35 Burst results for "Logic"

Seth Gruber: Assumed Premises Can Destroy a Nation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:46 min | 1 d ago

Seth Gruber: Assumed Premises Can Destroy a Nation

"Of development? I mean, come on, we're sophisticated people, Seth. You're trying to tell me that, you know, we have to get rid of birth control and all this. These are wonderful technological advancements we're told. And it makes life easier. Why should we inconvenience people? If you want to it's just a smidge, just get rid of the smidge. Yeah, yeah, yeah. There's a lot there, right? But that's what's the problem of living in a culture of death that has abandoned the moorings of a judeo Christian worldview. Is now we're lost at sea. And so what you said is very common to what we'd hear someone saying, of course. I hear it all the time. But by the way, I don't believe any of this stuff. Of course. But the point is, I'm trying to get everything you say there. Is packing pounds and pounds of worldview assumptions. Yes. And the window has been moved so much. That's right. And Reagan once said that the most dangerous ideas in a society are not the ones being argued for, arrhythmia C is Lewis, are not the ones being argued for. They're the ones being assumed. Yes. Because assumed premises, especially when undetected, can destroy a nation. You see, people tend to work out the logic of their position through their choices. And those choices reveal their deeply held worldview assumptions. But Charlie, how many people know why they believe what they can believe and can articulate a political and worldview vision that motivates and animates their beliefs, very few. But they're still operating off of those deeply held assumptions. And so when for the listeners of your show, whenever we're talking about these pro abortion arguments, people will just drop these lines that pack thousands of pounds of worldview assumptions, but they have no idea what they're operating off of. And so the job is an ambassador for the unborn and ambassador for Christ, a watchman like Ezekiel is in scriptures to be able to understand that and articulate that. Okay,

Seth Arrhythmia Reagan Lewis Charlie Ezekiel
Tracy Robinson: The Origins of 'The Matter of Life' Film

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:48 min | 3 d ago

Tracy Robinson: The Origins of 'The Matter of Life' Film

"You must be, you feel like you're right in the middle of the storm right now with this roe V wade debate and the movie is so timely. It's going to be in theaters in what they call those fathom events may 16th and 17th, the movie addresses the issue of abortion through science, philosophy and history. And I love what you said and I've borrowed your phrase clarity kills controversy. Tell me about the evolution of this important movie and why it was so important for you to get behind it and direct it. Well, the origin of this movie started back in 2016, 6 years ago, and my background's in film and video production. And I was commissioned on and off to do testimonial videos and promotional videos for a pro life pregnancy resource center in California. And I had never heard of a pregnancy center before, but I really admired what they were doing to help women in their time of need. And but I wasn't very concerned about the abortion issue. I didn't think it was a big deal in the grand scheme of things. I was pretty much in the mushy middle and apathetic. And it wasn't until my Friends at the pregnancy resource center invited me to an apologetics night and the topic was going to be the case against abortion. And I thought, well, I'll go and check it out and see what my pro life friends are talking about. And in less than two hours, the speaker Alan lehmann of Santos, he gave a clear concise argument for the full humanity of the unborn child from the moment of conception. And the logic and the clarity and just the just simplicity of this message really struck

Roe V Wade California Alan Lehmann Santos
Is Abortion Equal to Murder? John Zmirak Explains

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | 3 d ago

Is Abortion Equal to Murder? John Zmirak Explains

"I'm talking to John samira. What's there to say, John? What's on your mind? Well, thank you, Eric. I collaborated with my friend longtime pro life activist Jason Jones on an important piece at stream dot org. It's called once the law protects unborn kids. Should we seek legal penalties for women who abort them? That question has actually come up. The left is saying that we pro lifers want to send women to prison if they have abortions once we have granted legal protection to unborn children. They're saying we don't just want to lock up the doctors and the nurses and the entrepreneurs of the abortion industry. They're claiming that we want to send women to prison. And pro lifers, some prominent ones, are struggling with how to answer this. If we say abortion is murder, well, if you hire hitman and you get caught, hitman isn't just go to jail, you're going to jail. So if your logic is the abortion is murder, don't you really intend to lock up women who've had abortions once you can get away with it politically. Catholic once posed this. This is in the back of the minds of the suburban women voters who the Democrats think will rescue the Biden administration from the wrecking ball come November. And so we pro lifers have to have a principled answer to it. Typically the answer was always, well, we think the women are the victims. So we would never prosecute the victims. That doesn't quite cut it a 100%. Because first of all, yes, it's true. In many cases, women are coerced to pressure to abandon into having abortions. But not all of them. They're not all innocent hapless 14 year olds carried into abortion clinics by their parents.

John Samira Jason Jones Eric Biden Administration Hitman John
Understanding What It Means to Protect the Unborn

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:26 min | Last week

Understanding What It Means to Protect the Unborn

"My opposition is based on logic, morality, and it is not it is not, in fact, in my case, as much is, but this is not biblically based. Not that the Bible is silent, but that is not the reason if the Bible were completely silent on the status of the unborn. I would simply use reason and my moral system of U can't take human life. I don't understand why you can take human life before birth, but not after birth. I don't understand means I don't understand. It's not a matter of, I don't agree. I don't understand. That people are hysterically hysterical on this issue. That there is an inability to forthright condemn in the most powerful terms possible threats to Supreme Court Justices. Because deep down vast numbers of people on the left would like a Supreme Court Justice killed. There's no doubt in my mind. What this guy tweeted is exactly what I'm not saying liberals I'm saying leftists. Would not be unhappy. Let's put it that one.

Supreme Court
Devin Nunes Reacts to Biden's New Disinformation Board

The Dan Bongino Show

01:31 min | Last week

Devin Nunes Reacts to Biden's New Disinformation Board

"Now Before we get to that Devin your thoughts on this new ministry of truth here I mean listen you were in Congress This is a dangerous dangerous new breach of the contract between government and the citizens I mean did they not read the First Amendment Congress shall pass no law bridging the right of free speech that they missed that I mean what are your former Democrat colleagues What could they possibly be thinking with this nonsense Dan I think it's just they were grasping at straws And I really have to believe not knowing all the inside but having been there a long time that it wasn't true social that actually got this going because they knew by us using the rumble cloud us usually being un cancellable us being the home ultimately going to be home to millions of Americans where we're going to have this beachhead against these tech tyrants How are they going to control us They couldn't just call up Bezos and say hey cut the servers off Tell Amazon cut the servers off because we've insulated ourselves with we're only working with companies as you'd like to say in the parallel economy We're working with people that believe in free speech that are not woke and we're never going to be canceled So I can't believe they went down this road to create something like this and it's tough You really have to kind of read through the tea leaves of all the fake news stories that have been written about this And you kind of have to apply that When you kind of have to apply the logic of whatever they say in the story you just have to kind of take the opposite

Congress Devin DAN Bezos UN Amazon
Many of the Deep State Crooks Are Back

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Many of the Deep State Crooks Are Back

"Many of the same deep state crooks that were behind the Russia collusion hoax. That were that came out to certify that the Hunter Biden laptop was, quote, Russian disinformation. I mean, these shameless liars are now back. And what are they about to do? They're back to sign a joint letter, very similar to the letter that they signed in the Hunter Biden case. This time calling for social media to protect censorship. To keep censorship. And not to open itself up to a wider parameter of permissible viewpoints. And they're claiming that this is necessary to guarantee the national security. It's a complete fraud. But let's look at who some of these thugs are. Well, sure enough, James clapper, big surprise. Former Obama CIA director Michael morrell, former Obama CIA Pentagon chief Leon Panetta. But you got a few new names too. Form a bush natural security adviser, Fran Townsend. And these guys come out with their usual, well, they start off with this rather grandiose pronouncement quote, this is a pivotal moment in the modern history. There's a battle brewing between authoritarianism and democracy. Well, first of all, that is actually true. But not in the way they mean. There's a battle brewing between authoritarianism and democracy and they represent authoritarianism. And that's what they're trying to enforce on social media. They are the voices for authoritarianism, but posing as the voices of democracy. So there are the emissaries of the very evil that they describe here. And the pretext for censorship now is Ukraine. You're like, Ukraine. How does a debate over Ukraine threaten our existential our national security? It doesn't. It's obvious it doesn't, but these guys have sort of gotten themselves tied themselves into a knot, in which basically the defense of Ukraine is nothing more than the defense of the west, which is nothing more than the defense of America. Therefore, to be critical of anything happening in the Ukraine is basically to show yourself to be a traitor to show yourself to be a danger to national security. I mean, the leaps of logic, the chains that are woven here are really pretty remarkable.

