. K. to take a PCR test by the end of the second day after that arrival and to self isolate until they have a negative result in addition mosque wearing the shops and on public transport will once again become mandatory Johnson also promised top scientists to exonerate the vaccine program both of the U. K. cases were in England other links they also both involve travel from southern Africa Karen Thomas London

U. K. Boris Johnson Johnson U. England Southern Africa Karen Thomas London
Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 5 d ago

Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

"Covert nineteen cases from the new variant are emerging outside of southern Africa where it was first identified this very it is spreading around the world with two cases so far identified here in the U. K. British prime minister Boris Johnson announced new measures aimed at containing the spread of the Omicron variant many countries are imposing new restrictions on travel from southern Africa including the U. S. we were so slow to act on delta and the whole world it's such a high price for it Danny Altman is a professor of immunology at imperial college London let's try and be forewarned can do it properly this time so I think I could probably is warranted the good thing is that we have monitoring systems around the world to detect these variants very quickly the world health organization's Maria banker cove already scientists are sharing research with us information with us so that we can take action open questions include the effectiveness of current vaccines against Omicron and whether it causes more severe disease there's been no indication of that so far I'm Ben Thomas

K. British Prime Minister Bori Southern Africa Danny Altman U. Imperial College London Maria Banker Cove World Health Organization Ben Thomas
At least 2 people dead during first winter storm in UK

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 5 d ago

At least 2 people dead during first winter storm in UK

"Britain's first winter storm has hit parts of northern England Scotland's and the nine and killing at least two people storm Alwyn has posted parts of the United Kingdom with gusts of nearly a hundred miles per hour the extreme weather conditions caused road closures train delays power cuts and Holly waves in northwestern England Samantha I doctor tree fell on him and the northern alliance a man was killed when his car was hit by a falling tree though the worst of the storm appears to have passed many have been warned against travelling as heavy snow and high winds continue Karen Thomas London

Alwyn England Britain Scotland United Kingdom Northern Alliance Samantha Karen Thomas London
Reuters Is Suddenly Very Concerned About the Spread of COVID

The Dan Bongino Show

00:58 sec | Last week

Reuters Is Suddenly Very Concerned About the Spread of COVID

"So Reuters is very concerned about the risk of COVID Reuters you know fake news agency They're very concerned about the risk of COVID From Cubans protesting in the street of Cuba You know the same Reuters it was extremely concerned about COVID spreading during the Black Lives Matter protest Just kidding Of course they were in concern About the Black Lives Matter protests in COVID Again they like communist BLM or communists so they want to support them So you want to throw kind of water on it and say hey listen there could be COVID spread during the BLM protest So they did nothing But here's a headline from Reuters Cuban protests risk exacerbating COVID-19 spike all of a sudden are concerned Interesting because when you read some of their own headlines about the BLM protests thousands joined Black Lives Matter protests outside the U.S. embassy in London There's no mention of that whole COVID thing Because as I said to you opening the show you know the media They're communist sympathizers

Reuters Covid BLM Cuba U.S. Embassy London
The Incredible True Story of Squanto

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:09 min | Last week

The Incredible True Story of Squanto

"In 1608 before any ships before any people settled in what's now Massachusetts, I never knew this, because we all know that the Mayflower landed there in 1620. Chris, you knew that? I did at one point in my life. Right. So 1620 is when the pilgrims land at Plymouth. Sorry. But I always assumed growing up that that's the first time that anybody came to like what's Massachusetts. But I found out that's not the case. And the story of squanto, which I'm going to tell right now, which just wait, wait till you hear this. It starts in 1608, and it turns out that English trading ships would travel from Europe from England to Iceland, Greenland make their way down Nova Scotia all the way down and they would trade with the natives. Now I never knew that. So the natives were familiar with English sailors coming and trading and giving them knives and pots and pans and they would give them pelts and whatever. And they would trade. I never knew this. Well, in 1608, a group, a group, a ship led by a captain hunt lands or drops anchor off of what is today Plymouth Massachusetts. And the braves come down to the shore to trade with them as they've done before. Well, just so happens that this captain hunt was a bad man, and instead of trading with the braves, they whack them over the head, put them in the long boat, take them out to the ship, throw them in the hold, sail to malaga, Spain and sell them into slavery. This is 1608, one of the braves was a 12 year old. Boy named tisquantum. Now this is true story. This is all documented. I've done the research. Others have done the research. It's true. So he has bought by some kindly friars, who seemed to treat him well. Teach him the Christian religion, and this is the part that we'll never know how this happened. But they arrange for him to be freed and to travel to London. Now imagine from malaga Spain to London. So this is an Indian from what is today Massachusetts, a Native American, a patuxent, makes its way to London with the idea, and this is where it's crazy of getting back across the Atlantic to go back home. I know. It's like being on the moon and saying, so when's the next ship going back? There's no next ship going back. What are you talking about? But I guess the idea was not insane. He worked in London from what is it around 1612, 1613 for four or 5 years with a family called slany. This is all documented. This Indian named squanto to squantum learns the English language. He's there when he's there when Queen Elizabeth is on the throne, we're talking Shakespeare is writing his play. So he's in London. This Massachusetts Indian, and this is years before the pilgrims ever get to Plymouth rock, crazy, right? In 1618, I believe 1619, a ship is found. For him to go back to his home. And he's going to translate obviously because he knows the language. He's going to be on the ship working with these English as they're stopping, you know, and he's going to be doing the translating and so on and so forth. So somehow he gets passage on a ship. The ship ends up having to spend the winter in I can't remember if it was Iceland or Greenland. It's in my book. Where does it say? Newfoundland now, hold on a second. Anyway, the point is that it took them quite a while to get there, right? So they basically, no, it was Newfoundland. Sorry. They spend the winter in Newfoundland. And then the next spring, this is like 1619, they bring him to what's now the coast of Massachusetts drop him off. Thank you very much. Goodbye. This sounds crazy, right? This is document. This is a true story. So a year plus before the pilgrims land. This Indian has made the journey from Plymouth to Spain to London, spans 5 years London, learns the English language, learns the ways the English, and then ends up back where he started. He finds his way on foot to the village, which is right where Plymouth is today, right? Village where his Indian, where his family is, they have all been wiped out. In ten years, he's dreamed about getting home, he's dreamed about returning. He's dreamed for ten years. He's thought in his mind of doing the impossible to get all the way back

Massachusetts Braves Plymouth London Malaga Greenland Iceland Spain Slany Nova Scotia Chris Newfoundland England Europe Plymouth Rock Queen Elizabeth Atlantic Shakespeare
Firm Tied to Hunter Biden Brokered $3.8B Deal for Cobalt Mines to Chinese Company

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | Last week

Firm Tied to Hunter Biden Brokered $3.8B Deal for Cobalt Mines to Chinese Company

"Hunter Biden's firm helped Chinese company purchase rich cobalt mine in $3.8 billion deal. In investment firm that counts Hunter Biden among founder, its founders helped the Chinese company purchase one of the world's most lucrative cobalt mines from an American company. Biden established the firm, bohai harvest RST, equity investment fund management, with two other Americans and some Chinese partners in 2013. Hear that? Hunter Biden? Started a firm with Chinese partners in 2013. No, no, no, but hey, the real problem? Is moms and Grand Junction that show up at school board meetings? Who get their entire house searched by FBI agents? The American members controlled 30% of the Shanghai based operation and served on the board. I'm reading from Fox News dot com. The company notably completed a deal in 2016 that saw a Congo cobalt and copper mine transfer from an American company to a Chinese outfit. For the sum of $2.65 billion. Bhr served as a minority stakeholder to buy out around $1.1 billion of shares from London mining of Canada, who owned a portion of the Congo mine. Chris Clark, a lawyer for Biden, says he no longer holds any interest directly or indirectly in either VHR or scans. But Chinese business records reviews reviewed by Fox News in April 2021 showed that Hunter Biden continued to hold a 10% Chinese private equity firm stake in ball high harvest RST equity investment fund management through hunters, company.

Hunter Biden Bohai Chinese Partners Biden Congo Fox News FBI Shanghai Chris Clark London Canada
Taxi driver hurt in UK blast says it's a miracle he's alive

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Taxi driver hurt in UK blast says it's a miracle he's alive

"The taxi driver hurt in a Liverpool blast says it's a miracle he's alive in a message issued through the police David Perry says he's so thankful that no one else was injured in such an evil act British police have called with the November fourteen explosion a terrorist act I'm not trying to determine the motive of the bomber and models will mean the attack had died in the blast outside Liverpool women's hospital he managed to get out of the vehicle before it was consumed by flames the driver says he been overwhelmed by the good wishes and generosity he received after the attack Charles Taylor this month London

Liverpool David Perry Charles Taylor London
UK to probe racial bias in medical devices after COVID toll

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

UK to probe racial bias in medical devices after COVID toll

"The British government's investigating with the built in racial bias in some medical devices led to black and Asian people getting sick and dying disproportionately from covert nineteen witness to cystic surface has found that in the first year of the pandemic up to March twenty twenty one black and south Asian people in Britain have higher death rates than their white compatriots even off to factors like occupation and underlying health conditions were taken into account health secretary Sajid Javid has said the pandemic had highlighted health disparities along race and gender lines he says that a third of intensive care admissions in Britain at the height of the pandemic well people from black and ethnic minority backgrounds more than doubled their share of the population Charles Taylor this month London

British Government Sajid Javid Britain Charles Taylor London
WHO: Europe is only region with increasing COVID deaths

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

WHO: Europe is only region with increasing COVID deaths

"The World Health Organization says the corona virus deaths in Europe has risen five percent in the last week making it the only region in the world where because of its nineteen fatalities have increased in his weekly report on the pandemic WHO's says could nineteen that's an old regions other than Europe remained stable or declined a total of fifty thousand worldwide last week of the three point three million new infections reported globally just over two million came from Europe it was the seventh consecutive week the Kobe nineteen cases continue to mount across the sixty one countries and territories W. H. O. count in issue a pian region within Europe WHO's says the highest number of new cases were in Russia Germany and Britain Charles Taylor this month London

Europe World Health Organization W. H. O. Russia Germany Charles Taylor Britain London
 Queen carries out in-person audience at Windsor Castle

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Queen carries out in-person audience at Windsor Castle

"Britain's Queen has met with the military's chief of staff at Windsor Castle the meeting with general Nick Carter is the first face to face engagement since appeared off appointment cancellations concerns about the monarchs health have been replaced last month when she spent the night in a London hospital after being admitted for tests worries then intensified after she pulled out from Sunday's national remembrance service to pay tribute to Britain's war dead palace officials who had said it was the moment firm intention to make the event said she sprained her back at the talks the queen stood to welcome Qatar who's preparing to step down as the armed forces chief soon Charles

Nick Carter Windsor Castle Britain National Remembrance Service London Qatar Charles
UN climate boss: 'Good compromise' beats no deal on warming

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

UN climate boss: 'Good compromise' beats no deal on warming

"Cop twenty six nations finally strike a U. N. climate agreement after compromising on a cold deal despite reaching a decision following the climate summit many member states are disappointed after a last minute change which waters down crucial language on coal power that being said many leaders such as British prime minister Boris Johnson are optimistic we haven't beaten climate change and it would be fatal to think that we have because there is so much more that still needs to be done but what we do have now is a viable roadmap the final package highlights the importance of financially supporting developing nations and paving the way for better carbon trading the agreement also says big carbon polluting nations must come back and submit stronger emission cutting pledges by the end of next year Naomi shot in London

Boris Johnson Naomi London
Husband of woman detained in Iran ends 21-day hunger strike

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Husband of woman detained in Iran ends 21-day hunger strike

"The husband of Nazanin cigar Radcliffe the British Iranian woman detained in Iran and says twenty one day hunger strike Richard Ratcliffe thank supporters as he ends his protest outside Britain's foreign office after a long three weeks he continues to fight for his wife's freedom more than five years and she was detained and to run Rackley began his demonstration last month after his wife lost her latest appeal in Iran he hopes his hunger striker Sean a greater spotlight on his wife's case and added pressure on both the British and Iranian governments Naomi shot in London

