26 Burst results for "Loma Prieta"

"loma prieta" Discussed on Women and Wealth

Women and Wealth

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Women and Wealth

"Than what perhaps they had like on a percentage level or este yeah depending on the actual home what its actual what we call Dwelling value or rebuild value is so you can really range. It could sometimes be you know two three times more than what they were paying before just depends on the situation where the house is and yeah there's just so many factors that go into it that it's hard i'm really say percentage wise but i think it's important for people to review their policy. You know the say they live in san francisco or an area that really wouldn't be as impacted by a wildfire still review. Your policies still take a look them and and make sure you have enough what we call extended replacement costs which means that that's additional coverage that goes beyond what your home is covered for in in in you know very standard policies that i see some people have ten percent extended replacement costs over their coverage on their dwelling or twenty percent. I always strive for one hundred percent Over that but they used to be something called. guaranteed replacement costs. Which would they would replace your house no matter what and that was particularly with specialty carriers chubb pure and aig and cincinnati. But that's not really offered right now. Unfortunately yeah boy. It's so let's you know the fires. Are you know everyone always talked about here with with california. The word that always came up with earthquake and we haven't talked about earthquake at all. It's all become fire. But what about. I get asked us a lot. Should i keep my earthquake policy. it's so expensive. What what should i do. How do you advise people on an earthquake insurance well. That's a great question. Esther really good question. I would say. It's a hard one because actually earthquake a very personal decision buying earthquake policy because they are expensive and the deductibles are very high. So i think especially in the area. We really need to be cognizant of you know. Is it a wood structure home. If so is it earthquake retrofitted or a lot of people. Ask me what i mean when i say that and what i mean is is the house bolted to the foundation because would structure home can actually slide off the foundation during an earthquake just depending on the movement of their earthquake and sometimes earthquakes due to different movements. Right it goes one way and then it shifts and goes the other way and I've seen homes mean. I grew up in san francisco. I'm a fourth generation since consider believe me. I've seen a lot of homes damaged by earthquake. Our own home was built in nineteen eighty. One was actually survived that last loma prieta earthquake because it was bolted to the foundation. So that is why think. And i know i sound like i should be talking about buying insurance but i really advise my clients the best investment you can make is making sure. Your home is bolted to the foundation. Earthquake retrofitted has shear-wall because that will give it much better chance of surviving now..

earthquake chubb pure san francisco aig cincinnati Esther california loma prieta earthquake Earthquake
"loma prieta" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"On purposes not those which are represented to the donors. A you know what i mean. Yeah they i mean the red cross would say that it is being transparent and that it is being honest about how it's being spent the difference that they're just being vague. That's the problem we've found is that they would say well. We spent hundreds of millions in haiti but they wouldn't be specific they wouldn't show us. What project cost what. How much money did you spend here. What did you do here. And that the transparency that has always been lacking and i think you know the red cross has a is is one of our the the country's most you know respected organizations that had been around for decades and decades and has served so much good and they have been able to ride on the hotels of that goodwill it is a very unique organization because it is you know it has this sort of government component to it with its board. The president of the united states is part of the american red cross and and the country depends on it. If i may. We're treating this and me. If i'm wrong is if this aberration. I believe i recall. Didn't eliot spitzer before. He was the disgraced former elected official in new york when he was attorney general. Didn't they raise another half billion dollars after nine eleven and only somewhere in the neighborhood of one hundred and fifty million dollars ever goss can't purposes. There was nine eleven scandal. You report on the katrina scandal in the on the hurricane sandy scandal. There were three but this is. This is not abnormal for this long-standing respected organization right. Yeah and maybe even goes back to the loma prieta earthquake in california in nineteen eighty nine. I believe and there was a lot of complaints. But the american red cross had raise all this money to build housing for earthquake victims and And one of the city's ended up suing the american red cross. And saying you never gave us the money you said you were going to. We're going to give us so this. I mean this is. This is a long standing problem. There is not enough oversight or transparency when it comes to the red cross which is why a lot of people are now saying you donate locally into haiti and there's organizations like Pity dot com or other places.

red cross american red cross haiti hurricane sandy eliot spitzer goss loma prieta earthquake united states katrina new york earthquake california
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And a new problem for the North Bay, one of one South bound north of Petaluma Boulevard North Crash car into the Guard rail. Right lane. Joe McConnell for cake You Betty Jo McConnell's traffic support today comes from Lucky and Lucky, California. I'm Dave Freeman with a KQED perspective. Now at 8 43 this morning, the pandemic has taken a terrible toll on the small businesses that often defined the character of a neighborhood. One of those is Chinatown. Here is Larry Gen. Lee, one of the indelible stars of the strong A pandemic will certainly be the devastating impact on the businesses in the wonderfully iconic neighborhoods. Of our beautiful city. I grew up on the border of China town in North Beach, and I've witnessed both neighborhoods undergo multiple transitions. Nona's drastic is this On a recent trip to Chinatown, I was stunned to see how covert it decimated so many businesses. Recall how subdued businesses were after the Loma Prieta earthquake, but this pales in comparison. So many boarded up storefronts, empty outdoor dining Parkins. Ever familiar scenes of roast duck and pork are scarce. Busting dim sum partners have closed their doors. What has happened to the Chinatown I've known Have long since moved away from Chinatown. But as okay she goes, You can't take the Chinatown out of the boy. However, I realized we lose more than just stores as we see a longstanding businesses disappear from China town's landscape. This is where my great grandfather and grandfather lived when they first arrived to this country because they were forced to stay within his boundaries. Recent immigrants. Chinatown still serves as a center of their lives, a refuge from the rest of the city, which is more difficult for them to navigate. I feel the loss of the comforting memories of familiar scenes and anchor me to the past. There's a bakery where my parents bought my favorite coffee crunch cake and custard tarts for birthdays. Restaurant where we get the best fried chicken wings. The story I purchased my first walk. These memories of Chinatown around me and my Children generation a sense of continuity and connection to the journey of their forebears. The power of his history binds us together. Although I'm not ready to write Chinatowns obituary, I know some businesses one recover from this. Nonetheless, I have faith in the resilience of Chinese Americans. We're starting a lot. Not unaccustomed to catastrophe and during Angel Island and the exclusion Act. With the advent of the new year of the Ox, comes a renewed hope for harmony and prosperity. I'm sure the neighborhood will rise again. With the perspective I'm Larry. Generally. Larry Gen. Lee is psychotherapist in San Francisco. And you can share your thoughts on his commentary online at kqed dot org's slash perspectives where support for perspectives this morning comes from Comcast..

Chinatown Larry Gen. Lee Joe McConnell China KQED North Bay Loma Prieta Betty Jo McConnell Dave Freeman California Comcast North Beach Nona Angel Island San Francisco
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"For for fun just to go visit and all three times. Bret. I can't rember what time of year it's been there, but it was summertime, I guess both three times sparkling like California and in July. I mean, not a cloud in the sky, and I thought out in what they're complaining about. It's fantastic. It's exactly well. First times I've never seen and they say it doesn't rain as much as you think it is. It does. It's just cloudy all the time and then and mists and Um, but I'm like you. I like the sunshine, but I'm not. I'm not affected too terribly by the weather. However, I did just want to really interesting program A couple nights ago, actually. Ah, that I found on Disney. Plus as a matter of fact for ABC, Disney, But I just got dizzy, plus a documentary that Seattle area Seattle and I guess Portland are right for a catastrophic Not doing what it doesn't happen Level earthquake because of this weird set of circumstances. Um, and because it sits in this basin on it's one of those once every few 100 years and though, and it's like a nine plus earthquake, and they had won the last time was 1700. So it's been 320 years and these they have determined they happened there every 3 to 500 years, boy, So it's a documentary and it's a documentary. I can't remember what it was called to be honest with you, but it was absolutely fascinating and really Little alarming because Seattle unlike us here, they're not really engineering for that. They're not prepared for that. You know, they have so many break unreinforced brick buildings and you're not talking about an earthquake like Loma Prieta. You're talking about something tens and tens of times more powerful. They say it's it's a nine plus The kind of earthquake that only happens in a couple few places rarely around the planet. That is frightening. Is that frightening? You know, pretty terrifying, actually, and I did not know that was at risk. Yeah. Yeah, we'll continue such cheery topics that zaps we continue here on the Mark Dobson show Dan actually sitting in along with Brett Burkhardt, always by my side back here in a moment. Smokers smoke wildfire Smoke is bad for your lungs, like cigarette smoke and that fireplace smoke? Yeah, that's bad smoke, too. So please don't like that fireplace and create more smoke because smoke is smoke and all smoke is bad smoke..

Seattle Disney Bret Loma Prieta rember Mark Dobson Brett Burkhardt California ABC Portland Dan
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lie from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying the head of Twitter says his company was wrong. The block links to a New York Post article without context about presidential candidate Jo Bythe Sun The company drew fire from President Trump's supporters who accused Twitter and other social media companies of bias against conservatives will a day after holding competing town halls of presidential rivals are returning to battleground states with the Corona virus Pandemic front and center. Republican former governor Chris Christie had Cove in 19. He recently helped Trump prepare for the first presidential debate, during which Trump mocked former Vice President Biden for always wearing a mask today, Kristie urge Americans to mask up I think no matter what you're doing with your at a rally for your preferred candidate, whether you're out of the supermarket, whether you're at a protest, no matter what you're doing, you should have a mask on and should try to remain socially distant from folks. The former New Jersey governor now, ABC contributor on Good Morning America. With weeks to go until Election Day. The Biden campaign reportedly has so far outraised the Trump campaign. The Associated Press reporting that the Trump camp says it along with the RNC and allied groups. Head over $251 million on hand. At the end of September. The Biden campaign reportedly had 432 million at last check on Wall Street. The Dow is up 246 points. 7 20,041. This is NPR News live from the news on Brian What California has approved over 900 publican private elementary schools for in person learning. That's according to the state Department of Public Health. The re openings are contingent on state guidelines like mandatory face coverings for all staff and for students in third grade and above, State Superintendent Tony Thurman says there is no one size fits all solution to reopening. Follow these guidelines to the T until we learn more about what we're dealing with with Corona virus Until there's a vaccine. We have to continue to do the things that are proven, and that we know can keep us safe. Schools in counties that have remained in the orange tear for 14 days don't need approval from state or local health officials to reopen San Francisco officials say part of the largest infrastructure project in the city's history has now been completed. The city's Public Utilities Commission has finished work on the city's water system improvement program 16 years in the making among its goals, improving the water supplies. Seismic safety the commission Steve Ritchie says the need for that became clear 31 years ago this week when the Loma Prieta earthquake hit oil liquefied and broke Definitely a wake up call that.

