25 Burst results for "Loma Prieta"

"loma prieta" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

Northwest Newsradio

03:10 min | Last month

"loma prieta" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

"In Humboldt county, which is pretty rural along the coast, but it has had a fairly significant impact there. It definitely has in the, it's been a day of shaking in Humboldt county. And then the injury count has been going up through the day. People have been getting medical care and then they've realized that the numbers are higher than they originally thought. Most of the entries coming from people who either fell or things fell on them. And we've been hearing from a lot of folks, Ginger Parker's home badly damaged, standing in front of her crumbled chimney, all of the brick crumble down inside of her home in Rio Dell and she says, we were woke up by an aggressive earthquake in a big roar and things falling off the wall, hitting us on the head and just a lot of loud noises. It was a violent shaking by all accounts and amazing bill coming exactly one year to the day after a 6.2 magnitude quake hit humbled county on December 20th of 2021 and now at 6.4, talk to this guy named monk, it will come up People are plugging their hybrids into their houses if they can to power their house. He says everybody's just kind of been in shock driving around. It's been misty. There's a storm coming in. They're trying to shore things up for that with homes in that damage. There have been over 80 aftershocks that have hit lots of glasses broken in the area. It has had quite a few quakes in Humboldt county over the last 20 years among pretty remote on the coast there. We get a lot of earthquakes all the time. So we're no strangers to earthquakes, but larger ones are not as common. And they're probably going to have more if they've been feeling the ground shaking all day today in Ivan a seismologist with the U.S. geological survey. I think for the next days and even potentially weeks, if not longer, expect at least more of these aftershocks to come. And Bill, this afternoon, around 70,000 people in Humboldt county, they've got no power, PG&E is working on that right now. The state is sending an emergency supplies, food, constant sort of thing in case they're needed, probably not going to be needed, but just in case and most of the damage is things that fell off of shelves and walls, but there is some more serious damage, homes off their foundations, a bridge that is badly damaged. House fires, that sort of thing. So there's a lot of cleanup going on right now and then also assessing the damage figuring out just how bad it is. As we heard somebody say there, they're pretty used to this in Humboldt county, but something of this magnitude, it's got to shake you up a little bit. Yeah, I mean, it always does. Living in California and everybody in Washington, state knows as well, even though they've had, I believe, 5 quakes in the last 20 years or somewhere around that number over a 5. That it's something that those who have been in the area long enough that they have dealt with, but somebody who grew up in California and I remember the 89 Loma prieta quake and so many other quakes and being in those. Still when the ground starts shaking, then you get that panic feeling of how big is this going to get? Did I get the tail end of it and something bigger just hit a couple of hundred miles away all of that. So I would assume in Humboldt county that even longtime residents like you heard monk there a moment ago, he's lived in the area for a very long time. He says he woke up at a panic and screaming that you wake up with that violent shaking in the middle of the night

Humboldt county Ginger Parker Rio Dell earthquake Ivan Loma prieta quake U.S. Bill California Washington
"loma prieta" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

Northwest Newsradio

05:38 min | Last month

"loma prieta" Discussed on Northwest Newsradio

"6 35 as we continue more on that strong earthquake that rattled portions of Northern California early today. Breeding aside relief because we believe it could have been a lot worse. That's a Humboldt county sheriff William hansel in the aftermath of the shaking Alex stone covering the story for ABC News today and spoke with our northwest news radio's Bill O'Neill. Alex, you know, this happened, at least the epicenter is in Humboldt county, which is pretty rural along the coast, but it has had a fairly impact there. It definitely has in the, it's been a day of shaking in Humboldt county and the injury count has been going up through the day. People have been getting medical care and then they've realized that the numbers are higher than they originally thought. Most of the injuries coming from people who either fell or things fell on them. And we've been hearing from a lot of folks Ginger Parker's home badly damaged, standing in front of her crumbled chimney, all of the breadcrumb down inside of her home and Rio Dell and she says we are World Cup by an aggressive earthquake and a big roar and things falling off the wall, hitting us on the head and just a lot of loud noises. It was a violent shaking by all accounts and amazing bill coming exactly one year to the day after a 6.2 magnitude quake hit humbled county on December 20th of 2021 and now at 6.4, talk to this guy named monk, it will Kim up people are plugging their hybrids into their houses they can to power their house. He says everybody's just kind of been in shock driving around has been misty. There's a storm coming in. They're trying to shore things up for that with homes who have damage. They've been over 80 aftershocks that have hit lots of glasses broken in the area. It has had quite a few quakes in Humboldt county over the last 20 years among sand. We're pretty remote on the coast there. We get a lot of earthquakes all the time. So we're no strangers to earthquakes, but larger ones are not as common. And they're probably going to have more as they've been feeling the ground shaking all day today, any bond a seismologist with the U.S. geological survey. I think for the next days and even potentially weeks, if not longer, expect at least more of these aftershocks to come. And Bill, this afternoon around 70,000 people in Humboldt county, they've got no power, PG&E is working on that right now. The state is sending an emergency supplies, food cost that sort of thing in case they're needed, probably not going to be needed, but just in case and most of the damage is things that fell off of shelves and walls, but there is some more serious damage homes off their foundations of bridge that is badly damaged. House fires, that sort of thing. So there's a lot of cleanup going on right now and then also assessing the damage figuring out just how bad it is. As we heard somebody say there, they're pretty used to this in Humboldt county, but something of this magnitude, it's got to shake you up a little bit. Yeah, I mean, it always does. Living in California and everybody in Washington state knows as well, even though they've had, I believe, 5 quakes in the last 20 years or somewhere around that number over a 5. That it's something that those who have been in the area long enough that they have dealt with, but somebody who grew up in California and I remember the 89 Loma prieta quake and so many other quakes and being in those. Still when the ground starts shaking, then you get that panic feeling of how big is this going to get? Did I get the tail end of it and something bigger just hit a couple of hundred miles away all of that. So I would assume in Humboldt county that even longtime residents like you heard monk there a moment ago, he's lived in the area for a very long time. He says he woke up at a panic and screaming that you wake up with that violent shaking in the middle of the night. It is terrifying and a lot of people dealt with it today. ABC's Alex stone with us on the northwest news line with northwest news radio's Bill O'Neill, family members of the ivaldi shooting victims are furious after learning an undercover inspector was able to enter the elementary school without being challenged by anyone. The inspector reportedly entered rob elementary through an unlatched backdoor similar to how the shooter entered the school in May before killing 19 children and two teachers. The undercover operation was part of a security audit ordered by the state. Still ahead. I'm Brian Calvert in the experts say the key to a happy and healthy heart this season is more love and less liquor. 6 40 and we're learning what it might cost to bring an NBA team back to Seattle. Lots of dollars, Bill Schwartz with more in our Beacon plumbing sports updates. Several reports indicate mortgage lender Matt ishbi has finally seen a deal to buy the NBA Phoenix Suns and the WNBA mercury from Robert sarver for a total of $4 billion back in 2006, Howard Schultz sold the SuperSonics to clay Bennett for 350 million. Now this news could also impact whether Jody Allen wants to put the Portland Trail Blazers up for sale. Standout receiver Tyler Lockett will miss Saturday seahawk game in Kansas City. He had surgery to fix a broken bone in his left hand that certainly draws more attention on Seattle's other big play pass catcher DK Metcalf. He's always gonna be strange whenever Tyler's not playing or, you know, somebody's been there for so long. Not playing. But just another challenge along the way that we got over a car. Defensive lineman Brian monae goes to Seattle's injured reserve with a torn ACL. The hawks have other injured starters out of practice today, including running back Kenneth walker, safety Ryan Neal defensive lineman Al Woods. Eastern Michigan took the famous Idaho potato bowl, 41 27 over San Jose state and the hockey fans are skating their way to climate pledge arena tonight. The puck drops at 7 between the kraken and St. Louis blues. Sports was for its ten and 40 after the hour, northwest news radio. We'll have another update on traffic and a closer look at our winter weather forecast next

Humboldt county Alex stone Bill O'Neill William hansel Ginger Parker Rio Dell earthquake ABC News Northern California Loma prieta quake Alex ivaldi rob elementary Kim California Brian Calvert Bill Schwartz Matt ishbi Robert sarver
"loma prieta" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:34 min | 3 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on WTOP