Hunter Biden James Clapper Michael Morrell Fran Townsend CIA Ukraine Barack Obama Leon Panetta Russia Pentagon Bush America
Following Jesus Is About What You Give, Not What You Get

Truth For Life Daily Program

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Following Jesus Is About What You Give, Not What You Get

"Judas thought that following Jesus was about what he was going to get. So he went out and said to them what will you give me? She understood that following Jesus was about what she was able to give. That's why you see missionary biographies have always had the impact that they've had. Sadly, many of them have fallen into the catalog lists of out of print tales of another era. And one of the things that might be done is the on air thing of many of these old stories and good books so that the heroes of the past might become contemporary for a new generation. So that, for example, CT stud who gave up a fortune that was his by inheritance and went off to Africa with the story of the good news, his father had been converted. As a result of the visit of moody and sankey, his father was phenomenally wealthy and stud when at Cambridge, he played cricket for England, he was, it was far better than The Great Gatsby. That's where he lived. That was his whole experience. And he actually turned his back on all of that in order to go to Africa, but he gave away his fortune and kept some bite for his wife. His wife found out about it. She was really angry because he had given her a little poem. She was supposed to say in the morning with her devotion. She was supposed to say, dear lord Jesus, you are, to me, dearer than Charlie ever could be. He wanted her to understand that so that when he died, she would know that her best friend was Jesus. And she said, why do you keep all that money back for me? He said, well, I wanted you to be okay. She said, do you think that Jesus can only look after you? And he can't look after me, give my part away as well. And so they gave it to they gave it to general booth of the Salvation army. At what was the kingdom logic? Here it goes. This is CT stud. If Jesus Christ be God and died for me, then no sacrifice that I could ever make for him could ever be too great.

Lord Jesus Judas Sankey Africa Moody Cricket Cambridge England Charlie Salvation Army
"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

06:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Support for hidden brain comes from Verizon, Verizon unlimited is going ultra with 5G ultra wideband in many more cities. The 5G get more plan gives you up to ten X faster speeds and 6 premium entertainment subscriptions included. Not to mention unlimited data that won't slow you down no matter how many games you're gaming, songs you're streaming or movies you're watching. All that entertainment included saves you and your family over $350 a year. Visit Verizon to check out their best plan ever, 5G get more. Verizon is going ultra so you can get more. 5G ultra wideband available in 1700 plus cities. Speed claimed comparison based on 5G ultra wideband speeds to median Verizon four G LTE speeds. Unlimited data for smartphone data excludes mobile hotspot data. Additional terms and conditions apply to each entertainment subscription. $350 entertainment savings based on four lines on 5G get more plan with compatible Apple and Android devices. Support for hidden brain comes from good Rx with good Rx, you can instantly compare prescription prices at pharmacies in your neighborhood and find discounts that could save you up to 80%. Good Rx is free and easy to use and works whether you do or do not have insurance. Even if you have insurance, good Rx might actually beat your copay price. You can check good Rx online or on their app, and from there you can find prescription savings at more than 70,000 pharmacies nationwide. For simple, smart savings on your prescriptions, check good Rx. Go to good Rx dot com slash brain. That's good Rx dot com slash brain. Good Rx dot com slash brain. Good Rx is not insurance, but can be used in place of insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid. In 2021, good Rx users saved 81% on retail prescription prices. This is hidden brain. I'm shankar Vedanta a defining quality of wild, red, rage. Is that it often comes out of nowhere. It takes over our minds and deprives us of reason and logic. When Jess cavender lost it and literally fought a robber who had a gun pointed at her head, she took a very serious risk. She and her roommates could have ended up dead. In retrospect, you could say it was foolhardy and irrational. All this presents a mystery. It's taken millions of years of evolution to produce the human brain. It has an exquisite capacity for reason and logic. Why would natural selection install a circuit breaker to undermine our capacity for logical thinking? Doug fields has long puzzled over this question. His interest in rage grows out of his fascination with the brain, but it's also based on an unforgettable personal experience. The story he told me has the ring of a Hollywood thriller. But with a catch. Doug, our leading man is not a muscle bound hero. He's a neuroscientist. And not just any neuroscientist, but a walking stereotype of a neuroscientist. Here's his daughter, Kelly fields. We'd be watching a movie together and there's some sort of car accident or some big scene going on. And he'll just sort of chime in and be like, wow, you know, you can't see the shadow behind that plant in the corner anymore. Did you notice that they changed the lighting for no reason, even though it's the same scene? And I would be like, no, actually, I was watching the car accident. So yeah, just a very sort of typical nerd. Dog is 5 foot 7 and weighs maybe a 135 pounds. Glasses, thin hair don't think a Sean Connery or Matt Damon, you gotta think of Woody Allen here. In 2007, Doug was scheduled to go to Barcelona to present some research at a neuroscience conference. He decided to turn a work trip into a father daughter vacation, and took Kelly with him. She was 17. He was 57. Their first stop was Paris. Waiting in line the Eiffel Tower, Kelly got a new glimpse into how her dad's mind worked. A couple came up to us and was speaking perfect English with American accents. And they were very nice. And I just noticed they were standing too close to us. I kept glancing behind us, sort of like why are you standing so close? And I noticed this woman's hand near his pants and then I look again and I notice his pocket is unzipped and I just sort of whispered to my dad. I think they're trying to rob you. Dog was completely unfazed. My dad and for me that that was a decoy wallet. Your dad had a decoy wallet, you are just as surprised as I was. I was like, what? He had this special wallet that he would keep in his front pocket. It was special because of the way it was cut to fit into his front pocket. And that was his wallet. Sorry I'm blowing all your coverage, dad. And then he had a fake wallet and his back pocket with not a lot of money in it and a few fake credit cards. Duck came up with a strategy, many vacations ago. You know, when you travel, it's a wise idea not to have all your money in credit cards in one place. You can get robbed or mugged. And so the idea is if it's a pickpocket and they get a wallet that's useless, that doesn't matter. But if you're mugged, you can hand them the wallet or throw it on the ground and run. So that's why I do that. For anyone keeping score that's neuroscientist one,.

Verizon shankar Vedanta Jess cavender Doug fields Kelly fields Doug Medicare Apple Kelly Sean Connery Matt Damon Woody Allen Hollywood Eiffel Tower Barcelona
"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Get out of my house. You.

"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"logic" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm shankar vedantam. When saru Najarian was about ten, his pastime was collecting baseball and basketball cards. These were hard to come by in Cyprus where he grew up. So when sorrow's cousin pestered him to share his cards with her. He always said no. But she didn't give up. As she pestered and begged and pleaded. It came to a boiling point where I got so angry. That everything blacked out and I slapped a really hard sorrows arm seemed to act of its own volition. A second later I came back into the reality and I saw her crying and had no idea what I had done. Paula Reid experienced something similar at the same age. She was abutting environmentalist with a peace ecology flag hanging on her bedroom wall. One afternoon, she had the cracking of trees and a low rumble. She realized that her neighbor was knocking down trees to build himself a shorter driveway. He was using a bulldozer. This neighbor came up the road in the bulldozer and was pushing over trees, and something in my head just snapped. Paula's dad had bought a machete in his travels through South America. Without thinking, Paula sees the weapon. Its blade was about as long as her arm. In shorts and bare feet, she climbed up on the bulldozer and swung the blade. Metal struck metal..

shankar vedantam saru Najarian Paula Reid Cyprus basketball baseball Paula South America
If There's No More Emergency, Does the House of Cards Fall?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:51 min | 3 weeks ago

If There's No More Emergency, Does the House of Cards Fall?

"So doctor Malone, hear me out with this and I'm going to do my best describing this, but I kind of I worked this through in anticipation of our conversation. So if there's no more emergency, then does big pharma and the entire their whole apparatus? Is that House of Cards fall? In other words, if there's no emergency, then there's no EUA. If there's no EUA, then there's no liability protection for vaccine companies. If there's no vaccines, then no mandates, no vaccine passports, no social credit system, no digital currency, no great reset. Is that a step too far? I wish it was that simple. I agree that the if we no longer have the emergency mandate situation as declared by the executive branch, then many of the interventions that have been promoted will no longer apply social distancing the mandates, et cetera, the military mandates, for example. And that that House of Cards falls in that is the logic that has been presented by The White House for maintaining the mandates is that in the event that this thing suddenly grew new things, we would be remiss if we didn't have that in place. That's the logic I don't agree with it, but that's what they're promoting. And they wish to retain a lot of these measures and the extra constitutional authority by maintaining it. So that's in terms of the government. The in terms of this medical industrial complex and the deeper agendas and I think you mentioned great reset. My position is that this is only a skirmish, a first battle, we're up against an entrenched multi decade long program that is embodied in the young leaders program of the World Economic Forum. They have a lot of other strategies and the big issue here is what many in the economics community are warning me about which is that we're looking at some kind of major boundary event triggered by the hyperinflation and everything else in the Fiat currency, printing money, debt crisis, et cetera, not the least of which is the impending bankruptcy of the social security

Malone Pharma House Of Cards White House World Economic Forum
"logic" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

01:44 min | Last month

"logic" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"The gain grow retain podcast as well. And today, Jeff and I are going to talk about customer marketing versus customer success. Okay, here's the first part of my conversation with Jeff, the director of brand at higher logic and a cofounder of gain grow retain. Jeff, welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thank you, Benjamin. You did well on the intro. I'm excited to be here. It's going to be really fun to do this. I'm excited to chat with you excited to have you as a guest on the show. I was a guest.