President Trump Biden Twitter Chris Christie NPR State Superintendent Tony Thur Public Utilities Commission New York Post Loma Prieta Laxmi San Francisco Vice President New Jersey Steve Ritchie Jo ABC Department of Public Health
"loma prieta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"How some communities are creating that healthier relationship with fire. It's something everyone in the country needs to worry about, because wildfires are no longer just a problem in the West there moving into suburban communities all over the country. Before we get to that. Daniel searches the past for examples of how the U. S. Has dealt with major threats as inspiration for how we can bring about change now. Let's travel back in time to 1912 to the sinking of the Titanic. Despite the transmission of frantic S O s signal's help, could not arrive in time. From the moment the ship, saying it became clear that there hadn't been provisions to save everybody's life. On the ship. Stephen Beale is a historian at Harvard who's written several books about the Titanic. He says the ship makers from their perspective took safety seriously, in fact, exceeded The number of lifeboats that they were required to have. But that number was based on ship tonnage, not how many people were on board. And so there was a huge outcry about this, And that's really what led to change new safety regulations worldwide within two years. One of the things about the stories of disasters is That we don't want them to be meaningless, right? We want some good to have come from this so that whatever the disaster is will never happen again. Californians, Aaron a similar moment now. A camp fire ripped through the town of Paradise last November, the deadliest fire anywhere in the United States in 100 years it killed 85 people more than the Loma Prieta earthquake. And left a path of ash and ruin that shocked people across the state. It literally.

Stephen Beale Paradise Harvard United States Daniel Aaron
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"100 years killed 85 people more than the Loma Prieta earthquake. And left a path of ash and ruin that shocked people across the state. It literally looks like a war zone totally scorched hillsides. Trees that have fallen over. Many are asking. Can we make sure this doesn't happen again. Well, that's a challenge because you know, there's at least 100 Paradise is out there. Scott Stevens, the fire science professor at UC Berkeley, he says millions of people in the state live close to wild lands there so many smaller towns a lot of small towns all over Southern California, Northern California. Word. We have these conditions. We have conditions of high fuel loads very difficult ways to get in and out of communities. Fire has always been part of California, but the state is experiencing increasingly deadly and catastrophic fires. 2017 was the worst year on record until the fires of 2018. Does it have to be this way? No, it could be better. Californians could have safer homes, healthier forests cleaner air. Even in the face of unpredictable wild fires. I mean, if you if this became a priority enough for health, you know for our kids and our grandkids, everybody else it would just happen, right? It's not like something that's impossible. But it does mean asking tough questions about how we live in this state. Questions such as are their places where we shouldn't rebuild. Do we find homeowners who don't clear vegetation? And can we agree on how to manage forests? Grappling with these questions will call in Californians to evaluate competing priorities, but we've done it before. Think about what it was like to be in a restaurant before public smoking bans. People simply took it for granted that indoor spaces were going to be Contaminate with tobacco smoke. James for Pace is an anti smoking advocates who helped get some of the first non smoking bills passed in the late 19 seventies, he says at the time, the thought of telling people they couldn't smoke wherever they liked was unthinkable. That started to shift when public information campaigns taught people about the dangers of breathing tobacco smoke. Why do people smoke? According.

Northern California Scott Stevens Pace James UC Berkeley Grappling Southern California professor
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"There's one other thing that I've never seen included in the list of the emergency supplies that you should have in your go kit that is now included. Facemasks. Yeah, so there including face masks now and sanitation supplies, You know, the ones that we have in the mail room. Have you ever seen him? No. Okay. Do you know where the mail room is? I've been there once or twice Okay across from hammers office. So there's buckets, big white buckets like big paint buckets that you would get not the little buckets but big paint, but big back buckets and there's there's three of them per kit, and there's a whole bunch of them in there. They're labeled 123 and They have man, all kinds of stuff in there for an emergency. I'm thinking, you know earthquakes for around here. I was told that those buckets serve another purpose. They are toilets there. Party buckets, Yes, And so included within the buckets. Are these chemicals that you use when you use it as a toilet there bags that you put in there. There's a toilet seat that is included empty. I know there's a toilet see, And then there are chemicals that you can use in a day. Shinto, all the other supplies in there, and there are a lot of supplies. One of the thing I would add that they did not put in their list and I'm really surprised that they didn't cause it seems like the most basic thing. Is a first aid kit. And they do have those in our buckets. So, yeah. So, you know, pack a kid Just why not? I mean, it'll take you five minutes to put these things together. Just so you have it in the event that at some point You're going to need it. It's kind of like my mom purse already. Isn't it? Great. When you have babies, you get diaper bags. And then when the babies grow out of the diapers you keep toting the diaper bags because they're so great about it isn't there? I could handle emergencies so much. You got the baby wipes. You keep putting them in there because they're cleaning up messes item Band AIDS. Exactly. Kleenex, little extra teepee. Whatever it takes. I mean, that's what a mom bagged up. All right. So I want us to make sure that you know, KGO is your go to place here when it comes to fires when it comes to things that are happening in the Bay Area, So we're going to keep abreast of what is happening where evacuations maybe taking place areas that you may need to avoid. You know, the fire jumped Highway 80 last night Vaca Velvet Airfield area caused delays. We have a listener who said they were on the was on the freeway for three hours. Trying to get out trying to get out What tries to head to toe Lake Al Manar, and he's just stuck there on the freeway. Yeah, he said people were angry lighting and right on interstate 80. And there goes the freeway, which they had shut it down because the flames jumped the freeway. And it was unsafe. Yeah, you know this? This is one of the concerns that I have ever since the stories about the campfire. And there was a fire road outside out of camp fire. That wasn't maintained. And so that's one of the things that we have to understand, especially if you live in in wilderness areas. If you live in areas that are remote, you have to remember that if a nim urgency arises, everybody's going to try to get out of the same time. And if you've only got one road in and out You're in a world of hurt, so usually they didn't build fire roads. But those fire roads have to be maintained. And so if you find that in your community, you're looking around and you only see one road in and one road out. I would be at the next City Council meeting and asking them what they're going to do to get that fire road either built or, you know, clear it out and make sure that it's operational for if and when an evacuation happens because they're happening way too frequently with the wild. Fires, But there are other emergencies that arises. Well, That's another reason. We're talking about this yesterday, too, that it's important to back into your driveway. So that your you know when you when you when seconds air valuable Your car's pointed in the right direction and back into my drive start. Do it. Take it slow, So you don't hit anything that I don't hit things. I'm a good backer. Upper. You know, Some people are really bad Backer, Upper I'ma Good backer upper and I don't know why it It's I think I see backwards and it's like when I'm backing up. I always know which way to turn without thinking about it. I just automatically turned proper think people who have to parallel park a lot in San Francisco. So there you go. Tend to be a little bit better use of that does yeah. No, I'm a great backer. Upper backing up is one of my forte. So I don't have a lot of driving for taste. But the backing up is good. I mean, I have been known, Teo have people get out of the car so that I can back it up for them when I'm a passenger. Just get out or I'll take care of here. Yeah, I can back up. Like really long wind, E distances something else. My narrow area is stopping at the gas station every night on the way home. Yeah, I was thinking of that takes a lot of gas to get from the North Gate of San Francisco. And I wanted when I parked the car at night. I want to Will tank and when there are issues, things back up, Traffic backs up. And if you don't have enough gas in your car, I mean, it's one of it's a problem in a lot of emergencies in a lot of situations. Now, look, we're gonna have an earthquake and we're gonna have a big earthquake. I don't know when it's going to come, Although Kim and I have been talking about how it's earthquake weather And no matter what the the earthquake specialist tell you, we believe it's quite weather. Absolutely. I also believe that when you watch these things, you know you have Nick Sel. I have earthquake alert. And so I get report anywhere in the world. When there's an earthquake. That's over four point out. I get reports of them when they start happening in areas that I recognized in California. I start getting concerned about it and you know up, but the guy's er's. They were just starting to come in at just under 4.0. That's why I had the earthquake guy on because I wanted to know. Is this a sign that you no big ones coming? Well, here's what I learned. No way knows because if you go back and you look at the big earthquakes that have happened Inevitably, there were other earthquakes that preceded it and fairly sizeable Loma Prieta. I think he told us it was there was about a six that happened before Loma Prieta. That's a big earthquake. So there was that. And then there was the big one. I don't know if we even ask the question about 1906. But when you go around the world and you look at the really big earthquakes, there were smaller Earth. Makes that preceded them. Just briefly. It could be as much as a week or 10 days in advance of it, or it could have been within an hour or two of it and then have so if you start seeing this kind of activity, that's what I start thinking about. But the second thing is, and this is why they don't really know is that there are theoretically because nobody goes down there looks at the plates move theoretically. Those. Ah, smaller earthquakes also can relieve the tension so that the big one that might have been reading already get ready. It suddenly relieved because that's what first responders need in the middle of a pandemic and firestorm. 2020 is an earthquake. I mean, we got everything going against us, right? A look at the time. We need to take a little break here. We'll be right back. We have a lot of things coming up that are in the news that we wantto get yakking about, and we're going to get going on that when we return. You're listening to K G O Summer's Not here long So sees the sizzle with WalMart Find all your faves thatjust Oscar Meyer Hot dogs,.