"Businesses in Pennsylvania and provide a growth environment on crime, Oz said he has the support of many police groups and knocked fetterman's experience as mayor of a small town. Fetterman the lieutenant governors that he's done a lot to combat gun violence in Pennsylvania. The debate aired on news nation. It was also debate night Tuesday in the New York governor's race. Democratic incumbent Kathy hochul faced off with Republican nominee congressman Lee zeldin, more from WCBS TV reporter Marcia Kramer. The most part the one and only debate between Democrat Kathy hochul and Republican Lee zeldin, revolved around the themes they have sounded on the campaign trail. Zelda is the focus on public safety, bail reform, firing Manhattan district attorney Alvin Bragg and in congestion pricing. Pointing out that Zelda does not support abortion rights and is in her words an election denier. A magnitude 5.1 earthquake rattled the San Francisco Bay Area Tuesday just before noon local time, more from KPIX TV reporter Katie Nielsen. It didn't scare me because it didn't last very long. It was a short one. Patsy Paul is no stranger to big earthquakes. She and her family lost their home in the Santa Cruz mountains during the 1989 Loma prieta quake. Something she says immediately came to mind with October 17th, yes. Here we are again. Thankfully, this time there haven't been any reports of major damage or injuries. I'm Vicki Barker in London 26 hours into the job and it's into the lion's den, Rishi sunak makes his first prime ministerial appearance in parliament today defending policies he hasn't even announced yet. The signals so far, Britain's deep economic problems will require difficult decisions code for tax hikes and spending cuts. The U.S. Department of Education is pressing on with President Biden's plan for student loan debt forgiveness. Even as the legal challenges against it play out, this is education secretary Miguel cardona. We know 40 million people are counting on us to fight for them. And we're going to continue to fight for them. A restaurant is admitting it made a mistake staying open after a woman died in the bathroom earlier this month. The owner of Jasper's, which has been open in Laurel, Maryland for more than 30 years, says employees perform CPR and the woman, but he says now he should have closed the front door and let diners decide whether they wanted to stay. This is CBS News. Liberty mutual customizes your car and home insurance, so you only pay for what you need. Visit liberty mutual dot com to learn more

Kathy hochul Lee zeldin fetterman Fetterman WCBS TV Marcia Kramer Alvin Bragg Zelda Pennsylvania KPIX TV Katie Nielsen Patsy Paul Loma prieta quake Vicki Barker Rishi sunak Oz Santa Cruz mountains San Francisco Bay Area U.S. Department of Education President Biden
"loma prieta" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on WTOP

"Advocate for working people. Oz that he would try to revive businesses in Pennsylvania and provide a growth environment on crime, Oz said he has the support of many police groups and knocked fetterman's experience as mayor of a small town. Fetterman the lieutenant governors that he's done a lot to combat gun violence in Pennsylvania. It was debate night in the New York governor's race, democratic incumbent Kathy hochul faced off with Republican nominee congressman Lee zeldin, more from WCBS TV reporter Marcia Kramer. The one and only debate between Democrat Kathy hochul and Republican Lee zeldin, revolved around the themes they have sounded on the campaign trail. Zelda is the focus on public safety, bail reform, firing Manhattan, district attorney Alvin Bragg and ending congestion pricing. Pointing out that Zelda does not support abortion rights and is in her words an election denier. The magnitude 5.1 earthquake rattled the San Francisco Bay Area Tuesday just before noon local time, more from KPIX TV reporter Katie Nielsen. It didn't scare me because it didn't last very long. It was a short one. Patsy Paul is no stranger to big earthquakes. She and her family lost their home in the Santa Cruz mountains during the 1989 Loma prieta quake, something she says immediately came to mind. October 17th. Yes, yeah. Here we are again. Thankfully, this time there haven't been any reports of major damage or injuries. I'm Vicky Barker in London 26 hours into the job and it's into the lion's den, Rishi sunak makes his first prime ministerial appearance in parliament today defending policies he hasn't even announced yet. The signals so far, Britain's deep economic problems will require difficult decisions code for tax hikes and spending cuts. The U.S. Department of Education says it's pressing on with President Biden's plan for student loan debt forgiveness even as the legal challenges against it play out. Education secretary Miguel cardona. We know 40 million people are counting on us to fight for them. And we're going to continue to fight for them. At least 22 million people have already applied for relief on the website, student aid dot gov, a restaurant is admitting it made a mistake staying open after a woman died in its bathroom earlier this month. The owner of jaspers, which has been open in Laurel, Maryland, for more than 30 years, says employees performed CPR in the woman, but he says they should have closed the front door and let diners themselves decide whether to stay. This is CBS News. If you need to hire, you need indeed their end to end hiring system helps you attract interview and higher candidates all in the same place, visit indeed dot com slash credit. One O three Thursday morning, it's the 26th of October 2022 58 in the nation's capital spotty drizzle overnight only down to the upper 50s. So not a heck of a lot cooler than it is right now. Hello there, I'm Ian Crawford. Top local story we're following at this hour, there is some potentially good news this morning from

Kathy hochul Lee zeldin fetterman Fetterman WCBS TV Marcia Kramer Alvin Bragg Zelda Pennsylvania KPIX TV Katie Nielsen Patsy Paul Loma prieta quake Vicky Barker Rishi sunak U.S. Department of Education President Biden Santa Cruz mountains Oz Miguel cardona
"loma prieta" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:39 min | 8 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm shankar vedantam. Engineer lighty claw is convinced that our world would be a better place if we engaged more often in subtraction, instead of always choosing to add. The problem is, there are many psychological obstacles to subtraction. There are times, however, when opportunities for subtraction open up, and lady says smart people and smart communities seize on such opportunities. Lady tell me the story of San Francisco's embarcadero freeway. Yeah, like so many other city crossing highways in the United States, the embarcadero freeway was built after World War II and it was made possible by federal support for highways to move the military and serve the growing number of automobiles that stretched for more than a mile along the eastern waterfront. And it blocked precious views in excess to the bay. And so planners started to think, well, is this costing more than its adding, and finally the planning commission said, this is in the mid 80s. We should get rid of the embarcadero freeway. And what was the public reaction to this? Not good. But this one actually got put to a vote and it wasn't even close. For every voter in favor of removing it, there were two who wanted to keep it. And whether it was for fear of traffic, fear of lost business, fear of change, voters rejected it, and the people had spoken. So the planning commission basically moved on and focused on other projects. So following the 1986 vote, it seemed that the possibility of tearing down the freeway and opening up the waterfront was dead, and then something happened on October 17th, 1989. I'm Ted Koppel. There has been a rather strong earthquake in Northern California, so strong, in fact, that it has, among other things, knocked out all the power at candlestick park where the third game of the World Series was being played. But in the overall scheme of things, that may be the very least of things that has happened today. Let me assure you a piece of video that just came. So this was the Loma prieta earthquake, and of course the earthquake was a terrible thing. It caused a lot of damage, but it may have had one unexpected benefit. It changed how people thought about the embarcadero freeway. How so? Well, a number of ways, so the earthquake killed more than 60 people and injured thousands. A lot of the deaths actually happened on a similar double decker highway, the cypress street viaduct in Oakland and so people seeing this double decker elevated concrete structure just over a mile in length. It looked ominously like the embarcadero. And then it also gave people a view of what life would be like if you didn't have the embarcadero because the embarcadero didn't collapse during the earthquake, but it was rendered unusable for a while. And so people saw that they found other ways to get around the city. And that it didn't kind of totally ruin life in San Francisco to not have the embarcadero. And then what finally came of all of this, lady. It was still it wasn't like this was by no means a unanimous choice. I mean, there's a famous Pulitzer Prize winning San Francisco Chronicle columnist. And his name's herb Cain, and he's such an influential columnist. And even after the earthquake, as people brought this discussion back up, he has this great quote. Once again, there's serious talk about tearing down the embarcadero freeway. And even worse idea than building it. And so there was still resistance, but eventually the freeway came down. And when it was removed, they got the waterfront back, they saw an increase in housing, increase in jobs. It didn't cause traffic nightmare, trips were rerouted. And if you've ever visited there, it's one of the most visited places in the world. And it's obvious why it shouldn't be covered with a freeways. So it took about ten years, but by 2000 the ten year anniversary of the demolition, the chronicle was then reporting that it was hard to find anyone who thinks ripping down the freeway was a bad idea. So we've had a crisis of our own the last couple of years that have forced a lot of us to think about what we do, where we work, how we work. How might the COVID-19 pandemic serve as a potential driver of subtraction lady? Yeah, I mean, I think it horrific cost that's given us this singular chance for change and forced us to subtract in ways that we never would have managed on our own. In certainly, I don't advocate subtracting family visits and friendly hugs, but we've also had to get rid of things that I don't mind if they don't come back. Things like buffets and commutes and evictions, even carbon emissions. So I think that the crises interrupts this normal flow of things and shows us what a world with some of these subtractions might look like. You know, isn't it interesting that so often we actually need the external push before we can, before we see the value and subtraction, we've talked about earthquakes. We've talked about a pandemic. I mean, you can think of a forest fire the same way. It's obviously not a good thing when you have a forest fire, but the removal of all growth might be helpful for new growth to happen in a forest. But when I'm thinking about the marketplace, for example, businesses go out of business, stores go out of business because they kind of track customers or they're selling stuff that people no longer want. And of course, it's painful. If you happen to be the store owner whose businesses is going bankrupt, but the net effect of this is that it gives another business a chance to sort of spring up, but in each of these cases it's interesting that we almost need the external force in order to for us to see the value of subtraction. It's almost so emotionally difficult for us to do the subtraction ourselves that we need almost an external executioner to come in and do the hot stuff for us. Yeah, emotionally and cognitively difficult. And even if you look at evolution as a metaphor, the way that it works is through adaptation and then selection. So adaptation is an ad and then the selection is a subtraction and they're working hand in hand. And I think another fundamental disadvantage that's coming into play here is that we don't get as many reminders of subtraction, right? Because when something is added, there it is, right in front of you, as evidence that this adding this thing was a way to make change. If something was subtracted in the rare cases that we do it and follow through with it, it's by definition gone. So as we walk around in the world, we don't have these external reminders that, hey, here's this subtraction. It's also a good way to make things better. The things we subtract are often invisible. We don't notice them or we quickly become used to their absence. And so we fail to appreciate how these innovations, like Ana kite Klan's building blocks, are affecting our lives. But sometimes, inventors can find clever workarounds to this obstacle. Back in the 1970s, an aerospace engineer named Marion Rudy came up with the idea of using air to provide cushioning and running shoes. It was a classic moment where less added up to more. But there was a problem. You couldn't actually see this innovation in action. It was inside the shoes. Marion Rudy kept bringing the idea to shoe.