Nazanin Cigar Radcliffe Richard Ratcliffe Rackley Iran Britain Sean Naomi London
The Dinkins Effect Kicks in With the Biden-Harris Administration

The Dan Bongino Show

03:31 min | 3 weeks ago

The Dinkins Effect Kicks in With the Biden-Harris Administration

"David dinkins for those of you who don't remember the dinkins effect is this and it's kicking in right now with the Biden Harris administration He was the first black mayor of New York City He was a Democrat Eric Adams who's the mayor elect now about to take over for de Blasio is the Democrat as well Is going to be the second black mayor of New York City Again I don't give a damn about their skin color but the left is obsessed with it And is a part of the story The left media in New York He left this media which is basically all of the New York media There was radical left as you'll get They were obsessed with this story about dinkins being the first black man I mean it never stop It was like they didn't want to talk about it It was like dinkins was some caricature of a human being they wanted to be It was all about race so if they never want to talk about who think kids was what he wanted to do it was all about this historic but it just went on and on and he was lionized David dinkins Now again his skin color doesn't matter to conservatives but liberals are obsessed with it Everything to them is skin color The problem we think is was he was just terrible He was just a really awful mayor He was really genuinely bad Crime went through the roof The city economy tanked We had the bond market ready to leave Wall Street head over to London It was a disaster It was a mess This I don't think I can describe to you and paint a picture An awful enough terms How bad the city was during the David dinkins era It was so bad he managed to lose to a Republican many of you know Rudolph Giuliani To have a Republican when the mayorship of New York City which was like 8 to one Democrat the Republican Was an earthquake like we'd never seen before But when you saw and you lived the city and lived in the city Folks it was awful It was in a matter of if your car was going to be stolen Forget about broken into 8 cars were just stolen all the time It was like you came outside and you were actually stunned your car was still there You were like oh my gosh 7 days in a row I still got my car This is crazy It was that bad If you walk down the streets in the 7 5 precinct the three two you know certain areas and even in Staten Island It wasn't if you were gonna be mug that was gonna be like am I gonna lose one tooth or 7 Like am I gonna take a beating on this one or you just give up your wallet We need a matter of fact when you got mugged at the bus stop and people used to steal anything from you Money they'd steal like I used to buy wise potato chips Some guy combined ripped the bag out of your hand like that's just the way it was You didn't even file a police report It was just like expected Hey what happened at a Dan Hey mom my mom's name is Judy Hey Jude I didn't call it Jude I called her mom Hey Jude Yeah I came home They stole my wise potato chips in ten bucks Oh that's it Oh great awesome Only ten bucks today That's how bad the city was How does this relate to Harris Biden Because despite the fact that David dinkins became a God to the left being the first black mayor of New York City Folks things got so bad And turned around so quickly when Giuliani got an office that even the left wing media had to eventually say to themselves it's not because they wanted to do the right thing It's because they wanted to save the liberal movement and the Democrat party They eventually had to acknowledge that dinkins was just

David Dinkins Dinkins Biden Harris Administration Eric Adams De Blasio New York City New York Rudolph Giuliani Earthquake Judy Hey Jude London Staten Island Harris Biden Hey Jude Jude Giuliani Democrat Party
Prince Harry says he warned Twitter CEO of U.S. Capitol riot

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Prince Harry says he warned Twitter CEO of U.S. Capitol riot

"Britain's prince Harry has said he wants with the CEO that the U. S. capitol Ryan was coming a day before it happens hi he said he sent an email to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey saying that the site was being used to stage political unrest he made the comments on an online panel misinformation in California did you could Sussex also said of the said the email he didn't hear from to see again social media has been under fire recently for allowing misinformation to spread its pleadings outcomes such has the storming of the U. S. capitol in January of this year Karen Thomas London

U. S. Capitol Ryan Prince Harry Jack Dorsey Britain Twitter Sussex California U. Karen Thomas London
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Now you'll walk almost the end of half moon street certainly beyond halfway. You will walk past the hilton key on the right side the west side of the streets that you can see the flemings hotel clearly. There has often been a lot of building work going on here. It still As the boundary of shepherd market is still very highly sought after location. You'll see it's a fairly quiet straight even though you can see piccadilly running along the end at the south so it's being redeveloped but fleming's hotel has been here from very many years. It's nothing to do with. The inflaming is famous espionage circles. The hotel is very nice. We actually did the photo shoot in the bar of the hotel for the first set of spy walks that i did with airbnb. And it's a really nice bar. It's a basement bar and it's called monitors. These are all very interesting things because a basement bar has no windows. And therefore it was used by people like vera atkins to meet her spies. Her agents and debrief them before they perhaps went off for a long meeting in one of the flats and offices around shepherd market so menendez was attractive because it had no windows. But what i found when we're doing the photo shoot for the spy walks was it has no phone reception either so we had to keep going outside to get the photographers cell. So we can talk to him. And so i find interesting that there's a bar with no windows and no cell phone signal way you can meet. Spies right in the middle of london just off piccadilly fleming's hotel is also interesting because it was the home of bertie wooster and the christie house connections to the hotels. Well they believe it is the model for bertram hoteling agatha christie. Although other hotels claim that credit as well the likelihood is that i she did stay here when she was in london quite often that at least some elements of this hotel. The looking at today have made it into her stories as part of bertram although she is not a spy writer us such you do find a crossover between mystery stories on spying. A lot of spy. Novels are actually mystery novels. That happened to have some espionage content. If you believe anything on wikipedia you will know that. Bertram hotel is popularly believed to have been inspired by brown's hotel however the oxford dictionary of national biography. That suggests fleming's because agatha christie was known to stay at fleming's fleming's is one of my favorite hotels in this area. Because it's so little known it's kind of you have to be in a certain group of people to really know about it. They might disagree. It's been there for over one years. I think it's been on this site since it opened in eighteen fifty one. It certainly is old enough building and it looks like it could have been and they really play up. Their spike connections to bar is lovely. It's a really nice place to finish the walk. What we never did on the airbnb walk was actually going for drink because the cocktails are a little expensive but if you have to budget if your hair traveling to the uk on holiday it's definitely worth going in and getting a beer or cocktail in mineta's bar in the basement of fleming's before i had my world to walk also used to talk here about christina scar back. Because she was one of the agents vera atkins would have run and probably met in this hotel and the wonderful biography of christina by clan. Malay- is definitely worth a read. I will be reviewing that book. The spy who loved by clem molly in a future episode of spies of london. But i mention it because this whole war can indeed..

flemings hotel vera atkins fleming fleming's hotel christie house bertram airbnb agatha christie menendez bertie wooster Bertram hotel brown's hotel london wikipedia christina uk clem molly
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Six have been tracking a foreign prince a middle eastern prince who perhaps might be slightly large around the mayfair and making sure he doesn't cause a diplomatic incident his john day to had been spent hanging around mount st while fatboy had himself measured for a pair of purdy shotguns. First precariously brandishing a try gun. That's a practice test gun around the premises then throwing a tantrum. When he discovered he would have to wait two years before they were ready. And then later on. They're watching fat again from van outside a shuttered. Whorehouse here in south audley street the whole houses of south audley street are not widely advertised. Not obvious on this walk. But the interesting thing to me is that john kerry when he worked for my five worked in the building that you'll be seeing h. On this wall like field housing kuzma street. So john's lunch times would have been spent himself hanging around south orchestrate incurs street and therefore many of the locations in his earlier books and his perhaps most famous books tend to be from mayfair. More later now. The reason i liked per is because yes. The guns are intricate and expensive and highly regarded both as weapons for country shooting and as works of art in terms of the fine metalwork on them in the the woodwork on them but they also do a nice range of clothes racks jackets and so on and this shop is just great fun to look around his really old fashioned and traditional and just everything that makes mayfair great is exemplified by visit to purchase gunshop however however we are not going down south audley street we have we have a date in mount street gardens so we are heading east along mount straight past all the shops in the fancy restaurants. And on the right you will see an estate agents and passage along the side of the estate agents. Which takes you into mount street gardens. Sometimes as georgia's gardens and when you walk through first of all let me say it's even more of a favourite with me than grosvenor square gardens because it smaller. It's more intimate. It's sort of l-shaped which means you get little heidi corners here but also because eight is famous for kgb activity and you will see straight away and since georgia's gardens. Their high number of benches wooden benches many of which new would not have been there during the cold war however many of them were there during the cold war. And i've got information. That and i quote the second bench on the rights was used as a kgb signaling system to communicate with spies now the wrestlemania benches now that it's difficult to understand the second bench on the right..

mount street gardens mount st john day fatboy purdy john kerry grosvenor square gardens john georgia kgb
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Welcome despise of london. If you're taking this walk in person and actually walking around mayfair as you listen to this recording you should start in grosvenor square. The eagle squadrons memorial is towards the center of the square. Just on the south side near what used to be the millennium hotel from eagle squadrons. You can see the millennium hotel which were mentioned a second the old american embassy with a big bronze ego maruf and a number of other buildings which used by eisenhower and other americans in the war so grosvenor square is always been associated with on the east side. There is the tribute to nine eleven memorial. Peace garden that tab event. The embassy moved now and will become a hotel soon. Wisconsin building sign even the millennium hearts. How has its own stories. The interesting thing about my fair is that there are no tube station so the nearest and best way to get to grow on the chew is to come into long straight on the to nine and then walk west and south to get to the squadrons. Her bosses look at you and to bourbon spanish well twenty thousand and parkland and i think partly because of this positive public transport no tubes very few buses and the it's bounded on the north side box straight from the south side by cadila on the west by par lay. You tend to get a natural low in the ninety five area off the beaten track in a much noticeable quiet area of central really central. Some people say the most expensive postcode in one apartment in easy costume and so it's very granbury old area of london but not as an we'll be walking through shattered mockumentary but it has a lot of history especially postwar history and cold boisterous..

millennium hotel grosvenor square eagle squadrons memorial maruf american embassy Peace garden eisenhower london cadila Wisconsin
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

