35 Burst results for "Lockheed"

Why Is America Getting Mixed Up in Foreign Wars When We Have a Mess at Home?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | Last month

Why Is America Getting Mixed Up in Foreign Wars When We Have a Mess at Home?

"Angela Cote via wrote the book literally called the ruling class. He was also probably one of the wisest foreign policy experts ever. And for those of you listening that want to get a really good understanding of how we should approach American foreign policy, Angela Kota villa was one of the most prudent. One of the most fair and pro American thinkers. And challenge the CIA and the security apparatus unfortunately, he died tragically. I was supposed to spend time with him, actually, he was unable to make it because he got COVID and he died of something else. It was awful. But he had this, the reason I bring up Angela Kota villa and Michael Anton, who's with hillsdale college. That's a great actual reminder that I have to tell you about hillsdale, the wonderful hillsdale college Beacon of the north, Michael Anton, who is not, doesn't necessarily agree with everything that Angela coded via says, but is, in some ways, disciple, I don't want to speak for him, but he would say this better than I could, which is you should not get involved in foreign conflicts if you have extensive domestic problems at home. What are you doing saber rattling across the world? Trying to resolve border disputes when our when our own border is wide open, we have inflation, the country is politically divided and you have a regime that is wildly unpopular. Well, that is exactly what the security apparatus is doing. Partly to distract away from the failed regime of Biden, but also to try and feed the fire of the military industrial complex because look, if you're the military industrial complex, you're looking at Pfizer AstraZeneca Johnson & Johnson, Lockheed Martin Northrop Grumman Boeing, they say, hey, come on, cut us in for some of this. We got no wars going on right now. Front page of the New York Times, on Ukrainian front, warily awaiting the worst. After 8 years of war, grim anticipation of Russian invasion. So now we are being fed a nonstop line that we should care about the Russian Ukrainian border

Angela Kota Villa Michael Anton Angela Cote Hillsdale College Hillsdale CIA Angela Astrazeneca Johnson & Johnson Lockheed Martin Northrop Grumm Biden Pfizer New York Times
Judge: Loudoun County Teen Guilty of Sexually Assaulting Classmate in Girls' Bathroom

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Judge: Loudoun County Teen Guilty of Sexually Assaulting Classmate in Girls' Bathroom

"You are seeing in loudon county Virginia and this is new out of loudon county, Virginia. That parents that have children in loudoun county Virginia, 54% of them are going to vote Republican or for young kid. So The Washington Post came out and they were like, oh, the story is very misleading of what's happened in loudoun county. But guess what allowed in county judge, this is breaking in the last 24 hours, finds boy in a skirt, guilty of raping, female student and girls bathroom remember we talked about the story, and the media told us that this wasn't true. The victims have been vindicated, and their parents demand apology and kids walk out of their classroom and protest against schools. This couldn't be happening at a worse time for Terry mcauliffe. This is hit a apex where all of a sudden, in Virginia. And let me just reemphasize this. I said this yesterday. Virginia, this is the ruling class governorship. This is the place where you wine and dine Boeing and north of Grumman and Lockheed Martin, where you give money to Pfizer AstraZeneca and Moderna. This is the governor of Virginia is kind of a ribbon cutting deal. You get all the nice handouts you get invited to all the Washington D.C. parties because you're nearby. You get treated really well. Being governor of Virginia is one of the top perks of being part of the Democrat ruling class. It's rather desirable. But now all of a sudden the Democrats have deployed Obama, they deploy camel Harris, which I don't think that's going to help. They're deploying Joe Biden, Rasmussen reports. 32% of America believes 32% of Americans believe America is on the right track. 64% of Americans think America's on the wrong track. 60 4%.

Virginia Loudon County Loudoun County The Washington Post Pfizer Astrazeneca Terry Mcauliffe Washington D.C. Moderna Grumman Lockheed Martin Boeing Camel Harris Joe Biden Barack Obama Rasmussen America
"lockheed" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"lockheed" Discussed on The Drill Down

"At our website. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Biz dot <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> are. We <Speech_Male> are back with drill down <Speech_Male> that one number that tells <Speech_Male> us a whole lot is <Speech_Male> of course about hive. <Speech_Male> Blockchain <Silence> technologies <Speech_Male> and yes. <Speech_Male> We mentioned <SpeakerChange> that this company <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Creates <Silence> <SpeakerChange> ether <Speech_Male> tokens <Speech_Male> a creates <Speech_Male> bitcoin <Speech_Male> token. How many <Speech_Male> and huddles <Speech_Male> don for dear life. <Speech_Male> How many <Speech_Male> are they huddling. <Speech_Male> Well the <Speech_Male> end of august near that <Speech_Male> number of the company says <Speech_Male> it is holding <Speech_Male> huddling <Speech_Male> holding on for dear <Speech_Male> life. They literally <Speech_Male> use. The term is <Speech_Male> a coddle investor <Speech_Male> presentations hdl <Speech_Male> all caps. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it currently <Speech_Male> hoddle. <Speech_Male> One thousand <SpeakerChange> thirty. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Bitcoin <Silence> tokens <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> at least at the end of august. That <Speech_Male> was the number will look for quarterly <Silence> results to find out how much they <Speech_Male> have now. Wow <Silence> that's <SpeakerChange> a lot of money. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Silence> increasingly <Speech_Male> with the <Speech_Male> recent surge of <Speech_Male> in both <Speech_Male> the <Silence> price of <Speech_Male> btc. <Speech_Male> Bitcoin

"lockheed" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

08:25 min | 3 months ago

"lockheed" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Trying to keep some of the military programs that they have. There was an analyst from harrow. Lynch who i was shocked he he basically rod epstein he actually asked the ceo is like you know. This wasn't gross story now it's a flow story. Seems like a rudderless ship or he kinda cut a people are saying. I thought that i took onions to tell the. Ceo of a company that he's running around ship and the answer was really interesting. The ceo is a young guy named jim hasslet and he'd come from american tower. He knows technology. American tower the builder of cell phone towers and he talked about the long term change. In what lockheed martin used to do since world war two actually cited world war two in this conference call saying we used to make programs are used to make stuff and sell the stuff to the military. Now we're thinking about a mission oriented paradigm and that's different than what we've been doing since world war two Here is What jim tastes had to say when he was asked. Are you running to ship. Wire to sell in the stuff like you used to do. And he described a modern day lockheed martin but i'm getting Tremendous traction with senior government officials in the us and elsewhere understand that while our industry and they're hers. Our products and services over the years has been effective is largely that is in the physical world if you will in county and world. We're really good at technology is like i responded phase trial Precision weapons etcetera. Those are those are the newtonian world. Really good at as an industry in our customer knows how to buy what. We're not as good as we need to be. In the defense industry is merging that excellence and the physical world that we can bring to national defense but merging that with the developments accelerated developments in the digital world like companies specialized in things like five g. and is distributed computing and networking because if we merge those two things together in the ways that we're forecasting. We're building technology mass. We will increase the effectiveness of our current set of platforms and out faster and more robust way than be on just using the goal attributes in the physical world technologies. We're gonna keep doing all that We actually know turn on. And after verner for mission capability for our customers by by celebrating digital technologies indoor space and that is our strategy. He doesn't have a strategy. It's not rudderless. I thought that was fascinating. This notion of newtonian world for lockheed martin of old and a more digital world in lockheed martin of new if you will need didn't say digital transformation was about to say it for him boy. What's your next year down. The company called facebook full disclosure or few shares of facebook in the johnson family. 401k We also own shares of facebook in our household but we are not on facebook. we delete facebook accounts Over a year ago. Facebook shaimaa hypocritical. Stuff really yeah. So you believe in the stock. I believe we own it. I mean i think you know it's a lot of our. It's in a lot of different piles but facebook trades her f. b. shares fell today but they are higher by. Oh well just thirteen percent over the last twelve months so yeah. Let's talk about all this. Facebook news all observers them a lousy investor. Yes look at the reason i i. I'm not. I don't guess investment advice you wouldn't follow my investment advice if you could get it For example facebook vastly Before the market but facebook to me has always been a free cash flow story and while they reported earnings that were seen as a disappointment of wall street. Guidance was a disappointment of wall street. The stock was down in after hours trading after they announced the numbers although i think was up a little bit kind of break easily was falling today. And we'll see but not a big move into stock today nonetheless and then also a share buyback which might be helping stock who cares about the stock. I always say the business is growing like crazy. Twenty nine billion in revenues up thirty five percent over last year's record year record third quarter operating profits up thirty percent to eleven or ten point four billion dollars operating margins of thirty six percent which while it's less than last year it's thirty six percent operating margin that's unbelievable daily active users just when you thought everyone was on facebook including isaac his family or on instagram. What's up well. In fact lack of users were six percents. And we're monthly active users so the real story though was the headwinds from the changes and apple iowa's fourteen that don't allow the targeting and tracking of users across lots of different apps that really hits facebook where it lives which is selling advertising across not just facebook properties but elsewhere and understanding who those customers are telling advertisers who the customer is who they're targeting and how they can target them Facebook thinks that they can rebuild those capabilities and somehow work around that. I don't know that they can face a faith in facebook technologists. You'll want to believe that. And maybe the bigger question is if you can't target the viewers of an ad across lots of different apps and lots of different devices. Do you want to advertise with facebook at all. Here is a chief operating officer sheryl sandberg. I think it's hard to sit here and decide exactly where we're going to end up at the all of this is gonna be a multi year effort. We've definitely seen it hit already and we're definitely focused on tools to help advertisers. We think we have opportunities to strengthen targeting ourselves both by the work ourselves and as part of industry contortion. You're right in your question in that. Advertisers have to make a choice of where they advertise so the question for us is how good can are targeting. Be compared to other i think are targeting. Ten suffer compared to others like apple who have direct data themselves. But i think are targeting still remains. I think in very very many ways very good for advertisers. When you compare us on an roi we've always performed. Well we still do even though we've taken a ahead and we're focused on continuing to do that for business. Think she took a shot at apple. There that i think is saying well now apple can just keep all this private information for themselves when apple his very specifically said they also will not track users across different devices just to sell ads so that. I don't know that it's taking a little shot at tim. Cook in the folks. The fine folks cupertino just on the road from facebook sir mountain view headquarters but this is one to watch and It's you know it's it's interesting to to really see what advertising will look like since it's changed so much in the last fifteen years are coming up next. We've got a really interesting conversation with a giant bitcoin. Minor high of blockchain technologies is publicly traded. Co frank likes to make the case that it's almost like a pig. Etf do you buy it. We'll break homes in just a moment but first the drill down is brought to you by braintrust global talent network the matches highly skilled technical freelancers with the world's most reputable brands brain trust clients like bank of america goldman sachs porsche under armor and more agile teams fast at a fraction of the cost visit brain. Trust dot com. That's n. t. r. Us dot com to learn more are welcome back to the drill down podcast. We are joined right now by these. Ceo of hive. Frank holmes joins us right now. From where you frank are you in texas. Are you in san antonio texas for.