Jeff higher logic Benjamin
Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | Last month

Why America Is at the 'Abyss of Infinite Insanity' With Dr. Gad Saad

"With us right now is one of my favorite guests. He's a lot of fun. Gad sad is the Professor of marketing at concordia university and former holder of concordia university research chair in evolutionary behavioral sciences. He has held the visiting associate professorships of Cornell University Dartmouth college and University of California Irvine. And he also has a phenomenal book that he has authored called the parasitic mind, and he is one of the most articulate and effective opponents of wokeism and the moral decay that is occurring in the west. Professor sad, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. So nice to be with you, sir. So I think it would be helpful, doctor for you to kind of introduce the thesis behind your book, the parasitic mind. A lot of our audience is new and it has been a while since we've had a conversation. Reintroduce kind of the argument you make in that book. And why you've believed that these parasites, otherwise known as kind of the woke variants, are so dangerous to western society. Right, so I face two great wars in my life. The first great war was growing up in Lebanon when the Civil War began, and that allowed me to see the dangers of identity politics because everything in Lebanon is viewed through the prism of your religious identity. And then the second great war that I faced was the one the war that was being waged on reason, science, logic, common sense that we saw on university campuses. I've now been a professor for almost 30 years. And so I wanted to write a book that documented all of these dreadful ideas which I refer to as idea pathogens, postmodernism, radical feminism, cultural relativism, the fear of using biology to explain human affairs. So all of these idea pathogens have correspond human minds, leading us to the abyss of infinite lunacy. And so I wanted to explain first the pandemic of the human mind of the viruses of the human mind and then to hopefully offer inoculation a vaccine against these dreadful

Concordia University Cornell University Dartmouth C Charlie Kirk GAD Lebanon
Fox Analyst Gregg Jarrett Discusses KBJ's Legal Theories on Child Porn

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | Last month

Fox Analyst Gregg Jarrett Discusses KBJ's Legal Theories on Child Porn

"We are back with Greg Jarrett. He is the illegal mind political analyst for Fox News follow him at Greg Jarrett by his book, the witch hunt and the Russia hoax. Right now we are witnessing it is dick Danang blumenthal, who is asking questions, puff piece questions from the judge that has been nominated to the Supreme Court by the Biden administration. Greg, just a couple of things about this individual judge katangi Brown Jackson. She helped bring a case against the Trump administration to reinstate 81 Planned Parenthood programs across America. She has refused to state whether or not she believes in a living constitution. And then the strangest thing at all of all, we played it in the break Greg. She has this logic about why she gave the lowest sentence is possible to a child pornographers, she said, well, because the law was written before the Internet, the amount of porn that you can child porn that you can access is so much easier today. Therefore, they should be given a break. Is there some legal principle behind that? No, there's none. And actually one can make the opposite argument because of the ease of gaining child porn and people taking advantage of that ease. The penalty should be more stringent. So it's not an argument that I bought. But it's an argument that others will buy into. I think she's obviously incredibly smart. Knows a great deal about the law in the constitution. But she has been very clever in her responses, she will tell you how she'll go about deciding a particular case, but she won't tell you how she goes about interpreting the constitution, which is principally with Supreme Court Justices do.

Greg Jarrett Dick Danang Blumenthal Biden Administration Katangi Brown Jackson Trump Administration Greg Fox News Russia Supreme Court America
Why Is the U.S. Comfortable Associating With Ukrainian Nazis?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | Last month

Why Is the U.S. Comfortable Associating With Ukrainian Nazis?

"If America had a KKK battalion within our own military. I want you to imagine if we were supporting groups that were Nazis. Well, we are. Actually. It's amazing. It's just shocking to me how the left wing regime media has spent years smearing all of us as Nazis, anyone who dares show up at school board meetings as Nazis and then they fund actual real-life Nazis in Ukraine. And this is not like a slur or an exaggeration, there's a video right here that we see in front of us where there is literally a guy wearing a Nazi symbol in full tattoos with fully automatic machine guns saying in Ukrainian like we're going to go kill the Russians. And so the argument then goes will Charlie, we have to back somebody because Vladimir Putin is evil. I agree. Vladimir Putin is evil. Well then under that logic, why didn't we back ISIS to go fight Bashar al-Assad? What if both sides could be really bad? Now, this is the backbone of some of the Ukrainian resistance in Mari Paul, which is the southeastern corner of Ukraine. The southeastern corner of Ukraine is right within this kind of Russian separatist area. It's where a lot of the fighting is happening. It's an area that Russia really, really wants. It's a port city, so a question that I think is necessary for us is why does the American regime or the people that run our government? Why are they all of a sudden so comfortable with associating with Nazis? Now I'm not calling zelensky Nazi. He's a grandchild of Holocaust survivors. Obviously not. Zelensky's Jewish. But zelensky is partnering in some capacity without right neo Nazis on the mainland of Ukraine. This is

Ukraine Vladimir Putin Bashar Al Mari Paul America Assad Charlie Zelensky Nazi Russia Zelensky
Biden Administration Aims All Blame for Rising Gas Prices at Russia

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Biden Administration Aims All Blame for Rising Gas Prices at Russia

"So going back to where we start in this situation. It was very interesting comment. Joe Biden, he was traveling yesterday and he made this comment about who's to blame for the high gas process. Take a listen. Gonna go up. And do much right now. Russia's possible. You see what I'm talking about here. This Biden is basically starting what we'll see. I believe for the next few weeks and password for the next few months trying to lead as long as these high gas prices are going. He's trying to deflect from his own administration's issues and he's trying to deflect it on to Vladimir Putin. He's trying to reflect it all on the fact that Putin invaded the Ukraine. That is why you have high gas process. The problem we have here is it just simply is not true. Okay? Gas process started. I mean, what you have to look at. Let's just go back. And if we want to take this logic, if you take his commenters now, he's basically saying, oops, can't do anything. This is all on Putin. You know, this is why we're stuck where we are. Gas price is going to go up. We'll do what we can, but this is Putin's problem. Yesterday and when he announced the Russia all band, I mean, he actually said this is Putin's war Putin's war machine. You can starting to hear the political grinders in The White House start grinding out the message that this is not our fault. We're managing it. We're going to get you through this, but you need to understand nothing we've done has actually caused this. When the reality is, that's just not true in the bigger sense.

Putin Joe Biden Russia Biden Vladimir Putin Ukraine White House
The Flawed Logic of Critical Race Theory

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:13 min | 3 months ago

The Flawed Logic of Critical Race Theory

"I want to talk about the flawed logic of critical race theory as we can see a dramatically in a recent statement by one of the kind of apostles of CRT. This is ibram X kendi author of how to be an antiracist. And now Kennedy recently put out an article and this was not his article, but he was sharing the article from vox. And let's talk about the article first, and then we'll get the candies interpretation. So the article shows very clearly that it's talking about a government accountability office. A GAO study. And it shows that in K through 12 schools across the board. And this doesn't matter if you're dealing with schools that are in more affluent neighborhoods or schools in the suburbs, the inner city schools, it makes no difference. You basically see that black children black kids have much greater disciplinary problems. And there's a graph here it covers a bunch of different things out of school suspensions in school suspensions, referral to law enforcement, expulsion, school related arrests, and in every case you see that the numbers for blacks are large. And the numbers for every other group are smaller. The Asian Americans seem to have the least problems, then whites and Hispanics and blacks. Now, we've seen this pattern in academic achievement, but here it was seeing it on the back end we're seeing it on the disciplinary end. Now, the GO study is very careful to say that this could point to a systematic pattern of discrimination in the schools, but it doesn't need to because there are other possible explanations for why this would be the case. And but here's where ibram kendi comes in. He doesn't think that there are any other explanations. So he thinks that there are two explanations. Number one, black kids are inferior to white kids, and therefore they have more problems because they are more defective group. And ibram kendi, of course, flatly rejects that possibility, and therefore the only other possibility is racism.

Kendi GAO Kennedy Ibram Kendi
Dinesh and Daughter Danielle Discuss the Left's Distorted View of the Working Class

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Dinesh and Daughter Danielle Discuss the Left's Distorted View of the Working Class

"It's been really fun to have my daughter Danielle de Sousa Gil in town. We've been hanging out and we're about to head to California. The whole gang because we're doing some filming there for this new movie. But I thought it'd be fun to talk on the podcast today about an interesting article that it just came across about the culture war. Now, the culture war is thought to be a war over values. The leftist promoting progressive values, the right is promoting conservative values and I think the interesting thing Danielle about this is that a lot of people on the left think that working class people are economically liberal. But socially conservative. And the left thinks, wait a minute, why do these working class people always want to vote for their values, things like they don't like the gays? They all for guns there. They're religious fanatics. Why don't they vote their economic interests? We the Democrats are willing to give them all these benefits, but evidently those benefits are are not appealing. So what is what is wrong with this liberal logic that sees the working class as deluded and incapable of understanding its own interests? Well, the left always thinks that they know what's best. They always think that the leftist and leads like joy behar know what's best for people who are these maybe working class. I wouldn't say that actually they are mostly liberal because we've seen so many more people moving to the conservative side just because of this because they've realized that it's the conservative method that helps them to do better, whereas this idea that just getting by on welfare that whatever the left is offering them is obviously not working for them. So I think that they would know what's best, not these other experts who would be telling them what's

Danielle De Sousa Gil Danielle California Joy Behar
Callers: Potential Perspective of Hospital Denying Heart Transplant to Unvaccinated Man

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:28 min | 3 months ago

Callers: Potential Perspective of Hospital Denying Heart Transplant to Unvaccinated Man

"Okay. The transplant, they're going to have to give the person some immunization suppressant drugs. So they're probably just thinking like, well, we need to give this guy every chance he's got this heart makes it otherwise does get COVID transplant with immune systems to be lost. That strikes me as saying if he gets COVID, he's going to have a hard time, well, what if he gets cancer after he gets the heart transplant or what if you get why is there an assumption or that he's going to get COVID? Well, because it's spreading like wildfire, we don't have a vaccine for cancer, but then on top of that, if you get this guy the heart, I mean, someone else has been looking to get hard and if vaccinated might have better chance. That's probably logic. Do you agree with it? I'm not a medical doctor. So I mean, that does somewhat make sense. I mean, I kind of get it if you got somebody that's hard and they've got a better chance of survival. Let's see, that person has a better chance. It's like the caller said a minute ago. Remember years ago when I think it was Sarah Palin to raise the issue of death panels with ObamaCare and socialized medicine that concerned that the government gets to make a choice? Well, you get to live, you die. Well, you're 73, so you don't get lifesaving treatment, but you're 59, so you do. Doesn't it strike you as chilling that a hospital would even begin to go down this path and say, well, if you don't get a vaccine, you're gonna have to die.