19:13 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Intern before casselle off spare. So let us rewind a little bit through the life and context of Edgar speyer in London the head of a rich and famous Bank home and part of a banking Dynasty which stretched across the globe. There was a spare in New York and there was a spare in London and there were spiders in Germany in the late eighteen hundreds as well as Long Island him say spell his name is virtually unknown today except that he is one and indeed the first of only two men to ever be stroked at the request of the government from the role of the privy Council. In other words Spire was a privy councillor one of those very few people who is entrusted with key Constitution wage. Decisions in the UK and the privy Council of course is headed by the Monarch today. It would be the Prime Minister plus a few senior ministers plus a few Lords. They are absolutely top people in terms of the British establishment. So speyer has the unwelcome distinction of being the first of only two people ever to be removed forcibly from that privy Council because of his own allegiance to Germany at a time when Britain was very much anti-german to try and understand or compare who spare was he was described as the king of the London Underground a public benefactor patron of Music in the Arts and he did in fact start galleries found theater companies. He's done all kinds of Arty things in music and art itself. He was a regular guest Downing straight. The prime minister at the time was Herbert Henry asked with Edgar was known very well in all the right circles. So if I think of who that might be today, well, I wouldn't think of a Bangkok I would think of somebody not like Alan sugar who is well-known enough. He's a self-made millionaire where a spare really had banking in the family. So I'm not sure if his home early life, but he didn't feel like a self-made man. He felt like a guy who came from a very wealthy family from the beginning. In other words. He was used to people listening to him. He was used to getting his own way. And I think that should be understood. It was not used to having to justify his actions to anybody least of all the king of England. So then you think of somebody like Bill Gates in America or thought maybe somebody like James Dyson in the UK, but I'm struggling to think of somebody who is Rich and Famous enough to be compared to spare cuz he was famous at the time but not from a entrepreneurial self-made background. So he wasn't like a rockstar today individual Bankers are very far from the public gaze. Now that song Because of the financial crash I think you would find it hard to mention unless you work in finance and have someone who has worked in finance. I find it hard to think of anybody who is well-known enough wage a banking background to be compared to spare. So these were different times Banks were not the global conglomeration that they are today. They were much more localized much smaller much more of an old boys network, especially in London. It's my challenge to you guys to think of somebody who is from a banking background, but famous enough to to count as a spare for today is a very difficult thing to do. Okay. So I think I've made that point as the the title of this book suggests. It is a case study not a biography so he doesn't put in enough about Spire to be considered a biography of the man. It really focuses on his time in London and just gives you enough contract to understand what happened in the nineteen tends to expire in early 1920s without going through everything that happened in his childhood and so on. So the question that the author gives us is what Aspire a traitor Escape Goldberg. Or a spy and he attempts to put before as the evidence so that we can decide for ourselves which is a nice little mystery to set his off on it is important to remember that in the 1890s and Thursday 1900 s France Germany and Britain were pretty much allies. I mean they traded together they had cultural things in common. Obviously, they had a different language. They all had a different career choice, which of these were different times but they sort of grudgingly rubbed along the same road, even if they're in different Vehicles. It's how I would think of it and it wasn't until the first world war and the years leading up to that page Germany really became an issue for Britain. And so what we found was a little bit like with the Russians in London today London in Britain was full of Germans full of French people going across the business. They were fully integrated into society. They spoke brilliant English. Yes, they had, you know our names they were clearly different, but they were perfectly acceptable in society job. An establishment spare would become a privy councillor. He was Leading Light in in building the Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863. So there is an absolutely no suggestion that I can find out that there was any kind of grievance garage or any kind of Suspicion about Germans in Britain until probably 1910 or the very early nineteen hundreds at least and indeed speyer had come to see London England as his home. He felt more at home here than he did in Germany and he traveled regularly to America to work on business with his members of his family his brother ran the New York house and he had family running the bank in Germany what I've done which is unusual for me is to make this a much longer and better book review than normal because I think this mayonnaise this topic is so fascinating as I've said, especially for me with with a German family that I've put my notes the highlights and shares that I've made in my ebook Edition on Goodreads so you can see dead. All of the notes that I'm using and there are more on Goodreads than I have time for in the podcast. So we arrive at the first world war 1914 and as the war intensified so did freeling against the 50 g eight thousand Germans resident in Britain. So this was not just two or three people sixty thousand Germans were fully integrated living in Britain. Most of them would have been living in the south east and London, of course, they are today, but it became difficult for them. And the people the Press even started to make a distinction between enemy aliens. In other words proper Germans found the 6 and 1/2 thousand also 10% of people who were naturalized in other words. They had taken steps to make themselves British. But of course were German by birth within the names and German families back in Germany. So around 10% of the British resident Germans considered themselves to be British or you know, more than half British or they were quite dead. Here and didn't ever want to go back to Germany, especially during the war. So in January Lord Crawford raised with the Lord Chancellor the possibility of revoking the citizenship of the 6 and 1/2 thousand Choice Germans. And of course, there was one of these so things were on the tone and I suspect it was a frightening time to be in London in particular. I think possibly in the distant provinces. This was not intense but in London where there were mobs there were the possibilities of large crowds demonstrations and indeed spaz house in Grosvenor Square was attacked and this is where the king took his famous Outburst where he said if you're going to intern the Germans you can internally first because I'm German and everybody in my family is German. So this had a particular poignancy the king consider yourself to be German during a time when Britain and Germany were at War and this was going to be a bad War this was going to be a really bad thing that lasted for longer than people thought. Affected that killed millions of people and affected millions of families for generations and this antagonism that began here continued on and ended up causing the second world war. So these were serious times. Nobody knew quite what was coming then of course, but nevertheless you have a German King a self-proclaimed German king of Britain and people are cheating the Press leading the charge to get these Germans sent home effectively and you can imagine what reception they might have had because the German people would have seen them as British. They all turn upon mass is Germany during a war. They would have been thrown straight into prison or worse. And of course, that's what people wanted here was for them to be thrown into prison for the duration of the war. But by the time the US entered the war in April nineteen Seventeen years, so, you know, it's an easy target to say too little too late, but enroll the Americans to steal the glory at the end James speyer and Edward bite of inspire had severed the connection with each other's banking job. I'll say this but until then spare and Co had continued as before to conduct a large-scale business with Germany. So the London house severed its connections with Germany, but the American house in April 1917 was forced to cut its ties with the German banks. So the tide is turning in America as well as in Britain. And because Spanish was so rich and famous and well-known. He became a lightning rod for a lot of this denaturalization internment argument and he became a subject along with a guy called Castle. It was not particularly the subject of this book. They were sort of mentioned if anybody was to talk in generic terms about denaturalizing sending home Germans sponge and Cassell with the two names that they use as examples. That's how famous they were in the Press not just in Social establishment circles, and of course speyer started to do things off. Which were planning for various possible outcomes. So any War has two possible outcomes, either one side wins or the other side wins, and of course because the country of spares birth was fighting the country that he now lives in he made investigations to see what would happen should either of those outcomes occur and he obviously continued to write to members of his family in Germany even towards the end of the war when such things were discouraged frowned upon and possibly illegal. So this is where things really start to go badly wrong for spare the British foreign office in budget establishment starts to collaborate. Some would say collude with the American authorities to gather evidence about spaz business and personal activities America London and Beyond with the specific game of trying to get his British citizenship revoked. So there is a general mood against natural log. Germans living in Britain and there is a specific action focused on speyer by the British government pretty much in response to public demand and they don't sort of it's not the situation that they've been presented with evidence and then they charge him with a crime and then they have a trial they decided to have a trial and then went about looking for the evidence and this is kind of democracy at its worse slowest because it it shows how they arm of the state hand in certain situations when the public demand is so great just handed to the Mob and that's exactly what happened to speyer the government turned against him secretly behind closed doors and without his knowledge and began tracking him. They opened his mail. They sought evidence from America and South Americans were actively looking for small slip-ups that they could then turn into a big story and hold a trial and remove his citizenship. I think as somebody who's dead. Never lived abroad or emigrated anywhere. It's hard to understand the meaning of this today because the world is so globalized. It really doesn't matter. What passport you have most of the time you can travel a long way you like even if you have to get a Visa, it's quite easy. There are very very few countries. Even Saudi Arabia now allows tourists, you know, there are very few countries that will not let you in as long as you have a passport from somewhere and it's not a country that they are actively fighting against or having some kind of diplomatic beef with at a time of war or at a time of pandemic or a time of Crisis wage, which passport you hold suddenly becomes important and you suddenly with brexit to you suddenly have to think carefully about which passport is best for you. So now you have German residents in Britain applying for jobs passports. You have British people in Germany with British passports trying to get German passports to try and make sure that whatever happens with brexit they'll be okay in their families will be able to continue living wherever they are today. Yep. Happened to the first world war as well people started to really think okay. I'm a naturalized British citizen what happens if Germany wins the war they're probably going to come to Britain occupy the country and round apology room and practise. So the British people saw the Germans as traitors and the German people would see those living in Britain as traitors and that's why I like this book so much. It really makes you look at today's world and think about who is who and and where do you live and what relevance does that have to your life? So when you here recently about black and mixed-race people in Britain feeling on the edge of things feeling singled out when you have European people in Britain feeling marginalized and singled out through brexit when you have the pandemic marginalizing be a many people and the poor as well. And if those two things happen to intersect the pandemic will affect you disproportionately in the financial crisis, which is not on this song. Of course where the money was transacted and where the transactions were domiciled started to have implications about how the government's would handle those debts. So suddenly it was important whether your mortgage had been bought by Indian bank and sold on to some Saudis in in the good times that nobody cared. So it's when there's a war when there's a crisis when there's a disease suddenly people have to look at themselves and think okay. Am I British wage on my German? Who am I and what do I do if the worst happens and the worst could be Germany winning or for some people it could be Britain winning these kind of Crisis really push you to undertook you are what you want where your family's going where you live and all the most fundamental things about your life, which do not get asked in peacetime. And this is why I think this story is so great because spare has been really pushed and of course, he's wealthy. He's not an average person. Just trying to make a living somewhere. He is wealthy. He knows the Prime Minister. He knows the king. He's famous wage. Today would have zero sympathy. He's the Elon Musk of 1920s Britain zero sympathy people could easily just say this guy is different from ours. He's crazy his German Dead He's Rich. He's never going to struggle no matter what and although that is all true. I do think that for them for topic wealthy people a hundred years ago had more sympathy and standing in society then they would have today. So today everybody criticizes Bill Gates full of his vaccine activities and he's philanthropy certainly in in Europe. He is heavily criticized. Whereas a hundred years ago. Bill Gates would have been a establishment figure. He would have been looked up to he would have been given a title if he lived in the UK, he would have been Lord of something and he would have been a pillar of society as a cash buyer was so business people rich people. Yes, they were different. They were not as sympathetic as the deserving poor as as the Kings might have called them down. Not a cynical about these individuals as we would be today. I think spare today would possibly have an even harder time than he had in nineteen Fourteen and and Beyond into the early twenties. And in fact, it's j trial for denaturalization didn't happen until years after the war. I told them so long to figure out what they wanted to do that the war was over for three years before he had his citizenship revoked which is ridiculous really at the end of the war. They should've said okay, you know, whatever happened during the war. Let's leave it there. Let's move on but they didn't they continue to hand him. But the way spray was treated and he did lose the case. He was denaturalized. He was humiliated off and it left a stain on his record. It left a mark on his life and his attitudes to Britain for the rest of his life because in his eyes, he just couldn't really understand or he he refused to understand and Pander to these stupid as he saw them true realities. Yes, he did research what would happen if Germany won the war and how he might be treated but so would you is just common sense and if you're a successful businessman Always looking at risk and the future and predicting what might happen trying to mitigate. That's just human nature. So in his eyes, he was British. He'd made a lot of money which had to put in in taxes. He'd founded the Metropolitan Railway had given Britain a railway system, which is still the Envy of the world today. He was kind of a hero in his own artists and until nineteen fourteen. Pretty much everybody would have agreed he would have been and was a pillar of the establishment. He was a privy councillor and then a few short years later. Not only is he thrown out with the privy Council? He's actually thrown out of Britain effectively way you can imagine the sense of burning Injustice. But and there is a bot Spire did not do himself any favors. I think his background the fact that he was used to getting his own way meant that he made some errors avoidable arrows in failing to treat these charges seriously enough at the early stages. He didn't get rid of his connections to America and Germany quickly enough. It looked like he was dragging his feet off. In the perhaps, he wasn't it looked like he was reluctant to assimilate with Britain when the war came and of course he was hedging his bets as any good Banker would as any Gambler would but this was willfully misinterpreted by the British establishment as a means to get rid of the risk and the threat of speyer because he was mentioned softer in the press and he was a lightning rod for internment, but he was harshly treated but the details of this and of course was he a spy? Well, you'll need to read the book to find out not in the way that we think of one. So this is a great book. I've read it twice now. I think it's fabulous on its own terms, but it's also fabulous because it allows me to think about my background and about how people who migrated to Britain are seen today and untreated today. You've got Windrush you've got brexit these issues. Although we don't have a war yet. We do have things which are forcing people to think about their nationality about their passport about where they choose to live if they have that choice and that's why off. In this book is well worth your time. It's called Banker traitor scapegoats by the Troublesome case of Sir Edgar speyer by Anthony Clinton as I say, I will post in the show notes my Kindle highlights so you can see it on Goodreads go and get it get the paperback get the book. However, you choose to read this book add it to your list for lockdown. It is brilliant off..