earthquake shankar vedantam Engineer lighty claw cypress street viaduct herb Cain San Francisco Ted Koppel candlestick park Loma prieta earthquake Northern California Pulitzer Prize San Francisco Chronicle Oakland United States Ana kite Klan Marion Rudy
"loma prieta" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:14 min | 8 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"About our brain is as we age, we actually move from being very focused in the brain to actually having four wheel drive of the brain. We actually move much more lyrically and logically from one side of the right side to the left side. So which is great because what it means is that we can actually look systemically and holistically at things and connect the dots. It makes sense because you've accumulated so many experiences over the course of your life. You get to a point where you're able to synthesize all of that information. And I feel like just at 55 now an ability to kind of see things a little bit more clearly than I could. In younger years. I think whether it's wisdom or intuition, pattern recognition, you get to a place where the right answer just sort of pops up. And it's not because you've done some mathematical theory to get there. It's actually coming from your lived experience. I like to think of wisdom as metabolized experience, which leads to distilled compassion. And so in both cases, the metabolized of experience, how am I digesting my experience, leads to understanding yourself more the world more and then being able to have some level of compassion because I think wisdom without compassion is just doing something for yourself. Right. One of the things I did early on, which when I was 28 years old, so I started my boutique hotel company when I was 26. At 28, I realized I was clueless. I knew I was close to 26 too, 'cause I bought a motel in San Francisco and a bad neighborhood. It was a pay by the RO motel, which if you know what that means, it means it was very popular at lunchtime. People would come and have their little affair at lunchtime and then go home or go back to the office. And so at age 28, two years into it, I realized, I don't know if this business is going to work. And we had the San Francisco Loma prieta earthquake, and I was like, oh my God, we have no business now. So I started doing something that actually I would recommend everybody do. I mean, it's just simple about metabolizing experience. Every weekend, I would sit down with a diary. Somebody had given it to me as diary. I didn't use it as a diary. I used it as a place to understand my wisdom. And so I called up my wisdom book. And each weekend I would create like three, four, maybe 8 different bullet points of what I'd learned that week. And often the learning was painful. It was things like, oh man, you know, Linda Ronstadt wanted to take over our whole hotel, but I took a day to get back to her travel agent. And they booked something else. So it's like, okay, simple lesson, which is like, okay, if a travel agent is quickly. Yeah, I move quickly. Don't waste time. And so long story short is every weekend for over 30 years. I sat down and wrote in one of ten wisdom books and now Google Docs with what I learned that week. And the value in doing this is it actually allows you to start to metabolize your experience. You could do this for a team. You could say, once a quarter, we as a leadership team are going to do a vulnerable kind of experience where we said, what was my biggest lesson this quarter? And then let each person speak up about what was the lesson, what did they learn from it and how they're going to use it moving forward? Because that's a way we start to metabolize experience into wisdom. Yeah, that's amazing. So that's a practice that you still to this day. I still do. So let me be clear because I want to be fully honest. I do it once a month now. I don't do it every weekend anymore. But I did it every weekend for about 30 years. Wow. It conjures in my mind sort of a hybrid between a very directed journaling exercise where you're going in, you're not just doing morning pages where you're vomiting out whatever you're very intentional about what it is that you're focused on writing about. Matched with a practice that I've been in recovery for a long time. This is sort of like a daily thing to do an inventory to check yourself a little bit. Like, where am I going wrong? How did I contribute to that thing not going well, et cetera, which leads to a deeper level of self awareness. Yeah, I wish someone had told me this. You know, it's such a simple practice, but such a profound one in the sense of our life is meant to be examined, but not examined as if we did something wrong. Maybe we made a mistake. But the lesson from that mistake actually makes us smarter for the future. Or wiser for the future. And so I recommend it for most of the people that I work with and there's about 6 CEOs I mentor today just as friends. I mean, I don't do it for a living. And I tell them, you know, it's really simple. But like so many things that are simple, it's a practice. And you have to do it. Otherwise, it won't meaning anything. We should mention that the pay by our hotel fleabag motel in the tenderloin district of San Francisco became the Phoenix. I've stayed there many times. It's such an epic hotel and such a diverse dynamic neighborhood. I was in San Francisco this past weekend. I did not stay at the Phoenix. I ended up staying at the proper hotel, which is on the edge of the tenderloin, the tenderloin has really not gotten much better, you know. I bought this. I lived in San Francisco. 35 years ago and it's actually worse than it was 35%. It's one of the few neighborhoods in San Francisco that hasn't gentrified it. Yeah, it's a CD neighborhood. And it is CD and there's a lot of rich history there. And a lot of really interesting cultural things I was on the board of glide memorial church Cecil Williams church in the tenderloin for many years. And just beautiful. There's a lot of humanity there. It's sort of like going to India..

San Francisco Loma prieta earthquake San Francisco Linda Ronstadt Google Phoenix board of glide memorial church India
"loma prieta" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:13 min | 10 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"You need to provide the defense. Make it so your home can be defendable. I would say awareness really starts building in August and September when half of the state is on fire and its dark outside at noon because of the smoke. It's inescapable. But earth day is also about raising awareness about the conditions that are making disasters like wildfires worse, which definitely doesn't hurt. And when it comes to mitigating fire risk in particular, there are a couple laws that can be traced back to the momentum generated by that first earth day that Rosanna was talking about. Aggressive logging has made wildfire risk worse in many of California's forests by removing the biggest, most fire resistant trees. Large areas were clear cut and replaced by these tightly packed, even age, single species, plantations, which burn really easily and are more vulnerable to drought and pests. But pressure from environmental groups led to big changes in the 1970s. The California forest practices act of 1973 created a new state board to oversee the timber industry and directed it to impose roles on logging operations on privately owned land, and then the national forest management act of 1976 directed the U.S. forest service to regulate timber harvesting on federal land, including limiting the size of clear cuts. Ron, what kind of these actions by the state, oh, shake out, oh, wildfire preparedness week or whatever. Does that actually help us to try to mitigate for these things or try to plan for these things? You know, actually, it does. Sometimes politicians will want to hook to sign legislation or anything. And the two quakes that kind of have stuck in our memory for many Californians. It's the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, which happened on April 18th, just a few days away, and it destroyed much of the city. The Loma prieta earthquake or the shakeout day in mid October. Those seem to be like the big dates. So like 9 years ago, San Francisco passed its own law requiring apartment to be retrofitted, time to the 1906, San Francisco earthquake, and 7 years ago in LA, mayor Eric garcetti signed into law rules requiring vulnerable apartment and concrete buildings to be retrofitted. So they end up being good deadline dates to get in major pieces of legislation. Yeah, but part of me is like, you have these days in these weeks, even though we live in an era where these disasters are around us. Wildfire season is now all year Alex, earthquakes has run always warns us and none of us listen. It could happen any day. And then earth day Rosanna, hey, yeah, we got to keep the forest. We got to keep the hills, protect the condor. But when I think of environmental pollution, I mean, I'm thinking of working class communities, kind of like where like in the port cities where my dad worked, I grew up like a baseball throw away from the 9 one freeway in Anaheim. It's poor folks who have to live with these consequences of climate change. So Rosanna, why should we keep earth day? Why can't it be like earth month or celebrate earth every day, man? Yeah, I struggle with this because a lot of good has come out of earth day, but the movement has not arguably evolved in a way that is inclusive of how people think about the environment today. Earth day to be blunt was a pretty white movement. The modern environmental movement was anchored by people who could afford to care about the environment, people who had the privilege to pick which neighborhoods got more trees and clean air. If you look at the environmental pollution legacies today, we have created a system that essentially allows for sacrifice zones. But it has been encouraging to see more focus recently on the environmental burdens and injustices placed on predominantly non white lower income communities. I'm starting to hear from a lot more people within the traditional environmental space who are rethinking what it means to truly have resilient ecosystems and resilient social systems. And really recognizing that this is all interconnected. There has also been a super interesting shift in the way we're now talking about conservationism and the role of people within nature. The environmental movement of the 1960s locked us into a pretty specific governmental framework of how to take care of the environment, which ended up erasing a lot of communities and their knowledge. I reflected on this recently actually with California's head of natural resources, weighed pro foot, who has been figuring out ways to work in better partnership, for example, with tribal nations. To quote them, the modern conservation movement that catalyzed around earth day created this perception that environmental protection is protecting nature from people, but people have always been part of nature. Yeah, just to add on to what Rosanna is saying, there are definitely legacies of environmental injustice and racism that still exist and no single awareness day is going to fix that. Last year, there was a study by researchers at UC Irvine and UC Davis that found that the parts of California hit hardest by wildfire tend to have higher poverty rates and unemployment and a greater proportion of low income, older and indigenous residents. They also tended to have lower home values and higher rates of vacant ousing units. So these are some of the last remaining places in the state where homes are attainable. And people who often can't afford to live anywhere else are at the greatest risk. The researchers also found that wildfires are just more frequent in these vulnerable areas. They inferred this could be because of differences in vegetation management between high and low income communities and the availability of resources to fight fires in these areas. And when you go to those vulnerable areas, what are you seeing? Yeah, it's something I've come across a lot just anecdotally in my on the ground reporting. Last year, the caldor fire in El Dorado county destroyed grizzly flats, which was a blue collar community, but Lake Tahoe where there are all these $1 million vacation homes was protected. And plume is county, the Dixie fire devastated the working class town of Greenville, but the wealthier community of Lake almanor was saved. I should also note that government agencies have been really slow to include indigenous people in land management decisions and to draw on their extensive knowledge of how to manage land to reduce wildfire risk. And that's been to everyone's detriment. For instance, I recently visited Greenville for a story I'm working on. The town is the ancestral home of the mountain maidu. For centuries, the maidu did cultural burning in the hills surrounding Greenville to stimulate the production of certain foods, medicines, and tools, to more easily hunt and spot intruders, and to keep down populations of certain pests like weevils and ticks, among other reasons. The landscape became adapted to these frequent, low intensity fires. Then during the gold rush, the maidu were forced up from their land by European American colonizers who outlawed their burning practices and aggressively logged and grazed the land. As a result, it became really unbalanced, overgrown, and very fire prone. When the Dixie fire started last summer, there were parts of the forest that hadn't burned in a hundred years. Dixie fire is the first fire that we're aware of that has burned from the west side of the mountain range all the way over and to the valley floor on the east side of the mountain range. We don't have any record of that happening before. So the fire burns so intensely and so severely through all that dense timber, which was also dry due to the climate change supercharged drought. The firefighters weren't able to stop the fire when it raced over the hills and destroyed Greenville. And the maidu were forced to watch this knowing it was avoidable. Not only did the fire devastate the town, it took out the heart of the maidu ancestral territory. That includes about 2300 acres of land that might do it recently regained from Pacific gas and electric company. Ironically, state investigators have since found that a PG&E power line started the fire. But in the settlements, PG&E admits no wrongdoing, but the company has agreed to pay more than $55 million and will submit to 5 years of oversight by an independent monitor. And it's only recently that government agencies like the forest service, which manages about 57% of California as far as Sid land, have begun to embrace control burns as a useful tool to try to do prescribed burns more often. The problem is is that it was outlawed for so long that now the fuel content is way too high. But now conditions have grown so warm and dry while at the same time forests are so dense and overstocked, but it's often really difficult.