facebook rod epstein jim hasslet american tower martin harrow verner Lynch apple jim johnson sheryl sandberg isaac us iowa
Philippine Military Plane Crashes, 17 Dead, 40 Rescued

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:32 sec | 7 months ago

Philippine Military Plane Crashes, 17 Dead, 40 Rescued

"Several dead at least 17 people are dead after a Philippines Air Force plane crash lands in the southern Philippines, the Lockheed transport aircraft Crashed early Sunday and the Solu province where the Philippine army has been fighting Islamist militants. The military says the plane missed the runway and there was no indication of an attack. The Philippines. Defense minister says 92 people were on board and so far 40 have been rescued with injuries and 17 bodies have been recovered. The search for victims of the Florida condo

Philippines Air Force Southern Philippines Solu Philippine Army Philippines Florida
"lockheed" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 7 months ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg Markets with Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller. How do you kind of view the volatility in the marketplace here? Everyone's focused on the vaccine rollout companies across industries trying to shore up their balance sheets. These equity indexes just keep going up breaking market news, an inside from Bloomberg experts. The strong dollar policy, I think is Lot of its rhetoric because of all the dislocations. There's always relative value trades that you could be doing. The only issue is how hard can home prices go? It's the uncertainty. I think that is really creeping everyone. This is Bloomberg markets with Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller on Bloomberg Radio. Good Wednesday morning from the Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Studio in New York City and points beyond to our worldwide audience, Matt today we're going to chat with Everett Millman Talk about commodities Gold Bitcoin All that fun stuff, plus Brian Whelan. He's a TCW. And I think, TCW I think fixed income. They are huge and fixed income and they've been very cautious met about this credit markets. Yeah, There's a lot to talk about in these credit markets as we saw. Well, we still see the U S 10 year old. I don't my glasses on right now. But I'm looking at one point. Let's just call. I'm not going to look but I'm going to say 1.45%. There is exactly 1 45 11. Yeah. Uh, it's just Raises all kind of question marks. As you hear even more fed officials come out and say it's time to start to taper. We may have to raise rates at the end of 2022. Yeah, exactly. Right. So while all that coming up Right now, let's go and get a sense of what's going on with these equity markets here. Kind of a quiet day. But let's check in with bloomer Stocks. Editor Devils. Thank you. I'm sorry. Yes, dude. Charley Pollard First. I'm sorry to Dave Wilson coming up in just a moment. Here's what's going on. We've got the Dow higher S and P. NASDAQ. They are both trading a lower s and P little changed right now. Do you want to begin with the headline, though from the Bloomberg Professional Service, Switzerland is going to spend five billion francs on Lockheed Martin F. 35 a plane's shares of Lockheed Martin. They.

Brian Whelan Matt Miller Paul Sweeney Dave Wilson Charley Pollard Everett Millman New York City TCW Bloomberg Professional Service 1.45% Matt Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Bloomberg today First five billion francs 10 year old one point F. 35 both
How Buying Trends Have Changed Since the Pandemic With Alice Stolz

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

02:23 min | 7 months ago

How Buying Trends Have Changed Since the Pandemic With Alice Stolz

"Have changed a lot in property in the last twelve months. A main wave seen it from the perspective. I'm sure you've seen it from the consumer perspective with people searching behaviors changing and things like that what trends e it to mind at the moment what people are searching for it. It's as simple as that. And i think it's such a fascinating insight into people's what they're dreaming of us vice and we know that when it comes to property it's often onslaught during that people on the backbone thinking when are retired lot sleep eurotrash all that but i think what koi was created more urgency around that and we did say paypal suddenly looking things. That weren't that interested in in a you. Pray everything from hypothesis to guidance to dick to spice to spare rooms be further out and tends to commute so we definitely saw that wash through so quickly and one of mice me also was the bribery of people who they were sort of uncertainty but so many people were like stuff at this is my chance to take a leap and around with you. Personally wilson that right if it was just amazing to me how many these did think. I'm just going to break away from having to pay really needed. Neither see having pain in my office. And god what we saw. A lot of rounding on is term commutable acreage which he decide theory. A larger sized parcels of land could still community she. If i needed to today's awake with something but the people did that really really quickly. It didn't take that long for that to wash through. And do you think based on what you guys are. Seeing evert demand that that that's likely to change anytime soon or a week. Kinda gonna go through to the end of the year on the same sort of level of activity that we're seeing right now. I think as employers urging back to the office in some instances we ask saying a bit more people hang on. Maybe a will hold fire on that instance. I think a lot of did get washed out into the regions quickly. Is he really quizzes. Up and leave. i neu- the for some people. I really realizing the value of having that office nearby. That will i so. I think we're gonna say sheeting demographics table who do really value wanting to bain there. I don't know how you feel when. I really miss being in the office and i think on kind of lockheed and i can have the best of both worlds and have a house in the suburbs going to my work and collaborate with colleagues and i think people are appreciating that more than ever at the

Paypal Dick Evert Wilson Bain
Will Liverpool, Leicester or Chelsea Qualify for the UCL?

ESPN FC

02:08 min | 8 months ago

Will Liverpool, Leicester or Chelsea Qualify for the UCL?