Cancer Sarah Palin Government
Hosea Initiative's Terry Beatley on the Battle for the Unborn

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:22 min | 4 months ago

Hosea Initiative's Terry Beatley on the Battle for the Unborn

"We are delighted to have in studio. None other than Terry beatley, Terry, welcome back to America first. Hey Sebastian, I'm glad I'm back on. Thank you. So are you excited with this case in front of the Supreme Court with roe V wade potentially being overturned? I know we can't tempt fate, but we have faith. So tell us about how you are feeling right now in the battle for the unborn. I'm very encouraged. I'm super encouraged. I mean, we do have the chance of overturning roe V wade and all that means is the issue finally comes back to the states. This is important. This is not banning abortion in America because the Supreme Court can't do that. It just does what should happen in this nation. The decision goes back to the states because we are republic of states. And then what happens? And then what happens is I call it the battle for education. And here's the beautiful thing is the abortion issue can not maintain status quo in debating it, because logic, because truth, we can shine lighten all the dark places. So abortion will not stand, but at least it's going to be, it'll collapse due to education and enlightenment when people understand that we've been duped from the

Terry Beatley Roe V Wade Supreme Court Sebastian America Terry
John Zmirak: We Are Fighting Off a Public Health Dictatorship

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:26 min | 4 months ago

John Zmirak: We Are Fighting Off a Public Health Dictatorship

"It. Obviously, Donald Trump and Franklin Graham people that I would generally agree with on many things, they are saying people should get the vaccine. Of course, they're not in favor of vaccine mandates. But that's kind of where we are right now. Thankfully, the Supreme Court struck down Biden's outrageous overreach, trying to get every company in America that has a hundred and more employees mandate the vaccine. I don't know what's what's the biggest news. You know, because people say, it's so great that it was struck down then I think to myself, the idea that it had to be struck down. The idea that it was floated by this administration is just astonishing to me. Yeah, we are fighting off the imposition of a public health dictatorship. And here's the sort of logic point, a little chunk of logic, I think you should hurl in people's faces. Currently the law of the land is that privacy is such a sacred American right that a woman can abort her 9 month fetus at will. But if she wants to eat at TGI Fridays, she has to show the hostess her vaccine passport. Riddle be that Batman. It's simply

Franklin Graham Donald Trump Biden Supreme Court America Riddle Batman
Karl Marx Was Explicitly Racist

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Karl Marx Was Explicitly Racist

"If you follow the logic, Marxism is clearly strongly explicitly atheistic. And if you are atheistic, you have no grounds on which to say racism is bad. So it's almost comical how knotted these ideas get that the idea that you could not understand that somebody like marks not only is he ideologically leaning toward racist ideology, but then you find out, yes, and by the way, he was personally explicitly racist.

"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

05:17 min | 6 months ago

"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Logic and teach us about life at everyday level? So in popular culture, I think Buddhism is sometimes understood to be anti intellectual. But I don't think that's right. Making sense of the word is an important aspect of being a Buddhist from the very beginning. So the emphasis meditation which seems to suggest that we should get rid of our fault. And in some respect that's right too. But the Buddha pointed out a long time ago, our program is to do with the mistakes we make in making sense of the world. He thought that we are all doing it wrong, and not that it is wrong to understand and have thought about the world. So it is important that we get our cognition straight. It just that we should get our cognition in line with our experience. And that's what I take to be the main lessons of Buddhism. And in the way that I talked about Buddhist logic, this emphasis on experience is an important lesson. The way you make sense of the world should be the result of your own work based on your own experience. I think that's an important lesson for our everyday lives. But to me, the lesson of taking Buddhist approach to logic doesn't reside not only in what Buddhist traditions say, but the fact that it is actually a traditional philosophy that I wasn't educated in. I was a student in Australia, which meant that I was thought what we might call straight western logic and western philosophy. So Buddhist logic was an eye opener for me. And it took me a long time to work out what was going on and it took me even longer to work out what I could do with that. But the whole experience has been really rewarding. And I can recommend to all philosophers or anyone really to learn at least one tradition of phosphate that they are not educated in or not familiar with. Because doing that gives you resources that can expand your philosophy toolkit and enrich your conceptual landscape. Now, outside of philosophy, this ability to move across different traditions of thought is also important one. Just to give you a sense of this about the year ago in the middle of this pandemic, I was invited to collaborate with the action group on intrinsic value in Antarctica. Yes, you had me right. This is a group that Lisa international project on the protection of Antarctica under the sponsorship of the scientific community, committee on Antarctic research, which is a thematic organization of the international science council. Now, this group is working to protect Antarctica, whose environmental health is rapidly deteriorating. But the necessary infrastructure development for scientific programs, as well as tourism and exploitation. The reason why this is really one to me is that under the national treaty called the moderate protocol, the environment of Antarctica is protected by recognizing the intrinsic value of Antarctica. This identifies the main challenge facing the protection of Antarctica to be that development of the concept of intrinsic value. That is relatable by all the nationalities and cultures operating in Antarctica. Because the hub to all sign this measured protocol. This involves engaging with various nationalities and cultures and understand their history in relation to intrinsic value. If you think about that, this is called culture philosophy in action. Things like this show that skills to be sensitive to a concept in its proper context, while being able to cross the floor to put it in close curator dialog, are sold variable in our daily lives. I would say that's an important lesson to this approach to losing countries about our everyday lives. Koji, thanks so much for joining me to talk about Buddhist logic. You're most welcome. And Koji Tanaka is senior lecturer in philosophy at the Australian national university in Canberra. He was speaking there with Sam baron. Check the website for more info, we are the philosopher's zone and you can find us via the Aryan website. You can also follow us via the ABC listen app or your preferred podcast portal. Next week on the program, a conversation about the philosophy of psychedelic experience. I'm David Rutledge, I hope you can join me for that one and in the meantime, you can hit me up on Twitter at David P zone..

Antarctica committee on Antarctic researc international science council Australia Lisa Koji Tanaka Sam baron Koji Australian national university Canberra David Rutledge ABC Twitter
"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