Rosanna U.S. forest service San Francisco California Eric garcetti Loma prieta earthquake Greenville earthquakes Ron Anaheim Alex mountain maidu UC Irvine LA baseball UC Davis Lake almanor El Dorado county Lake Tahoe
"loma prieta" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:01 min | 10 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"For the lack of any big quake so far this year? Not you because the last time you mentioned a lack of big earthquakes we just had one like a month later. Uh oh, I changed the damn it. I always do that. On the wildfire wing is Alex wigglesworth, Alex since water is the opposite of fire. Can you make it rain? I wish we'll get there one day. And joining us in you is our Cassandra of the coast, Rosanna Shaw. So how was that conference of crustaceans you cleverly canvassed in Cabo? I think it would be shellfish of me to talk about that when we're supposed to be talking about earth day. Touche. Thank you all as always for joining us. And Rosanna, let's actually start with you. Reading silent spring, take us back to the 1960s. What kind of state of mind were we in leading up to the creation of earth day? Three things come to mind when I think of the sparks that ignited the modern environmental movement. One obviously was Rachel Carson's silent spring, which really helped the public think about how everything on this planet is connected. Before this book, it was the post World War II era, chemicals were the miracle of science. Frankly, our town has gained a lot by the coming of the nylon plant. In every way, air town is a bigger and better community. Industrialization was our economy booster and we were just starting to learn seemingly simple concepts like food chains and ecosystems. And these concepts I might add were being debated and questioned publicly by major corporations and industries, not unlike the way climate change science continues to be debated today. There was a motto at the time, dilution is the solution to pollution and silent spring really made us reconsider that frame of mind. The dilution just means the problem re accumulates elsewhere. There was also the Santa Barbara oil spill in 1969 in this stunning fire in Cleveland, where a river quite literally went up in flames because there was so much trash and chemicals in the water that the river caught fire. These events shocked us into seeing just how rampant our disregard for the environment was at the time. We take a lot of our environmental protection laws for granted today, but back then, we were just dumping chemical waste into rivers in the ocean. Pesticides like DDT got fogged all over beaches and farms in the smog, as anyone growing up in LA would remember was just awful. So all of this ended up leading to the creation of birthday then? Yeah. Later in 1969, senator Nelson, a Democrat from Wisconsin, was in Santa Barbara to follow up on the oil spill, and he came up with the idea of doing a national teaching on how human activities were damaging the natural world. This was in the era of the counterculture and the Vietnam protests. So teach ends were very much in Vogue at the time. And this idea led to earth day, which led to some pretty significant legislation that continues to guide the way we manage and protect our natural resources today. The clean air act, the clean water act, it also led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, which has a complicated track record today depending on who you're talking to. But can you imagine the EPA not even existing before 1970? I should also note that these landmark regulations were passed under president Nixon, it may not feel like it today, but protecting the environment was a no brainer bipartisan issue back then. All this history, all these people pushing, but now when I think about earth day, I think about my mailbox, just filled with all these emails from companies saying, oh look, we're green, RICO friendly, we're carbon offsetting carbon neutral. You get sick of earth day, quick that way. Is that the same for you, Rosanna? Yeah, I mean, I would say earth day today has evolved into a number of things the cynic in me thinks of all the greenwashing email pitches that flood my inbox too. There are so many. But there is still a lot of meaningful education work that happens each year come April, community cleanups, special education events. I noticed that a lot of environmental campaigns and big policy decisions also often get pegged to earth day. So even though we should be thinking about these issues every day, not just once a year, it is important to acknowledge that earth day has become an important way to check in on these issues at least once a year for folks who aren't engaged all the time and it's not just about buying more stuff that is quote unquote sustainable. We'll be right back. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business, it takes a dedicated team working together, and the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough. At city national bank, we aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you. After all, it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them. See what personal can do for you at CNB dot com. City national bank member FDIC. Michael Lewis here host of against the rules. Each season I've been asking what's happened to figures in American life, who need us to trust them. Referees, coaches this season I'm taking a long look at experts. Why is a country that's like the best in the world at creating experts? So horrifically bad at figuring out who they are and taking their advice. We're going to find out together. Listen to against the rules wherever you get your podcasts. So Ron, we're talking about earth day and the campaign every April sort of reminds me of shakeout that they were supposed to pay attention here in California. To earthquake prevention and safety, but no one does what they is it supposed to be again, I forget. It's every third Thursday in October, which is usually around my birthday. So it's easy for me to remember it. I always actually thought that it happens to be around the anniversary of the Loma prieta earthquake, the World Series earthquake from 1989, but the real reason is actually quite boring. The first one happened only in 2008. And it was in mid November and the schools were like, mid October is actually a better time for them. So that's the reason why. But the anniversary is actually for me are helpful because I can almost peg any time of the year to an earthquake. It's a helpful reminder that any month could be a time for an earthquake. I mean, there is this kind of myth that there's an earthquake weather of it happening during hot weather, but that's not true we've had earthquakes in the winter time too. If you give me a month, I can give you the name of an earthquake that has happened before. Welcome to give a month and round Lin gives you an earthquake. First up, we have the times host and columnist Gustavo arellano. June. June June June, there was the landers earthquake of 1992, a magnitude 7.3 that shook up the Mojave desert. Next is Rosanna Shaw, coastal overlord, and pun master. September. September, the two, the two quakes in Mexico, the 1985 and the one from 2017. And that's it. For a given month and Ron land gives you an earthquake. Tune in next month, for ask Rosanna how she's doing and she'll ruin your day with a terrible joke. Wow, we're gonna take this show on the road one day, Ron. But Alex, so there's a shakeout day. There's an earth day. Is there a day where we just think about just wildfires? And doesn't the idea itself kind of sound silly? Sure, there are wildfire awareness days, although I'm not sure that any of them are widely observed, California actually has a wildfire preparedness week in early May. We said in the past and I'm going to bring it back today, we.