"Let's start at. What was i think. Effectively may not turn out to be this way chelsea could still go out but a play off for the champions league between chelsea and leicester city it's bridge was a replay of the game on saturday. Then you have a cup final Homemade some not all of the same choices including putting my man reese james in the back three convince And chelsea one. I think in the end it was to wind. And you could say maybe you're gonna start at the end but i thought chelsea really really dominated the day. That was their god. They were after they were really fantastic at times. In the way they build up the movement away from the back under pressure at times. I still alice the plate for draw. And maybe i'm wrong. Maybe that's not. That was the idea. But he's certainly felt like that in in the team that selected with natural on the bench in the way they played in the weather priced. Look to me via merged lockheed. Very happy with that was fair well. Madison came in. So we can have madison. I thought was really poor. I don't think he's fully fit. Maybe no he's on your hard if you play for a draw to to have my against a team like this against him chetty like this to to to expect too much from madison. Nothing the upshot of all this is that we're set up for one of those end of the season kinda three way runs but three-way dances chelsea are playing away to aston villa. A win guarantees them. A champions league. Place is only going to be easy at all we'll get on to this lester. I'm liverpool liverpool beating burnley three now essentially if they both way and they're gonna finish level on points it's going to be decided by goal difference and liverpool now have an edge of four goals in the goal difference so so liver put up again chris perez. That's right liverpool roy. Hodgson his final his final game. He loved to put one over liverpool and less spurs. Who can still still have to play for your petty place. Yeah so clearly lester. Greatly advantage giving. Now just kidding kidding

Chelsea Reese James Leicester City Champions League Chetty Madison Liverpool Lester Burnley Villa Chris Perez Hodgson ROY Spurs
U.S. Space Force Missile-Warning Satellite Rockets Into Orbit

America's First News

01:21 min | 8 months ago

U.S. Space Force Missile-Warning Satellite Rockets Into Orbit

"Missile warning satellite for the space force rocketed toward orbit Tuesday. It was the fifth in a serious of space based infrared systems satellites. Mento replace the longtime defense support program Constellation of Surveillance satellites. United Launch Alliance set the Atlas Five rocket toward Cape Canaveral are from, I should say well from from big difference from Cape Canaveral. Space force stations. All right. Let's get to that launch 543 at listen to lift off lift off line that was five rocket with fifth space based in friend System satellite, the United States Space Force. 15 seconds into flight. He's gone too closely Controlled engine operating parameters. Continue. Look good. You're hearing the voice of Patrick Moore providing launch vehicle that data. Those will keep getting the pitch over. Program body. Rachel. Good. Good to your pressure on both of us are bees. Lockheed Martin one a $1.86 billion contract for the satellite and the next one that's due to launch next year. They're intended for an orbit 22,300 miles high.

Mento United Launch Alliance United States Space Force Cape Canaveral Patrick Moore Rachel Lockheed Martin
FAA Reaches $44 Million Settlement in Age Discrimination Case

Aviation News Talk podcast

02:04 min | 9 months ago

FAA Reaches $44 Million Settlement in Age Discrimination Case

"From the washington. Post dot com f. a. agrees to pay four million to resolve long-running age discrimination lawsuit about seven hundred former as employees. Whose jobs were outsourced. Two thousand five will share in the settlement. The faa has agreed to pay forty four million to resolve a long-standing lawsuit brought by former employees who alleged that their jobs were outsourced because of their ages. The case was filed in two thousand five when the faa decided to hand over the work of about two thousand employees notice flight services specialists to a private company faa officials including the head of the agency at the time were open about the aging specialised workforce being a factor in the outsourcing deal. According to evidence presented in the lawsuit but the case languished in the courts for years as one judge retired in the law firm that originally represented the employees was closed with the former employees reaching retirement age. A new team of lawyers began hashing out a settlement with the government last year. The faa did not admit wrongdoing and said in a statement that the settlement speaks for itself. The lawsuit initially sought to stop the privatization plan which involves giving a one point eight billion dollar contract to lockheed martin government services firm and weapons maker when that effort failed the specialist and support staff became lockheed employees their pay remained roughly the same but they lost out on lucrative air traffic control. Pensions joseph sellers a partner at law. Firm cohen milstein which joined the case in two thousand sixteen. Describe the financial harm faced by the former employees as brutal. Suddenly their pension investment was ripped away from them. He said recouping that retirement pay became the focus the lawsuit the forty four million dollars summit fund will be shared by six hundred and forty six former employees or their estates sellers acknowledged. The payouts won't cover everything that former employees lost police said. The case was unusual because it was not pursued as a class action that meant that they won. Each of the six hundred seventy one plaintiffs would have had to have a separate trial to determine what they were owed potentially extending the case several more years

FAA Martin Government Joseph Sellers Cohen Milstein Washington Government
Taiwan says seeking long-range cruise missiles from US

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:14 sec | 9 months ago

Taiwan says seeking long-range cruise missiles from US

"To buy long range air launched cruise missiles from the U. S ahead of Defense Ministry planning tells Reuters that they are looking at Lockheed Martin's A GM 1 58. The U. S. Has not said whether provide the missiles the U. S. Senate

Defense Ministry U. Reuters Lockheed Martin GM U. S. Senate
SPACE FARCE

Ground Zero Media

05:39 min | 1 year ago

SPACE FARCE

"Days ago. We observed the thirty fifth anniversary of the space shuttle. Challenger's bush in the killed seven brave astronauts and a chance to actually get into that. I just thought it kind of bring the room down and it would it. Would basically a habit gets reflect back on the failure that the shuttle program eventually became. I'm man i'm and it's arguable. That the shuttle missions were a failure but it just Conversations before with people who said it's the equivalent of taking a bus out of the garage. Hang around the earth a couple times. That's all it was but you know it was interesting. At least the space program had something going on at the time. And i thought it would. I even met a shuttle astronaut Good guy Just that by the time We had a conversation on a cable channel about moon landing in. I didn't like each other afterwards. And i i didn't. I didn't wanna cause trouble with him. In fact he was just an amazing astronaut. Let's astronaut my god guys space. You know pro. You know again. I look at astronauts. It's like i. I'd look at a veteran. Or i look at a soldier who fights. I mean they got more than i do. I sit studio. And gripe all the time but i just you know. I was amazed by The he was not my first astronaut. I've met a few Never met buzz aldrin or ordeal armstrong. Or anybody like that. A few shuttle astronauts. I've i've met a former nasa. Well no i interviewed chuck cernan but i was never. I interviewed him over the phone. So i i don't know i just have an affinity for space i i i love it because of course i love the topic of aliens. Ufo's avi lopburi more. We come on. Space travels amazing. I mean we'd star trek star wars. These are things. I really like And you know noticing too. I grew up in utah. Where more than fire call was twenty miles away thirty miles away from where i lived and this is where the rings were made for the space shuttle program of course the failed challenger explosion was because of the ordering problems were more than thiokol and only two failures in the whole space shuttle program where people were killed. Astronauts were killed. No real new information though. That was out there and You know and we kept being promised this was just you know the shuttle program was going to be used to not only take the bus out for a dry but it was also going to be used to go to the space station and bring astronauts food and stuff and now well for the longest time we were contracting russia. We're having a deal with russia to send astronauts to the space shuttle to the space station to well actually said food to the space as well and i thought why are we relying on russia in and this whole nonsense about how russia was our enemy and everything. They're our enemy. Why are they helping us with our space program. Just didn't make any sense. But yeah i mean looking back at our field. Space programs is important. Indicate that president. Barack obama crippled dass his efforts to send astronauts beyond low earth orbit. When obama came into office. he didn't want a number of other. Presidents have done to determine their goals for nasa. He formed a presidential commission to study the space agency and then he came up with some recommendations so he you a committee the committee. You basically. you're saying well. I think there are far more important things. We need to invest our money. And so i'm gonna cut your budget. You know basically what area. We're gonna bring you altogether. Cut your budget. So you're going to have to deal with you know whatever that's all it's been cutting budget and budget cutting and and And so that's why you have now space x that's why you have You know these other companies visas and others who want to do space because you know space has been neglected. The budgets have been neglected in our government for some time but we had a lot of conservative presidents like george w bush and of course donald trump. Who said yeah. We're all the speech program. Let's get it going. And the reason why is because there's brooke obama once said and this is one of the reasons why he basically said no to you know exorbitant budgets for space. He says well. You know spaces. In america. First issue. And we should be more universal. We she wore. We wore worldly with our concepts in our conquest of space. We need to do you know we didn't do it all together as a world. It's a it's a world bring people together in a world government or world philosophy. I think reagan kinda hinted to what he said. You know our differences worldwide would vanish. We were facing an alien threat from outside of this world but that was an alien threat. That was the idea that if there were aliens out there wanting to eat us then we would certainly band together as a group. I mean that's what independence day was all about right. See the independence day. Movie or armageddon were nasa saves the day. You know it's time and time again. We get told it. Our space program is amazing. Well yeah they do amazing things. But it's not as amazing as it used to be. I mean lockheed. Martin ceo norm augustine Headed up the augustine commission during the obama administration actually was named after maga sanofi headed up with the. It's called the augustine commission and basically they returned with a set of recommendations after few wants convening during the obama administration so the commission found the program then in existence project constellation was not execute under any reasonable

Russia Chuck Cernan Avi Lopburi Thiokol Nasa Buzz Aldrin Challenger Armstrong Bush Barack Obama Brooke Obama Utah George W Bush Donald Trump Augustine Commission Obama Administration Reagan Martin Ceo Norm Augustine
Lockheed Martin announces a deal to acquire Aerojet Rocketdyne for $4.4 billion

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Lockheed Martin announces a deal to acquire Aerojet Rocketdyne for $4.4 billion

"The Maryland based Lockheed Martin Corporation announced they'll be taking over Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings. The deal is valued at more than $4 billion Ero jet is a rocket engine manufacturer that took part in the race to the moon. Lockheed CEO says the deal will amplify the company as a leading provider of 21st century warfare solutions.