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"His Fall From Grace, which is a somewhat tragic story any other decade, you know for Risen to prominence in the nineteen fifties sixties or anything after that or if it's finished his career before or 1900. We would never have heard of him, but he became really quite famous and was even mentioned by The King The King was outraged that people were protesting in asking all Germans to be interned wage. Excited to the wife of the then prime minister. Let them take me first. All my blood is German My Relations are German lets me the king the intern before casselle off spare. So let us rewind a little bit through the life and context of Edgar speyer in London the head of a rich and famous Bank home and part of a banking Dynasty which stretched across the globe. There was a spare in New York and there was a spare in London and there were spiders in Germany in the late eighteen hundreds as well as Long Island him say spell his name is virtually unknown today except that he is one and indeed the first of only two men to ever be stroked at the request of the government from the role of the privy Council. In other words Spire was a privy councillor one of those very few people who is entrusted with key Constitution wage. Decisions in the UK and the privy Council of course is headed by the Monarch today. It would be the Prime Minister plus a few senior ministers plus a few Lords. They are absolutely top people in terms of the British establishment. So speyer has the unwelcome distinction of being the first of only two people ever to be removed forcibly from that privy Council because of his own allegiance to Germany at a time when Britain was very much anti-german to try and understand or compare who spare was he was described as the king of the London Underground a public benefactor patron of Music in the Arts and he did in fact start galleries found theater companies. He's done all kinds of Arty things in music and art itself. He was a regular guest Downing straight. The prime minister at the time was Herbert Henry asked with Edgar was known very well in all the right circles. So if I think of who that might be today, well, I wouldn't think of a Bangkok I would think of somebody not like Alan sugar who is well-known enough. He's a self-made millionaire where a spare really had banking in the family. So I'm not sure if his home early life, but he didn't feel like a self-made man. He felt like a guy who came from a very wealthy family from the beginning. In other words. He was used to people listening to him. He was used to getting his own way. And I think that should be understood. It was not used to having to justify his actions to anybody least of all the king of England. So then you think of somebody like Bill Gates in America or thought maybe somebody like James Dyson in the UK, but I'm struggling to think of somebody who is Rich and Famous enough to be compared to spare cuz he was famous at the time but not from a entrepreneurial self-made background. So he wasn't like a rockstar today individual Bankers are very far from the public gaze. Now that song Because of the financial crash I think you would find it hard to mention unless you work in finance and have someone who has worked in finance. I find it hard to think of anybody who is well-known enough wage a banking background to be compared to spare. So these were different times Banks were not the global conglomeration that they are today. They were much more localized much smaller much more of an old boys network, especially in London. It's my challenge to you guys to think of somebody who is from a banking background, but famous enough to to count as a spare for today is a very difficult thing to do. Okay. So I think I've made that point as the the title of this book suggests. It is a case study not a biography so he doesn't put in enough about Spire to be considered a biography of the man. It really focuses on his time in London and just gives you enough contract to understand what happened in the nineteen tends to expire in early 1920s without going through everything that happened in his childhood and so on. So the question that the author gives us is what Aspire a traitor Escape Goldberg. Or a spy and he attempts to put before as the evidence so that we can decide for ourselves which is a nice little mystery to set his off on it is important to remember that in the 1890s and Thursday 1900 s France Germany and Britain were pretty much allies. I mean they traded together they had cultural things in common. Obviously, they had a different language. They all had a different career choice, which of these were different times but they sort of grudgingly rubbed along the same road, even if they're in different Vehicles. It's how I would think of it and it wasn't until the first world war and the years leading up to that page Germany really became an issue for Britain. And so what we found was a little bit like with the Russians in London today London in Britain was full of Germans full of French people going across the business. They were fully integrated into society. They spoke brilliant English. Yes, they had, you know our names they were clearly different, but they were perfectly acceptable in society job. An establishment spare would become a privy councillor. He was Leading Light in in building the Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863. So there is an absolutely no suggestion that I can find out that there was any kind of grievance garage or any kind of Suspicion about Germans in Britain until probably 1910 or the very early nineteen hundreds at least and indeed speyer had come to see London England as his home. He felt more at home here than he did in Germany and he traveled regularly to America to work on business with his members of his family his brother ran the New York house and he had family running the bank in Germany what I've done which is unusual for me is to make this a much longer and better book review than normal because I think this mayonnaise this topic is so fascinating as I've said, especially for me with with a German family that I've put my notes the highlights and shares that I've made in my ebook Edition on Goodreads so you can see dead. All of the notes that I'm using and there are more on Goodreads than I have time for in the podcast. So we arrive at the first world war 1914 and as the war intensified so did freeling against the 50 g eight thousand Germans resident in Britain. So this was not just two or three people sixty thousand Germans were fully integrated living in Britain. Most of them would have been living in the south east and London, of course, they are today, but it became difficult for them. And the people the Press even started to make a distinction between enemy aliens. In other words proper Germans found the 6 and 1/2 thousand also 10% of people who were naturalized in other words. They had taken steps to make themselves British. But of course were German by birth within the names and German families back in Germany. So around 10% of the British resident Germans considered themselves to be British or you know, more than half British or they were quite dead. Here and didn't ever want to go back to Germany, especially during the war. So in January Lord Crawford raised with the Lord Chancellor the possibility of revoking the citizenship of the 6 and 1/2 thousand Choice Germans. And of course, there was one of these so things were on the tone and I suspect it was a frightening time to be in London in particular. I think possibly in the distant provinces. This was not intense but in London where there were mobs there were the possibilities of large crowds demonstrations and indeed spaz house in Grosvenor Square was attacked and this is where the king took his famous Outburst where he said if you're going to intern the Germans you can internally first because I'm German and everybody in my family is German. So this had a particular poignancy the king consider yourself to be German during a time when Britain and.

London Britain Germany Edgar speyer prime minister intern New York UK England privy Council Long Island America privy Council of course Alan sugar London Underground Bill Gates Monarch Downing Lord Crawford
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Of London. This is a special episode a detailed book review of Banker traitor scapegoats by the Troublesome case of Sir Edgar speyer by company Lenten now, I've read this book before but I really wanted to cover it for the podcast because it struck a note with me because Edgar speyer was a German National living in London towards the end of the nineteenth century and he was also there for in London as an influential businessman when the first world war started and that's when his problems began and this is partly why we have the traitor scapegoat spy.

Sir Edgar speyer London
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

16:32 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Something happened during and after world. War Two. The completely changed the nature of my five. AM I. Five is responsible for security on the mainland of Great Britain and Northern Ireland but they have no powers of arrest. So they cannot take people off the street without the corporation of the police although they are responsible for the security of Great Britain they do get involved in overseas actions, but clearly am I, five does not have and has never had the exotic cachet of six the. Overseas. Intelligence Agency. The people who at least in our common mythology put people in harm's way on a daily basis and dash around with guns in hot and really exciting locations and my five agents usually a sitting Morrison's carpark with a pair of binoculars if the lucky so much for the Meth as always the some truth in that and a lot of falsehood, lot of misunderstanding and my five agents have been involved in dangerous operations overseas. But the has always been this overlap and disconnect and. Parity. All of those contradictory words that you could use to try and explain that tracking bodies is never a clean cut case of well, this operation is am I six. This one is five because it's mainly based in. Britain. This one is h q because it's mainly electric surveillance that has never been easy and I used to say to people on the walk. Am I six tracks people at long range over a long time and it's the kind of early warning system. As an event or an attack or some problem comes closer in time perhaps the agents, the terrorists whoever they are arrive in Britain to carry out whatever it is they're planning. Responsibility then Hanzo to a my five, and then when it comes time to arrest people that hands over to the police and in theory in fact, am I six, seventy, five and G. C. H. Q. in the police, it's opposed to cooperate and collaborate in a seamless fashion anyone who has experienced of the public sector or indeed the private sector knows that large organizations find it hard to collaborate seamlessly especially when the stakes are high. So looking at the recent Manchester bomb attack on the music concert, it turns out that the Police Fire Brigade. Am I five everybody made mistakes ambulance service everybody made mistakes everybody seems that the inquest trying to? Massage their role in it. And you can see why because when the inquest happens first of all bad news, you don't have an inquest if it's gone well, what you tend to find as with any other walk of life is that blame starts to get attached. And what you need to make sure is that you and your organization don't get the blame or at least they don't get much of the blame as. This has happened with the corona crisis. It happened with the financial crisis. He happens every time there's a crisis there's a flood of as a fire grenfell people are trying to divert deflect blame, and that runs through certainly British culture and probably Western culture and the rest of the well to nobody wants to get blamed nobody wants to take charge. So when you have a larger complex investigation all. Of the agents are supposed to be represented and at different times but sometimes things go wrong. The reason I mentioned this now is that it was never certain that Emma five and my sakes would become the two main security organizations. In this country you can tell from the numbers a my nine which was responsible for escape innovation and and getting people out of come like coldest during the war. Clearly, have no purpose wants to us over one day I'll do an episode on. Am I, want him I to rest of them, but you get the feeling that there is a potential future where there is only one service which covers my five and six and J. C. H. Q. and possibly has powers of arrest lightly American FBI as well, or there's a few to add more than these two or three services they could be split up. And all the time that that is at least theoretically possible, you will get the situation where people are trying to protect their own organization. Even if it's the detrimental, another one added to this is that M, I five is responsible to the. Home Office. Whereas my sixers responsible to the Foreign Office. which again sets up trade constraints and differences and differences in leadership at the top level, which can filter down through the ranks. So it was never guarantee that am I five would become. The British. Security Service. There was never been a British secret service officially, there is the Secret Intelligence Service am I sex and the security service had my five. There is no organization with the official name. Secret Service. Put together and I five my sakes and H. HQ could be considered the British secret service in other words relatively off the grid certainly until nineteen ninety four, they were never officially acknowledged. Allah everybody knew they existed but this phrase that's used now plausible deniability. Helps them to get away with things that perhaps they wouldn't have been able to do today or in the past if they had been officially accountable and transparent in the way that perhaps the police and fire brigade have to A. Lesser extent, the regular military as well, and also during second world. War, there was o the Special Operations Executive, which shows that join a specific crisis. A new organization can materialize, and then at the end of the war, it was never guaranteed that SOS would be disbanded. It could have been rebranded and modified put could have continued. It just happened that the politics which had driven right through the war got the better of it and it got disbanded largely and the people who were not let go were merged into him I six. So this paints a picture of uncertainty especially at times of war and internal political crisis of any kind like the Northern Ireland troubles for example, this all goes to show. That five's existence as the Prime Homeland Security Service the Americans would call it. Homeland Security was never guaranteed at any point in its past and certainly isn't guaranteed today. So with that brief overview behind us, we can now look more closely at the buildings something. I didn't know that am I five was based at Watergate House in the strand from nineteen. Twelve until nineteen sixteen that was when it moved to sixteen Charles Straight for the rest of the first world, war after that war, it moves to queens gay to nine, hundred nineteen and then to Cromwell road in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, nine, remember that this was when it was just thirty two people. So nothing like the Organization of today it's in. Nine hundred, thirty, four when Emma five first arrives at. Thames House on Millbank now it's certainly Thames House back then was the same size it is. Now it's quite clear lake. Building with some status and some history. But if there are only thirty odd people is pretty over three, didn't take the whole building and I understand it just took part of the top floor of what's called the South Block which his the block currently occupied now as things get really interesting because in the Second World War, always London was getting heavily bombed. So Am I five moved out I to one would scoops prison and then further out to blend him in nineteen forty now, it's pretty clear that it grew substantially joined the War that growth as we saw with? So a moment ago was not guaranteed to carry on those people could easily have been redeployed after the war but in fact, in nineteen, forty, five was, when am I five moved slackened fieldhouse, which puts it into may found cousin straight and into my mayfair walk and it stayed there for thirty years until nineteen, seventy six. So these offices do not move often he was second fieldhouse throughout John Kerry's career there through John. Bingham's career and people like Guy Little Thomas Harris Kim Philby all worked. At some time or another in Infield House, it moved to one forty, Gal shooting nine, hundred, seventy six since demolished where it stayed until nineteen, ninety four when it returned the Temps House this time to occupy the entire building, and there is now a northern operation center from five in Greater Manchester. Now, that is a response to domestic terrorism, but also to the reality that to secure such large island as Great Britain requires detailed intelligence beyond London and I. Think one of the witnesses of my five shown by the Manchester bomb is that it can be too large to respond efficiently. So the new northern Operation Center is certainly a step in the right direction and just recently some smaller departments like the Northern Ireland Office of moved out of Tim's house to give him I five even more space it seems to me that they earlier heads of them. I five were far more colorful and memorable than the current ones. Some famous ones who jump out to May after Vernon. Kell. who was the first one from nine? Hundred, nine, hundred, nineteen forte longtime. Percy STILLETO. Who Ride for seven years in the late forties Dick White Roger Hollis who Peter Right fingers spy. Never been proved or admitted by anybody. Stella Rimington. Who was the first female had of five in the early nineties Eliza Manningham Buller Dame manningham-buller whose father was in the secret service as well, and then more recently. Andrew. Parker has just recently given it up to guy called Ken mccullum, but it's really Vernon cal. Dick. Quite Hollis would have been Kim Philby parallel universe who stunned out as the founding fathers. The people who really got 'em I five going and sustained. After the war as well. So that's a brief history, a brief look at 'em, I five through its buildings. You can see Tim's House on my Thames Walked Westminster Walk and like Infield fieldhouse on the mayfair walk. Gala straight we can see our straight, but unfortunately, the building itself has gone just before we hand over to Paul for this week's Book Review. We have our final factoid. Did you know that Guy Burgess had dinner with Donald Maclean on the night they escaped Britain? That's not the facts on the fact. So it is that Guy Burgess was introduced as a man called Racha styles Roger Styles is a made up name quite obviously. But it's made up from two names used by Agatha Christie Roger. ackroyd was one of her murder victims and the affair at styles was one of her books hence Roger Style. Anybody who'd ever read Agatha Christie would immediately wrong the Foreign Office. Now without further ado, let's hunter. Paul for his review of Rowland Phillips a spy named often the nickname of Donald Maclean. Thanks Paul. So I I read this book when it came out as an e book and it is extremely well written is very readable strongly recommended but this copy is the heart have in my hand which was given to me indirectly from a deceased person I never met friend who is clearing out of the house. So the book knew that I was into spies and suggested I could take it and I'm really pleased that I did because the hardback is so much nicer than the kindle version. The first thing to note is that inside the covers there is printed. A top secret memo which records the final days in Britain Don McLean with times, coded references and cross-references. This is clearly an official government document which has been released from the archives and it shows that at seven thirty. PM. McLean introduced Guy Burgess to Mrs McLean as Roger Styles. They announced after dinner. They would be going off to see somebody else and might be away the whole night. Neither of them were ever seen again at least not in Britain Rowland Phillips is a professional publisher working for John. Murray is not writer. This is his first book. It's brilliant. Surreal shaming. More, it's very readable really well done. It's produced by bodily hack vintage of Vauxhall Bridge Road, which is the road where myself says so I I really wants to grab his second came out because Donald McLean is something often the `Nigma as the title suggests I think there are several reasons for this one is that he was a very serious career man vague successful person whereas the guy he escaped with Guy Burgess was now London character, a gambler drinker, a party animal very outgoing. So Guy Burgess eclipsed virtually everybody who knew it and he had a very mixed reputation people. Loved. Guy Burgess or they hated him and many people went off him as he is behavior got more Marlon dish. So Guy Burgess stands tall as a character Kim Philby was famous because he was so senior in the secret service and because of his press conference where he said he was innocent and because he got the prime minister to state that he was innocent Philby was always the media player and able to manipulate the media whereas was private man I think these things together plus the fact that he escaped at the same time as Burgess means that he's always lumped together. As almost as one person as as they do on instagram now where this is a famous couple and emerged two names to get one name and people just call them using that one mixed up name. So Burgess Maclean always seemed to be Burgess Maclean. It's never maclean and Burgess Burgess and maclean almost became one spy. This is interesting because McLean didn't really know Guy Burgess spent very little time together until they escaped. Of course, people say that Burgess was meant to come home that he was meant to be escorting and helping McLean, but he was meant to return and he decided. At the last minute to stay away, and of course, soon after their escape, the finger of suspicion pointed to Kim Philby who then stole the limelight for the next few years and I think these things together ten sa- lead us away from the McLean story because Philby Burgess and the famous Anthony Blunt steal the headlines The to get forgotten always McLean and Ken Cross and I think in these kind of stories, it's better for you and your family and your friends if you're the one who gets forgotten. So I think McLean's family obviously had an interest in making sure that he was, misremembered or diss remembered in the mists of time. But another particular reason I had for wanting to focus on mclane was that he is buried a few miles from my house in Penn Churchyard and I went to see his grave in twenty eighteen as a result of this book coming out and I have to say my photo which I'll put. On the website is much better photo than the one in the book minds and color for start pretty clear to me that they text on the memorial of Don, McLean's father dolled himself, and some other family members has has been refreshed and polished is much clearer today than it was when this photo in the book was taken the flap say here that. Ronald Phillips had a lifelong connections to Don. McLean. Any story I'm not surprised. I think most of the British establishment had some kind of connection to the Maclean family. So Don McLean Donald do art McLean was a family man with a wife Melinda and two sons Donald and Fergus and I think this sets him apart as well. Kim Philby was married but was never commented on as a family man a true father. Burgess seventy not blunt not it's whole either so he was quiet. He was professional. He was committed to his cause do was a family man his father was part of the British temperament and he's drifted into the midst of time and I think this book more than any other book about McLean really brings not ho it says in the back cover that he was a diplomat, the husband Patriot, a traitor deceive when. A spy he was all of those things he was a massive contradiction and this is a very well written well researched data book, but it is still very readable. So I strongly recommend this to you either the e book audiobook all the hardback I particularly enjoyed heart buckling is a really Nice edition I strongly recommend it to if you want to learn more about the Cambridge five over say dealers do make an Appearance, but I think Donald Payne has been less well served by books and papers in both burgess onto filthy and to a lesser extent blunt as well. That's all I have for you this week. Pleased to give us a follow at a review on your favorite podcast APP. Remember these podcasts are completely free forever view to download I listen to wherever you like to listen to. You casts spies of London will return..