Rosanna Shaw Alex wigglesworth Rosanna senator Nelson Santa Barbara Rachel Carson Touche Environmental Protection Agenc Cassandra Cabo earthquake Alex president Nixon Cleveland city national bank Wisconsin Vietnam City national bank RICO LA
"loma prieta" Discussed on Women and Wealth

Women and Wealth

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Women and Wealth

"Than what perhaps they had like on a percentage level or este yeah depending on the actual home what its actual what we call Dwelling value or rebuild value is so you can really range. It could sometimes be you know two three times more than what they were paying before just depends on the situation where the house is and yeah there's just so many factors that go into it that it's hard i'm really say percentage wise but i think it's important for people to review their policy. You know the say they live in san francisco or an area that really wouldn't be as impacted by a wildfire still review. Your policies still take a look them and and make sure you have enough what we call extended replacement costs which means that that's additional coverage that goes beyond what your home is covered for in in in you know very standard policies that i see some people have ten percent extended replacement costs over their coverage on their dwelling or twenty percent. I always strive for one hundred percent Over that but they used to be something called. guaranteed replacement costs. Which would they would replace your house no matter what and that was particularly with specialty carriers chubb pure and aig and cincinnati. But that's not really offered right now. Unfortunately yeah boy. It's so let's you know the fires. Are you know everyone always talked about here with with california. The word that always came up with earthquake and we haven't talked about earthquake at all. It's all become fire. But what about. I get asked us a lot. Should i keep my earthquake policy. it's so expensive. What what should i do. How do you advise people on an earthquake insurance well. That's a great question. Esther really good question. I would say. It's a hard one because actually earthquake a very personal decision buying earthquake policy because they are expensive and the deductibles are very high. So i think especially in the area. We really need to be cognizant of you know. Is it a wood structure home. If so is it earthquake retrofitted or a lot of people. Ask me what i mean when i say that and what i mean is is the house bolted to the foundation because would structure home can actually slide off the foundation during an earthquake just depending on the movement of their earthquake and sometimes earthquakes due to different movements. Right it goes one way and then it shifts and goes the other way and I've seen homes mean. I grew up in san francisco. I'm a fourth generation since consider believe me. I've seen a lot of homes damaged by earthquake. Our own home was built in nineteen eighty. One was actually survived that last loma prieta earthquake because it was bolted to the foundation. So that is why think. And i know i sound like i should be talking about buying insurance but i really advise my clients the best investment you can make is making sure. Your home is bolted to the foundation. Earthquake retrofitted has shear-wall because that will give it much better chance of surviving now..

earthquake chubb pure san francisco aig cincinnati Esther california loma prieta earthquake Earthquake
"loma prieta" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"On purposes not those which are represented to the donors. A you know what i mean. Yeah they i mean the red cross would say that it is being transparent and that it is being honest about how it's being spent the difference that they're just being vague. That's the problem we've found is that they would say well. We spent hundreds of millions in haiti but they wouldn't be specific they wouldn't show us. What project cost what. How much money did you spend here. What did you do here. And that the transparency that has always been lacking and i think you know the red cross has a is is one of our the the country's most you know respected organizations that had been around for decades and decades and has served so much good and they have been able to ride on the hotels of that goodwill it is a very unique organization because it is you know it has this sort of government component to it with its board. The president of the united states is part of the american red cross and and the country depends on it. If i may. We're treating this and me. If i'm wrong is if this aberration. I believe i recall. Didn't eliot spitzer before. He was the disgraced former elected official in new york when he was attorney general. Didn't they raise another half billion dollars after nine eleven and only somewhere in the neighborhood of one hundred and fifty million dollars ever goss can't purposes. There was nine eleven scandal. You report on the katrina scandal in the on the hurricane sandy scandal. There were three but this is. This is not abnormal for this long-standing respected organization right. Yeah and maybe even goes back to the loma prieta earthquake in california in nineteen eighty nine. I believe and there was a lot of complaints. But the american red cross had raise all this money to build housing for earthquake victims and And one of the city's ended up suing the american red cross. And saying you never gave us the money you said you were going to. We're going to give us so this. I mean this is. This is a long standing problem. There is not enough oversight or transparency when it comes to the red cross which is why a lot of people are now saying you donate locally into haiti and there's organizations like Pity dot com or other places.

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"loma prieta" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Will be back. We hope from san francisco. Welcome to good seats still available. A curious little podcast devoted to exploring what used to be and professional sports. Here's your host. Tim hanlin well. There are your friends. My name's tim hanlin. And it's good seat still available. Thank you for finding us. My goodness yes. Of course you know. This is the place to revel in what used to be in professional sports. That's our little our little want in life and we appreciate to no end Uwe downloading us putting us in your ear buds streaming doing whatever it might take to ingest a this week's really interesting episode That clip kind of sets the tone. Perhaps the most famous among a whole bunch of famous events to have occurred at the legendary. I i think that qualifies depending on the time and the place in the team event. You might have been there for candlestick park. Yes the stick in the southern corner there of san francisco proper the longtime home the first time home of the san francisco that really the first time that the very first a specific built for home of the san francisco baseball giants. Yes when they moved from new york of course they didn't start in candlestick park Until nineteen sixty. The giants of course moved in the late. The late fifties The construction of the park however was Begun in nineteen fifty eight and was a little a little treacherous in the beginning little sidelines with some some questionable bidding For for said Project but of course the new york baseball giants would not have moved to san francisco without the guarantee that there would be a brand new ballpark for them eventually. And that's what Began in nineteen sixty on april twelfth. I ever game played by the san francisco giants in that new park known as the stick or candlestick park of course It became well known for football as well certainly in the nineteen eighties for sure. The san francisco forty niners after A number of years at old stadium in san francisco proper In the golden gate park there Made it their home and of course Brought with them Nfl desires in terms of filling out the stadium and encasing it Sort of all the way around and artificial turf which they brought along in the nineteen seventies earlier on that that experiment was luckily disbanded In the latter part of the decade. But there's probably no more memorable event That candlestick park was famous for or maybe infamous for them. What you just heard in that That set up clip of course That was the very dramatic and that was literally what occurred. That's what you heard and saw on. Abc television on A fateful evening late afternoon on. October seventeenth nineteen eighty nine. A seven point one on the richter scale known as now loma prieta earthquake. That struck san francisco just as the third game of that year's world series between the oakland a.'s. And the home standing san francisco giants was getting ready to get underway. Jim palmer was kind of going over some of the The game highlights from the first two games setting up the tone for what was going to be gained three and al michaels the Play by play announcer and host for both the for that For that game and you heard what happened literally that earthquake just Decimating The region at breaking up the game Of course it was continued ten days later in the as one The final two games of that series to sweep the san francisco giants. But make no mistake. That was a very memorable moment. And very scary moments and of course tragic regionally of course in the bay area happen at candlestick park. And we're gonna get into all those kinds of events. Lots of interesting stories around the giants. The forty niners. A little bit of oakland raiders in there The san francisco golden gate gales of the united soccer association makes it appearance and Some very interesting Outside of sports events And much much more with our guest. This week steve travers as we talk about candlestick park the book that he has written Came out a couple of years back called remembering the stick candlestick park from nineteen sixty to two thousand thirteen. And let's put it this way Candlestick park was a memorable for lots of different reasons. Some of them fun and and positive and championship for sure. But certainly some some less than a wonderful memories to Windy yeah we certainly that Foggy you on on more than one occasion for sure Cold oh boy. It certainly had its reputation for being cold And and all kinds of other sort of little idiosyncrasy. Shall we say for this park. I think Depending on your perspective depending on the team that you're rooting for depending on the time you already for the team in the san francisco bay area that inhabited candlestick park. Either loving cherished memories Maybe a few forgetful ones or ones that you wanna forget and tragic In some respects as well all of those and more is our conversation this week as we get into the You know. I know with forty fifty year history or so fifty three year history or so of the wonderful and oft maligned candlestick. Park was steve travers. We'll get into that conversation in a few moments time interesting stuff for sure. Coming your way our sponsor this week we spin the wheel and we landed on our pals at old school shirts dot com. Where of course for ten percent off all your purchases. you're gonna use that promo code. Good seats yes. Good seats the promo code at old school shirts. Dot com just tremendous stuff. You know this is the the treasure trove of of great t shirts that Keeps on giving more and more fun and cool stuff added all the time It sports teams and leagues all kinds of city commemorations but also various collections dead malls or ice cream parlors of sorts mascots beer amusement parks All local horror hosts perhaps nightclubs or radio stations that you may remember of the past and certainly stadiums among other things at old school. Shirts dot com. It's it's a great pop culture history and You can commemorate those wonderful memories. In in commemorative shirt form and as a as a sort of scrolling here the stadiums tab. We'll take you to all kinds of great stadiums now. Interestingly you'll see a you know a shirt devoted to the civic arena in pittsburgh the igloo There's a disco sucks shirt commemorating the old comiskey park There is an astrodome shirt. There's is a vet shirt for philadelphia. Fans all kinds of great stadium shirts from the past busch memorial stadium and maybe memorial stadium in baltimore or the old georgia dome or the old atlantic county fulton county stadium the murph jack murphy stadium but alas time to guilt and shame are pal. Pf wilson and his pals third will shirts dot com. There is not one in the collection for.