San Francisco Loma Prieta hammers Bay Area Vaca Velvet Airfield toe Lake Al Manar WalMart Nick Sel Teo City Council California Oscar Meyer Kim
The Lifelong Gardener, Toni Gattone

Cultivating Place

05:21 min | 1 year ago

The Lifelong Gardener, Toni Gattone

"I'd love to start by having you tell listeners exactly like where you are in your garden life and practice what it looks like right now, your relationship to plants, oh? Golly. Well, you know like you I have my gardens never looked better. Because I'm home. I'm I'm not going out and so all the weeds are gone and we live in a very small piece of property in. Marin. County in the town of Lark spor-. and. We have to elevated raise beds we have about. Thirty. Containers. And Vertical Gardens. And they are all chock full. Of veggies and fruits. I've got a aspired apple tree was six different kinds of apples, which is very when you have a really tiny yard blueberries that are, oh my gosh. That's like the fifth year of of their life in containers and a we have more blueberries this year than we've ever ever had. So and I got of course I've got roses and ornamental season But I have to say the roses have become the bane of my existence in the garden because I'm always fighting black spun. what are you GonNa do it you need to hear you either GonNa live with it or you're going to pull them out. Right and I did I I did decrease them only got five rose bushes now. And they better behaved here. That's all I can say that's what I on when I go. Okay. You gave and where you are in Marin what what does own would that be sixteen, sixteen seventeen okay. All right. So you are you are cooler by quite a bit than than me and warmer in the winter and interesting I. I love the idea of the blueberries in containers, and of course, the vertical gardening and the raised bed gardening in the container gardening is all going to be part of what we're talking about. Give us though I wanNA. Go back a little bit because I think you have a really great gardening of history and story yourself that brought you to this love, and then the work that you're doing with this love, will you take us back to the people and places and plants that grew you into a garden and plant loving person Tony Well, I think the the great inspiration stare into my grandfather's backyard in Chicago. He was an amazing gardener I mean you could. You could eat it seemed like each blade of grass in his backyard was was healthy and. Vibrant. His roses I never saw any sign of disease anywhere and he had a very small but jury productive Vegetable Garden and I I always saw the joy that was on his face when he was sharing with us the flowers in the fruits of his Labor. And continued with my mom and my mom, and I had a beautiful. Relationship, we were like two old shoes we used to say. she she was very supportive of me and whatever I felt like I needed to do. It was like, okay great. You know one of the the pivotal moments in my life was the Loma. PRIETA earthquake. Because that year my father passed away and then when the earthquake happened. My Foundation was shaken to the core. Yeah. What year was that Tony Eighty Nine and. I made up my mind when I finally got on the ferry to come home and I could see San Francisco inflames. And I said, I don't WanNa do this anymore. I don't WanNa work in downtown. San Francisco. And I applied for an equity line on my home, and soon as that goes proved I, quit my job in downtown San Francisco and I sat in my garden say now what? And my garden gave me of the inspiration to start a business in the garden industry. I didn't know what I was going to do but. Eventually, I found my way to find beautiful products that I loved and manufacturers that I wanted to represent and then slowly, but surely I added. To My company and I would find the products that good a garden shows and find the products and train them, and they would go out. We would all go out and sell the products to nurseries and gift stores and hardware stores all over California. And I loved it. I loved it was so much fun. but eventually I, I lost my my passion for that it took twenty eight years but. I walked away from that and twenty eighteen so that I could you know focus on being a speaker and author?

San Francisco Marin Vertical Gardens Tony Well California Lark Spor-. Tony Eighty Apple Chicago
Prediction

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Prediction

"Welcome to kids Smith and mystery your host kid crumb today. We're GONNA look at several events that were predicted. And of course we'll start with our current pandemic predicted seventeen years ago by science. If you still believe in science and is this a first well of course not you can look back. A hundred years to the nineteen eighteen. Banish flu epidemic tremendous number of similarities. Between on then. And what's going on now but we're going to leave that behind. Don't look at earthquakes. Also predicted are subduction zone. Earthquakes have occurred every three hundred and fifty years said six hundred BC with the most recent taking place January twenty six seventeen o one evidence for the earlier quakes or predictions comes from core samples taken from the ocean floor. The seventeen hundred quake caused several coastal regions are both Washington and Oregon to drop sixty six feet. Massive coastal storms during the nineteen ninety seven and ninety eight storms washed away tons of sand revealing hundreds of stumps the remnants of Sitka spruce forest. It is through a combination of carbon dating and counting of rings. That the date of the last cascade subduction zone or C. S. Z. Quake place the Earth. Surfaces made up of seven major plates in many smaller ones. The smaller place creator quakes for short durations of fourteen to forty five seconds it may reach nine point five on the Richter scale. They often take place at what is called the fault line between plates March Eleventh. Two Thousand Eleven Japanese experience subduction zone quite that lasted more than four minutes at a nine point one. On the Richter scale it was the fourth most powerful earthquake in the world since modern record taking began in nineteen hundred to shake created a soon nami that reached one hundred thirty three feet and move six miles inland. It moved Japan's main island of Honshu. Eight feet and shifted the earth on its axis between four and ten inches. This was an earthquake created by the shifting of the Pacific Plate Vialli to help put earthquakes in perspective the Loma Prieta quake that interrupted the nineteen eighty nine world series in San Francisco. California lasted fifteen seconds. The Great San Francisco earthquake of Nineteen. Six was eight point six and it lasted. Forty five seconds but Japan's greater earthquake of twenty eleven lasted over four minutes at nine point one on the Richter scale based on data from Oregon. Siochana Oceana Graphic Person Patrick Corcoran and US GS is Alaska. Science Center true mysteries of the Pacific northwest will now who are predicted. Minute by minute. Impact of a Cascadia subduction zone earthquake on the Oregon coast get this after three hundred twelve years the CS is he could no longer take the strain. It ruptures a spot fifty five miles west of Cannon Beach Oregon and quickly spreads along the seven hundred miles of length from British Columbia to Mendocino California. The North American plate slips fifty seven feet to the South West sliding over the one to Fuca plate. But remember we're talking about a crushed more than fifty miles deep. The first movement sends a pressure wave that travels through the Earth's crust at thirteen thousand miles an hour it will reach the West Coast in ten seconds. The leading edge will hit cannon beach and seaside thirty seconds later it reaches Portland Oregon in fifty seconds at his Seattle at nine point one. It's what Size Malla. Just call a full rip. Most cities can withstand a six point eight quake last year forty five seconds. But the difference between a forty second and a four-minute quake is like the difference between a head on collision at four miles an hour and forty miles an hour within three minutes. Shaking continues the coast will drop from six to twenty five feet after five minutes. The worst is over for Portland and Seattle will have suffered from ground. Liquefication building collapsed gas fires citywide after six minutes. People seeking high ground to avoid the SU- NAMI will be impeded by debris and driving will be almost impossible at eight minutes to Sonoma will be about twenty five miles offshore. It approaches like an enormous high tide but flash floods speed. The leading edge will only be inches but it will increase to forty feet is predicted that the cascade subduction zone quake would create twice the impact of Japan's great quake of twenty eleven. Keep in mind that by the time you finish listening to this podcast. There will earthquake somewhere in the

Oregon Japan San Francisco Patrick Corcoran West Coast Portland Seattle Pacific Plate Vialli Cannon Beach Oregon Smith FLU Sonoma Fuca Plate California Science Center Size Malla Washington Alaska Loma Prieta
"loma prieta" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Happened before you couldn't even imagine that whatever I was telling my son they closed down the school for a month they made the announcement in class individual teachers made the the announcement my son said you could hear roars coming up from the classrooms all across the school what is going on in their teachers at the schools cancel for a month which when your kid a month is rest your life so yeah and I still see said schools canceled tomorrow the kids right but so my son I said this is a big deal this never happened in my life is never happened as far as I know yeah this is just this is amazing yeah a month off and honestly we'll be fine for now we have one listener us say that they he was a gentoo lives in the bay area California and he there is he began a diary a daily diary after the nineteen eighty nine Loma Prieta earthquake hit you may remember that one during the World Series brought down highways and killed many many people terrible tragedy and disrupted life in the bay area for months and months and months and months but he started to keep a daily diary he said the it's something to do years from now people have a personal memory of the times you might suggest this to those in your audience it's an interesting idea and I don't mind it I I mean I think it's a pretty good idea I'll tell you when we come back if you're gonna pick a time to get caught in a hotel room with a with a gay male hooker and a whole bunch of math dude picked the right weekend for it which do fairly well on a politician did I don't know we can got buried by the growth of wires you're suggesting it to me I was gonna say I got like half a dozen objections that that among other things on the way hi I am Brian Berger founder.