Aerojet Rocketdyne Holdings Lockheed Maryland
NASA adds Blue Origin’s upcoming New Glenn rocket to its launch services catalog

WSJ What's News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

NASA adds Blue Origin’s upcoming New Glenn rocket to its launch services catalog

"Reusable rocket developed by amazon founder. Jeff bezos his space transportation company. Blue origin has been named by nasa potential launch provider for scientific missions later the steck aid and makes the company eligible for such nasa business for the first time and allows blue origin to use the new glenn rocket to compete for awards. Neces- said no specific contracts had been awarded to the company in a statement. Laurencin was proud to be a nasa's launch services catalog and look forward to providing reliable launch for years to come other rockets already cleared to compete for nasa scientific launches include ones from elon. Musk's spacex and boeing lockheed martin joint venture

Blue Origin Nasa Jeff Bezos Laurencin Amazon Elon Musk Spacex Boeing Martin Joint Venture
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 1 year ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
Career Coaching for Women in STEM with Prasha Dutra

GradBlogger

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Career Coaching for Women in STEM with Prasha Dutra

"Press you again. I'm really excited to have you on I think a good place to get started just to maybe introduce yourself to the grab blogger podcast audience and job Start talking a little bit about your journey. Sure. So thanks. Thanks for something that up so well and you know also sort of seeing the parallels in the two shows and how we're serving the community in our own special way. So that's always exciting to you know, meet more people who are in the space because it's you know, still really Mitch and really exciting and growing fast. So that's exciting. But yeah, so my mom sort of starts in India, that's where I grew up and I moved to the us about eight years ago to pursue my Master's in mechanical engineering and the plan was I mean, I did a bachelor's in chemical engineering back home from University of Pune, which is like they call it Oxford of the East so it's really popular. That's where all the schools are and a lot of kids and a lot of you know, even manufacturing for for India is not in that area. And so that's where I went to the chemical engineering and the plan was to come to us and do aerospace engineering but soon realized that Arab. Ace is not very welcoming for students with bassist and you know, even Boeing and Lockheed and all these companies at least when I was applying were not spontaneous and so my one of my big goals was to get a job because you know, there was something very important to me. So I switched gears and moved to Mechanical still took all their space courses in got a mechanical degree and they'd get a job one year before graduation, which I think was so cool as a foreign student as an international student. It's usually very very hard to get jobs, especially with the sponsorship restrictions for Reeses. So I think that was really really cool. And actually now I gave a talk on that to a lot of people where it's just so great that if you use our resources, well you can do well and then just move six times and six years between between homes and states and I've lived all over in Northeast between wage Texas of lived in north Texas East Texas, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island where I'm based now, which is the tiniest state in us and its really really cool and off. So I moved here. It's a few years ago. I got married in 2017. That's when I started like contemplating everything in terms of what am I doing with my career? Where do I want to go? And even though it's doing really well in my nine-to-five job and knock on wood. I I still am I was more with saving for more and that's how her stem story came to be. I

India Texas Mitch University Of Pune Reeses East Boeing ACE Lockheed United States Rhode Island Pennsylvania
The Parents Are Not Alright

Latino USA

07:11 min | 1 year ago

The Parents Are Not Alright

"I'm in the virtual studio today with producer Ginny Moon Hey Jeannie I'm waving to you all the way from Harlem, Hey Maria, I'm in Queens. So Jeannie were talking about our favorite topic today parenting, right? Yeah and parenting in twenty twenty is a whole new level parenting. You know what I have adult children now. So honestly, I am so thankful that I do not have to be raising little kids during this time I just can't imagine. So what have you been doing because how old is your little boy now Medina's turning three it's been an adventure I don't know how else to put it. But in this adventure, you're not really going anywhere, right? No, it's an adventure within the four walls of our apartment. So what's it been like like? How do you even manage it I don't some days and some days I do. I had to cut back to part time. So when everything shut down I, just tried to manage the best I could. But it became too much I. was burnt out I was trying to work at night I was trying to work in his nap times and also like switching gears from mom to try and. Write an email or work I can't multitask again if I have a toddler running around in the background running my life like he's the boss, I can hear my in the background saying Mommy's. But yeah, you just Kinda deal with it. Yeah. I have to say in the beginning the only way I made it through, was my coffee in the morning and passing the torch to the wine that I would have to the day. I know you're tired genie as a parent but the thing is, is that when people are tired, they're like, oh, my God the last thing I want to do is go to work but for you, you're like I'm tired I really WanNa go to work yeah. Because I just WANNA. Work without distractions like how many times a day do I have seen running in here and being like me and like L. And he wants to play and like. Hangman. And it's nice. I had review. On some level, but I really just want to focus for an eight. Hour Day Without a distraction and it's because it's really hard to switch gears feel like women are good at multitasking. But this is not one of those scenarios I wanNA parent when I need to parent and I wanna work when I need to work I can't do both at the same time. So. This whole thing about the schools being closed down like New York City like they try to never close the schools down, right? Yeah. So the fact that they did shut down and they shut down all around the country poses a really big challenge because. Not, everybody can set up for remote learning I mean not everybody has Internet. Some kids only get their meals if they're going to school so. It really has been a challenge on a lot of different levels. So you decided that you like all parents you're like, okay I need to talk to other parents and commiserate and think and see how other people are doing it. So you didn't gather a group of parents I guess virtually right? Yeah I did because there's been a slew of articles about the mental load that everybody is dealing with as parents because you're not meant to do both things at once like you can't parent and work full-time that's why childcare exists and none of this was meant to be a long term solution. But I do want to say before we start that even though we have all been affected by the pandemic, all of us participating in today's roundtable have been fortunate enough to still be working in some format. So we're all healthy and we're all grateful for that but we're barely hanging on by threat. So here we go. I want to welcome from Dallas Texas we have. dinty Cabanas. Hi. How are you? Thank you for having me. So glad you're here I have Joe Marvin Tura from Richmond California. For having me and I have to Haida Alencastro from Orlando Florida. Hey thank you. Teeny. Thanks for having me and just the disclaimer everyone knows to hide it and I have actually known each other for like twenty years. So no surprises there little bit. All right. So I just want to quickly go around the virtual room. And tell me about your kids what you do. This is our Sia I am in Dallas. As you said, I have two little girls wind will be ten in three weeks. The other one will be four in two weeks. And I for fulltime digital marketing manager for. Mary. Kay Corporate here in Dallas Great Jomar. Hi I'm Joanna and I'm in Richmond. That's you know the bay area and my little one is turning three months and I teach elementary school. So juggling the new definition of a teacher and first time parent has been very, very interesting adventure. Into Haida. I have two kids. My son is ten years old and my daughter is about to be eight and a few weeks and I am a systems engineer for Lockheed. Martin but I work from home. So I've been A. Since two thousand and five. Okay. So we're going to start from the beginning. I think I mean I don't know about the rest of you but I think we all were kind of like Oh. This is going to be a few weeks we can do this. No big deal, but walk me through personally what? Each of you guys had to go through and like what kind of plan you came up with to get by for the end of the school year. Well for us like all of you we've had to adjust we did not work from home originally We were released for spring break and never came back. We were told we were going to stay. And do you learning and so it was a shock I'm not gonNA live my husband and I freaked out a little bit. But then we had to pivot really quickly. Right what are we going to do? Do we have the right equipment to we have the right setup at the House Both of our kids are in the same school. So that was one good thing because it was need to everybody. So the school they know what they were doing. We know what we're doing the girls were like what's going on? So the ambiguity of it all was really challenging for all of us. But we just started getting a routine down our dining room became our command center. So I would say the first two weeks were horrible I'm not GonNa lie but I think we've all pivoted. Can and so I was pivoting at home I was pivoting at work. And even with myself like how am I going to take time for myself and you know lose it But I'm not allowed I'm sure I'm not a lot. Of. This

Dallas Jeannie Medina Ginny Moon New York City Producer Haida Alencastro Harlem Queens Maria Joe Marvin Tura Dinty Cabanas Dallas Great Jomar Richmond Texas Marketing Manager Kay Corporate Joanna Richmond California
Congress releases scathing report on Boeing 737 Max

Startup Showcase with Scott Kitun

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Congress releases scathing report on Boeing 737 Max