candlestick park san francisco Tim hanlin tim hanlin giants san francisco forty niners old stadium san francisco giants steve travers baseball new york united soccer association golden gate park loma prieta earthquake Jim palmer al michaels Abc television Nfl niners oakland raiders
"loma prieta" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Storms during nineteen ninety seven ninety eight washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of a sitka spruce forest. It's through a combination of carbon dating the counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone quake took place. The earth's surface is made of southern manager plates and many smaller ones. The smaller place creator earthquakes for short duration of fourteen to forty five seconds. That may reach nine point five on the richter scale. They often take place what is called the fault line between these plates. Many people are familiar with the san. Andreas fault march. eleventh twenty. Eleven japan experienced a subduction zone. Quake that lasted more than four minutes. At nine point one. On the richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record of began in nineteen hundred the shade created a su- nami that reached a hundred and thirty three feet and muga six miles. Inland it move. Japan's main island of honshu eight feet shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the pacific plate finally to help put earthquakes in perspective the loma prieta quake that he will erupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in san francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The great san francisco earthquake of nineteen six was eight point six and lasted forty. Five seconds but japan's great earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes. Nine point one. On the richter scale based on data from oregon seed geographer patrick corcoran. Us gs alaska science center. True mysteries of the pacific northwest will now tour. The predicted minute by minute. Impact of a cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the oregon coast after three hundred twelve years. The cs z can no longer take the strain it ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of cannon beach oregon and quickly spreads alongs the seven hundred miles of its length from british columbia to mendocino california. The north american plate slips fifty seven feet to the south west sliding over the one fuca plate but remember. We're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour. It will reach the west coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit oregon's cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later which portland and fifty seconds seattle in another fifty seconds at one point one. It's what seismologist. Call a full rip..

seven hundred miles California fifty seven feet ten seconds fifteen seconds eight feet fourteen san francisco Five seconds honshu Japan more than four minutes thirteen thousand miles an hou forty five seconds four more than fifty miles nineteen hundred fifty seconds a hundred and thirty three fee hundreds of stumps
"loma prieta" Discussed on ConCiencia Podcast

ConCiencia Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on ConCiencia Podcast

"Seton response each your nopal orient yusupova using pro laima. Porchet all applaud. The end does yes. Gloria kiss stolman etorofu level agency into being problem columnist. They won't tell is get them. Being no no oil stem concord loma prieta lamb ticketmaster asean dakota's e on. I let us on. This gabio won't travel. So when i let us on this deal. A coastal six wiliest can pro-moscow which are chassis. Immature symbolic is costa c. comatose thaddeus until synonymous could adult stem up out of it that hint. I'm being a locust song. Las cargoes mazda cows komo mojo in this is still. Id your lovely committee manual episode. You'll kesse my el mondo or so late last year your ceo. John o'connor school system. Machiko enquirer news is centralized chanel contributed at the qatar shchukin. Sanyo's alas wearing our though is a saloon there s soyinka's is dan carry that oppo overlay monus legless yellow in the mall will need to be a jump up about it. They issue they keep lassie lessees else. Or obviously las personas. Krankl tariffs trump hundred produce some being airplay composing in in iowa services. Aluminum pot callahan. I was the seat can know kim meal obvious the evening kick outta michael soussan meet the. Let's skip some Moon is k. Is for sentiment. The holiness genesis antelope paso barrel lantis quinta jazz. What the casali. The mutual iglesia elise enjoy better. Derails call me ceremonials. Comey's pass me. Primoz steals some eagles. Borka lila's yarmulke perreault born messiah news e quando sally. The league went the dog and the settle que. relevant is second and yada edit game in the book wisdom Quintas ganja Get your ecuador gauge yami May midweek with him in stores In castilian on examining a huge Battle lucas at You only see negatives Begin on it been will It will examine At quality honesty Later liga e jumping Ladder Guys was many Was no noise. Style is the Innocent novak when does ties with bagel Bit eliminate quebec would kiss him. Burundi went in this. The abra lamented rectifies as the to who stagger jessica samantha by salvo. Lima and to cast a look at the you have is the not to work at the garden I look in genesis donald yesterday. Good earnings Sinop weather's with multiple bucking. No yes i will look you know not not that you respect them in mill..

Gloria yesterday michael soussan jessica samantha Primoz last year nopal John May iowa second Seton six wiliest castilian Burundi soyinka stolman ecuador Sinop asean dakota
"loma prieta" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

CREATE with Katrina Julia

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on CREATE with Katrina Julia

"To atlanta georgia for travel and one flight in visiting costa rica in twenty sixteen for our transformational retreats. I knew i wanted to travel to costa rica. gotten my time in costa rica for about three months with law for tuna monteverde them and well antonio an s kazoo and san. Jose has been incredible and his coming to an end in the next few weeks to give you an idea. My living expenses are approximately half of what they were in. Atlanta georgia not including any collaborations in costa rica's known to be one of the pricier places in central america. But i have found ways to cut it down. So here's some examples. I spent about six hundred dollars for a one month. Stay in lawford tuna. Costa rica spent about a fifty dollar weekly average for groceries. Herbalife global nutrition supplements fifty dollars on average for adventures. And i also got several hosted thirty from monthly travel insurance seventy dollars monthly storage unit in atlanta twenty dollars weekly average transportation twenty dollar monthly mail services and twenty dollar weekly average eating out so the total of nine hundred sixty average monthly experiences. I'm sorry monthly expenses but then the total without storage insurance and mail is about seven hundred forty dollars average real monthly expenses in costa rica compared to atlanta georgia. When i was leaving about sixteen hundred dollars one month apartment right in in buckhead hundred dollars weekly average groceries and herbalife global nutrition. Sixty dollars monthly average light bill. Twenty dollar monthly average internet twenty dollar weekly average transportation twenty on average weekly eating out and then twenty dollars rental insurance about eighteen hundred forty dollars on average now. My current plan after costa rica include guatemala march twenty second to march to may second actually thirty change because i booked my flight from guatemala to mexico so now that may second is altered to me six And i added the reason for doing that. I added a couple of days in guatemala city. Since that's where i'll be flying out of mexico on average will be until about mid june ish waiting to hear back on a couple of projects so that may also alter about two weeks in belize and then back to costa rica from july until the end of september then panama and then after exploring these parts of central america. I'll be headed to south america. So that will roughly include colombia ecuador peru bolivia paraguay brazil chile argentina and the further out. Might travel is the more hazy unclear so i do have airfare for guatemala and now i do have airfare for mexico and i have sent numerous pitches now for guatemala and mexico and then also for believes and costa rica and i do have a confirmed media. Stay at a retreat center in loma prieta panama yearbook still toro's and i've also felt relief. Save during my travels. I typically don't travel at night or really do things at night. Unless i'm returning from some sort of activity with a group and that typically includes being dropped off at my state and initially i started reading the us embassy advisories but then i quickly realized how they focused on anything and everything negative and do not highlight hardly any positives of any country leading me not to really rely on them at all other than at a glance and i wonder just being really transparent honest if the us embassy put together guide on the stakes if they would include the same sort of focus on unemployment unrest and crime and any particular states and respective cities all around the united states to be aligned with what they've done with global travels in case. You can't tell. I'm very passionate about showing the accurate representation of global travel both from a positive aspect and You know concern aspect but also including the likelihood which is usually slam especially if you take certain precautions and also with doing that. With the united states number two and artika. An article is the world's southernmost continent in known for being the driest coldest windiest in the nearest countries are south africa australia new zealand. She led argentina the majority of excursions leave from argentina and most commonly last about nine to ten ten days. I may likely take an adventure from argentina to artika and why that may be my last country in south america for this time around number. Three africa africa's known for mount kilimanjaro. Victoria falls nile river in game reserves to name a few in two thousand and two. I visited egypt and the now river visiting the continent of africa. For the first time. I loved my time in egypt with my mom including gotta valley of the kings lecture in cruise along the nile in two thousand thirteen. I visited tangent. Morocco on a day trip with my mom as well for her birthday i loved it all in a new. I would be back. Currently i plan on visiting some of the northern parts of africa including egypt again followed by the southern countries number four europe europe is home to a long history with castles beaches vineyards and cathedrals it is known for its impact on the world with art culture in architecture not to mention numerous things in history. The three most visited cities in years past include paris. London rome you didn't know. I am half polish and half bulgarian born in poland to polish mom and bulgarian father. I've a history of travelling experiences in europe. Going back forty plus years. I have visited all three of the most visited cities in europe several times. My mom and dad currently living in bulgaria and my brother and his family in australia. And i visited both numerous times plans. Visiting europe include meeting. Family new places in greece italy belgium and numerous other countries. Along the way the last time i visited europe was in december of twenty eighteen for christmas in bulgaria with the family. I'm so grateful. I went because i almost didn't number five asia. According to the national geographic asia is the largest and most populous continent home to the largest russia and most populous china nations as the largest continent asia covers approximately thirty percent of the earth's land area asia includes about sixty percent of the global population. I have visited asia. Before when i visited india in two thousand ten india's considered to be the second largest country in asia both in terms of size and population. I visited the golden triangle of delhi audran. J. poor with my mom as well as my friends sundeep sweating and chandi garh. Which was absolutely incredible. It truly is incredible india. My plans include visiting russia. China singapore thailand in bali among other countries number. Six australia. australia is famous for its natural wonders. Beaches in desert's one of the most highly urbanized countries as well with cities like sydney melbourne and perth. Australia has been on my list for years for numerous reasons including the culture the land and the great barrier reef. I have dreamed of diving in australia for over a decade. You didn't know him. Also had scuba diver and i love Koalas as well. I can't wait to see them up close and personal. I plan on visiting new zealand nearby as well. It's part of the submerged continent zeelandia.