Burgess Burgess Britain Kim Philby Don McLean Manchester Northern Ireland Donald Maclean Burgess Maclean G. C. H. Police Fire Brigade Guy Little Thomas Harris Kim P McLean Donald McLean Emma London Paul Dick White Thames House
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Welcome to spies of London with Paul Dataman. Okay. Welcome to this episode. It's our new format that we introduced last week we now have a book review every week, a shorter book review, the main pace, which could be fifteen or twenty minutes and some factoid like Steve Writing afternoon if you are interested in guest hosting on providing a book review and you have USB, microphone and some ability to get me an MP three. Then get in touch we would love to hear from you. Did you know that Portland spy Ethel J was released from.

Paul Dataman Steve Writing Ethel J London Portland
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"And crime go together but it's been don't death and there were many many people that's more knowledgeable than me about Jack The ripper and all the other kind of weird crimes that happen over the last few centuries. But not that many spy walks London wasps to a couple and fact my first ever spy what was London Walk they choose different locations to. Me Different stories but they were quite inspiring to me. I see them as the gold standard of course, they typically blue badge people some of them are well-known actors and actresses, and that is really great I've always looked up to them but not that many people office by walks and I thought well, okay. Maybe it's because there's not that much demand and that part. Of, it was tested and found to be wrong I. think the number of spy podcasts the number of spy activities around now escape rooms in many ways is a spying kind of challenge in a way it's a cerebral challenge. So I picked spy walks because I knew about spying and that was the only reason I've always enjoyed it. All I know is that from The moment I picked up the day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth when I was twelve, I have been hooked on the genre for me. It was books for some reason I always was drawn to books more than films and TV shows the went that many TV shows was the prisoner and so on but it was either James Bond movies to heroes of. Telling Michael Kind of war stuff or it was books and I was always drawn to the books. You can read them anywhere pick them up anytime. You don't need any expensive equipment to look at them, which when you a twelve year old is kind of important cost nowadays, twelve olds have thousand pound mobile phone that didn't exist back in the seventies and eighties of. Course there's always books from a it was Freddie Freddie Forsyth. But as they arrived at my late teens, I, started to get tired of the kind of gun toting assassin action adventure to an extent and I realized that there was more to espionage than guns and girls and I migrated to John Licari when.

Frederick Forsyth Michael Kind London James Bond John Licari
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"If you don't know about telemark. This is not the place to come today. I do have an article about telemark on the website. and. There is a film with Cup Douglas. Major. Major Hollywood film called Heroes of Telemark, which is well recommended. None of that will help you in the what happened. What happened was one of SOA's most daring and successful raids from the whole of the Second World War there is a plaque in Baker street on the office. They used to plan this amazing stunt in short. What happened was that Norwegians who had a understanding of the area had escaped from Norway under Nazi occupation somehow arrived in Britain they were then parachuted back into Norway. They overcame the defenses of the hydro plant. Destroyed it and prevented it from making heavy-water, which is an essential ingredient in a nuclear bomb, and then when they realized that the Germans had managed to get heavy-water stores or supplies into a boat and escaped. So they had enough heavy-water on the boat to make some bombs they blew up. The boat is absolutely unbelievable and early we're not talking about John Truth is stranger than fiction they had to move out of this. It was no surprise that this became such a successful movie with a massive cast because eight is absolutely unbelievable. If it hadn't happened, nobody could have possibly made a film of it and the reason I like Neil Baskin's book. There are many books about tally markets famous. seriously. Famous. This book has a front section with maps as list as a cast lead. So you know who was in various operations. Yuna are who was on the allied side including Winston Churchill and Roosevelt. who the German scientists were deserve map of Great Britain Norway remember this is an American writer for an American audience American publisher, how to pronounce Norwegian vowels, loads of photographs, the chapter headings, or even really nicely done, and there are photographs every two or three pages. This is a really accessible book, but it is not at all dumbed down for young adult audience and I've never liked the the time adult. The Hunger Games was young adult that was by the same publisher Harry, Potter, Adult, some of Sarah NBA's very scary and haunting novels are young adults, but they are good for any age and I think a good book is a good book. I'll get off the soapbox, but this is a good book. It is not for kids if it does get any teenagers involved in this world, then it's toilets job even better but I'm not saying that it. You should avoid this book if you're older than that I, think this. I've been reading SPY BOOKS FOR THIRTY YEARS. This is a good book. It's a great story strongly recommended and if it gets any body into the idea of military history espionage Cold War James Bond. It's fabulous recommended get this get the Nazi hunters fallen nail on twitter. He is just so readable. Well, thanks Paul. he was getting a little bit excited though I think that's the end of this week's episode. Thus the end of this week's episode episode sixteen we are looking for people who have a podcast setup, which means a USB microphone to appear as guests or possibly as an interview. So if you have a voice and microphone and the ability to push the voice through the microphone and recorded into MP three file and you know what all that means pleased to get in touch, we are looking at ways of getting guest hosts from other podcasts, friends of mine who Know about this world, even more than I. Do I'm learning as I go even after thirty years, we may start by having guest book reviews, but we definitely want to do proper to way live interviews this year. So it's that sounds like you get in touch if that's not you sit back and relax follow the podcast listen to the trailer read the website. There's a lot going on there on facebook instagram and twitter, and we love that you've listened to this to the end. It was longer than we expected. That's the beauty of podcasting spies of London will return..

Norway publisher twitter Great Britain Norway Neil Baskin Yuna Hollywood facebook John Truth Winston Churchill London Britain Sarah NBA James Bond Paul. instagram writer Harry
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"To kick off this episode with our first factoid and the factoid four today is that Roger Moore who wants play James. Bond cost us to watch bond movies in the everyman theatre in Girard's Cross Buckinghamshire Yeah I know you could have bumped into bond watching bond. So without further ado, the main topic for this week is John Look Hurry. Otherwise known as David Cornwell, I'd like to start with a nursery rhyme because I think you'll like it tinker tailor soldier sailor rich man poor man Begemann. Dr Baker Find Shoemaker, Wiseman Madman taxman please how.