"Words, deception and basically disturbing both words used In a scathing report from Congress on their investigation into the Boeing 7 37 max development. It's re sort of its certification and maybe even it's re certification and about its relationship with the FAA. Pretty damning stuff. Right, John? By far the report that came out of the House Transportation Infrastructure Committee. Really highlights of very really damning picture of how Boeing and the FAA went about certifying the 7, 37, Max and All the missed opportunities to alter course and I think that you know, really spells, you know? Ultimately, a process breakdown about how this whole thing proceeded seemingly normally. But again going back in retrospect and looking at all these different opportunities to change course on DH account for this. The design of the 7 37 different way really is you see that over and over and over again in the house ended up collecting over it's over teaching of investigation. And it's my It's my guess that some people might actually go to prison on this because the actual behavior in my estimation was criminal. You know when you talk about criminal negligence It's written all over this, but it goes back to the basic relationship that the Federal Aviation Administration has with both manufacturers and with airlines. Two areas. They're supposed to regulate their not their clients. They're not. They're partners. I remember John being an immediate United Airlines. You may have even been there that day. I think you were When one of the operation guys, you know that stood up and said, You know, we are going to get the plane recertified. We're working with our partners at the FAA. And I stood up immediately and raised my hand and said, Excuse me. Did you just defined the Federal Aviation Administration as your partner? Isn't that the root problem here? And, uh, I didn't get a good answer. Because if you go back to the history of the FAA, we're talking decades. The people that actually certify any airplane, whether it's Boeing or in the old days, McDonnell Douglas or Lockheed or Convair. The people who certify that plane is airworthy. Or actually, on the payroll of the manufacturer. They're called FAA designated inspectors. Now, if that doesn't scream conflict of interest, I don't know what does The amazing thing is that that discussion is not new mean you like you just said that this this goes back decades. I mean, when when you hung it at you know what happened when the MacDonald does. DC 10 was ground back in the late seventies. There was all this discussion around delegated authority and how and how they're not. The FAA was able to act as an adequate regulator of Of those they were tasked with regulating And by the way, and by the way, John in that particular case, I know it so well. American Airlines maintenance guys figure out they could save four hours per engine change in maintenance by violating the maintenance manual and using a forklift truck instead of doing it with with pulleys and levers. Which violated the maintenance man, and they actually want told the FAA. They're gonna violate it. And the FAA said Okay and in the plane that crashed American flight 1 91 in Chicago, which, by the way, still ranks As the worst aviation disaster in this country in history. Up on the plane in question they were putting on a new engine. They have to fasten it with special bolts, and they had two of the bolts in two of the four bolts in when the when the lunch whistle blew So they went to lunch, and during lunch, they forklift lost pressure. Which is the reason why McDonald Douglas didn't want him to use a forklift truck. It bet one of the bolts and broke the other, but they didn't know it came back and install the other two bolts. They flew the plane empty to Chicago on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend, Back in 1979 and They took out a full load of passengers for Los Angeles. We know what happened next. So this we knew this. You know you're absolutely right. This this is this is or 40 years ago, just about Yeah, and you know, And when you look at the DC 10 I mean, I've spent a lot of time in the last two years looking at the history of it because it is so similar to the 7 37. You know a lot of the new Certainly the root causes were different around the maintenance. Of the engine and how it was attached the aircraft, But there are there were definitely issues around around looking at the same core issues as your craft manufactures, which is how do humans interact with their technology? And how do How did an aircraft respond to damage and it's never just one thing

Federal Aviation Administratio John Partner Boeing House Transportation Infrastru American Airlines Congress United Airlines Mcdonnell Douglas Mcdonald Douglas Macdonald Chicago Los Angeles
The U.S. Hypersonics Program Matures

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

03:33 min | 1 year ago

The U.S. Hypersonics Program Matures

"We're here because really in the span of a couple of weeks, our knowledge of the US hypersonic weapons program is significantly expanded and a lot of these disparate pieces that we have been tracking are falling into place. Steve. been at the forefront of reporting a lot of these developments. Can you summarize the highlights for us? Right well, just to kind of give you a a an update Eh cross the entire spectrum because it's a huge portfolio. So let's go back to March that was the last flight test hypersonic flight tests that the DOD has has carried out with that was with the blog zero common hypersonic lied body. That's the glide body that's going to be the front end for the army's long range hypersonic weapon and the Navy's intermediate range, conventional prom strike, which is summering launch missile. That was a successful flight test It was later described by president trump as a as the super duper missile We were trying to figure out what that was, but that according to CNN's reporting. That's that's what he was referring to. At the time. The Air Force meanwhile has got a couple of different programs. Ongoing one is the AGM one, eighty, three A. Rapid Response Weapon Lockheed Martin design for for both the front front end and the integration, and they did a captive carry flight tests that would appear to be pretty successful just a couple of weeks ago and they are moving that into flight test with the FRONTON actually incorporating the design from the tactical boost glide program from Darpa that was supposed to be an independent separate. Well, not quite there. They are linked that was supposed to be a separate flight test program that they've now folded that into the aero vehicle design and will continue testing that through era there. was also on the Hawk programs. That's the next set of flight tests that are supposed to be happening That's hypersonic everything weapon concepts which is basically a scream jet powered cruise missile There's a Lockheed version and Raytheon version We know back in May that the Lockheed attempted to do a captive carry test with their version of the Hawk missile but there was some kind of failure during the flight test We still don't know exactly what it, what it was but it appeared to be somewhat damaging and but since then we hit me for nothing about. where. They're going with that except for the fact that the Air Force a few weeks ago, launched a follow on program to develop an operational prototype. Jet Powered cruise missile that you know would be a follow on to the the program But in the competition Air Force basically selected three companies a couple of weeks ago to form the competitive field for the follow on Hawk missile and those three companies are Lockheed Raytheon and Boeing. Which of course, the interesting part there is Boeing locking Raytheon are heavily involved in the Arrow Program and the TV g program and Hawk program, but Boeing has been shut out. So this gives them a chance to come back into the hypersonic Arena for at one point buying of course, was the sort of champion in especially in the air breathing propulsion space with the x fifty one program, and if you go way back I'm sure guy could could chime in on on these programs would be like the space shuttle and fifteen with Boeing's legacy companies so. That kind of brings us up to speed with where we are right now.

Boeing Hypersonic Arena Lockheed Raytheon Air Force Donald Trump Raytheon United States Fronton Steve. DOD CNN Navy President Trump Darpa
Accenture’s aerospace team reveals strategies for aerospace CEOs looking to the future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Accenture’s aerospace team reveals strategies for aerospace CEOs looking to the future

"What is the state of aerospace and defense today, and what's your outlook for twenty twenty one and has that changed at all in the in the recent past Recent past go back into a January February odd things have changed dramatically. If you say recent past in terms of how feeling today for. So spilling back in in. June. Not Not nearly as much. I think know by sum it up I think I look at the industry and so almost tell two cities. If you remember that Dickens novel where on the commercial side, we have all kinds of things going on and you know the impact of airlines and the reduction in capacity, and now reduced number of aircraft being taken and all that kind of stuff going on dampening down you know the business and Yoga Cyber Defence and defence. Largely continuing to perform you know well There are some some issues. There are some blips in supply chain certainly related to things like covid. But it's really is tell to city and we look at Boeing and Airbus both announcing production rates and rate cuts, and of course, we have the existing 737 challenge facing history as well. No I think there's a different side of the coin when we start looking at what's happening on the defense side. And what is that different side of the coin much more positive right? Well, it's much more positive and you know this morning are. Reported there the results in in even just in our she concede example of the Tele two cities playing out. Right now and you know. I think. What I'd like to say is that looking at what's what we're hearing and if we were going to go into farmer air, show the share, which, of course, unfortunately, we did not every year accenture steps back and looks at kind of what we're seeing across the numerous research elements that we have our tech vision, our commercial index and supply chain research, and we look at the work we're doing for clients we look at what we're talking to our. Clients about in terms of where their priorities are. We look at what's going on in industry at large, and from that, we try to distill out what we think are really going to be the you know quote unquote stories to watch and weird do that this year Joe I think there's four things that I think would come out in their four things that I hear consistently I think pat would echo this well when we talked to sea level executives Across our clients defense and commercial, those four things are related to cash management number one number two supply chains smart manufacturing number three workforce in workforce impact in a before's is really rounding technology in systems in resiliency of those systems. into look thinking about where we are today in covert and and what companies need be thinking about as they look forward, their calendar twenty-one. Those four things are really top of mind. Pat, what's what are your thoughts had? We gone to Farnborough what were you prepared to be talking about I? Think the themes that John mentioned are spot on one concept that intertwined through cash management supply chain workforce and systems resiliency is really a need to continue the digital transformation the the level of of change that aerospace and defense companies are dealing with today is is really unprecedented and I think it's changed Focus of of trying to accelerate the agility of decision-making workforces is been fascinating topic. How has a house the debate on that changed in this? I mean, we had a lot of ish. A lot of the talk was about workforce shortages and now companies are laying off tens of thousands of people said, Short Term Blip, John, I mean what are you telling companies to do to be prepared for the workforce of the future? You know. It's interesting. If you think back a couple years, we're worried about the grace. ooh Nami and everybody retiring he let me go back back to January timeframe worried about shortages whether it's pilots are or people in the maintenance shops in of course, we see companies laying off and furloughing on the commercial side, but we also see companies on the defense side hiring, right? So I think Lockheed announced five thousand new hires northbound eight thousand new. Hires right. So it's almost again that tell see what's happening but I think you know the three things that were talking to clients lot about now in this code world where we have more people remark in remotely than we ever did before Amsterdam you have more you're gonNA WANNA add onto this but it's really about you know the people experience how how each individual worker is being interacted with with their company and that comes down to. How they were who they work with and how they get their work done. The second thing is around or Culture. The culture particularly, I think in our industry and maybe I'm biased because I'm in this of this industry but you know you walk into the building and you see the sign, you see the flag, you walk through the hallways almost any aerospace defense office or even in factory assembly floor, and you see the product you see pictures of the product you see people, pictures of people using the products I mean that helps build culture. Now, I, see the four walls of my Home Office or maybe it's my kitchen table or wherever I happen to be working remotely. It's it's a big topic these days how you manage in we'd and maintain culture in the third is really about the work itself and how the workforce works at work in Delhi deals with things like remote collectively high-performance compute environments. Can I get to those from homes cure environment