mexico belize costa rica india bulgaria panama fifty dollars guatemala south america twenty dollars China Costa rica seventy dollars twenty dollar hundred dollars atlanta Herbalife south africa egypt italy
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And a new problem for the North Bay, one of one South bound north of Petaluma Boulevard North Crash car into the Guard rail. Right lane. Joe McConnell for cake You Betty Jo McConnell's traffic support today comes from Lucky and Lucky, California. I'm Dave Freeman with a KQED perspective. Now at 8 43 this morning, the pandemic has taken a terrible toll on the small businesses that often defined the character of a neighborhood. One of those is Chinatown. Here is Larry Gen. Lee, one of the indelible stars of the strong A pandemic will certainly be the devastating impact on the businesses in the wonderfully iconic neighborhoods. Of our beautiful city. I grew up on the border of China town in North Beach, and I've witnessed both neighborhoods undergo multiple transitions. Nona's drastic is this On a recent trip to Chinatown, I was stunned to see how covert it decimated so many businesses. Recall how subdued businesses were after the Loma Prieta earthquake, but this pales in comparison. So many boarded up storefronts, empty outdoor dining Parkins. Ever familiar scenes of roast duck and pork are scarce. Busting dim sum partners have closed their doors. What has happened to the Chinatown I've known Have long since moved away from Chinatown. But as okay she goes, You can't take the Chinatown out of the boy. However, I realized we lose more than just stores as we see a longstanding businesses disappear from China town's landscape. This is where my great grandfather and grandfather lived when they first arrived to this country because they were forced to stay within his boundaries. Recent immigrants. Chinatown still serves as a center of their lives, a refuge from the rest of the city, which is more difficult for them to navigate. I feel the loss of the comforting memories of familiar scenes and anchor me to the past. There's a bakery where my parents bought my favorite coffee crunch cake and custard tarts for birthdays. Restaurant where we get the best fried chicken wings. The story I purchased my first walk. These memories of Chinatown around me and my Children generation a sense of continuity and connection to the journey of their forebears. The power of his history binds us together. Although I'm not ready to write Chinatowns obituary, I know some businesses one recover from this. Nonetheless, I have faith in the resilience of Chinese Americans. We're starting a lot. Not unaccustomed to catastrophe and during Angel Island and the exclusion Act. With the advent of the new year of the Ox, comes a renewed hope for harmony and prosperity. I'm sure the neighborhood will rise again. With the perspective I'm Larry. Generally. Larry Gen. Lee is psychotherapist in San Francisco. And you can share your thoughts on his commentary online at kqed dot org's slash perspectives where support for perspectives this morning comes from Comcast..

Chinatown Larry Gen. Lee Joe McConnell China KQED North Bay Loma Prieta Betty Jo McConnell Dave Freeman California Comcast North Beach Nona Angel Island San Francisco
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back up in the parking lot, not a big deal, but the metering lights are on Joe McConnell for KQED. Now it's 6 43 a perspective. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman. The pandemic has taken a terrible toll on the small businesses that often defined the character of a neighborhood. One of those is Chinatown. Larry Gen. Lee has this morning's perspective. One of the indelible stars of the strong A pandemic will certainly be the devastating impact on the businesses in the wonderfully iconic neighborhoods of our beautiful city. I grew up on the border of China town in North Beach, and I've witnessed both neighborhoods undergo multiple transition. None is drastic is this On a recent trip to Chinatown, I was stunned to see how covert is decimated so many businesses. Recall how subdued businesses were after the Loma Prieta earthquake, but this pales in comparison. So many boarded up storefronts, empty outdoor dining park. It The ever familiar scenes of roast duck and pork are scarce. Busting dim sum partners have closed their doors. What has happened to the Chinatown I've known Have long since moved away from Chinatown. But as old cliche goes, you can't take the Chinatown out of the boy. However, I realized we lose more than just stores as we see a longstanding businesses disappear from China town's landscape. This is where my great grandfather grandfather lived when they first arrived to this country because they were forced to stay within his boundaries. Recent immigrants. Chinatown still serves as a center of their lives, a refuge from the rest of the city, which is more difficult for them to navigate. I feel the loss of the company memories of familiar scenes and anger me to the past. There's the bakery where my parents bought my favorite coffee crunch cake and custard tarts for birthdays. Restaurant where I would get the best fried chicken wings. Or the story right? Purchased my first walk. These memories of Chinatown around me and my Children generation a sense of continuity and connection to the journey of their forebears. The power of this history binds us together. Although I'm not ready to write Chinatowns obituary, I know some businesses will recover from this. Nonetheless, I have faith in the resilience of Chinese Americans. We're starting a lot. Not unaccustomed to catastrophe and during Angel Island and the exclusion Act. With the advent of the new yearly ox comes a renewed hope for harmony and prosperity. I'm sure the neighborhood will rise again. With the perspective, I'm.

Chinatown China Joe McConnell Loma Prieta Dave Freeman KQED Angel Island Larry Gen. Lee North Beach
The Lifelong Gardener, Toni Gattone

Cultivating Place

05:21 min | 2 years ago

The Lifelong Gardener, Toni Gattone

"I'd love to start by having you tell listeners exactly like where you are in your garden life and practice what it looks like right now, your relationship to plants, oh? Golly. Well, you know like you I have my gardens never looked better. Because I'm home. I'm I'm not going out and so all the weeds are gone and we live in a very small piece of property in. Marin. County in the town of Lark spor-. and. We have to elevated raise beds we have about. Thirty. Containers. And Vertical Gardens. And they are all chock full. Of veggies and fruits. I've got a aspired apple tree was six different kinds of apples, which is very when you have a really tiny yard blueberries that are, oh my gosh. That's like the fifth year of of their life in containers and a we have more blueberries this year than we've ever ever had. So and I got of course I've got roses and ornamental season But I have to say the roses have become the bane of my existence in the garden because I'm always fighting black spun. what are you GonNa do it you need to hear you either GonNa live with it or you're going to pull them out. Right and I did I I did decrease them only got five rose bushes now. And they better behaved here. That's all I can say that's what I on when I go. Okay. You gave and where you are in Marin what what does own would that be sixteen, sixteen seventeen okay. All right. So you are you are cooler by quite a bit than than me and warmer in the winter and interesting I. I love the idea of the blueberries in containers, and of course, the vertical gardening and the raised bed gardening in the container gardening is all going to be part of what we're talking about. Give us though I wanNA. Go back a little bit because I think you have a really great gardening of history and story yourself that brought you to this love, and then the work that you're doing with this love, will you take us back to the people and places and plants that grew you into a garden and plant loving person Tony Well, I think the the great inspiration stare into my grandfather's backyard in Chicago. He was an amazing gardener I mean you could. You could eat it seemed like each blade of grass in his backyard was was healthy and. Vibrant. His roses I never saw any sign of disease anywhere and he had a very small but jury productive Vegetable Garden and I I always saw the joy that was on his face when he was sharing with us the flowers in the fruits of his Labor. And continued with my mom and my mom, and I had a beautiful. Relationship, we were like two old shoes we used to say. she she was very supportive of me and whatever I felt like I needed to do. It was like, okay great. You know one of the the pivotal moments in my life was the Loma. PRIETA earthquake. Because that year my father passed away and then when the earthquake happened. My Foundation was shaken to the core. Yeah. What year was that Tony Eighty Nine and. I made up my mind when I finally got on the ferry to come home and I could see San Francisco inflames. And I said, I don't WanNa do this anymore. I don't WanNa work in downtown. San Francisco. And I applied for an equity line on my home, and soon as that goes proved I, quit my job in downtown San Francisco and I sat in my garden say now what? And my garden gave me of the inspiration to start a business in the garden industry. I didn't know what I was going to do but. Eventually, I found my way to find beautiful products that I loved and manufacturers that I wanted to represent and then slowly, but surely I added. To My company and I would find the products that good a garden shows and find the products and train them, and they would go out. We would all go out and sell the products to nurseries and gift stores and hardware stores all over California. And I loved it. I loved it was so much fun. but eventually I, I lost my my passion for that it took twenty eight years but. I walked away from that and twenty eighteen so that I could you know focus on being a speaker and author?