California founder Loma Prieta Brian Berger
Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:25 min | 2 years ago

Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

"Let's cross over to California now a late last week governor Gavin newsom announced the launch of the nation's first statewide earthquake that system is molecules Los Angeles acting bureau chief collateral Bella on the morning of the fourth of July a six point four magnitude earthquake struck southern California the largest hit the state in over two decades two days later that record I stopped by a seven point one magnitude shake these two major earthquakes that struck California earlier this summer reignited conversation about the state of preparedness for when the next big one hits and a month following that siesmic event at least eight thousand aftershocks had been registered and sales on supplies for a homemade emergency disaster survival kit had increased so last it's News Dallas authorities have been working on the reliable early earthquake warning system that could potentially save countless lives couldn't have come at a better time speaking to the press last Thursday on the thirtieth anniversary of the catastrophic Loma Prieta earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area California's Governor Governor Newsom announced that the nation's first statewide earthquake early warning system was finally ready to be released to the public thirty years ago on this day portion of this bay bridge collapse in the earth quake live in the Marina District San Francisco Rico Way I remember like it was yesterday three decades later proud to announce that we finally have an early earthquake warning system that now is operational encouraging people to download the by shake out developed by seasonal adjusts at the University of California the my shake up will alert the public when a shake with four point five magnitude or greater has been detected with officials hoping to be able to alert people up to twenty seconds before the ground starts to move the new system will also warn residents to wireless emergency alerts these are sent to everyone even those who have downloaded yep this is the culmination of years of work both in terms of advances in technology but so politically until now only residents in the Los Angeles County area had access to similar alerts early warning systems have been credited with saving lives in other countries and those seconds are crucial for people to drop cover and hold in order to be safe get four million people to download this APP about the end of twenty twenty if we do so we will have the most comprehensive most I think technologically four earthquake warning early warning system of its type anywhere in the world Mexico and Japan have done versions of this the no one if we're able to get these APPs downloaded we'll have the technology of placing that will save lives That we will here in California if we download shake please do so let's be prepared for the next big

California Los Angeles Bella San Francisco Bay Area Califor Governor Newsom Mexico Japan Bureau Chief San Francisco University Of California Los Angeles County Twenty Seconds Three Decades Thirty Years Two Decades Two Days
Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

Joe Gallagher

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Earthquake App Provides Early Warnings

"Game between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland is was just about to begin when suddenly as al Michaels and Tim McCarver were previewing the upcoming game buildings and bridges collapsed widespread damage and fires sixty three people were killed across the bay area nearly four thousand injured now new technology aimed at saving lives unveils seconds save lives local mayor Libby Schaaf says she remembers well the Loma Prieta quake early warning can allow people to avoid more catastrophic loss like was experience thirty years ago and so the new California earthquake early warning system a network of sensors spread throughout the state that detect an earthquake the moment it begins and then sends an alert in two ways one the already in place wireless emergency alert system or we are the system used to send amber alerts and also on the new app called my shake it is through that up to that the state can glean data from users who

San Francisco Giants Oakland Al Michaels Libby Schaaf Tim Mccarver California Thirty Years
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

America's Morning News

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"In California is launching a mobile app that will send out early earthquake warnings governor Gavin Newsom and other officials announced that system on Thursday Thursday marked the thirtieth anniversary of the deadly Loma Prieta quake how we are now seeing the nation's first comprehensive early alert system for earthquakes we're now seeing the ability for millions and millions of Californians to download an app my shake download the app by Scheck second save lives early warning can allow people credible opportunity to prepare to covered

California Gavin Newsom Scheck
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

Forum

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"On the thirtieth anniversary of the deadly Loma Prieta earthquake California governor Gavin Newsom chose a site near the bay bridge in Oakland to announce the launch of the nation's first statewide earthquake early warning system the tales from Serra Husayni member station KQED in San Francisco the system uses a smartphone app called my shakes to alert users to quakes of magnitude four point five or larger advising them to drop cover and hold on up to twenty seconds in advance depending on distance from the epicenter Richard Allen directs the UC Berkeley seismology lab which helped develop the Sheik where technology over the past decade it's taken a little time but now we're very proud we think we have the most sophisticated early warning system in the world right now he says it should reach people faster than the existing wireless notifications which will continue along side the new

Gavin Newsom Oakland San Francisco Richard Allen California Serra Husayni Kqed Uc Berkeley Twenty Seconds
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"The governor's office of emergency services says earthquake early warning alerts will become publicly available statewide starting today your listening to live in local headlines talk radio five sixty KSFO the Sheik alert system will be unveiled on the thirtieth anniversary of the Loma Prieta earthquake the warnings will be pushed through a smartphone app and the same wireless notification system that issues amber alerts the system detects the start of an earthquake and calculates the location intensity and alerts the areas where shaking is likely to

Loma Prieta
California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

Tim Conway Jr.

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

"Earthquake early warning alerts will soon be available statewide warnings will come from the fake alert system that's pushed through a smartphone app it's the same system that notifies the public about amber alerts the California governor's office of emergency services says that system will detect the start of an earthquake and calculate its location intensity and alert any areas that shaking will happen the system debuts Thursday thirty years after the Loma Prieta earthquake that rocked the bay area it's also the same day as the annual great shakeout officials say they've worked to develop these alerts for years but it's only been available in large scale in LA county so far Monica Rick's

Earthquake La County Monica Rick California Loma Prieta Thirty Years
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Trust if you can't trust the the doctor who's taking care of you or your family you've got nothing and we can talk more about how to prescribe antibiotics appropriately but that's a case where the antibiotic didn't need to be given and that puts a parent and a very difficult situation yeah I'm Jane I thank you for the call was seconds away from a breaker but Stephen once in a wired fictions disease doctors paid less than other doctors house are paid to try and has to do with something called RV use and physicians are largely compensated based on the procedures that they do not on intellectual expertise and infectious disease doctors don't really do procedures we'll return with talk about McCarthy stay tuned for more he's the author of super bugs a race to stop an epidemic this is formed I'm Michael Krasny this is coming up tomorrow on forums San Francisco Chronicle conversely a guard checks started at that paper in nineteen seventy two the same year the Transamerica tower open and she's been there ever since Johnstone Loma Prieta and the other biggest stories of the past half century she recently announced retirement and tomorrow we'll hear stories from her forty seven years at the chronicle to listen to past shows and join the discussion visit KQED dot org slash forum and for the latest updates on our programs in gas.

Stephen McCarthy Michael Krasny San Francisco Chronicle Johnstone Loma Prieta Transamerica tower forty seven years
"loma prieta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Oh, maybe ever have hold with the railing, okay? Looking at this guy's mugshot if they're saying suspicion of drugs. I can tell them it's not as suspicion high as a kite. Something I don't know why on f Morgan sixty three years old. Oh. This, this goes back to our naked bike ride story yesterday. It's always the people taking their clothes off that you don't wanna see, you know, it is, isn't it? I just it is one of those things, this is bleed well, and, you know, then how do you go ahead and your Big Mac right after seeing this dude naked? Yeah. Enjoy your nuggets. Okay. Well, hopefully this guy is in jail, and then he'll have plenty of bars to try to make relations to. There you go. Here's another one deputies arrest. No, we've very good. Cocoa woman in Florida shoots her boyfriend for snoring. Too loudly now that I think most of us can relate to that. Most women can relate to that. Yeah. I'm really glad my fiancee is still alive. A woman is facing charges after cops as she shot her boyfriend after an argument over his snoring. According to police now, here's what I don't understand. How is this argument, either you snore or you don't? Maybe she was trying to get him to do things to stop it. And he wasn't doing it. Or she was trying to make him stop in the middle of the night and he wasn't stopping because he was asleep. Yeah. Maybe both the suspect and the victim are believed to have been drinking leading up to the incident. There's always some sort of drugs or alcohol involved in these stories. Have you noticed that? Yeah. Especially with Florida. I'm looking at this woman's mugshot definitely also under the influence. Yeah. Oh, yeah. You kidding me? She's been charged with tempted murder and aggravated battery and was transported to the provide county jail where she's being held without bond. According to online records. Let's hope her cellmate doesn't snore. We're gonna have another good Lord man. We know it is funny because, for whatever reason I have started to snore. I'm fifty one. I've never had an issue snoring until recently, I didn't even believe that I was snowing. And then, of course, you know, these days you can do anything with audio and video on your darned cell phone your smartphone. So of course, you know, Amy records me snoring. Just to prove that I am indeed snoring. Now, I've started actually waking myself up, did you sleep on your back because that could be a problem? Yeah. That's what I do. I sleep on my back. So so usually about two or three times a night. I get the kick, you know, sleep on your side kick, that's exact-. I have do. Right. My, my dad, I kid you not. Hey, used to shake the wall. Yeah. Are you snoring Loma Prieta happening all over again? What is this? That's I know. That's my fear. And I might even overweight, I nothing for whatever reason, you know, my dad was a big guy, but I said to my step mom way back when I said, how do you sleep through that? And she said just over the years. You just get used to it. Here's something crazy. Is that after my dad died? You know what she said? I can't sleep because I missed his snoring. Oh, it's like white noise. Oh, yes. That's really that you lost all this way. And then started to snore usually at works in the other way. Yeah. I don't. I don't get it. I'm down over seventy pounds all of a sudden I've started snoring. So do you drink right before you go to bed? No. He's not right now. I San grease is pretty much all I do. But yeah. Yes. That's exactly right. Yes. So, yeah. I don't know. I've started taking melatonin these kinds of things. But anyway, and we have one more Florida story about a gender reveal an alligator from what I understand. There's this Florida couple they decided to do a gender reveal party for their tenth child. Boy, oh my Lord, they got a black balloon. They dangled it from pole in front of the gator urging it to puncture it with his jaws. When the when the alligator snapped up the balloon it revealed a pink powder that they were going to have a girl. This is the most Florida story. That's ever Florida. I mean, I, I hate these gender reveal things anyway. Retarded. Yeah. Thank yous their pet alligator, first of all, as a pet alligator with ten kids. Yeah, good point. You can't cuddle an alligator maybe they have it as a pet so it can take out the weak ones. He go go to bed or. We're gonna feed you to the allegation. Snappy is gonna get you next. Good lord. Man. Yeah, I I'm with you. As far as the as far as the gender reveals go. Oh my gosh. I, I don't know why they do this any any reason to have a party. I guess I saw gender reveal the other day where a couple had died a dozen eggs blue and pink, and they were hard, boiled except for one. And the one that wasn't hard, boiled was the actual gender of the baby. And they were smashing the eggs against their foreheads. Oh my Lord, so that the one that burst got all over the woman's face. And now you're covered in Egge. What are you dumb? They literally have egg on their face. Yes, eg all over their face. And everybody's cheering. And I'm sitting there going, okay. Well, I mean, okay, I'm gonna have to blame social media for this, right? It made like stupid video share with that had like three million views and all these likes. And I'm just sitting there going smashed an egg on your face and see here. Here's the problem as stupid as that. Is there now going to be thousands of people who do the same thing because we live in a nation of lemmings and to have some people do something stupid on social media, and it gets three million shares likes views comments. Whatever it is then everybody else has to do it as well. This is simply and sadly what we do here in America. Whether it makes sense or not. My name is Dan mandis in for Brian Sussman. By the way, you can find out. More about me, I'm on social media, oddly enough on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. And that is all three four, Dan MandA show. Dan, mandis again, along with Katie green, and share a year. It is whistle blower, Wednesday. Now coming up next. We have a number of different things, including Joe Biden, and David Letterman, Letterman have the say about Donald Trump and another story regarding a democrat from Ohio, who is calling Trump supporters racist, and dumb. It's all straight ahead under-age smoking in vaping is a serious problem. One way to combat it raise the legal age to purchase from eighteen to twenty one about eighty percent of high school students. Turn eighteen before graduating, if they can legally buy tobacco, they.