John PAT Twenty Twenty Home Office Boeing Dickens Lockheed Airbus Delhi JOE Amsterdam
China says it will retaliate after US orders its Houston consulate to close

Todd Schnitt

11:31 min | 1 year ago

China says it will retaliate after US orders its Houston consulate to close

"With the Chinese. Let's deal with the hacking situation and the story that broke yesterday and even before this, we had heard that the Chinese were actively trying to steal intellectual property on Research for a Corona virus vaccine and it comes down to the Chinese know that this virus originated in Wuhan. The Chinese know that they misled the world. They misled the United States they misled. Originally, the World Health Organisation, which has become complicity with the Chinese. On multiple levels and the Chinese did a disservice to humanity. Let's look at it through the prism and the lenses of us here in the United States. That if they would have let us know in December Or early January what they knew and if the Chinese would have locked down Wuhan sooner, even just a week sooner. They didn't tell their own people between January 14th in the 21st and there was a massive spread and rule on at that point. They don't even tell their own people or they didn't move to lock things down. And again the Chinese Communist government completely to blame here for mishandling and mismanaging and lying to the world. And with that said the Chinese don't want Toby. Shown up that they don't want to be behind the eight ball. They want to also be the ones that say, Hey, we've got the best vaccine against Corona virus. Instead of all of the other pharmaceutical and research and institutions around the world that are working diligently and feverishly. On a vaccine whether it's German scientists whether it's French, whether it's what we're hearing out of Oxford in the UK Fizer here in the United States and, of course, their branches all around the world, Moderna. You know, that's just a fraction of who's working. Johnson and Johnson here in the United States is just a fraction of who's working on this vaccine. And the Chinese were we heard this two months ago. I talked about this on the program months ago that the Chinese were tryingto hack and steal data from all over the world so they could be first. Was saying, Hey, we got the vaccine. And now we have two Chinese hackers that have been formally charged with trying to steal research on the Corona virus vaccine. Trying to steal from private companies trying to steal from our government agencies as well. And this is what came down from the DOJ yesterday. And these two guys apparently work that the Chinese Ministry of State Security and the Gwang Dong State Security Department To lead a campaign, which the DOJ the assistant attorney General, John Demmer said was a sweeping global computer intrusion campaign. That's the nice way to say hacking intellectual property theft just going in and stealing. Chinese are very, very good at this. That's why they've gotten so far militarily. From a industrial standpoint, they stolen countless countless hundreds of billions or trillions. An intellectual property. Lee. Zhou Yu, 34 years old and dung. Jeez, I got zero J A Z a shot. G, uh 31. According to the reports, they targeted intellectual property and confidential business information. Held by Pharmaceutical companies and those that are steaming full speed ahead toward a corona virus treatment. Treatments. So the therapeutics the testing issues, the vaccines they were trying to rip off and bust into everything. And this is what the Chinese have done again. Defense contractors. Why do you think the latest generation of the Chinese fighter jet looks just like the F 35 Because they ripped off was the Lockheed Martin or north of Groman. They They controlled her back in the late to thousands like 8 4009 And they stole a whole lot of defence information on the F 35 ripped it off. So it's defense contractors. They rip off the pharmaceutical companies. A computer high tech medical device companies. The Chinese even have a history of busting into solar energy companies here in the United States video game development They're ripping off information. They're stealing codes. It's nonstop on what the Chinese do their absolute thieves. When it comes to intellectual property. According to the indictment. These malicious cyber activities began more than 10 years ago. And were ongoing as of the date of the indictment, according to AA de MERS. During that time, the hackers stole terabytes of data from hundreds of targets. Establishing themselves as a prolific threat to the U. S and foreign networks. And these charges from the feds. They say that these Chinese hackers tried to access the accounts of other organizations that we're not government organizations. They tried to bust also into dissident organizations or actual dissidents or clergy, human rights activists. Is it trying to get Intel and so they can punish and and go after anything that's a threat to the Chinese Communist. Regime. That's what this comes down to. Yeah, Lee and Dung they were working on high tech companies. That was their focus, but they had a whole team. They work of others, obviously, but Lee and Dung they were, they were focused on busting into high tech companies here in the United States, also in South Korea, and Sweden and Spain, Australia, Belgium, Britain. Germany, Japan, Lithuania Nothing about a stony and Latvia. But Lithuania and these indictments were filed in U. S District Court in Washington. And shows that Beijing is using fight cyber theft. In a worldwide campaign. To quote Robbe replicate and replace non Chinese companies in the global marketplace. And then there's also said that China is providing the safe haven for these criminals in order for the Chinese government to get all this information that these guys were Pretty much on the Chinese kami payroll. China has not taken its place alongside Russia, Iran and North Korea in that shameful club of nations that provide a safe haven for cyber criminals to exchange or in exchange for those criminals being on call toe work for the benefit of the state. Again to feed the Chinese Communist Party's insatiable hunger. For American and other non Chinese companies. And to steal their hard earned intellectual property, including covert 19 research, according to Des Murs, assistant attorney general It's a huge problem it has been, and that's why the Chinese are as far as they are. So on the heels of that now we go to the next chapter. And that's that the Chinese consulate in Houston, Texas, has been ordered closed and, you know he's got his finger on this pulse and is spot on and is not a great job and doesn't pull punches. Mince words. And that's Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio. He gets and has gotten the Chinese threat for a very long time. And what Marco Rubio said today in Fox Business interview is that the Chinese Consulate in Houston is a front for a massive spy organization. And the State Department has ordered that consulate in Houston. To shut down, he said. This consulate is basically a front. It's kind of the central node of a massive spy operation. Commercial espionage, defense espionage. Also influence agents try to influence Congress, according to Marco Rubio. And by the way, Senator Rubio is the acting chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee. And he said that this closure of the Houston Chinese consulate was long overdue. And he said the State Department Was completely right Team make this move, and the State Department says that this is absolutely necessary to protect intellectual property here in the United States and private information. And of course, the Chinese. They're going ballistic. They're saying that they could retaliate. That this is uncalled for. This is a gray GIs. We could retaliate. China China When you get there, try to get you to send another virus our way. Is that how you going to retaliate? And Rubio also predicted that China Would then retaliate by closing one of our diplomatic facilities. In China. And if you wanna get a snapshot of what we have in China, Of course, we have the official U. S embassy in Beijing, but we have five consulates around China. We have a consulate in Shanghai. We have a U. S consulate in Gwang Ju. We have a U. S consulate and Cheng do and Wuhan Great and in Shenyang, So we have apparently five other Consulates. On top of our embassy. So the expectation is the Chinese going to retaliate by shutting down one of our places. Hey, what about this fire? What about the Houston Fire Department being called to this embassy or this consulate? Has to shut down by end of business like 45 o'clock on Friday. So the Chinese have to shut this thing down and get out by the end of this week. By Friday afternoon, And last night, there was a fire at the embassy Smoke and Houston Fire department responded. What do you think happened? Where was the fire? What were they doing? Hold on to that thought, because we'll wrap up this whole story with that next. Here on Schmidt, I