San Francisco Marin Vertical Gardens Tony Well California Lark Spor-. Tony Eighty Apple Chicago
Prediction

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Prediction

"Welcome to kids Smith and mystery your host kid crumb today. We're GONNA look at several events that were predicted. And of course we'll start with our current pandemic predicted seventeen years ago by science. If you still believe in science and is this a first well of course not you can look back. A hundred years to the nineteen eighteen. Banish flu epidemic tremendous number of similarities. Between on then. And what's going on now but we're going to leave that behind. Don't look at earthquakes. Also predicted are subduction zone. Earthquakes have occurred every three hundred and fifty years said six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for the earlier quakes or predictions comes from core samples taken from the ocean floor. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions are both Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet. Massive coastal storms during the nineteen ninety seven and ninety eight storms washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of Sitka spruce forest. It is through a combination of carbon dating and counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone or C. S. Z. Quake place the Earth. Surfaces made up of seven major plates in many smaller ones. The smaller place creator quakes for short durations of fourteen to forty five seconds it may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place at what is called the fault line between plates March Eleventh. Two Thousand Eleven Japanese experience subduction zone quite that lasted more than four minutes at a nine point one. On the Richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record taking began in nineteen hundred to shake created a soon nami that reached one hundred thirty three feet and move six miles inland. It moved Japan's main island of Honshu. Eight feet and shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate Vialli to help put earthquakes in perspective the Loma Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The Great San Francisco earthquake of Nineteen. Six was eight point six and it lasted. Forty five seconds but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale based on data from Oregon. Siochana Oceana Graphic Person Patrick Corcoran and US GS is Alaska. Science Center true mysteries of the Pacific northwest will now who are predicted. Minute by minute. Impact of a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the Oregon coast get this after three hundred twelve years the CS is he could no longer take the strain. It ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the South West sliding over the one to Fuca plate. But remember we're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later it reaches Portland Oregon in fifty seconds at his Seattle at nine point one. It's what Size Malla. Just call a full rip. Most cities can withstand a six point eight quake last year forty five seconds. But the difference between a forty second and a four-minute quake is like the difference between a head on collision at four miles an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes. Shaking continues the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle will have suffered from ground. Liquefication building collapsed gas fires citywide after six minutes. People seeking high ground to avoid the SU- NAMI will be impeded by debris and driving will be almost impossible at eight minutes to Sonoma will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide but flash floods speed. The leading edge will only be inches but it will increase to forty feet is predicted that the cascade subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake of twenty eleven. Keep in mind that by the time you finish listening to this podcast. There will earthquake somewhere in the

Oregon Japan San Francisco Patrick Corcoran West Coast Portland Seattle Pacific Plate Vialli Cannon Beach Oregon Smith FLU Sonoma Fuca Plate California Science Center Size Malla Washington Alaska Loma Prieta
Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:25 min | 3 years ago

Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

"Let's cross over to California now a late last week governor Gavin newsom announced the launch of the nation's first statewide earthquake that system is molecules Los Angeles acting bureau chief collateral Bella on the morning of the fourth of July a six point four magnitude earthquake struck southern California the largest hit the state in over two decades two days later that record I stopped by a seven point one magnitude shake these two major earthquakes that struck California earlier this summer reignited conversation about the state of preparedness for when the next big one hits and a month following that siesmic event at least eight thousand aftershocks had been registered and sales on supplies for a homemade emergency disaster survival kit had increased so last it's News Dallas authorities have been working on the reliable early earthquake warning system that could potentially save countless lives couldn't have come at a better time speaking to the press last Thursday on the thirtieth anniversary of the catastrophic Loma Prieta earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area California's Governor Governor Newsom announced that the nation's first statewide earthquake early warning system was finally ready to be released to the public thirty years ago on this day portion of this bay bridge collapse in the earth quake live in the Marina District San Francisco Rico Way I remember like it was yesterday three decades later proud to announce that we finally have an early earthquake warning system that now is operational encouraging people to download the by shake out developed by seasonal adjusts at the University of California the my shake up will alert the public when a shake with four point five magnitude or greater has been detected with officials hoping to be able to alert people up to twenty seconds before the ground starts to move the new system will also warn residents to wireless emergency alerts these are sent to everyone even those who have downloaded yep this is the culmination of years of work both in terms of advances in technology but so politically until now only residents in the Los Angeles County area had access to similar alerts early warning systems have been credited with saving lives in other countries and those seconds are crucial for people to drop cover and hold in order to be safe get four million people to download this APP about the end of twenty twenty if we do so we will have the most comprehensive most I think technologically four earthquake warning early warning system of its type anywhere in the world Mexico and Japan have done versions of this the no one if we're able to get these APPs downloaded we'll have the technology of placing that will save lives That we will here in California if we download shake please do so let's be prepared for the next big

California Los Angeles Bella San Francisco Bay Area Califor Governor Newsom Mexico Japan Bureau Chief San Francisco University Of California Los Angeles County Twenty Seconds Three Decades Thirty Years Two Decades Two Days
Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

Joe Gallagher

01:00 min | 3 years ago

Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

"Game between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland is was just about to begin when suddenly as al Michaels and Tim McCarver were previewing the upcoming game buildings and bridges collapsed widespread damage and fires sixty three people were killed across the bay area nearly four thousand injured now new technology aimed at saving lives unveils seconds save lives local mayor Libby Schaaf says she remembers well the Loma Prieta quake early warning can allow people to avoid more catastrophic loss like was experience thirty years ago and so the new California earthquake early warning system a network of sensors spread throughout the state that detect an earthquake the moment it begins and then sends an alert in two ways one the already in place wireless emergency alert system or we are the system used to send amber alerts and also on the new app called my shake it is through that up to that the state can glean data from users who

San Francisco Giants Oakland Al Michaels Libby Schaaf Tim Mccarver California Thirty Years
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

America's Morning News

00:44 sec | 3 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"In California is launching a mobile app that will send out early earthquake warnings governor Gavin Newsom and other officials announced that system on Thursday Thursday marked the thirtieth anniversary of the deadly Loma Prieta quake how we are now seeing the nation's first comprehensive early alert system for earthquakes we're now seeing the ability for millions and millions of Californians to download an app my shake download the app by Scheck second save lives early warning can allow people credible opportunity to prepare to covered

California Gavin Newsom Scheck
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

Forum

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"On the thirtieth anniversary of the deadly Loma Prieta earthquake California governor Gavin Newsom chose a site near the bay bridge in Oakland to announce the launch of the nation's first statewide earthquake early warning system the tales from Serra Husayni member station KQED in San Francisco the system uses a smartphone app called my shakes to alert users to quakes of magnitude four point five or larger advising them to drop cover and hold on up to twenty seconds in advance depending on distance from the epicenter Richard Allen directs the UC Berkeley seismology lab which helped develop the Sheik where technology over the past decade it's taken a little time but now we're very proud we think we have the most sophisticated early warning system in the world right now he says it should reach people faster than the existing wireless notifications which will continue along side the new

Gavin Newsom Oakland San Francisco Richard Allen California Serra Husayni Kqed Uc Berkeley Twenty Seconds
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"The governor's office of emergency services says earthquake early warning alerts will become publicly available statewide starting today your listening to live in local headlines talk radio five sixty KSFO the Sheik alert system will be unveiled on the thirtieth anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake the warnings will be pushed through a smartphone app and the same wireless notification system that issues amber alerts the system detects the start of an earthquake and calculates the location intensity and alerts the areas where shaking is likely to

Loma Prieta
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

Tim Conway Jr.

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"Earthquake early warning alerts will soon be available statewide warnings will come from the fake alert system that's pushed through a smartphone app it's the same system that notifies the public about amber alerts the California governor's office of emergency services says that system will detect the start of an earthquake and calculate its location intensity and alert any areas that shaking will happen the system debuts Thursday thirty years after the Loma Prieta earthquake that rocked the bay area it's also the same day as the annual great shakeout officials say they've worked to develop these alerts for years but it's only been available in large scale in LA county so far Monica Rick's

Earthquake La County Monica Rick California Loma Prieta Thirty Years
Siemens, GE vie for Iraq electricity contracts

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

06:03 min | 4 years ago

Siemens, GE vie for Iraq electricity contracts

"Francisco earthquake. No, not the one from nineteen o six caused by the San Andreas fault. This one was before that in eighteen sixty eight that's when a deadly quake struck along the Hayward fault in the East Bay and cake science editor Craig Miller says the next big shaker will most likely come from there again, and Greg I've always thought that the San Andreas fault would produce the next big one. Yeah. Most people do that. Actually, I think we can thank Hollywood for that. And I'm not saying that the San Andreas fault, doesn't pose a major threat. But if you think about the Hayward fault, first of all it tends to go off big about every hundred and fifty years, and it's are you doing the math here with me? It's been one hundred fifty years. So we're do you think about the Hayward fault is it's been described as the country. Most urbanized fault. It runs north and south down through the East Bay through all of the most developed densely populated areas. Not to mention major infrastructure like an airport railway as a major port. If it breaks with. Let's say a magnitude seven quake it's going to be a major event not just in the East Bay. But throughout the bay area and beyond. All right. So that's pretty scary. What's being done to prepare for it? Well, since the Loma Prieta earthquake back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine somewhere between seventy and eighty billion dollars have been poured into retrofits and different types of resilience strengthening. But at the same time California's been very late in rolling out an earthquake warning system in the city of San Francisco, for example, has just begun cataloguing all of its tallest buildings and kinda valuating each one of them for their earthquake vulnerability. So we have a ways to go that was K Craig Miller. Tiffany

East Bay San Andreas Earthquake Hayward Craig Miller San Francisco Loma Prieta Hollywood Editor California Greg I One Hundred Fifty Years Eighty Billion Dollars Fifty Years