Dr Baker Find Shoemaker Roger Moore David Cornwell Girard Wiseman James John
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Did try to kill US cripples that purpose in doing the interview of cost to the opposite. So the fact that the VR never hits the news or at least not the mainstream news is perhaps one sign of success. One thing the research for this episode has shown me that the VR is very, well worth research is worth coming back to in a future episode and it does pay to get better acquainted with what they are trying to do because they are the closest to my sakes in the CIA of all of the Russian agencies therefore. Given that mix and CIA to that hit the news and hit the James Bond Film. So often in fiction that perhaps the ESPN should be better known than it is so I will be looking in more detail in a future episode out the SVR. So I've just got time for the final factoid before taking a closer look at the book for those people who thought that the Cold War ended when the USSR collapsed in the early nineties have a look at, Aldrich Ames who was charged in February nineteen ninety four with providing highly classified information from nine, hundred, ninety, five to the Soviet Union and Russia. It is believed that the information he passed let the execution of. Nine US agents in Russia in April of Nineteen, ninety, four, he and his wife pleaded guilty to espionage and tax evasion, and he was sentenced to life in prison without parole solo that spy starts in ninety five. He was active through the fall of the USSR on the Berlin Wall and as list here on Wikipedia of spies who were arrested during the nineteen ninety S, and in two thousand one Robert Philip Hanssen was arrested for spying for the Soviet Union for more than fifteen years out of twenty seven that he served with the FBI. So the Cold War never ended. Okay. So it's now time to handover to Paul for the review of the new spies by James Adams. Thanks Paul. So this book by James Adams, this is the paperback edition of James Adams from Nineteen ninety-four but Adams, himself claims that he takes him about three years to write a book. So it was certainly being evolved and researched as the wall was coming down and Gorbachev was being replaced by Yeltsin, and that fails these names to me feel like a different universe almost. Okay. So I was a teenager back in the. Early, nineties, but everybody felt like the fall of the wall in particular the dismantling of the USSR. So soon after it meant that the Cold War was over I think that that is the assumption that everybody made who was outside of this world. The book starts with a look at Tash Trees, which I've mentioned in the early factoid there a red brick mansion that was used entertain spies from behind the Iron Curtain and. After the curtain collapsed. It was opened up to people like James, atoms, western journalists, and intelligence agents to come and talk and see how things have changed to say that this kind of complex which was built in nineteen seventy-two by a Finnish architect and dominated by twenty two story main building was being dismantled but even here months after the fall of the USSR atoms claims that the buildings of tennis trees had an air of k the. Guardhouse a single wooden structure looks like a relic from Stallard Loft. Any size this in chapter one how times have changed five years ago the KGB had an army of three hundred thousand men kept files on millions of Soviet citizens absolute power to enforce. One of the most ruthless tyrannies ever seen three, hundred, thousand staff that dwarfs anything Britain ever had I'm pretty sure it dwarfs anything Britain combined with America ever had it was genuinely a secret. Police force which had informers in every avenue. Every corner of the USSR somebody claimed that there was no part of the world that had never been visited by somebody from the KGB and I think that's probably true to an extent at least in the places that were interested in any way. So in this time period way short time period form head of the CIA we're going to ten ashtrays and Russia talking to people in Moscow. One of the directors of the Sismi Sakes were going flying into hungry fly into East Germany Russia trying to lobby I suppose the former KGB to become more open, more transparent, more westernized but such a history of cultural spying and snooping was never going to disappear within five minutes and as I've just said there about the VR, it was the mid nineties. The legal framework was still being agreed and by nineteen ninety nine when Putin came along. I think he reversed pretty much everything that he could as quickly as he could. So James Adams feels privileged in sitting in Moscow with the head of the former. KGB and I think he was I cannot imagine that conversation happening today items felt thrilled and privileged to be allowed into the former KGB officers and to talk to people and to get the lay of the land it seems to me he was one of the optimists so. By page six, he admits that there were believers and skeptics the latter the skeptics argued that the Russian I was very much alive and a military coup or even take over orchestrated by the former KGB could see the communists revert to type today. So by nineteen ninety, four, the skeptics have either left or been forced revise their thinking as the reforms of proof to last longer than expected so I think some people expected the reforms to last. Literally five minutes, but three or four years after the coup the reforms were still ongoing and going in the right direction as the believers would see it. But now he says although the skeptics the real hard liners left, the community has divided between the true believers and the cynics who claimed that much of the old intelligence structure remains an has to be said from twenty twenty s perspective. The cynics correct there is absolutely no question about. that. Perhaps, some of the skeptics of returned the group of cynic say the KGB may have changed its name and its missions but we'll remain active against Western interests for the foreseeable future particularly in the former Soviet republics and immediately Belarus springs to mind. I bought this book as an optimist. I was very excited by the possibilities of the United Germany we had grown up in the eighties with the risk and the threat of nuclear war government. Films that were air-raid tests on a regular basis we were conditioned to believe that life on earth could be stopped within seconds at any moment, and although I didn't particularly by that because this idea of mutual showed destruction was meant to access tarrant and I think the Cuban missile crisis as long ago as the sixties shows that it did act as a deterrent people even in Russia were. So terrified of the possibilities of nuclear war that even the Russians even the USSR did. Not Stoop. So low and of course, famously only the West has ever detonated a nuclear bomb in anger in Japan. So we were growing up through the with fear of electricity being turned off every five minutes, coal strikes and shortages nuclear war. There are no doubt that the parents of that time were more terrified than the kids but for that to be switched off virtually overnight with the fall of the wall and the collapse of the art seemed like a massive story a massive. Event certainly as big as corona virus or the financial crash or any kind of hurricane or soon army. My Bait was a massive massive thing and for James Adams of professional journalists to write this book, hit the ground at the right time. The majority of people were optimists I've already said in a previous episode that John Kerry and some experts were never ever of the mind that the threat was finished from Russia, it was just regrouping evolving and they've been shown to be. Correct I feel that James was optimist back in the early nineties perhaps because he went there first hand and spoke to these people and realized they were just humans like everybody else. He wanted to believe that they had changed their approach and they did try I believe that until nineteen ninety nine Russia was very much desperately trying to modernize and join the international community if you like. But Times change attitudes, change people change and I'm certain now that the FSBA GRU if not the. VR have taken many many steps back towards their Kub past I'm not saying that this is good or bad true tried to be objective. Clearly. I. Don't agree with the script Nevada assassination attempts and I think that Russia should not pretend to be democratic I think if you're going to have elections, they should be free. In fact, there is their right to not hold elections. But if they hold elections, they should be fair wants and that goes for America as well as Russia. Democracy as we all know, he's a terrible idea but it's the least terrible idea that anybody's ever come up with for running a country and you should try everything you possibly can to be objective unbiased allow the elections in the votes to be counted properly. Clearly, that's not what is happening in the East right now there's been tensions in Ukraine Crimea Belarus. Now, we are a long way from Russia reestablishing the US saw, but we have a lot closer to that than we were. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. So I think James is an excellent rate. I really enjoyed it when I read it in the nineties I was on the side of the optimists. Then I was only a teenager I. Am now on the side of the cynics and the skeptics who would can see what is happening with chemical weapons assassination attempts political kidnappings, interrogations, fearmongering targeting paypal's families, and friends, and colleagues to try and silence them. This is a very dark time for many people. In many parts of the world, and this is where it becomes harder to stay detached because I didn't give talking about specific spies like Gordon Lonsdale back in the fifties is easy after fifty or sixty years to treat them in a somewhat academic and something's going on right now with is still in hospital Russian elections taking place Bellarusse in a big state Lebanon a big mess that becomes harder to detach, and it really tests your commitment to object vets and all the rest of. From this that I'm fighting that on a daily basis I, think you've got somebody being a dictatorship pretending to be a democrat dot is bad news for the people of their country and for everybody else in the world as well. Okay. So the book reviewed. So the book we reviewed in this episode was the new spies exploring the frontiers of espionage by James Atoms published. By Hutchinson Inland Thank you for listening the best where you can help us. If you enjoyed today's episode is to leave review on which ever podcast directory or APP you use doesn't matter reviews a good five star reviews are very much welcomed but even one-star reviews allow us to learn from our mistakes. Thank you for listening to spies of London spies of London will return..

Russia USSR KGB James Adams US James CIA Soviet Union Moscow James Bond America ESPN East Germany Russia James Atoms Aldrich Ames Tash Trees Paul Berlin Wall
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