Florida Donald Trump Loma Prieta Dan MandA murder Dan mandis Katie green melatonin America Dan Amy Joe Biden vaping David Letterman Brian Sussman Facebook Egge Twitter Ohio
"loma prieta" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

09:26 min | 2 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"On. And thank specially to mayor Erica, said he of Los Angeles. Our next guest is a size Malla GIS to Caltech. And she's a leading thirty on earthquake risk. Would you please welcome? Lucie jones. Okay, lucy. So interesting to me that people clapped earthquakes. So tell us something, we don't know about her quakes start there. Most people think of California's a place with a lot of earthquakes. The reality is, we don't have enough. Now, maybe that's only something small just going to say, but we can look at the geology, and see how many we should have, and especially the last couple of decades. Ben particularly quiet we call it earthquake drought. And the, the only downside of as it is at least a complacency, people think that this is what we have to be ready for. And we need to remember the long run we get more very interesting. So for twenty years, that scale is probably just not significant when you thinking, quakes, yes. On the larger ones. That's right. An actually if you want to see some really interesting debates geologist try to do statistics. Lot of us. Struggle on how to do it correctly and we argue over it. But if you go to small earthquakes, then you have a lot of them and statistically significant that the last twenty years is quite a bit quieter than the previous century so quick to part question. I wanted to tell us about earthquake prediction, and how it's changed over recent decades, and then related to that. What can you tell us about the probability of a big better quake? Let's say in California in the next. Let's say ten twenty and fifty years. Okay. I'll start with the last one and just say the big earthquake on the San Andreas seven point eight, something like that is absolutely inevitable. Just give me enough time. Enough time we're talking decades centuries. What? Well, all right. So we average one hundred fifty a little too excited about the product. I don't get to create my own experiments. I have to wait for it. What the earth is going to give me and I came in here and my first decade, we had a lot of earthquakes. We had Whittier narrows we Northridge we had Loma Prieta, and then for the next twenty five years at the end of my career. Nothing I I miss them. But I realized that not everybody else does the problem is, is that the pattern really is. Random I can give you a rate I can do the earthquake climate if you will. But what we don't have is the particular storm when the rain's coming into night. And my iphone says, there's a fifty percent chance of rain starting at eleven o'clock. That's because they can measure the cloud coming in. There's nothing that has to come in for the earthquake to happen. Or if there is it happens for every earthquake, and there's, there's an average in earthquake once every three minutes in southern California. So what do you? You mean that it's random do, do you really mean that it's random statistically, as far as we can tell it really is? Random now. You think okay we're building up the stress on the fall two years. Quick should happen when the stresses built up the problem is that the earthquakes actually happened at stresses much smaller than the breaking strength of the fault. And it's like if it goes on stable, then we go into a different mode, and dynamic friction is much weaker than static friction. And so the timings controlled by when you happen to get a little break just somewhere on the fault, and it goes on stable, we aren't actually building up to the full strength of FOX. Does that mean there'll never be a time where we can really predict earthquakes? I believe we will never predict earthquakes now notice my qualify. I'm a scientist. I don't say absolutes. The fundamental is do magnitude ones and magnitude sevens beginning exactly the same way if they do there's nothing to predict you don't want me to predict the ones and as far as we can tell at this point the one. In the seven start the same way. I know you're excited for the next big earthquake because it'll keep you busy, which not a bad reason to earthquake. But most people, I would say would probably rather, not have a big earthquake for obvious reasons, loss of life and damage, and on, and on and on, so. Let's talk a little bit about. I guess what? You'd call earthquake risk management, right. Tell us one smart thing and one dumb thing that California has done to manage earthquake risk. So. Really smart thing that mayor said he did his listen to me. He. He invited me to city hall. We had a long discussion. We ended up creating a cooperative project where the US Geological Survey who was my employer at the time. Put me in city hall, and together, we created a resilience plan the two biggest things generally, we know which are the bad buildings that are going to fall down, and we have mandated repairs. The owners have to spend the money to fix those buildings. They don't kill what kind of money are we talking about for retrofitting? Yeah. I mean, there's about fifteen thousand buildings involved, and it's paid by the owners, and if it's a rent controlled apartment, then it split fifty fifty with tenants, but they're not allowed to put the whole cost onto the tenants the concrete, or a commercial building the owner pays for it, and he can change his rant as needed, or you can choose to tear it down. Can I ask you said that the seven is inevitable like, like superman the first movie like the I mean, what is this? I actually watched that movie with a class of. We got thrown theater. It's. We can look at the geology, and Los Angeles is moving to San Francisco and just five million years. We will be a suburb of San Francisco, and that is inevitable and it's not going to be stopped plate tectonics goes on. The question is, are we gonna take the next step in it tonight or next year or fifty years from now and these policies that are building the right infrastructures did these apply to seven level, earthquakes? Absolutely. We do pretty well in a magnitude six, we have had sixes that don't kill people. So we are gradually building it up. I mean, it's all relative thing we absolutely could have a city resilient to it. We can't stop all damage. We could do a better job with our water system. All that Los Angeles act. He was talking about it crosses the San Andreas fault in a wooden tunnel built in one thousand nine hundred and the tunnel is nine feet diameter and the expected fault. Also. That will be twelve feet. So it won't exist after the earthquake. Okay. Mr awesome. Mayor would have you done about that. They are planning the engineering solution now. How much greater is the risk of dying in an earthquake in California versus let's say New York. Not much. We have a lot more earthquakes that you have a lot worse buildings. There was a study that said, what's the expected money to be lost in the different urban areas? Los angeles. Number one San Francisco's. Number two Seattle's number three in New York is number four. I understand that earthquake insurance is not required in California. And that roughly just fifteen percent of property owners have it should it be required. That, that's a different policy question than science, but it is going to hurt our economy, very badly eve what happened to San Francisco in nineteen. Oh, six it was the only city that mattered on the west coast in nineteen. Oh, five that quake happening, essentially destroyed the whole city the next decade is the biggest growth decade in the history of Los Angeles. People gave up on San Francisco and came, south there. Konomi went down for decades, and you can argue that San Francisco never. Regained its position. Makem on Lucie. Jones says the big one is coming and she can't wait. Is there did you turn up any facts that are worth revisiting there is.