08:24 min | 6 months ago

"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"So in a practical sense, as a scholar, what's involved in taking a Buddhist approach to logic? I think what is important in taking Buddhist approach is that I have to argue against most, if not all of my colleagues. And I guess I'm used to this since I have the habit of disagreeing with any orthodoxy, regardless of the topic. Anyway, more seriously, I have two aims in taking a Buddhist approach to logic. Why is to challenge the current orthodoxy about logic as I have been saying, I'm happy to talk about this more if you're interested. But another aim I have in taking a Buddhist approach to logic is to change the direction of philosophy profession. So in recent years, the lack of diversification in philosophy has been publicly discussed in many places. The problem that I'm particularly concerned with is the lack of representation. The Asian philosophical tradition in philosophy departments globally. I think it is disproportionate to the amount of activities in Asia as well as the labor of interest and interactions with Asian philosophies and characters among our students differently, but also I think among professional philosophers as well. Now, as I see, the problem of diversification is not just the lack of diversification as such. But I think there is a problem with the way that the lack of diversification is probably the least. It just so easy to attribute the problem to racism and time and time again. People are pointing out that each institutional racism within the philosophy profession. Now, I don't deny that there is such institutional racism in your profession. And I'm very sure that the bus philosophers have skipped this episode because they have absolutely no interest in hearing about basic logic. But also, it is clear that when you ask philosophers, who they take to be canonical, they usually pick white guys. And if you say, as David Hume once said, or as David Lewis argued, that often carries some white, whereas if I said, as damaged prime, or if I cite the argument given by someone whose name you can not even pronounce, that would hardly carry any weight. So I certainly don't disagree that there is institutional racism that has passed along over generations. But to identify it as the only problem or even as the main problem is not quite right. I think the problem goes both ways. And that's because I think Buddhist philosophy just hasn't been presented in a way that is digestible for logicians and philosophers. In Buddhist studies, a typical approach to Buddhist philosophy is philological and not philosophical. That means that the dominant form of claim to be debated is such and such a thing are set or meant this or that. But if that's what this colors are debating about, it is irrelevant to asking questions like, is logic about cognition or can we make sense of logic as being able to expand our knowledge? So in order to engage with contemporary logicians and philosophers, we can not just regard state or even just to analyze the text. I do think that we have to take note that text. But the idea is to table and engage with the contemporary relationship philosophers based on those ideas. That because what we have to be able to do is show what we can do with those ideas in our own context. Rather than just to present that here the ideas. You have to be able to demonstrate what you can do with those ideas. And I don't think we'll discuss have been able to do this. So part of what I do by taking with this approach to those seriously, is to bring this idea to the table and show them where the importance of those ideas in contemporary debates. By doing this, I hope to contribute to changing the direction of philosophy profession. Okay, so we've been talking so far about what is logic is and the way it relates to logic in the formal sense that we have in philosophy. I want to zoom out a little bit now. Just think about what a sludge can abroad a context. So what is the connection between Buddhist logic and Buddhism as a way of life? Well, that's a good question, actually. I guess Buddhism is a bus tradition, and I don't even want to pretend that I can comment on Buddhism as such generally. But I do know that debates are very important for intellectuals in India where some originated. Now, it is said, though, I don't know whether this is what actually happens that if you lose a debate or public debate, you'd be obliged to change your interaction as well as religious affiliation. So the best play that key role for India interactions as I understand it. And you can still see a bit of this in the courtyard of a Tibetan monastery, where debates are practiced. Now, Buddhist logic was developed in this backdrop, it was developed to serve as a reliable method to show that Buddhists are right, of course. And everyone else was wrong. What else can not be? Buddhist logic was taking up very seriously. So despite what the contemporary Scottish sometimes say, some of these locations were the biggest names in tar. So Buddhist logic was considered to be a big thing for Buddhism. Now, to think about your question from my own modern perspective, I'm actually doing this on the spot. So I'm not sure what I would say is coherent. But anyway, Buddhism's identified two kinds of inference. Why is called inference for oneself? And this is inference that we perform for oneself to acquire knowledge. Another is called inference for others. And it is essentially a statement of inference rather inference itself. So inference for others is an inference in the form of a statement that you present to others so that they can go through the inference by themselves. Even though the emphasis in the contemporary literature is on inference for others, but it's logic and themselves think that inference for one's surface primary, at least thinks that. And that's because unless you activate your inference in a cognition to expand your knowledge, strictly speaking, you are not making an inference. You might be having another thought, but not inference. So now coming back to your question, one connection between Buddhist logic and Buddhism as a way of life has to do with the experience, I think. From the beginning of Buddhism until the latest developmental Buddhism in Asia, that's generally Japanese Buddhism. Data strong emphasis on experience. If you read the early compositions or what are considered to be the words of the Buddha, you will see that he often tells his disciples to go and see things for themselves. And the Japanese Buddhist door gan tells you to reflect on what you see when you meditate. But his logic was positively developed to refute a number with this Indian idea does some texts are so authoritative that you don't even need any proof beyond the worst content in the text. The thought was that, unless you make an inference by yourself, you wouldn't come to know anything. So if you want to expand your epistemic landscape, you can not just hold up a text as if that does everything for you. You have to do the work by yourself and make it your own. And this emphasis on experience is the impossible and Buddhist visionary. And I guess that's how I connect tattoo. Okay, so I just want to bring us to a close now by thinking about the relationship between what we've been talking about in terms of logic and everyday life, because at some times, thought that there's a connection between Buddhism and everyday life. So what is it that Buddhist approaches to.

David Lewis David Hume Tibetan monastery Asia India
"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

13:20 min | 6 months ago

"logic" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"European philosophical bubble can forget that formal logic of this kind is not the only game in town. This week, we're talking about Buddhist logic, where the point of logic is not just to make us argue correctly, but also to help us expand our knowledge about the world. Koji Tanaka is senior lecturer in the school of philosophy at the Australian national university in Canberra, and he's speaking with Sam Barron. We're talking logic today we're talking Buddhist logic, and what I'd like to do to begin with is just get a sense of what logic is for philosophers because it's a little bit different to the way that people ordinarily think about logic. So can you start by just telling me a little bit about what logic is? What logic is, I think is a controversial issue. So I don't think I can give an answer that can satisfy everyone. But what I'm going to say is basically what I tell my students as they first encounter logic at university, and this is the kind of thing that I tell them in my very first lecture. So what I tell my students is something like this. When you decided to study logic or maybe philosophy, you might have made the announcement at family dinner because that's what to be a big thing, that you are now studying logical philosophy. And unless your family is enlightened enough, in which case, obviously, they must have immediately understood why. That's a great idea. They must have asked you why. Why is it a good idea to study at the university? Your family might have accepted whatever the reason you give them, because they usually love you. But some of the reasons make it true that it is a good idea to study logic at the university. So logic as is understood in philosophy is about those reasons. The reasons that make whatever the point you are making true. When you make an announcement at dinner table or you have a brilliant idea and your family starts asking you why. You want to convince them that you know what you are talking about. And one way to do that is to provide reasons. And logic is concerned with the reasons that support a truce of the point you're making. So just to introduce a bit of terminology here, the reasons you give are called a premises, and the statement or IV that you want to prove to be true based on the reasons is called a conclusion. Then, logic is concerned with the relationship between the premises and the conclusion, in particular, the relational that preserved truth as you move from the premises to the conclusion, meaning that if the premises are true, then the conclusion must also be true. And logic is interesting this relationship that preserves from premises to the conclusion. The reasoning that has this property is said to be valid. So that's another terminology. By studying logic, you can come to see which reasons are good ones because they make your idea true, and which ones are not, because they may not make your idea true. And which reasoning is varied and which one invalid. So that's more or less what logic is about. At least, in the way that it is understood in philosophy. And so you've talked about taking a Buddhist approach to logic in your work. What does that exactly mean? And why is taking a Buddhist approach to logic important to you? I think taking a Buddhist approach to logic means different things to different people. So I just going to say what this means to me. So to me, it is to take seriously the Buddhist philosophical tradition called promenade vada. Now, this is a school which is sometimes called the Buddhist school of logical epistemology. Now, I think it's true that this tradition is probably the least known philosophy tradition within Buddhism. If you are coming to Buddhism academic array, but historically, this is a tradition that has been most influential within Buddhist philosophy. At least in India where Buddhism originated. Now, given that background, what this means to take this traditional seriously, at least to me, is to make a conceptual shift. So as I said before, logic is concerned with the relationship between the conclusion, which is the claim you want to make. And the premises, which are the reasons you give for the conclusion, in particular, it is concerned with a relationship that preserves a truth from the premises to the conclusion. Now, this relationship is usually understood to be formal, at least in the so called the west. So logic is predominantly understood to be formal in contemporary west. But this is where conceptual shift comes in. Because a Buddhist approach to logic becomes important when we focus not on the logical rules or print posts as such. But on the cognition that are involved in inferring a conclusion from the premises. Or if you start focusing on the cognition that if you instantiate those logical rules or principles, then you start appreciating the importance of taking a Buddhist approach to logic. So just to articulate a bit more on this, according to the former conception logic, which is the dominant form in the contemporary west, logical relations that preserves from the premise to the conclusion in some sense, obstructed from inferential cognitions. Or I suppose, another way of putting a point is that logic is not about our thoughts themselves, but the relations between them, even though those reasons are not relations between cognitive states. And if people like that, you must start thinking that hang on, what are we talking about? When we are talking about a lot of reasons, what are we talking about when we are talking about truth preserving erections? But the problem is not only about the nature of what's called relations, because if we understand logic according to the former conception, it is not clear how you can improve your inferential practice by losar means, because logic is not about what is involved in fighting on conclusion from the premises. Because it is not about cognitions. In contrast, taking a Buddhist approach to logic is to think of logic in terms of influential cognition. There are various components to this. Firstly, Buddhist logic signs are not talking about anything abstract. When they talk about lots of validity, they are talking about certain influential recognitions. So there is no interest in anything I was struck or anything mysterious. When we talk about Buddhist approach to logic. Second, logic or I guess for them, lots of information cognition can give us new information. So if inference is buried, it's provide new information. Now the third point of consciousness number three, according to the former conception, what inference counts are valid is a matter of truth preservation. So long as the conclusion is true, when the premises are true, the inference counts as bad. But again, that's not the case for Buddhism. For them, the conclusion must arise because of the premises or to put it in cognitive term, the cognition that expresses the conclusion must arise because of the cognition that expresses the premises. Basically, a way of putting this is that conclusion, somehow has to grow out of the premises. Now you asked me a kind of important question about why this is important. And again, I guess why this is important is different for different people. But to me, this is important because I have grown suspicious of contemporary orthodoxy. So presumably, I take it resistant want to say that biological reasoning we can learn something new. But it is not clear how the formal conception can allow rosic to be a means of acquiring new knowledge. Think of it like this. If strictly speaking, logic is not involved in our infrastructure activity, we can not say that logic is what can generate our knowledge. If so, what's the point of studying logic? And that was precisely the reason that I was pressed on when I first started studying Buddhist logic. So I started studying Buddhist logic at the Tibetan university in India. And in the very first meeting, I met my teacher, the teacher that I studied under. And he asked me to explain what I was talking about. When I talked about logics, just to get a sense of what I was getting at by studying Buddhist logic. I basically articulated the formal conception lots since that all I knew about logic at that time. And his response was, well, what's the point of a studying loss? If that's what it is, and I didn't have a good response at that time. And I had come to think that he was right to ask that question so that was the best lesson I have ever had about Buddhist logic actually. And that was even before I learned anything about Buddhist losses from him. So that's why I think taking up this approach to is quite important. So just to put this kind of provocatively, is the idea almost that there's a kind of failure of formal conceptions of logic or logic as it's usually used in philosophy to do what may be logicians or logic has been put forward to do. So you might think that logic is put forward to give us a sense of how reasoning works or how we gain knowledge. But in fact, because it's so abstract and so formal, there's a sense in which you can't really get anything out of the formal systems that people use in philosophy that you don't really put in from the beginning. And that seems to be a way in which we're not really getting any new knowledge out of logic. But what you're saying is that this sort of Buddhist approach brings logic down to earth in some sense by returning it to these kinds of cognitive foundations, the kind of foundations in knowledge and foundations in information production. Is that the idea? I think that's exactly right. So I think as many scholars have pointed out, Buddhist logic is developed within the context of epistemology. So the concern is always, how do we acquire knowledge? And deducing that logic is an important part of acquiring knowledge. And I think that's the aspect that seems to be lacking from the way that logic is usually understood in contemporary west. So I think when we start thinking about what exactly does law school reasoning does and if you try to understand that in a way that people use your understood logic, which is to think of logic to be rather abstract, it's not really about anything and so on. I think you start losing a grip of how something like logical reasoning can be useful can expand our epistemic landscape, so to speak. So yes, I think you got the contrast exactly why. And so I'm just curious as to why it might be that logic in the west has this kind of character. Is it because what happens when philosophers produce these logical systems is they produce a set of rules that really focus on the form or structure of what you say rather than the content? Is it because we have kind of abstracted away all of the information that we've then lost the capacity to generate information or connect up to epistemology? Is that what's going on? Yes, I think that's right. So just to think in terms of the way that the manual can understood logic. And I don't know what exactly happened historically. But I think it's a useful way of understanding how this formal logic came about. So the way that he understand logic is that logic is a structure which is generally applicable to our cognition. By that, he's not talking about cognitions of this or cognition of that. So if I'm looking at my laptop, I have a certain group in the state, but this cognitive state is about this laptop. Now, does not think that logic is about that. But logic is about cognition generally. But that means that it's now we are talking about something which is not about the cognition that I'm having right now, but somehow we have to think of cognitions as such. And then you start understanding the relationship between those cognitions, even though these cognitions are not about anything. So I think what Buddhist logicians are trying to get at is that when we are in a certain situation in everyday life, we have certain cognitions, but these cognitions are about something and the thought is that unless something like logic is about those cognitions, it's better hard to understand what it's got to do with our fault or activities. You're listening to the philosopher's zone this week, Sam.