16:06 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"There for for taking and the KGB took it and assigned it to miladi Once home. Trained up had been in the Red Army had gone to school in America. He had this kind of international background. He sailed to New York or an ocean liner and became a spy as with all good spies. They all bought several names. He met a man on bench in Central Park who introduced himself as Emile goldfish. He was really William Fisher but better known as a Rudolf Abel. He had been born in New England in 1903, but to Russian parents. So the thing about communism Cold War spying post-war spying and indeed the moles of the thirties the King Philip and so on they will often driven by ideology and I've mentioned this several times on the walks and in podcast that it is difficult to put ourselves into the mindset of the thirties forties in Europe. War was inevitable sides had to be chosen and some people chose the Victoria side and some people chose the other side that's always happening but for some reason the echo And the ripples from that time still live with us today. It is very obvious for us to say that communism has its limitations that it's economically bankrupt ideologically bankrupt way. It works on a Ponzi scheme at the center where if you get rich and the masses the millions and millions of normal people get manipulated and lied to now that may be a very brief overview of Communism, but it's a pretty accurate one not to say Catholicism isn't without its faults, but it at least tries or strives to be meritocratic and fair that's a different conversation to say that it might not always work like that. But getting rich is part of the leader capitalism, whereas in communism. It's it's described as a kind of failing of an evil unless you're one of the elite of course in which case it's strongly encouraged communism has at its heart a a deep cynicism and a double life and from a distance from England from France Germany, even from Canada and America if you read the text books about communism, you think we'll okay. Everybody has a job every looked after wage. He has a home is no homeless people. Everybody's fed. Nobody's hungry. It kind of looks great at a time when people were hungry in Britain. They were starving in the thirties in America this kind of notion of a society which could be organized in which everybody got along and was nice to each other and looked out for each other and helped each other and there were no rich people and there were no poor people and everybody was middle class. These were powerful ideas for first of all, upper-middle-class people never had to work and never needed to but also for anybody working classes anybody would be attracted to that. Once they saw the poverty in wage Europe is completely understandable to me that intelligent people in huge numbers thought that communism was a good idea. You have Kim filter you have charge blade you have melodia Lonsdale all on different sides different Nash his different backgrounds, but all agreeing with each other that communism was better than Fascism and that it had to be one of the other there was no middle way you either a communist of the left or a fascist of the right place. And everybody hated the fascists there for anybody with a rational logical mind would become a communist. So that kind of thinking has led me to soften my opinions of filthy and the rest of that particular the episodes about guy Burgess and the walking special episodes as well. But I will be coming back to this with a Donald MacLean book to Alan Bennett has helped to persuade me that the spies were not the traitors that allows people like to think he wrote to at least two players about spies possibly more and one of them in particular about guy Burgess and he is off the view that there were no worse than the rest of them and that they weren't half wrong bad as people make out Lonsdale originally entered Canada using the identity of a live double that is a living Canadian communist who had volunteered his passport for the cause and in later on became this dead double goddamned to have a child born in Canada nineteen twenty-four who had emigrated to the Soviet Union with his finish mother and died there in nineteen forty-three melotti first got hold an identity card, which is easier to get than a passport wage. And then that led on later to a passport of Canada. He then writes too so s the the Chinese school at the University of London gets on a course there and somebody recommends to him. He should join the Royal Seas league in Saint James is on the S and James's which is interesting to me cuz I nearly joined that once cuz they have a deal with the London Library. They do have clubs all around the world and it strikes me as a very obvious place for a spy to arrive at home. You can live there in an International Community where not many questions will be asked meladi returned from Canada to New York crossing over Niagara Falls is Gordon Lonsdale in February 1955 and made his way back to London. Now, this is a book review in the style of the London Review Books. So we don't really mention the book very much. It is a Kindle single. It's only sixty or seventy Pages. It'll cost you about eighty pounds about a dollar home and it's fabulous definitely recommended. It's clean. It's short. It's factual. It's done by a pro. You can read it in about an hour, but it's just amazing. It's really good. There's a guy in Bridge. The one who eventually led to his downfall was Harry Horton Horton joined the Navy at sixteen and after the second world war took a position at the admiralty that led him to a posting in Warsaw in nineteen fifty-one by now in his mid-forties. They felt out of place in the Diplomatic community and Halton dealt in the black market selling penicillin. It seems to be money that drove him to reproach a secretary of the Polish Minister of Foreign Affairs in Warsaw. So Horton was in it for the money not for radiology, which immediately put him down the ladder in lonsdale's eyes and indeed many other people's eyes to he was British, but he portrayed his country for cash but nevertheless his wartime service and background eventually led him to a real life a top-secret job. The KGB were not sure that he could be bought as they pretended to be from Poland and said look, we're polish spies went to work for us. It was only later that they admitted that they were actually the kg be dead. But by this time Horton had a job at the underwater weapons establishment at Portland in Dorset, and he had absolutely white-hot connections there. So he was working on with his girlfriend off the sonar for Britain's first nuclear submarine, the dreadnoughts. Absolutely Prime information KGB had a few problems with him. He was difficult to manage and the eventually assigned him to God and Lonsdale home run him for I think a number of years certainly quite a while. It was the 11th of July 1959. When Horton was first introduced to Lonsdale both men had completely opposite opinions of each other still hated Horton and Horton thought they were kind of friends now no story about spies in Britain during this period of time would be complete without mentioning Peter right the Spy Catcher And fact the writer of the book called home I capture and this seems to be a common theme that Peter Reich wrote his book to make money because his MI5 pension was so bad. There is somebody in this story who had to go into business in retirement age. His his armor five pension was so bad. It makes you wonder whether am I five would have done better just to give them all a proper pension to be honest, especially at that time as public-sector pensions were supposed to be generous. Anyway, that's just my sniping and indeed the man who eventually betrayed Lonsdale and George Blake was given the codename sniper. It was late April nineteen sixty and someone had been sending Anonymous letters to the CIA written in German. So the agents sniper claimed that the Russians have two very important spies in Britain one in British intelligence the other in the Navy these two unknowns were codenamed Lombardo one and Lombardo to and this was during the aftermath of the philby scandals British intelligence were certain they had no mole, but he'd later turned out to be George Blake. It was the Navy one that worried people because they didn't know who it could be. This was Horton remember and the claim was that name sounded something like Hopkins or hopner, which is very far away in SpongeBob. And sound but the case was eventually handed to a guy called Charles L. Will it was later found that LOL was in one of the photographs found in one of lonsdale's briefcases some of the words he had unwittingly off or was he at a party with Lonsdale before Lonsdale was suspected. In fact lol became suspected as well by Peter right and others and part of the handling this month. Let painter right to suspect Hollister head of MI5 who I've also mentioned in a previous episode. This is absolutely why I start to think that human intelligence. This kind of agency wage work is never a good news. It leads everybody to a state of febrile paranoia on both sides of the table MI5 who are trying to catch these moles becoming more paranoid than everybody else and start seeing moles everywhere and the whole thing every ten or twenty years degenerates into this kind of paranoid meltdown which in any other business wage Walk of Life would be seen as absolutely potty and it seems absolutely normal when it's upper-middle-class people with degrees talking about Marxism and I think this kind of amateurishness which wage went on in the security services certainly through the late eighties and the fall of the Berlin Wall was partly what the 1994 intelligence had was trying to address was trying to say look if this thing is so secret that nobody actually knows about it. How do we know we're doing the right thing in the right way in the most efficient way is costing hundreds of millions of pounds a year to run these agents and to catch the foreign agents and all we end up doing is offering a paid each other now again, that's a simplification. But sometimes you have to simplify in order to illustrate the point. So on we go Halt and starts to meet Lonsdale in London and hand over paperwork and so on they train each other up of rather Lonsdale trends of Halton to take good photographs using spy cameras and other equipment and later on some of the briefcases that are dead. Stolen by MI5 apprehended by MI5 contain all this amazing 1960s spy equipment and I have to say that 1960s by equipment is way more exciting than modern technology because everything had its specific purpose. You wouldn't have a phone that could take pictures. You know that everybody had you know, there were Specialists cameras miniaturized cameras, which the mayor possession of such a device would cast suspicion on you. First of all, they were very expensive to make difficult to get hold of and why would any normal person have a spy camera because they take bad photos was now everybody's got a spy camera in the Palm this a thousand times better than what the KGB could make in the sixties. So the times have changed the technology has changed and I think there's something really romantic and exotic about this Old Town. She thinking about the umbrella on the bridge again, of course. So on we go the Watchers there were surveilled Horton was followed to a bench outside the Old Vic where he met Lonsdale and wage. When the MI5 guys followed Lonsdale after the meeting they realized he walked around in circles for a long time before going back to his car which had already previously passed in the street. This is spy trade craft. This is not something that you'll person would do. So the Finger of Suspicion went to Lonsdale as with all Spy operations, they didn't just arrest him because what they really wanted was to find out who he knew and what he was doing. He had a flat at the white box near Regent's Park flat 334. He had a bungalow in ruislip and this Bungalow in ruislip turns out to be pretty important not least to me because I used to live near here and I can imagine exactly where this Bungalow is. You can get the book if you want to know the exact address, but it's precisely positioned between ruislip station and ruislip Gardens at the end of a road and the the cul-de-sac leads into a footpath that's not wide enough for a car to go down. This means that you can approach or leave the cottage being sure that you're not being followed because obviously if you follow by pedestrian, you could spot them straight away and you certainly can log Live by a college town down a footpath even better. I said Gardens is across the road from North Pole to the RAF base, which is actually the base where Lonsdale was exfiltrated from when he was involved in a prisoner swap many years later. The location is fabulous. It was owned by two Russians. Again, they lied about their backgrounds and so on pass themselves off as other people Russian book dealers Lonsdale lived with them for many months. And in fact MI5 lost wages of them in London and it took them a while to catch him in ruislip and after he had been arrested and jailed the people in the house were also arrested and jailed as well for helping him. And because Lonsdale was the prize assets. He was sprung out of jail bath KGB in a prisoner swap with gravel win, another famous spy, all the people that helped and worked with the Hortons the Russians in the Rye slip Bungalow stayed in jail for many more years and long sell only got 25 years. Whereas famously George Blake. I think it was forty-two. It was so long that Blake escaped was Lonsdale didn't even need to escape cuz he was sprung out by a prisoner swap. The whole thing is a who's home. Of spies and Spike catches Peter writes here Rodger. Holly says here. Lonsdale's here legs here Philip. He's here and really none of them suspected God and Lonsdale if it was off that polish tip-off and Hortons amateurism. He might never have been caught it's easy to say that if this hadn't happened then that would never have happened people say that all the time but Lonsdale was such a professional and he'd grown to like his lifestyle in the west as wheeler to find which is crucial for me. I think if you hate to the west and you hate capitalism and you hate all of that, it's easy to sneak loyal to Communism but having lived in America lived in Canada lived in Britain, he got a taste for the lifestyle and although he remained loyal to Russia until the end. When his Allegiance was tested to save a lease and he may have been killed in a poisoning which if you've heard minor Valley episode, he will realize it still going on Lonsdale retained his allegiance to Russia until the towards the end, but he did enjoy birth. Left and I think he might never have been caught wearing not for the tip-off right became paranoid started to suspect Rodger Hollis, everybody else. He suspected anybody who wasn't him basically and indeed by catch a book has largely been discredited but they eventually traced Lonsdale to ruislip. They investigated the owners of The Bungalow found a communist past and Lonsdale was caught and given 25 years. This is a great lunch time read it'll take you about an hour or 90 minutes. If you're a slow reader, it's virtually free. It's less than a pound on Amazon. It's a Kindle single Gordon Carrera from the BBC is right tone. He's a very rational journalist. He's used all the usual sources that we took in archive Christopher Andrew and so on Nigel West a lot of this was already known but what I liked about this book is its shortness and the wage sticks the fats and really clearly describes a time and a place in Western European history. So that's got in Lonsdale not a sports bag, but a dead Russian boy who had his eyebrows. Stolen and used for Espionage Garden on stale died in suspicious circumstances after drinking vodka. He might have had a stroke his father died young equally. Well, he might have been poisoned so off on that bombshell I leave you for another week. We have lots coming up in the podcast. We have Donald MacLean. We have a few John le carre things lined up for you and I want to dig deeper into some of the locations on the same box as well. The original episodes were done in fifteen minute chunks to help you out. Keep it short one thing. I realized that the podcast allows is a walk virtual walk where the locations are further apart. So Spies of the home counties might be coming soon to take in John the carriers childhood home under home. He lived in grammar sinden as a professional man working for MI5 and MI6 and of course the race live Bungalow lived by Golden Lamb style so that Spite of the home counties. I will also revisit some of the London spy walks as well. We have a very full Autumn for you as the weather and the leaves turn off..

Gordon Lonsdale George Blake London Britain KGB Harry Horton Horton Canada America Europe Peter Reich Donald MacLean New York ruislip Horton Red Army Philip William Fisher Central Park Ponzi scheme
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Welcome to Spies of London. This episode is a book review of the illegal by Gordon Carrera from the BBC the hunt for a Russian spy on a post-war London and it's about the Spy Gordon Lonsdale Gordon. Lonsdale was a Canadian man who came to Britain by ship. He told everyone had been born on the 27th of August 1924 in Ontario Canada in reality. He was Conan meladi born in Moscow. Now, I've come across God in Lonsdale many times. He was easily one of the best and most Professional Russian spies operating in Britain at any time. He was known to me because he was involved in a prisoner swap without wanting to give you too many spoilers as he was highly valued by the KGB and he met George Blake in Moscow and George Blake & Garden Lonsdale were betrayed by the song. So some people suggest that if they hadn't been portrayed particular Lonsdale might never have been discovered by the time he was discovered clearly his super deep secret undercover of work which involved him taking on this Canadian identity living in Britain away from his young family was taking its toll and more than that as with so many of the best writers when Lonsdale go back to Moscow. He started to compare it to what he'd seen in the west and realized that the West Was better. I was richer more exciting more interesting more. Make more fun and he had serious alcohol problems, but there were a few details about Lonsdale which intrigued me and I have to say I thought God unless there was a man name