California Los Angeles San Francisco Lucie jones New York lucy San Andreas city hall Caltech Erica Ben US Seattle geologist Loma Prieta Makem Northridge
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:57 min | 3 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"Great. Here. Hearing. Victor return audio and we will be back. We. Gimme of heard that sound on channel seven ABC in nineteen eighty nine. When the Loma Prieta earthquake struck have you been wondering about with quake lately? Have you been thinking? Wow. There has to be one coming soon. Big one. I have I'm not sure why. But it's been on my mind quite a lot lately. So when I saw the article in the San Francisco Chronicle saying that we are in an earthquake drought. It struck a nerve. Joining us is Dr Glenn Biassa. He is a size Malla gist with US Geological Survey in Pasadena, Dr BSE thank you so much for being with us this afternoon. Smart poyser. So you and a colleague I suppose looked at a thousand years of data along the state's three most active fault lines. The Senate race the Hayward in the Senate who CEO and found a pretty interesting information. What did you find all that data? The first historical observation at the twelve sites that we have where we we look through the sows in years. There's not been surface breaking any of those sites in the last one hundred years the data don't predict this long out. Well, what does the data show what what historically has happened prior to this period of time? So at most of these sites, we we expect quake every say one hundred two hundred fifty years in some cases, two hundred fifty years, so but the sadistically among twelve some should've hit in two hundred years since the last among any of them, which was the central fault in southern California. So together, they any one of them could have a gap of one hundred years if they all have it. We wonder something else going on. Oh, well, what might that? Something else. Be. I mean, are we gearing up for something incredibly massive? I would offer two theories one is the that. This is normal quiet after perhaps a run of very large earthquakes. I your listeners will be familiar with the nineteen o six earthquake rupture with a ruptured from south of Monterey for two offshore actually in northern California. Three hundred miles long and southern California, experienced comparable earthquake in eighteen fifty seven and with these with some others in a flurry in the eighteen hundreds may have in some way, we can't fully say run the system out. Just it all the energy got bled off and his last hundred years has been in some sense, a recovery the alternative is that somehow there they are coordinating for some more active other coordinating some other way that we don't know. And our paper was to be a bit of a spur to people who are are better equipped to models to see if there isn't enough other way, where faults would communicate perhaps and lead to this quiet period. There have been a number of smaller quakes and some of them very serious quakes. You're talking about the quakes that actually 'cause rep shirt in the earth. Can you describe what you mean by that? For these faults of when they rupture the ground surface. If you were to look at a fence line, perhaps that had been straight before you'd find it off side or a road that used to line up or the stripe in the middle of a road doesn't line up anymore. You would see small examples for the Napper's quake and bigger ones for earthquakes in the nineteen six six spectacular pictures of these offsets, actually pretty black and white photos that person could find. Did you do the smaller quakes because it seems like the last week or so there have been quakes in the three range little less little bigger? Do those smaller quakes do. They relieve pressure on the big faultlines. Yes, or no, okay. So every earthquake releases spring energy stored in Iraq, we've many of players springs, and you compress it let it go and flies across the room. When it does that it's releasing energy that you put in squeezed when you have an earthquake. It's releasing spring energy. Now, you said threes and fours each earthquake the energy released goes up by a factor of thirty for every magnitude unit. So you say, well, I need thirty magnitude fours to release the energy of one five and I need thirty magnitude five to get to a six thirty six's. So now, we're up at nine hundred annoying earthquakes to do the job of one big earthquake. So understand what false what these faultlines what they are. And what they have to do with one another. I mean, you talk about coordinating. It sounds as if you know, this is a conspiracy of sorts and. They're going to really get us if they choose to. But of course, they're not sent Chinton. And so tell us what all of this actually means how they're related to one another. The first thing to say is that the we pick these because we don't think earthquakes will happen on them part of the mouth of the problem. We have to make them independent. So these arms, we don't think twigs ever happen on both of them at once. These are the false that carry most of the slip many of your listeners will know that the Pacific plate is moving north at about two inches per year compared to say Utah. And two inches initiative house as expressed on these faults the false that we studied. So these should be the most active and they've been quiet. Okay. So I'm I'm concerned that what's going to happen is we're going to have some sort of a massive event. And that we are so much more densely populated so much, you know, and so much more spread out in terms of our population to I mean, we're dense, but we're also just a much bigger population that if we hit by a big one, and eventually we are that it is going to do not only immense damage, but there's going to be an incredible loss of life. Is there any way of intimidating if that is going to happen? And if so when. The wind is the hardest part of our science. Tell people that the math is hard as predicting the weather, but instead of buying a barometer temperature sensor we have to pay millions of dollars for the same data and one borehole so data's hard to get your concerns about populated areas. I personally very concerned about the East Bay. This is a subject. So the Hayward fault runs, perhaps, you know, right through the bear stadium. And it's it they had to retrofit the bear stadium. Hopefully survive the earthquake that we expect to run up through the foothills there that is not going to be a pretty sight. And I encourage people who are considering retrofit shrink thing building. Please. By all means if you can please to the Hayward fault run. So it enjoy it splits off the Andrea south of the Santa Cruz mountains and then runs of well, there's a south Hayward north Hayward. But they run. Perhaps two hundred miles really north of Hayward and Berkeley and so on and then joined another set of faults up there. So okay. So let me make sure because you said that with these major faultlines if if an earthquake happens on one of them earthquakes don't happen at the same time on others of these major falls. Right. So it's not like if the Heywood fought of we have a big one on the Hayward fault that it could or would likely trigger something on another on the San Andreas, for example. We don't expect behavior. I like to remind people other fellow scientists that the earth is not read our papers and doesn't care what we. I think that's probably true. So we get supplies is now and again, but we have experienced in the past. There are other fault systems like this in the world, and as a rule, well, while some overlap is not unknown in the faults of the world, a bigger quake that is to say it'll be mostly on one but include a spur on another this is not unknown. But it's quite unusual. And we don't have any reason to think that's occurred here. Limit gain another bit of understanding here because okay winning earthquake happens. We're generally told will the where the epicenter of the earthquake is what does that mean? And is the determination of whether it's going to be an earth. Rupturing earthquake is earthquake is that dependent on the faultline or the depth of the earthquake or how much the plates have moved or to all of those things have a bearing on it. The primary the primary element on defaults. Earthquake magnitude had that earthquakes that are large enough to be tens of kilometers long almost always break to the surface. They carry the service if you went there you'd see it. Magnitude first, and then the type of fault. You can't hide a larger quake nineteen fifty two. And current county. We had the largest instrumental earthquake in southern California occurred there to not break the surface because it was a trade recall, it a reverse faulting earthquake one piece lighting under another, and it didn't leave a an expression at the surface the false. We studied are more like the. If you're detach piece of cardboard to two freight trains side by side and one of them pulls out of the station. There would be a tear in the material that you attach to between the two and this is the kind of terror. One past another recall, it strikes live that is on most of California's faults, but not all. So we're we're almost out of time here. But how how should we be preparing because there's gonna be a big earthquake? And I'm talking about individually. Is there anything that we can do to be preparing? But also as communities, right? The first thing to say is the distance of the fault matters the most how should we prepare? If if the average is three to four quakes per century are are gonna come back then three to four. But I I have said, and it could be six maybe more in the coming century means actually might be higher than average right now day to day. We can't plan that way because they're still talking fifteen years apart. So people need to prepare take advantage of the retrofit with earthquake bracing bolt if you live in an old house, you can get help bolting down there. Other types of programs to help people secure their home in their space. I think folks to take advantage of those. I think your listeners would know that please don't sleep under any heavy objects. Heavy TV set or a bookcase that could hurt you or your children as they sleep. These are very very practical steps plus the things for water and. You know, food for an emergency that just sort of make sense on any terms. Yeah. Well, that's true. That's absolutely true. Well, Dr be I'll say it has been informative talking with you. And if the big one strikes anytime soon, I'm going to be giving you a call back. So that we could talk about just what you know about what had happened to us. Thank you. Thanks for the research that that you have done and thanks for joining us today on cagey, Al it's been a pleasure. Thank you. All righty. That's Dr be ASA. He is he's a seismologist Glenn BSA seismologist with the US Geological Survey in Pasadena. I mean, do you feel like you're well prepared like where we are? Well, prepared for the big. When are you like me? I mean, are you somebody who has really been thinking that something's going to happen? It's something it's almost like you can smell it. You just feel like it's not that far often than me like it's going to happen today. But it's not that far off eight eight oh, eight ten is the telephone number. You're listening to Keijo Pat Thurston on K G. Oh, I'm.

California earthquake Hayward us San Francisco Chronicle Loma Prieta Pasadena bear stadium Hayward north Hayward ABC Dr Glenn Biassa Victor Senate Iraq Santa Cruz Dr BSE Monterey Pat Thurston CEO
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"Enemy half the time with with our government here. You'll love it. And you hit it right on the freeway perspective. You know, you're caller that talked about the central freeway. I helped campaign to tear that down it was damaged by the Loma Prieta earthquakes as well as the embarked era freeways. I remember that. Can you imagine today having the embargo freeway a double decker freeway around the embarcadero? It just it's it's kind of hard to imagine. You can look at a map when this country was in the heyday of building our interstates. There was a map that the federal government had taken the central freeway where ended at fell street had dumped onto Phil street all the way down through panhandle park and then connect with the city boulevard over there in across the Golden Gate, and then the freeway was supposed to go all along the barrel through the marina and connected. The Golden Gate Bridge. So you would have had two major elevated freeways through the hardest Francisco around our waterfronts. And frankly, you know, I helped her down the freeway and get your view boulevard built because just city depends on tourism more than anything. And when I moved here in this neighborhood. It was a ghetto underneath that freeway and Hayes valley, which is now in LeBron neighborhoods in the city was a ghetto. You didn't go there. It was it was. We couldn't couldn't those things have been rectified without having to eliminate the freeway. I don't think. So I mean, if you look at the nature of the city of your last caller said, it's a peninsula design. You know, obviously, not for moving people quickly through the city. I don't think the answer is more freeways, I think freeways, damaged the value of the neighborhoods in which they are built really clearly hear in central San Francisco. You look at Oakland. Oakland is amazed the freeways and west Oakland, basically cut off by freeway. It it stagnated and freeways are building walls. And I don't think we weigh the answer. I can't say that you know, it is true that a freeway through a city can indeed bisect the community in more ways than one. It's like, you know, people talk about being on one side of the railroad tracks or the other side of the railroad tracks it can it can indeed do that. I've seen it in other places. I've seen it in Oakland. I've seen it in south Florida. The same kind of thing it just seems. You know, if the idea is that aesthetically it isn't pleasing. Sometimes we have to balance the aesthetics, and we have to balance the practicality the pragmatism the need for moving people. People moving is a very important aspect of a city thriving. We gotta find a way to rectify those things eight oh eight oh, eight ten is the telephone over that's eighty eighty eight ten you're listening to k geo Pat Thurston on K G. Oh, I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in.