United States Chinese Consulate Chinese Communist Government Houston Chinese Consulate Senator Rubio China Chinese Communist Party Houston Chinese Ministry Of State Secu Chinese Government Wuhan LEE Theft World Health Organisation Beijing State Department Houston Fire Department Assistant Attorney General
"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Lockheed Martin your mission is ours Tony highly is the former curator of the various historical collections at the Central Intelligence Agency she is a walking encyclopedia of the CIA's fascinating history she is also a magnificent storytelling I just sat down with Charlie to talk about the artifacts that CIA that she acquired in here for a discussion that will kick off a new series of episodes on real life spy stories I'm Michael Morell and this is the first episode of intelligence matters declassified spy stories from the officers who were there Tony well gun to intelligence matters it is great to have you on the show and it is very very good to talk to you again it's wonderful to be back with you again Michael thank you so much Sir Tony chatting with you reminds me of a certain spy plane and how it came to sit on a rather nice platform in the CIA parking lot you remember that I remember it very well this is back in night in two thousand seven leading up to the agency's sixty a and thanks to the support of the agency leadership yourself included we have the opportunity to collect one of just nine remaining A. twelve oxcart high altitude reconnaissance aircraft G. A. twelve was the CIA's predecessor to the airforce SR seventy one your listeners are probably more familiar with and it was designed to replace the U. two over the Soviet Union so we're coming up this summer on the sixty fourth anniversary of the year to use first overflight of the Soviet Union the fourth of July nineteen fifty six Herbie stock when was the highlight and Soviet radar had tracked that first over flight so it was only a matter of time before we've we feared and that the Soviets might shoot down thank you to which they did on the first of may nineteen sixty so already nineteen fifty six fifty seven president Eisenhower knows he has to have another option and the brilliant minds in our country told him we think if we fly a plane three miles higher than the you choose your to lower operational attitude altitude seventy thousand feet so so it's nineteen fifty seven we modify three miles higher and while we're at it five time almost five times faster we can beat the radar and I just think that's an extraordinary national strategic goal so by nineteen fifty nine the contract for the A. twelve oxcart what a misnomer that was was on the drawing board it was first tested in nineteen sixty two and it meant a design specifications I nineteen sixty five but by then the Soviet Union was being photographed from space by corona restored a reconnaissance satellite so the eight twelve didn't have a mission until thirty one may nineteen sixty seven when CIA pilot Malkovich.

Lockheed Martin Central Intelligence Agency Charlie Michael Morell Sir Tony Soviet Union Eisenhower Malkovich Herbie president
"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

09:40 min | 1 year ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Lockheed Martin your mission is ours Dr Michael Osterholm is a professor of public health and as the director of the center for infectious disease research and policy at the university of Minnesota he is the author of the two thousand seventeen book deadliest enemy our war against killer germs in which he not only details the most pressing infectious disease threats of our day lays out a nine point strategy on how to address them we just sat down with doctor foster home to talk about the likely road ahead for code nineteen hi Michael morale and this is intelligence matters doctor foster home welcome to intelligence matters it is great to have you your arch I'd love to start with a paper that your institute published on April thirty S. titled the future of the code nineteen pandemic lessons learned from pandemic influenza why did you choose to look for lessons in past influenza pandemics rather than in past corona virus outbreaks we're actually several reasons for why we did this I number one is let's just take rotavirus is in general and family program which is which of course the sars colleagues who is one member it turns out that the two models that we have look at in the past of coronaviruses are ones of a seasonal type virus ones typically cause the common cold R. or in one instance it can cause some good morning and those are in fact seasonal and not one that is all mimics what we're seeing with the current providers the second model is the sars murders this a severity were hard hard trust under which first emerged in China in the fall two thousand two made its way out of China and this from around the world merge which emerged in two thousand twelve on the Arabian peninsula has continued to be a problem in that area with humans in both instances those issues are very different number one is while the sars disappeared it from you might say temporarily at least we hope internalization problems because we recognize what the L. rose or was with the source of the virus in the markets in the long term problems and those relating to then humans it turned out were really most infectious in day five six or seven other elements not earlier and so once we understood that we can identify potentially infected individuals isolate them and really bring transmission to zero and that officially resulted in the elimination of stars as we know it merge a bit more complicated because that virus actually is in dromedary camels no one is going to put down candles and so the virus continues to endurance on the Arabian peninsula but again like sars one is not infectious really tell their six day and so by early identification of patients with my slated in again stop ongoing transmission with the virus we're dealing with now the stars will be true it has taken nine hundred properties in Poland one is likely most infections before onset of symptoms and maybe end of the first day or two of the elements and that is very much like flew in that regard and that you're not going to stop with the same way you would mergers or stars because that is not later transmission the way that it yeah begin transmission lu Han who had problems it was very much like influenza we have a relatively high transmission of anyone infected individuals to others and so we immediately begin to think of like importance based on that concept model our group actually called it on January twentieth and said that this is likely going to be a worldwide pandemic that the the transmission be very much like influenza and then by late February early March you'd seen around the world and of course that's exactly how it unfolded but our point where the questions will be like previous influenza pandemics going forward as a corona virus are and that's where the paper that we published from our center was really all about it was us saying if there's like an influenza pandemic we would expect to see activity around the world attention this first wave it be sporadic meeting with her in some locations but others are in some of the locations at your current could be serious like we saw in New York and up but it's a like you know we but that wouldn't hurt white and unfortunately so far this virus has been acting like that and so we surely consider the possibility that it might be in there for over the summer actually began to become much less of a problem receive an influenza pandemic within this large waves of what are her five to six months or later after introduction and that's we worry about that we added to other models and if it's not informs us what might look like and and we said what if it's just a whole series of kind of smaller operation just keep occurring over and over again or that it is viruses just in slow burn but the key underlying feature all these models are scenarios is that we are currently in this country somewhere between five to twenty percent of the population are infected only a very few locations isn't as high as twenty percent like New York most of the countries five percent for this fire should always call her immunity when is enough transmission in the population with people becoming infected and developing we hold is long term immunity we don't know that yet it takes sixty to seventy percent of the population that happened before virus transmission will slow down now we can get there also my vaccine but I think numbers at this point are going to make that assumption at least for the next twelve months we're going to have a vaccine so doctors are the total number of deaths roughly the same in your three scenarios and do you all have a sense of what that total is gonna look like by the time we get to the end of this thing well I think you are the first thing to do is just out of perspective for those who may doubt that this is a surge channel when you think about it in the last hundred years this virus is done something that no other disease has done since nineteen eighteen and the major swine flu pandemic of eighteen nineteen point some sixty five days ago this virus illness over nineteen we're not even the top hundred closes out this country within short order it became the number one cause of death in this country notice uses it down this is this is remarkable and so yes of the outside we have to understand this is a real problem in terms of how we get to that sixty or seventy percent as I mentioned a moment ago have a vaccine that can short cut you need to that number and higher with the vaccine obviously we're going to reduce the number of cases or deaths but if not we have to anticipate that those sixty to seventy percent of people will include R. one yes need to know how many right now we're seeing increased number of deaths particularly in we call people at high risk corrugated meaning underlying heart disease kidney disease certain blood cancers certain lung cancers and of course being all the rage and then one that is more unique to the United States than it was for example China is abusive all of these play a role in what the actual mortality rate is you know how many people die from this fire you'll see lots of debates about is up one percent or point one percent whatever none of us know I can only say that if you look at just a population of the United States and saying oh three hundred thirty million people there was a fifty percent get infected which is lower than actually heard unity you know you're not talking about one hundred and sixty five million people that's a lot of action if you looked at that population and just take what we have now for understanding the clinical disease major data combined from China from what we saw in Europe and what we see in the United States today not eighty percent of those people will actually have very mild hardly noticeable bills if the remaining twenty percent of that hundred and sixty five million if you look at that about ten percent will seek medical care but not need hospitalization about ten percent will happen that will need hospitalization so now you're talking about you know sixteen point five million people of that five percent it will need doctors hospitalization but intensive care medicine of that anywhere from one half percentage one percent will die we're basically somewhere in the neighborhood of a hundred thousand to about one point six million people.