Gordon Lonsdale Gordon Lonsdale Gordon Carrera Conan meladi Britain Spies London BBC Moscow Ontario
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"That might be taken to an extreme in certain countries or cultures, but I don't think that the situation where the Russian State blatantly lies about living in care about Paula Patton navalny and other things as well could be ever considered value as I understand it because Rania by its very nature requires. The complicity of the other person is a party home. So it's possible to argue that the kremlin's denials over navalny our van. Yo for the Russians in other words, everybody Russia knows they did it. Nobody thinks that anybody else did it they certainly don't think it wasn't a poison probably if they've Seen anything about it understand what Nava joke is and know exactly what's happened. I could understand how that would work for domestic audience. If it was part of the culture and established social norms. I can see that but the reason I do agree that it's run you is that these statements were made publicly to international news outlets and there is no way that the West will ever believe that anybody other than Russia killed live in England tried to kill scrap pile and seemingly tried to kill navalny. Nobody will ever believe this so it cannot be brand-new in an international sense. It could only possibly ever work off inside the culture where this thing happens. So I'm looking into this more. I want to learn more about it. I think the whole idea is fantastic in a kind of academic sense and it kind of curiosity sent off that you can have a business or social system where this kind of blatant lying is somehow a social nicety. I want to learn more about this. If you do know more about this, please get in touch email or off. The links on the website forms, you can fill in as well. It would be great to learn more about it. I wanted to introduce this idea of ran yo, I wanted to let you know I'm looking into it. I don't quite buy it as a way of international diplomacy, but I could say how for a domestic Russian audience that it might just work certainly Germany Britain and the five eyes are not buying any of this. So without further Ado, let's take a closer. Look at the background to the cases. I keep mentioning litvinenko, which I know a lot about from my spy walks crippled and of course today navalny over to you Paul these situations when you are in the middle of them present a difficulty for anybody to write about or podcast about part of the reason for this is that I am so used to dealing with people who are long since Dead from the cold war from the forties and fifties and sixties and then people like live in enka who was murdered in London fourteen years ago 2006 still seems like a pretty fresh memory but long enough juice. Since that you can analyze it and talk about it and think about it with some distance living and Co stands out in my mind because it was so unexpected and so shocking and so I won't use the word impressment it because wasn't quite unprecedented but it was from an era that I believed we believed in Britain had finished had closed and what the limit anchor killing did was to bring bring to the fore all the suspicions of USSR Cold War Russia. And again, that was just subsiding when the script pal poisoning happened which was horrific for different reasons because his daughter had been involved policeman had been involved and then weeks later that a woman died who was absolutely nothing to do with it. All the ambulances and police cars had to be buried in a field concrete or something like this all those gopal and his daughter survived and I believe to have gone to America that was even more shocking to me personally because he was at least notionally retired and certainly wage. Old enough to be relaxing at home with his daughter but there was this level of cynicism there the way this indiscriminate poison had been applied to a house in the hope that the right person would come into contact with that and then this chain reaction of police getting involved doctors getting ill and this snowballing level of risk where everybody who came into contact with the victims with the house with the cleanup of the house were exposed to this massive risk of chemical weapon used in a Suburban town in Britain and and not in 2006 not in nineteen sixty-six, but just a couple of years ago and then there was a massive International outcry diplomats were expelled remember the coaches in London expelling the Russian we call them diplomats, but there are spies and again life went back to normal for those who are not directly affected at least page then the second I heard about navalny. Who as I specialize in Cold War. I wasn't really aware of the details of current Russian politics, but it emerged in the valley was the opposition log The real risk to Putin and the pattern it was so obviously a poisoning but it was obviously not radioactive poisoning because of what we learned with litvinenko the symptoms were completely wrong people were talking about g h b and things but really an overdose of GHB might issue a pretty Stern warning to somebody but it didn't seem like the kind of thing that the wrong state would use but for them to use knowledge shock so soon after denying that they were involved in the scriptural attempt after parading two people two men who were so obviously g i u officers if you'd been a that's sort of pick two men out of a lineup that looked like Gru officers, they would be the two it was so amateurish and ultimately a failure that I never thought for a second. Happen again. So soon and the reason for hesitancy, of course is that navalny is still critically ill Germany is saying his life is not an immediate risk. I know from the Nova Chalk poisonings in Britain that some of the people off Most badly affected were very badly affected in are still dealing with the consequences of that years later. So navalny is by no means out of the woods, but it seems likely I will survive which allows you then to talk about it in a different way. But this is a there's no escaping. This is a horrific horrific event. And even for some reason the valley has been poisoned with his grown up in his face is falling in prison before suspected poisoning. Of course. Nobody would run the right tests. Even somebody who's repeatedly on constantly at risk followed by FSB agents founded his little wife his family his friends his colleagues Hound a daily every single day every where they all go hounded even then this is somehow just a package saying because it was on a plane it with other passengers around with staff around. We don't know whether the Nova truck was applied to his clothes which some people suggesting or it seems unlikely it was it in the T now that that seems to age Red herring the novice shock the gel or the cream seems to I think partly because it's so strong and powerful that it doesn't need to be ingested. He's actually easier therefore to apply each something that the person victim is likely to touch or come into contact with the clothes seems an interesting possibility maybe his seat the Airlines seat, but then wouldn't touch his skin and would it just going to his clothes something like that seems likely we know it wasn't anything on the plane because the reaction was so quick during the flight that it must have happened in the airport or earlier that day off we know from the script Bossa. Nova truck does act very quickly. They left the house went from meal and then within an hour or so, maybe two hours they were feeling symptoms and they were found. Of course on the bench by members of the public when the symptoms start to kick in it seems to happen very quickly. So please stay tuned. Please follow, please look at the website. Please sign up for email updates as well Germany's reaction to it person's reaction to it the American wage. To it is still being established. We may well see diplomats expelled from all of those countries and others maybe the EU will respond in a better way this time. Now that Germany has been brought into it may seem to remember last time with scriptural Germany were a little bit hesitant about wanting to offend Putin for the reasons political reasons. So there we go. It's still the Cold War. It's cold war one. I think the cold war never went away. The only people who thought that were perhaps Britain in America, I think Russia and.

Britain Germany Russia Putin Nova truck Paula Patton litvinenko America Germany Britain London kremlin Nava Rania EU USSR gopal England
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"It worth it for this small amount of money that they're offering because if you get in the wrong case the wrong project your life could be turned upside down. So that's my review of the book A Game of moles by Desmond Bristow and his son bill and I do recommend it. I thought That the material in here the people he knew are so fascinating and so well-covered everywhere else, but this was some genuinely New Perspectives for me, and I think it's definitely worth a read grab a hold of second-hand paperback if you can but don't expect a riveting read of the kind you would get from the professional. It's not in the league of Ben McIntire book. For example strongly recommended full facts about Tommy house and Kim philby that I hadn't seen anywhere else. So go to and we'll see you next time. Next episode will be back to a normal Spies of London episode. No more walks four thousand and no more book reviews for a few weeks. Thanks for listening. Please go to our website Spies of London, and sign up for news and read.

Desmond Bristow London Kim philby Ben McIntire Tommy house
"london" Discussed on Spies of London

Spies of London

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"london" Discussed on Spies of London

"Shepherd market and you will soon see the graves pop up on the left take a left at the grapes walking North now back to Curzon Street on your left of the C-Max Brothers the red book shop and I'd like you to stop outside Mike's brothers and look across the road across Curzon Street. You will see Heywood Hill on your left and g o f off at the Barber's on your right. The reason for stopping here is that I believe this must be where John le carre has stopped when he was thinking of the scene in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy when George smiling nice Robbie Martin Devon, George Smiley is clearly the colors best known character. He was played by Alec Guinness in the TV series in the 70s and by golly Element in the recent feature film multi Martindale is the drunk who likes a long lunch and is not exactly George Smiley's normal cup of tea and they bump into each other quite accidentally so off smiling is on his way to Heywood Hill Bookshop to sell an old grimmelshausen German novel in German. I think it's the first edition. The reason he's doing this is that his divorce from and lay down Smiley is taking a long time and she seems to have control of the bank accounts. So he's only access to Ready Cash is to start selling off his rare book collection. So here's walked from by Water Street in Chelsea is home through the rain book under his arm and he's about to arrive at Heywood Hill. So I believe he would have either emerged from the archway where you now stand or probably from a long career some street from the west and he's about to walk over towards Heywood Hill to go in and Rowdy comes out of trump as having had his haircut probably had a few bottles of wine already. He shouts at George they have a conversation Rowdy encourages George off to a nice day. Restaurants so that could well have been in Shepherd Market behind you one of the many restaurants that you've seen there. They have a long lunch that goes off into the evening and George Smiley accidentally leaves the rare book in the restaurant and he doesn't collect life until the end of the book. He never made it to Heywood Hill that day and the rest is history as they say he goes on the mole hunt. The rest of the book is quite clearly based on Kim philby. So George never sucked into Heywood Hill Heywood Hill is famous for many reasons. You might be able to see the blue plaque which shows that Nancy mitford worked there one of the famous mitford sisters a famous novelist. And of course the sister of unity home a relationship with that off Hitler and the sister of Diana who married Oswald Mosley. So Heywood Hill has its own literary backstory there. It's cold war and indeed World War II back story and it has a secret place a special place in the stories of John le carre. I suspect John le carre had his hair cut at trumper's and bought a few books in Hayward Hill when he was working at Lincoln field house. Just along the road. This is my favorite song. But on the Walk we're nearly at the end. Now, there's only one official stop left. I like it because I can quite easily imagine than the young John le carre a building up his Archive of scenes and applications ready for his first book of indeed. Tinker Tailor was well into his career, but grimmelshausen Trump has Heywood Hill these places Purdy's appear in many of his works. So take a last look at Hayward. He'll take a look through the window and Mags Brothers, which has some really rare and very valuable items in there and then walk along cars and straight to the East and take a right down Half Moon Street right. Now your walk almost the end of Half Moon Street. Certainly Beyond half way, you will walk past the Hilton keep on the right side the west side of the street so that you can see the Flemings Hotel clearly often been a lot of building work going on here. It's still as the boundary of Shepherd Market is still a very highly sought-after location. You'll see it's a fairly quiet straight, even though you can see Piccadilly running along the end at the South Pole. It's being redeveloped. But Fleming's hotel has been here from very many years. It's nothing to do with Ian Fleming is famous in Espionage circles. The hotel is very nice. We actually did the photoshoot in the bar of that hotel foyer. The first set of spy walks that I did with Airbnb and it's a really nice bar. It's a basement bar and it's called manetta's these are all very interesting things because a basement bar has no windows down there for it was used by a so eight people like they're Atkins to meet her spies her agents and debrief them before they perhaps went off for a longer meeting in one of the flats and officers around Shepherd Market wage. So manetta's was attractive because it had no windows, but what I found when we were doing the photoshoot for the Spy walks was it has no phone reception either. So we had to keep going outside to get the photographers with the signal so we can talk to him. And so I find it interesting that there's a bar with no windows and no cell phone signal where you can meet spies right in the middle of London just off Piccadilly Fleming's hotel is also in dog. Because it was the home of Bertie Wooster and I got the Christy has connections to the hotel as well. They believe it is the model for Bertram's hotel in Agatha Christie. Although other hotels claim that credit as well the likelihood is that as she did stay here when she was in London quite often that at least some elements of this hotel that you're looking at today have made it into her stories as part of Bertram's although I am not a spy writer as such you do find a crossover between mystery stories and spying a lot of spy novels are actually mystery novels that happen to have some Espionage content. If you believe anything on Wikipedia, you will know that bathrooms hotel is popularly believed to have been inspired by Brown's Hotel. However, it's the Oxford dictionary of national biography that suggests Fleming's because Agatha Christie was known to stay at Fleming's Fleming's is one of my fave hotels in this area because it's so little known it's kind of you have to be in a certain group of people to really know about it. They might disagree. It's been there for over a hundred years. I think it's been on this app. Right, since it opened in 1851. It certainly is an old enough building and it looks like could well have been and they really play up on their spy connections. The bar is lovely. It's a really nice place to finish the walk but we never did on the Airbnb walk was actually going for a drink because the cocktails are a little expensive but if you have to budget if you're here traveling to the UK on a holiday, it's definitely worth going in and getting a beer or a cocktail in my office bar in the basement of Fleming's before I had my soe World War Two walk. I also used to talk here about Christina skarbek because she was one of the soe agents that Vera Atkins would have run and probably met in a hotel and the wonderful biography of Christina by Claire male is definitely worth a read I will be reviewing that book The Spy Who Loved by Claire Molly in a future episode of spies of London, but I mention it because this whole War can indeed most of my walks are about a time a period of time when all the spies and agents were men. But talking about soe is a chance to talk about the women because dead Most of the men who were able to were fighting in the regular army navy and Royal Airforce in the second world war. And so the women got left behind they were meant to be making tanks and missiles but some of them especially the foreign with with the people who had left France Eastern Europe in extremely dangerous circumstances wanted to get home and they wanted to get home as quickly as possible and they didn't want to be planting potatoes and people, you know, skarbek who was almost an olympic-level skier was an absolute modern-day hero. She put herself in danger many times and many of their Atkins agents were women many of them were executed by the Germans when they were captured. There is an SLE Memorial in Lambeth and we might cover that in the forthcoming city of London walk Fleming's has that part in the history. It's not near the soe offices, but it off by Vera and others and it does give me a chance to mention that particularly during the war not so much afterwards, but during the war was the first time when women were put into these non-uniformed wage. Dangerous situations pretty much of their own free will in many cases they felt like they had a duty to liberate their own countries, but there were also British women who put themselves forward as well who didn't want to do a safety job. The story of Christina in particular is worth a look Christina died a violent death in London after the war and.

Heywood Hill George Smiley Ian Fleming Heywood Hill Heywood Hill London Shepherd Market John le carre Heywood Hill Bookshop Vera Atkins soe Christina skarbek Airbnb Flemings Hotel Alec Guinness Nancy mitford Brown's Hotel