Oakland Golden Gate Bridge Pat Thurston Loma Prieta federal government Golden Gate San Francisco Hayes valley panhandle park LeBron south Florida
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"Point five in my neighborhood. You know, it's funny because that's a west coast thing if you Becky east, there's a three point five they're like, but it was it was a slammer. And I I don't know what created the sound because I'm I'm cottage that's not sitting on a slap maybe lifted up and dropped it. But. So you remember the Eighty-nine quake, right? Yeah. Absolutely. Okay. And what was do you? Remember, a sound was it's all about the sounds. No. I mean, I guess the rumbling. I remember I just remember I had a TV on the corner of my desk, and it fell off. That's what I remember it. I mean because everybody I mean, the time that was in that storm was robbed and the guy. Cock the gun. I hear that like right more than I remember the image. Because actually he wasn't pointing into me. But I heard a cock. So you think about this is that I don't have a plan. I mean, I have a fire plan for when I'm in San Diego, and I have a home down there. But I mean, I'm not there. But when I was I mean, we were we get the FARC three miles from our home at one point. And you know. Eighty mile an hour winds blowing that stuff it can blow it, you know, obviously sparks and next thing. You know, the Kanye next on fire. And what do you do? What are you gotta get out? I had got forced I got all the my filing cabinet stuff the records and deeds and all that stuff. I needed pictures of the kids my to computer, hard drives, you know, the MAC things. And then after that, I can reply we can even now I could replace but pretty much. I mean, obviously, the old ones my me when I was a baby, and my parents, but pretty much I mean, even my wedding is online. But I'm just thinking if we could if they're huge when hitting the city, we're stuck in the city. You can't get I guess you could take a ferry boat out of town. Right. That would be. If I had to get back to East Bay or I could take finally get somebody to take me down. If I wanted to my wife travels to San Diego a lot. And I go down there. I don't know to me. It's really interesting dilemma, and they tell you to prepare. But I don't think you can really be prepared for this. If it really I mean, you know, we have two hundred zero to three point five three point five that up to seven that could be. It's not the same. I know. But. Earl. Hi, you're on Keijo a chip in Nikki Europe repre. Hey, jeff. I'm retired military. And I think I've been I'm a brand new prepar I wouldn't say trapper, but I have been prepping for a few years now. And I think I've gotten obsessed with it. I mean, you would be prepared for everything. And you can go through scenarios in your head all the time. It was like what if this happens? What if that happens, but you still need all the basic necessities? So you always need water food and first aid and depends on where you live. If you live in urban rural or suburban or whatever. That's how you press. Yeah. And I've been going the line I've been going online to YouTube and watching those guys do it and getting ideas from them. I'm I'm the. For my neighborhood. So I've been trying to have meetings your the way you're the one in your neighborhood. The what? Captain. Oh, captain. HOA is that for our? Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Block captain for the neighborhood watch. We can we had a few break ins and stuff like that. So I just because. That's good. I walk out and check on my neighbors and stuff like that. So you just getting into it. Right. But there are people like, you know, the people in the midwest that you know, when a nuclear war, they built silos and remember that movie Cloverdale member one with John Goodman. He played the crazy guy. Yeah. It's a weird movie. I'm not a bad defense. But you know, I live in Libya and Oakland. So I have to prepare for whatever happens here in Oakland. So thursday. Forgot about first aid. So I aid you would need somebody got hurt bad because the hospitals would be insane right move. How many people died in Loma Prieta was it like as sixty nine. So might say something like sixty isn't sixties. Yeah. Collapse.

Kanye San Diego Becky east Oakland FARC Loma Prieta John Goodman YouTube Libya East Bay Keijo Earl jeff Nikki Europe Cloverdale
"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:12 min | 3 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KGO 810

"Into that. There's a lot to talk about the Nancy Pelosi thing is weird and brought up the part of government. I did not know. Yeah. I was I was unaware of her travels, but he should comply commercial. And I'm sure I guess I get that. I mean, I guess that's why because it's. The military is part of the executive Ryan. But it still is better as you can get is it we need to start talking about earthquakes more. I think we're unearthly country. We talk about it. I woke up this morning. I was laying in bed, and and it and I'm about about eight miles seven miles from Piedmont not that far. And I heard what I thought a door slam the door sliding door. What was that sound didn't occur to me that it was an earthquake? Because I was because we had thunder and lightning later right in my head. I had I'll get groggy. But then I'm reading this is the second back to back day. We had a three point five this morning, and then we had a three point four on Wednesday. And you know, nobody knows I mean, it's a fluke or and and it doesn't mean these smaller quakes and the Hayward fault has been three quarters of a century before since we had a really big one. And that is that runs right through Berkeley and into across the hill down the bay area, right? Well, yeah. And it's on on the, of course, east side. And then I started reading a little bit this morning. And I'm re I just finished a book called the city state by Tom McHenry, former mayor of San Jose, great writer, by the way, and it's a really interesting book, and he starts out talking about Loma Prieta which happen in our. Yeah. And he went to Santa Rosa. And he said that he thought he was in. Germany after the second World War. There was you could smell death. Oh god. How bad it was. Yeah. You could smell people who they couldn't get to their bodies. And you know couple days into it. And. Got me thinking that. I have no plan. I mean, if there was no seriously. What do you mean? You know? All right. So it cell towers went down. How would I mean how in the bridges? Are you can't cross the bridges because if there's a big quake they're gonna shut the bridges down? Right. Well, I mean until they determine whether or not they were although the new design, you know, after eighty nine this bay bridge is supposed to be safer, but then you talk to architects scorn. But I mean, I I take it all the grain of salt. I figured that. It depends on where the earthquake is the severity all that stuff. If we got like seven five or an eight and you're near the epicenter. It doesn't matter. How you build something? It's I mean, it's gonna fall over unless you're right to part of it glasses gonna break something bad's going to happen. And I have no plan for that. I mean, just how do you communicate with cell phones? How would we get? I don't have a line lamb line. My exactly even landlines might not. Even you guys have a place to meet do you have that all set up all of our family is in about a six mile radius, right other? So you can walk by was here. How would you get home? I have no idea start walking. I don't know. I mean, I literally walk obviously. So obviously, but I just don't I don't know how I would probably have to stay in the studio with you. It would be little. Number party two guys have like water. Oh, yeah. Well, I mean, you have to remember that I'm married into a military family. So they had all kinds of stuff, and we have a, you know, at the very basic. We have a ton of 'em. Are we do have someone? Meal ready to eat. Okay. You know? Yeah. I have water. I'm sure not enough. Do you have it stored in my garage, big plastic bottles? From deer park, those kind of big bottles ear part, you know, they deliver water to your house Auvinen into nine. Does it just bottled water? Oh, small bottles. So now, you're not just dragging it. Right. I think I'll go stinky for a while. And so I figure out how to live, you know. But I don't know if I said this on the radio yesterday, but I I had to fly early. No, I didn't I was telling shut when I was leaving my brother-in-law's house yesterday. And I didn't want to shower said, you know, I use this stuff and hearing me telling them, but it's it's it looks like a water plants. Ops up, and it's for people that that you don't have time to Bates you spray it all over in town hall, and I got home last night. And I didn't I didn't take a shower yesterday. I got home last night. I still didn't have b-. Oh, it was amazing to think I didn't I I can smell anyway. So, but I wonder how many people out there have plans because this was a really we had kind of you know, with the storm yesterday, which was just today. It was really still brain and heart. It's supposed to rain again today and tomorrow, I mean, it's pretty much the bulk of the story at least I mean in San Jose. I drove through crazy rain. I mean, I if I went fifty five all the way home that was fast, and then I get home in the power. So and thankfully, my mom loves candle and actually tell everybody you were so sweet last night. You drove me, right. You picked me up. She walked two and a half blocks to her car, porn, rain comes and picks me up. I run out. I get in takes me to Bart right there. And every I didn't get wet at all until I had to take Bart from a liberal, and every I ran out to the street thinking, it was mine, and it was somebody else's. I get in. Are you are Mondo? And he goes now, I'm Tony damp. So I got totally soaked in that little bit. Anyway. I I really have no plan. And I'm wondering what is stopping you from having a plan. Well, I mean, you know, I travel I travel alive living in Lafayette. And if it all broke down, right? If if if we got that big one, I you know, I don't know how I'd get back. You know, I think most people would not understand how to get out of the city, but that's another you can plan for. I mean, it's literally you just have to you can't have a drone pick you up. So that you can't take care of. But you should. To say it happened right now. Okay. Okay. You could stay here as long as the building was still standing by. No people. He's been here. A long time. The one Marin brick would always freaks me out. Right. Yeah. So I mean, so say we couldn't say were on the street, every hotel is going to be full and cars, you can't get out of the city. I know I know bay area people you'd be able to be taking care of others that okay, she, you know, people don't even know him. I know when tragedy heads people there are helpers out there. I mean, I'm not trying to be all pollyannish about it. But believe me. All right. So here's the number eight hundred ten do you have a plan and began to worry because I think that the public affair now we have this every year we have that. Right. That earthquake preparation dance. Yeah. It's one of those things where you just if you especially natives to California, you're just like, yeah. I got my water. I got my food. What do you got a fire plan in San Diego? I mean, you ought to have a fire plan. I know but fire can get to you like that. Once it starts, and then all your records are gone earthquake. You don't lose your records as.

San Jose Bart Nancy Pelosi Piedmont Germany Berkeley executive California Ryan Hayward Santa Rosa Loma Prieta Tom McHenry San Diego Mondo Tony damp deer park Bates Lafayette
"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:59 min | 3 years ago