Koji Tanaka Sam Barron Buddhist school of logical epi school of philosophy Australian national university Canberra rosic Tibetan university India Sam
"logic" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

01:57 min | 8 months ago

"logic" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Button. You do not want to miss all the action coming your way right here on first-class fatherhood all right. Dad's we are headed onto the stage today with a platinum selling recording artist. And i glance father bobby hall better known as logic joins me on the podcast today. Logic is grammy nominated hip hop artist. Who has had three number one albums ten platinum singles and billions of streams. His smash hit single one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five reached number three on the us billboard. Hot one hundred. Obviously that is the national suicide prevention lifeline. He received two nominations for the song including song of the year and best music video at the sixtieth annual. Grammy awards. logic is also an actor and film producer as well as a new york times. Bestselling author is new memoir. This bright future is available now which chronicles his life growing up with an alcoholic and mentally ill mother and an absent absent crack addicted. Father it takes you right up into his rise to fame. The linked to the book is in today's show notes. Bobby hall will be here with me and just a few minutes so please stick around for the view and today's interview with bobby hall was recorded on. Video is available. If you guys to watch on my youtube channel you like to watch the conversation between logic and myself. Please subscribe the first place. Fatherhood on youtube link is in the description of today's podcast episode. All right if you guys enjoy today's interview wit- logic you gotta go back and check out so many other musician das- that i've had on the podcast here including three backstreet. Boys nick carter. Aj mclean and brian literal. All stop by as well as instincts. Chris kirkpatrick. I've also had boys. Dement shawn stockman on the podcast here as well as sugar ray bands. Mark mcgrath go through the archives of the podcast. You'll find many other music. Dads that have join me right here on the podcast. Be sure to follow me on instagram at alexander school least role the other upcoming guest announcements and i cannot say. Thank you enough for all your support out there helping first-class fatherhood rise up to the ranks of one of the top. One percent of all podcast downloaded worldwide. That's all because of you guys out there. If you're enjoying the podcast. Police be with that rating review. It always goes a long way to help me out. And there's always guys please spread the word about the podcast every father india neighborhood or any contact list. Let them know.

bobby hall Bobby hall grammy Grammy awards Aj mclean brian literal Chris kirkpatrick youtube Dement shawn stockman Mark mcgrath new york times nick carter alexander school us india
"logic" Discussed on Poker With Presence

Poker With Presence

05:25 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on Poker With Presence

"So one of the cool new pieces of technology that. I've been noticing out in the world recently in the last year or two is these four k. Cameras where if they are using them for instance in a sporting event and they get a close up on an athlete. It's almost like you are literally right there and you can reach out and touch that person that the cameras focused on its that vivid. It's that clear. There's so much detail but one thing about those cameras is that there is definitely a trade off in the sense that one you have such a tight narrow focus on the object. That's in front of you. The background gets very blurry. And you can't really see much of anything that's going on aside from the one object or person that the cameras focusing on and so there are definitely pluses and minuses to this one you get a much clear view of the main thing. You're looking at but on downside. You can't see the entire picture as clearly as you could before with the other camera technologies that exist and this is something that i'm thinking of today as i think about the relationship using your mind and using an analytic heavy logic heavy framework versus using more of a feeling sensing methodology where you are very connected to your nervous system. And you're not trying to figure out every little detail to the tenth degree as you work through a hand of poker but rather just feeling and sensing your way through to the end. And i very much believe that. You can't do both at the same time because the more that you go into the analytic model the more that you're moving your attention away from creating connection from creating flow and that is really the only way that you can access things like your intuition your subconscious feelings about what the right thing to do is and the further you go the other way into presence and connection and feeling the less that you're going to be interested in moving into your head in moving into thoughts of proving every single thing of sorting through every piece of information of having to make sense of every little detail of every single spot that you play because it simply is two different models of going about problem solving in one you're using one part of yourself and in the other you're using another and so more that you focus on going straight into your head the less you're going to be able to presence in access your intuition and so for me that's not a worthwhile trade because i strongly believe one thing about poker which is this at the time of the test at the time that the spot comes up you either know the answer immediately or you don't and if you studied well enough and you have the knowledge ingrained enough inside you to where if feels really easy and feels really good then you're going to know fairly quickly what the correct answer is if you don't have that fairly quick understanding of what the right play is to make in that moment i have a strong belief that your best bet is not to try and figure it out to try and logic and reason your way to it because it takes more time than what you have available to you to actually sort through all the details and rather than that i think your best bet is going to be to slip into the other mode of being one of presence one of connection one of sensing and feeling rather than thinking because when you're thinking and you don't have a solid base of information to think off of your thoughts are all based on projection anyways and they're not actually going to be as reliable as you think they are more just creating a false sense of security free to feel like you can justify something that you're kind of wanting to do whereas if you can just go ahead and accept that i kind of don't know the answer right now and i'm going to go and study and figure it out later on the logical side but right now what i most need to do is to tap into something else something more on the feeling sensing side now you've actually acknowledged what's true which is that you're lacking a level of technical knowledge and proficiency that's going to give you the answer logically and your best bet is to just put yourself into as big of a state of presence and connection as you can because when you don't know that is the best way through is to go into your intuition go into your subconscious but you can't do that if you're hedging your bet and trying to come at it from analytical angle to justify your positions as well and i think that is ultimately where we find solutions where we find surprising answers that are often way more accurate than we ever could be when we looking for the proof in the logic to show us the way in those spots where we haven't quite stuttered it having said that always make it a practice when you don't know the answer to something to study it away from the table later and give yourself all the time and space that you need to lay that foundation of knowledge so that one a similar spot comes up in the future you immediately known you don't have to go through this process so knowing is better than not knowing but this is a game where we just don't know constantly and so you need a way to deal with that and i think that this is the best way to do it all right that's all i got for today's episode. Thank you for listening as always if you enjoyed it and you want to receive more content like this on a.

"logic" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

02:38 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on More Content Talk

"It's not about confidence. It's about not knowing admitting admit that there is no one answer in that. Yeah some people are just mean. That's just that's just true so people are just mean you. You're not searching for any answer or finding any answer. I should say by trying to recreate the world in your own. Image is an uncertain world. But you want to slam certainty on top of it. Well you can't. You're not going to be able to. We have a plan. An idea a certainty of mind. We are in charge. Sound like trump right. doesn't that sound like trump. Yeah that's because everyone sounds like that in their own way because everyone has all the answers right. Everyone knows it biden can't do it. I have to do it because i know better. I i would think if the arrogance of this this dumb fuck who went down to the capitol building threatening to blow people up all because he thought he knew better. I know i know trump's going to be reinstated. I know and then the moment that gets slipped on its head in the idiot. The orange bird isn't he is input back to where he was in the white house. This full freaks out and he's going to blow up the whole world simply because he scared that he he might have gotten it wrong. It's not we're most content when the mind is leading the way forward with a plan of action a plan of its own making and certainty so just because something seems like it will work to you. That doesn't mean that it will so why come up with the plan. What's the point. There is none. You know you know. There's no point to all this Advance planning and all this crap. Because you know that you're just flying by the seedier pants i mean. I hope you do participate. Let me tell you something. If you don't recognize that you're in a lot of trouble you notice. How bad things they kind of sneak up on you. You can't really see them coming unless you take a step back and you admit to yourself that hey really bad shit could happen here. Maybe i should plan for those things.

biden trump white house
"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:08 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

"That's logic aka bobby. Turn tino aka young sinatra aka suraj bryson hall the second and chris aroo founder dictionary music group the success of logic music the two of them are relying on an old business strategy the business relevant diversification like a few years back logic published novel. Psychological taylor called supermarket. He'll just released another book. A memoir called this bright future and for the past few years. Been working on a project with filmmaker. J.j abrams and chris as he mentioned. He launched a joint venture with sony. A few years back and built a brand new label for discovering new talent as label is called. What else records. Thanks so much for listening to the show this week. If you are not subscriber please do subscribe or follow wherever you get your podcasts that you want to write to us or email addresses h. Ibp at npr dot org to find us on twitter. It's at how. I built this or at cairo's and on instagram. It's at how i built this. Npr or guy dot rosh. this episode was produced. By james dillon. Uc with music composed by run teen. Louis was edited by me brand with research. Help for our production. Staff includes casey herman rachel faulkner. Jc howard julia. Carney elaine coats sarah safari liz metzker and ali sober. Our intern is harrison. Bj choi jeff. Rodgers is our executive producer. Guy rise. and you've been listening to how i built this. This is npr. This message comes from npr. Sponsored go daddy. Making different future starts with you go. Daddy helps you create cell and get found online so you can create change or build an empire start different may go daddy dot com..

aka bobby tino aka young sinatra suraj bryson hall chris aroo Psychological taylor J.j abrams james dillon npr Ibp casey herman rachel faulkner howard julia Carney elaine sarah safari liz metzker sony ali sober chris choi jeff cairo Npr
"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:48 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

"That is even bigger than than the two of us. Well what. I think. Chris has already done that in visionary music group and the partnerships that he has but i wanna be really say that but even so i have a record label and we're both equal partners on that that that we run together called elise eum with artists that i've signed that we believe in that will go out and essentially make us money or you know by by killing it. So it's those those businesses. I think that mind state you like. Iva production company ever really discussed it too much. But it's called bobby boy these things. I'm doing my films through. And and yeah exactly and so imagine like if i have this production company and i write a script and somebody else takes the wheel so i. I'm looking at the future through still being creative but more so behind the scenes. Because i have a fan base that wants any product. I am willing to give them as long as they are familiar with where it is coming from. So how about you chris. I mean the brand logic. There's a lot of equity in that now and growing my business and and have have used my experience and i think some relationships and most importantly i think the knowledge and experience at that i've been able to gain while building lodge career right next to him. i've i've recently took on a handful more clients. I've i've seven management clients. Right now. I just i just did a joint venture label. What sony music. Which i'm very very excited about so. Yeah there there's there's a lot of things to look forward to. And and but one thing i will say though is we kind of didn't answer questions and the question was what are what are we have i so kind of because we have these artists artists. We have shirts. They're doing things for us. I can't speak for chris. I like to think i can when i say this said you know that. Were always on the hamster wheel always going. The truth is my brain is hamster wheel. It does not stop. And that's how i live. So i have to be involved somewhere if i'm not. I trust no one with my money with my company with my this with that. If i'm not involved. Like i trust chris with my life but i'm not just going to be like just go take it and not because i don't trust them but because i don't work that way i need to know how you cook the fries at mcdonald's who sweeps the floors who flips burgers the exact time to flip burgers this that even if i'm sitting all the way on the fifty seventh floor in the ceo. Chair i need no so. This is a question that i ask. Everybody comes on the show and of course. I'm going to ask both of you. I you chris when you think about the journey that you've taken know twenty year old. No experience like pitching this guy logic to where you are now like how much of that you tribute to just really hard work and intelligence and skill and how much of that do tribute to look. I think it's probably somewhere in the middle between the both I look back at my life. And i think being raised by parents played played a large role in who. I am as a person today and instilling confidence in me. How serendipity played such a role in me discovering who logic was. I told the story if i hadn't been sitting at my computer at that. Very moment to click that youtube lincoln. See the video of logic. I don't think we'd be sitting here today But there's a large large portion of that where you know it just takes an almost unimaginable amount of hard work and perseverance because of every roadblock and every door that's closed to figure out a way to get through it I think it lives somewhere in the middle. I think my journey. I would i would probably have one foot in hard work and intelligence in grind and hustle and one foot in pure and simple luck logic. Yeah i mean. I think it's in the beginning. It's a lot of luck right. 'cause if without that lucky wouldn't even be blessed enough to be in those positions in those situations. You know it was really funny. I can't speak for other famous people. Celebrities musicians whatever. But i can tell you like no one knows how hard i work and until you how are we can work and i pay out over a million dollars in salary to to my employees a year. This is a real.

elise eum chris Iva bobby Chris sony mcdonald lincoln youtube
"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:07 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of his.

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

"I just.

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"logic" Discussed on How I Built This

"A career in music isn't even on chris's radar because at that point in his life. He was laser focused on soccer. I thought i was going to be a professional athlete. I played soccer very competitively growing up all the way through high school and got an opportunity play division one which which i thought was the first step to completing that goal right when he paying by the way what what college i my freshman year i played for canisius college in buffalo and i thought that was the best opportunity for me at the time. They're very competitive team soon. After that i think after my sophomore year and i had transferred in between then To a different school. I realized that i just you know i wasn't good enough. I was. I was very good. But i wasn't. I wasn't good enough to play at the highest. I'm trying to trying to figure out how you like made a transition into music. I mean did you. Did you think. I'm not gonna do sports. I'm going to get into the music business. Yeah i was. I was twenty or nineteen probably at the time when i started trying to figure it out. I knew when i stopped playing. I wanted to do something. I loved him was passionate about. I think that's all. I knew so. I kind of asked myself you know. What else do. I love as much as that sport and the only thing that i can answer with was music so i said okay that that's what i'm gonna do. I didn't know where i'd start. I didn't know anybody. I didn't have any relationships. So would literally go to barnes and noble and kind of read books on the music business and and try and figure it out and i chose management because i thought it would be the least barrier to entry and i was like okay if i find talent and start working with them. That would be my way into the business. But you didn't think let me go like cpi job working for like one of these big record labels or management companies and kinda get experienced like. That wasn't where what you thought you should do. I i tried. I definitely tried that route. I started with internships. I didn't graduate college. So i didn't really apply for jobs. But almost every major record label. I applied for internships and i kept getting turned down one after the actually got one interview that they actually had me come in for an interview and i thought it went great and ultimately they you know they said you know sorry. This isn't gonna work. And i just remember emailed the woman and i asked actually still have the email i asked why is in is in this going to work. And she told me i didn't have enough experience which i just thought it was really funny because go for an internship. Yeah right and the funny part about. And the reason why i said i have actually printed out recently and i'm getting frame for the office. It was def jam which is ultimately where where logic logic signed to a a year. A little bit over a year after that so all right. So you're living on long island with your parents and getting all these rejections for internships. Oh so what like you decide. Maybe i'll just do this on my own without an internship like maybe i'll just figure this out yet and to be honest i didn't have another choice I didn't i couldn't get internship. I didn't have any relationships or you know friends or family that worked in the business. That could give me an opportunity. So yeah i didn't i didn't have a choice. That was. that was the only pet that i had. So what did you did you decide to like. Start a business or did you. Just i decide let me kind of scour. The internet can find someone that that starting a business came a little bit later. I was just like you know what. Let me let me find some talent. Let me let me reach out to them and just kind of started dialogue and try to build a relationship with some of them and you know convinced them to let me manage them. How did you come across logic stuff. Yeah it was it was it was. It was kind of by by chance it was. You know. i use the word serendipity. I was managing in artist. Rapper at a philly at the time and this was twenty eleven so it's very early days of twitter. You know and i probably at the time fall. Twenty five thirty people. And i was sitting in front of my computer and his dj. The rappers dj. That i managed from. Philly tweeted out a a youtube link right. There was no description. There was no Anything else in the tweeter was just the link and i clicked. It was a acapella video of logic wrapping The university of maryland campus. And it was super. It was super low budget in poorly done. There was there was wind in the microphone. He actually i think had the microphone tucked in his hoodie There was just something about it that that stood out to me. And i thought it was really special and i kind of dug a little deeper to try and find out who he was and reach out to him. What did you say like. I'm chris and i have a manager. A manager can we. Can we jump on the phone. You have first of all. I probably asked him if he had management. 'cause i don't wanna step on anybody's toes You have to understand it. You know a kid trying to get another kid to trust me with their career. I had no. Yeah no experience. No resume I think i pointed to some of or one of the other artists. I was working with at the time and say hey you know working with artists. We had built this so far. You know check it out. And i'd love to To to be involved. I just time oversight chris. You're like you were twenty years old and you were emailing like different potential artists including logic at the time who is not that well known and you were saying a manager. What did you like. What did that mean to you. Well how would you even know what to do. Like were their books. Said a. here's how to be a the manager of a recording artist. Like how did you know what had an associate contracts and find venues and record music. How did you not do any of that. I i didn't to be honest You know a lot of what i was doing was was learning as i went to looking back now i. I'm very grateful and glad that i did learn that way. Because i think that's the best way to learn. A lot of management and a lot of the music is very difficult. I don't think you can learn it in a textbook. Yeah and you call. And i should mention you called your your company visionary music group right. Yeah yeah which is a great name. It sounds like a huge company. Like you've got a big building in hollywood visionary music group it was i remember i made and at the time having to come up with a company name it was more just kind of you know i formed an llc. When i started to make money. Because i had to be paid. And i had a little. I remember a microsoft word document which some names and i ended up landing on on the word visionary. I thought it was at time fitting. I think that's how logic and i looked at ourselves. we are doing something very different.