"loma prieta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But I'm curious what knowledge of earthquakes we can apply to the NASA. Insight Lander currently on Mars laundering for Mars quakes. KPCC's? Jacob Margolis might be able to answer this one. And what insight could potentially teach us about quakes here on earth. Chickens. Jacob. It's amazing how much earthquakes or a size. Is kind of connected to the very very cutting edge of science. Oh, yeah. I mean, the insight Lander is so cool. I went over to JPL to actually see how the little hammer that they used to send tool down into the Martian surface, actually, work a Nesta's upholstered laboratory. Yeah. Sorry, right down the street from where we are right now. And it was so neat and what they're basically doing with that is they were reading those signals from that hammer using these really sensitive seismometers as well. As those seismometers also pick up all of these different like strikes, meteor strikes and stuff like that on the planet, and they use those waves to map the interior of the planet that is so cool because waves travel differently through different kinds of materials inside the planet. And as for what we're going to learn based on Mars and how we can apply here. I'm actually not quite sure, but I do know that the size that besides monitor that they're using there is so sensitive that if you placed it in the middle of the United States. States you could detect waves on the west coast. That's how sensitive it is. So they'll have a massive amount of data go through to be able to kind of figure out what's inside the red planet. I have never seen anyone as excited about anything as man. You will you're in good company because we got a lot of folks in our audience just like that before we bring in one more guest and gets us. Some more your questions and thoughts, I wonder if we could go back to Sandy's comment who wrote on Facebook about moving to Cincinnati having a home that was made earthquake resistant. She wrote in part, my designer and builder have always longed for a tornado or earthquake to see how the house performs. I'm not sure I would wish that on her home. But what is your sense of how Californians are doing in terms of protecting their homes against earthquakes? I remember from San Francisco that the majority of San Franciscans are renters rather than owners and a lot of their homes are on those like like single like where the soft story building where the first floor is almost on stilts with parking. And it presents a massive challenge with retrofitting select on here down here. It's it's similar. We have a lot of soft story apartment buildings which are basically like you said elevated apartment buildings with carports underneath and there is a mandatory retrofit for those in Los Angeles to keep them safe. When it comes to houses there are different programs. That you know for under a thousand dollars you can brace your house if it's on like a race foundation. But you really do that if you are the owner of the property when it comes to renters, it's a lot more difficult more difficult to tell if you are in a safe building. But while there are some programs here that do promote retrofits. You know, I asked a lot we asked a lot of people for this podcast. Like, okay. So is your is your home safe? Is it ready for the big one or even even a smaller one and a lot of people just didn't know? And so I would say that there are good programs in place. However, a lot of people still live in Ingraham's fat. Speaking of that podcast. We are speaking Jacob Margolis science reporter here KABC and the host of the podcast the big one your survival guide. Also joining us here in studio now is the podcast lead producer. Michele yousef. Michelle, welcome to one A. Hi, thanks for having me. How did the podcast come about? So we were Interbrew where we were taking pitches from the newsroom and Jacob came in. And we started talking about earthquakes and decided that it was a great time to put together a narrative show about the big one because nothing like it had been made before. And because it was about to be the twenty fifth anniversary of the Northridge quake, which happened in one thousand nine hundred four was kind of the last big earthquake. Californian's remember? And once we started working on it. We became aware of the shakeout report and realize that there was a lot of information out there that needed to be disseminated in an accessible way to people in California and outside the shakeout report. Yeah. So yeah. We're obsessed with a got. So it's a two thousand eight document that Dr Lucie Jones, actually, spearheaded and several seismologists structural engineers. Psychologists three hundred different scientists contributed to it. There is a large group of people, and essentially they predicted what would happen on within southern California. If an earthquake happened on the southern San Andreas fault about a seven point eight magnitude on a clear day. And so that is the information that we have been using to model the fiction scenarios in the podcast. There are an infinite number of scenarios that when it comes to earthquakes how they break where they break which false they break on and southern California has over three hundred different faults. Right. That's a lot. So we chose the southern San Andreas because it is one of the most studied because the shakeout report, and because they go into gruesome detail about what this what quake like this a quake this size will be like if and when it hits what's your sense of how people are viewing the threat of these quakes Michel whether or not know. The the audience for KBC and beyond because podcasts are international really one. Even talk about earthquakes. I mean, this isn't the kind of thing that most people like to think about want to think about I don't think many Americans think about an earthquake unless they're in one or like the Loma Prieta earthquake which is thirty years ago, this Tober, whether it interrupts the World Series is this something people want to talk about I think there is a vast array of responses we've gotten so they're the people who are really excited to start talking about earthquakes and to start preparing and have started building the community around it. And we've heard from a lot of those people, especially parents, young podcast listeners. But then there are those who who don't want to be talking about earthquakes, and a lot of people have felt that this is too scary thing to be talking about in its gruesome reality. And I think we have seen some of those people come around as you know, they've listened to the. At the sewed or maybe read a little bit more about earthquakes. But I do think on the whole people are very fascinated with earth moving the two thousand fifteen yorker article that went viral the really really big wine. That did go viral reason, I think people are interested in preparing for large says Astor's, and and this podcast. I have to because I know there's a lot of people outside of LA, maybe people that don't live in earthquake zones listening to this. It's not just about it. Our focus is the big quake. But it's also about disaster preparedness it's also about what it's going to be like after you, maybe lose power. Maybe you don't have access to water and with a number of natural disasters that we see in the US it's relevant to people with regards to the disaster. Preparedness peace mission, give a sense of some of the things that that the podcast is trying to get people to do to prepare for this apparently inevitable big one other one or two aspects of disaster preparedness that tend to get overlooked that might take people by surprise that. They should be keeping in mind. Yeah. So at the end of every episode we have three to five practical tips for people. So listen all the way through the through to the end. A couple of things that I think apply to all disasters. Not just the big earthquake in southern California. Are you know, have your gas tank always above Mt? Above empty, definitely. But above half, you never know when you might need to evacuate, and when a disaster might make it so that you can't access gas stations or they're not open. So that's a very easy one. I think having a printed copy of a map of your city. So that you know, where you're going even when GPS down or internet might be down or you may not have access to left wants to figure out where you're going water one one gallon per person per day is what FEMA says and you should plan for up to two weeks. At least when it comes to a big earthquake and food is a huge one too and some sort of shelter tent, maybe. And then I think speaking of FEMA everyone should download the FEMA app. Now, it's you don't have to wait for disaster in order to familiarize yourself with the resources that. Fema has available and having that accessible on your phone at any point. I think makes you more prepared for a disaster. Although as I understand it Jacob it's worth noting that FEMA, obviously their jobs to help with disasters yet in any disaster that I've ever covered whether it was a hurricane or tornado or anything. The understanding is that for the first three days, you need to be ready to survive on your own those first seventy two hours after the disaster has pretty much passed. You should be as self reliant as possible. And that is absolutely one hundred percent true for a big earthquake here as well. We talked to the we talked to the city of LA, we talked to the director of emergency services for California, and we talked to FEMA and all of them said that people need to be ready to survive on their own for a couple of days. That's because it's gonna take forty eight to seventy two hours if we're lucky for resources to start to roll into this area with ten to twenty million people. I mean, that's a lot of people that you're gonna have to serve. So even if help does come in it won't be enough help immediately with regards to be able to fend for yourself. Jacob. There's there's kind of this. You know, if if you've watched too many, Kurt Russell movies from the eighties that Los Angeles becomes this lawless place after dark, and that after a disaster like, you know. Did society falls apart the social contract disintegrates Sanad Maksimir? It's totally Mad Max, except it's an LA instead of Australia. You did research for the podcast about this was that borne out by the research in terms of what is expected to happen socially after the big one. No, it's not we've had a lot of people come to me and say like I feel like a chef motorcycle with gas cans and at a gun across my back and the truth matter is people especially when it comes to natural disasters want to help one. Another people want to make sure that everyone around them survive. I mean, you'll end up helping the person right next to you. If you're when the earthquake does hit, and so we we spoke to Joe trainer who's the director of disaster science and management at the university of Delaware. And he specifically talked about how post major disasters we see the most altruistic side of people and a sense of community starts to build. So that was really optimistic for find out. And we are a lot of people ask. Guns and guns are something that we address in this podcast as well. And I had a debate with my friend over whether he should get a gun. He's very stuck on that idea. He thinks that you know, people are gonna come steal all his resources. He's defend his family. That's not what we've seen. That's not what the science has played out and people like Lucy argue that by getting a gun. You're also setting yourself up to be in a situation where you know, maybe you react to in a way that you would react if you didn't have a gun, maybe rather than diffusing the situation you'll end up exacerbating it, and that's really scary. And that's the scary part. The people think that their neighbors won't help them in there, all alone, especially in LA, or perhaps you have a gun as part of your disaster kid weapon, which you never fire and have no working relationship one hundred percent. And then when you're adrenaline is running and you're jacked up and freaked out and someone comes up for help write a bump in the night. And then that's your first rounder his parents shot through the door when he was a kid because they thought an intruder was in their house, and it wasn't and it could have been one of them. I wonder a by the way, another resource that might be of use is ready dot gov, which is the federal government's website for all kinds of emergencies. A lot of the same tips for earthquakes apply to just about every kind of disaster, especially being prepared for.

earthquake Jacob Margolis Los Angeles California FEMA United States KPCC JPL Lander NASA San Andreas San Francisco Nesta Michelle San Franciscans director Facebook Loma Prieta Cincinnati
Siemens, GE vie for Iraq electricity contracts

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

06:03 min | 3 years ago

Siemens, GE vie for Iraq electricity contracts

"Francisco earthquake. No, not the one from nineteen o six caused by the San Andreas fault. This one was before that in eighteen sixty eight that's when a deadly quake struck along the Hayward fault in the East Bay and cake science editor Craig Miller says the next big shaker will most likely come from there again, and Greg I've always thought that the San Andreas fault would produce the next big one. Yeah. Most people do that. Actually, I think we can thank Hollywood for that. And I'm not saying that the San Andreas fault, doesn't pose a major threat. But if you think about the Hayward fault, first of all it tends to go off big about every hundred and fifty years, and it's are you doing the math here with me? It's been one hundred fifty years. So we're do you think about the Hayward fault is it's been described as the country. Most urbanized fault. It runs north and south down through the East Bay through all of the most developed densely populated areas. Not to mention major infrastructure like an airport railway as a major port. If it breaks with. Let's say a magnitude seven quake it's going to be a major event not just in the East Bay. But throughout the bay area and beyond. All right. So that's pretty scary. What's being done to prepare for it? Well, since the Loma Prieta earthquake back in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine somewhere between seventy and eighty billion dollars have been poured into retrofits and different types of resilience strengthening. But at the same time California's been very late in rolling out an earthquake warning system in the city of San Francisco, for example, has just begun cataloguing all of its tallest buildings and kinda valuating each one of them for their earthquake vulnerability. So we have a ways to go that was K Craig Miller. Tiffany

East Bay San Andreas Earthquake Hayward Craig Miller San Francisco Loma Prieta Hollywood Editor California Greg I One Hundred Fifty Years Eighty Billion Dollars Fifty Years