soccer canisius college chris buffalo def jam university of maryland Philly youtube twitter hollywood microsoft
"logic" Discussed on Restaurant Tales

Restaurant Tales

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"logic" Discussed on Restaurant Tales

"Were international magazine. It's pretty cool really had to have chip in other countries. That hasn't really come up yet over the industry to but yes. A lot of fun is the accent. Three hundred seventy two submissions published eagles publishing seventy four okay rating on. That's where's the farthest that you guys have had someone Inner something from australia has got to be. That's way but Lasted a bus asia australia. We had a couple of artists from africa has time india. South americans submit i. I don't think so at this point but we're trying to move in the future. Maybe translations of poetry oldbury cool. We can work with different languages as well. We don't have to tell you guys. Feel like the industry's kind of diverse. At least an entire issue someday kitchen spanish. I'm a big fan of that. I was gonna. He's got a kind of a funny story. Actually how we all got connected on this as well. I was just like popped up on instagram. And i was like oh shit. This is a really amazing idea. So the started following you guys. I was like oh man. I was like super super excited about it. One night i was. Actually i was sitting at the bar. A where where brady works. My girlfriend was working. And i was like she would really like. I should order one of these copy of of this magazine. Because that's definitely something like she would love this and i also selfishly Wanted to read it to. And so i ordered it and then and then i think we zach. I think we connected like the next day or something like that about it about and then in and there was like i was like actually really last night i just ordered just ordered a magazine from you guys for my girlfriend and they're like well. We should probably just do this. I think so credibly surprising. Yes like that's really adds up all each other for a minute. Yeah i mean we. Cd is or was like. I'll take credit for like sort of finding finding gas tax to use instagram. Gets us basically just like some people stuff just search hashtags stop and i was like oh Yes actually restaurants so beatable at all and yeah and now now. We're here. But so. I wanna i wanna talk a little about you. Both your backgrounds Service industry wise and stuff and then from there maybe get into the story of how you kinda came up with eighty six logic and started this whole process. That sounds great as before beauty..

africa australia india asia last night instagram Both next day Three hundred seventy two subm spanish one of seventy four One night artists South americans eighty Cd six eagles
"logic" Discussed on The Daily Boost

The Daily Boost

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"logic" Discussed on The Daily Boost

"Let's start by getting the big question on the way. . Have you done your homework? ? Did you sit down and say where's my life going? ? How's it doing? ? Do I like? What ? do I want to get rid of some of the stuff I don't like do I want to bring more good stuff in my life if you will stop for just a couple of minutes today and think about pat? ? Things will change. . So it works kind of law of attraction. . It gets in the back of your mind you go about your day not thinking too much about it, , and suddenly you're world changes do your homework. . So. Let's . talk stress. . Are. You . stressed I'm not saying you are, , but you know in this time that we're living right now I think all of us come up with moments where. . We'll stressed I know I've seen that started in March didn't it and it just keeps on going we have had nothing that they talk gal politically about October surprises we've had march and April or may own July August September October It's GonNa. . Keep going and. . What do you do about it? ? But one way idea with it and one way a lot of folks I know deal with it even though it's piling on top of you and sometimes a man what the heck to have trapped at home with my kids. . By Dogs my wife, , my husband, , a staff I need to get out. . Oh my gosh. . What do I do? ? If, , you're feeling a little bit more stressed. . There is time proven way I've used in. . So many other folks views. It's . a very human way. . By the way I began to use I think probably naturally Oh twenty, , thirty years ago <hes>. . But when I began to study STOIC philosophy, , it really began to make a lot of sense to me. . Along with a Kind of came together my life. . So I want to give you a very simple way of thinking about the say and you may not believe me but you gotta go with it. . Okay. . It's real simple. . It's GonNa make sense to you, , and if you will do this. . Ever. . By Car have. . You ever gone to buy car. . And you just have this beautiful carcass, , put the best one I, right , Oh, , my God Gar car, , and your Motion Starts Spinning and Spinning and spinning, , and then the salesman sits down and you start talking numbers and. . I don't know I. . Don't know. . I don't know, , and then you finally got gotta deals like well. . And you get the car. . or You decide not to it? ? It's okay. . Right. . Is that ever happened to you. . That's what you're going to do right now starting today with everything you do. . Okay. . So here we go. . Number One. . If you feeling, , it'll stress. . Do me favor just kind of recognize that you're there And also do this just remember Scott in your ear right now you're in an emotional state of mind. . How do I know that? ? Because, , everybody is emotional right. . We all we're emotional beings. . That's half the trouble we get into where it on our sleeves. . We react emotionally it's there. . It's like buying a new car right? ? Well, , I love it I love it. . If you recognize your in an emotional state. . And Stress Real or otherwise. . Is being felt by emotions. . We all do that. . But significant and usually good decisions rarely come from a place of emotions right? ? Even if somebody asked you to marry him, , you're like, , okay. . Hang on let me think about it I. . Love My lover going to you think about this I. . You know what I mean right. . So recognized where you are I know it's hard I know it's not gonNa make any sense at all like <hes> but man the world's falling apart. . What am I going to do to get through this? ? Number two. . Lounge paused even if it's for millisecond. . Start Gathering facts about how you feel when I do this, when , I have to balance my business growth and family and farm and Alpacas and all the stuff that I have run here. . To spreadsheets I go to I go to checklist, , I go to things that I keep track of data if you will. . That's what it is. . It's hard data it could be bad data I don't really care, , but I just want to know what their information is power, , right so I'm paused emotions are in check right now and I'm going to pull the data just facts because that's driving home feeling. . Now to understand and give myself a chance to do the the next step, , I want to be able to logically think this through as humans like buying a car. . When you get emotional. . The next thing you're going to do is logically think through it now. . Emotions are wanted him things, , right? ? You can logically come the conclusion that is good for you, , but you might not agree with emotionally right it happens. . So you gotta stay in the game here right? ? Emotional state of mind we're getting the data we're logically looking at it and no more looking for is not answers that make you happy. . That's not necessarily case. . We're looking for anything driving the stressing causing the stress and we're looking for options and opportunities for getting yourself out of it. . So if you gather the data and the day is really bad. . Okay I. . got a reason to be stressed that in it's so should remove some of the stress, , but then you flip to the next side. . Okay. . Great. . I've looked at the data. . And I'm stress were going to do about it. . And you begin to find a way out I'm gonNA tell you this. . In. . I'm going to say ninety nine point not Naza hundred percent hundred percent of the cases warriors warriors worry just kind of happens, , right? ? It most of it doesn't ever come true when you stop and pull a logical look at the data. . You're gonNA find that it's not as bad as you think it is and you're GonNa find that certainly not everything is terrible. . There's lots of cool things in lots of things you can do lots of options you have you're GonNa Begin to see if you'll look for it. . And just that all by itself will calm you like I said, , I'm a business guy right I'm kind of a data guy I'm a rule emotional guy but I'm also very logically driven. . So I'm the guy that when I see things that are going not the way, , I want them to go and starts to spin me a little bit and we all get. . There we all do. . The data settles me down now I don't always see it the first time give you this as well. . I don't always the first time and sometimes it's a few days or even weeks before I even think to figure out which set a data to look at. . Look at that. . That's bad. . That's bad. . That's bad. . That's bad. . But if I keep going eventually going to find. . Something that says, , Oh okay. . I'm just kind of overthinking this. .

Scott Smith Naza pat H. E. L. salesman founder officer