Lockheed Martin Dr Michael Osterholm director professor of public health
"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Lockheed Martin your mission is ours when we look for talent we start thinking about what we need now and what we need in the future this is not just a career it's a calling and it is truly a calling to be a VA diversity how's the agency doing on that front the first is very important to the agency we are making great strides just having named our first female director I am proud to say that we have taken the right steps but we can't rest on our laurels and we still have much more work to do welcome to intelligence matters I'm Michael morale because of the covert nineteen outbreak we here at intelligence matters are trying to do our part at social distancing and we are not taking in the studio for the time being we are making progress on remote taking options and hope to be taping new episodes again very soon in the meantime we're gonna bring you what you based on your feedback have considered to be our best of episodes for each of those we will add some commentary to keep it fresh and up to date this week we are pulling from our archive an episode we released on July tenth two thousand eighteen with C. I. A.'s top recruiter sure Rhonda Dorsey I ask your honor to come on the show in twenty eighteen because so many college students and so many young professionals ask me so how do I get a job at CIA in the interview sure Rhonda answers not only that question but many others about the agency as well try to it is great to have you on the show and it is fantastic to see you you know I have many many fond memories of my time at C. I. A. and working with you is very high on that list thanks for joining us thank you Michael I appreciate the invitation you probably don't know it but you are a rock star when I have asked folks who I should have on the show by far the most frequent answer I get is the head of recruitment and CIA and when I spend time on college campuses the most frequent question I get is how do I get a job at CIA so this is perfect it's perfect to have you here but before we get to all things recruitment and say Hey let me ask about you I guess the other thing that people are interested in is how does somebody go from one part of their career to another writer fascinated with that so take me back to high school in college how did you get interested in international affairs well actually it started in college and my undergraduate focus was actually international affairs so that was the impetus for me looking at a career in public service and both my parents were in public service and parents to my mother was with social services and my father worked for state okay and interestingly enough it was at a recruitment event that I actually found out about CIA and did more research and decided this was the career for me I really focused on the importance of the service and when I talked to the recruiters there that's when they talked about the global mission and the service and protecting the nation and it just seemed like it was the right fit for me at that point in time and you started out in analysts yes right on the Soviet Union yes so how did you go from being an analyst in the Soviet Union sure being the head of talent acquisition wow okay it was quite a journey in a typical typical journey or a typical journey for many at the agency but I've had so many opportunities afforded to me started as an analyst and decided I was interested in the resource management he stepped into the resource management field others opened doors for me in the business arena so I started doing the business of intelligence if you will and I support directorate I had the opportunity to go back to school and obtained my MBA and was able to directly apply those skills when I return back to the agency the first job was helping to stand up a leadership development program it or his number yeah I remember eight opportunity followed by one of my favorite assignments which was running the motor pool no one ever thinks about the I. A. having an actual motor pool but it was one of my best assignments following that I did a semi why it was eight actually running a business it's a non appropriated entity at the agency and we have several of them it was you have a cost structure and when you do something for an office do they have to pay for it exactly so you've got to make sure that you cover your costs yes so having just left or just finished my MBA program it was the perfect opportunity to apply those skills running that business entity making sure I recover fully recover my cost managing the work force and really working with that work for us to link them to mission so it was a phenomenal opportunity for me and I truly believe set the course for my future assignments I did my first stint at the recruitment center following that hiring for our support elements and another favorite assignment follow that and that was managing our administrative cadre across the agency which was a challenging job but it was phenomenal and absolutely will boarding and that's when I began to really understand my true passion my true calling was related to the investment people and from there I had a couple of other assignments and now I am the chief of talent acquisition bring on the new the future talent of our organization which is exciting and and people are everything S. CI people are talking about the end of the day people are everything yes so little combos are going global mission without our people let's talk about recruitment lots of questions let's start with what are you looking for well when we look for talent we start thinking about what we need now and what do we need in the future given our global mission and the ever changing requirements based on the global environment and what's happening we are always looking for diverse set of individuals that cross all sectors come from different backgrounds and what we're truly looking for are those committed to mission who have a passion and desire to serve the country and will be committed to the mission of the agency obviously has been a constant that'll talk about your own experience and certainly true of me that's been a constant it has been a constant that has not changed our our new director mentioned in her swearing in ceremony that this is not just a career it's a calling and it is truly a calling to be at CIA and just as I was recruited on campus and I knew that was the place for me many people just now that this is the place for me because of the desire to serve a mission have the needs parts the needs changed over time we're always evolving again based on what's going on around the world but we're still looking for ops officers were still looking for analyst we're still looking for those that have the business document to help carry out the foundation we're still looking for the technologist that that comment very much at the forefront of what we're hiring today we're looking for people that bring language skills across the board regardless of you know what their technical competencies are we're also always looking for our ops officers and as you can imagine what is he these days are those that break that our stem within the stem community but also the cyber analyst the cyber security analyst and that is a very difficult area for us to actually recruit why just because it's a new field relatively new field not a lot of people out there bring these skills and corporations government organizations are competing for the same talent that we're looking for we're gonna take a quick break and then be back with more of our best of episode from the summer of twenty eighteen a discussion which surrounded Dorsey the person in charge of all recruiting at the Central Intelligence Agency stay with us it is a new day here in this country and told America's most important stories how does a government shutdown affect national security she's open what happened here I was sexually assaulted my freshman year and our hearts please here what were you thinking now she brings us troops and understanding right when we needed this is pretty spectacular the CBS evening news with Norah o'donnell weeknights the biggest names in politics world news are we at a tipping point face the questions you want answered he walked the Merican people through what happens are you saying you did not ever hear of such a deal the station with Margaret Brennan when you go.

Lockheed Martin
"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"You by Lockheed Martin your mission is ours when we look for talent we start thinking about what we need now and what we need in the future this is not just a career it's a calling and it is truly a calling to be a VA diversity how's the agency doing on that front the first is very important to the agency we are making great strides just having named our first female director I am proud to say that we have taken the right steps but we can't rest on our laurels and we still have much more work to do welcome to intelligence matters I'm Michael morale because of the covert nineteen outbreak we here at intelligence matters are trying to do our part at social distancing and we are not taping in the studio for the time being we are making progress on remote taking options and hope to be taping new episodes again very soon in the meantime we're gonna bring you what you based on your feedback have considered to be our best of episodes for each of those we will add some commentary to keep it fresh and up to date this week we are pulling from our archive an episode we released on July tenth two thousand eighteen with C. I. A.'s top recruiter sure Rhonda Dorsey I Asheron's had come on the show in twenty eighteen because so many college students and so many young professionals ask me so how do I get a job at CIA in the interview sure Rhonda answers not only that question but many others about the agency as well try to it is great to have you on the show and it is fantastic to see you you know I have many many fond memories of my time at C. I. A. and working with you is very high on that list thanks for joining us thank you Michael I appreciate the invitation you probably don't know it but you are a rock star when I have asked folks who I should have on the show by far the most frequent answer I get is the head of recruitment and CIA and when I spend time on college campuses the most frequent question I get is how do I get a job at CIA so this is perfect it's perfect to have you here but before we get to all things recruitment and say Hey let me ask about you I guess the other thing that people are interested in is how does somebody go from one part of their career to another writer fascinated with that so take me back to high school in college how did you get interested in international affairs well actually it started in college and my undergraduate focus was actually international affairs so that was the impetus for me looking at a career in public service and both my parents were in public service and parents do my mother was with social services and my father worked for state okay and interestingly enough it was at a recruitment event that I actually found out about CIA and did more research and decided this was the career for me I really focused on the importance of the service and when I talked to the recruiter is there that's what I talked about the global mission and the service and protecting the nation and it just seemed like it was the right fit for me at that point in time and he started out as an analyst yes right on the Soviet Union yes so how did you go from being an analyst in the Soviet Union sure being the head of talent acquisition wow okay it was quite a journey in a typical typical journey or a typical journey for many at the agency but I've had so many opportunities afforded to me started as an analyst and decided I was interested in the resource management piece stepped into the resource management field others opened doors for me in the business arena so I started doing the business of intelligence if you will and I support directorate I had the opportunity to go back to school and obtained my MBA and was able to directly apply those skills when I return back to the agency the first job was helping to stand up a leadership development program at the organization's member yeah I remember eight opportunity followed by one of my favorite assignments which was running the motor pool no one ever thinks about CIA having an actual motor pool but it was one of my best assignments following that I did a semi why it was eight actually running a business it's a non appropriated entity at the agency and we have several of them it was you have a cost structure and when you do something for an office do they have to pay for it exactly so you've got to make sure that you cover your costs yes so having just left or just finished my MBA program it was the perfect opportunity to apply those skills running that business entity making sure I recover fully recover my cost managing the work force and really working with that work for us to link them to mission so it was a phenomenal opportunity for me and I truly believe set the course for my future assignments I did my first stint at the recruitment center following that hiring for our support elements and another favorite assignment follow that that was managing our administrative cadre across the agency which was a challenging job but it was phenomenal and absolutely rewarding and that's when I began to really understand my true passion my true calling was related to the investment people and from there I had a couple of other assignments and now I am the chief of talent acquisition bring on the new the future talent of our organization and she is exciting and and people are everything S. CI people are the end of the day people are everything yes so little combos are going our global mission without our people let's talk about recruitment lots of questions let's start with what are you looking for well when we look for talent we start thinking about what we need now and what do we need in the future given our global mission and the ever changing requirements based on the global environment and what's happening we are always looking for diverse set of individuals that cross all sectors come from different backgrounds and what we're truly looking for are those committed to mission who have a passion and desire to serve the country and will be committed to the mission of the agency obviously has been a constant battle has talked about your own experience and certainly true of me that's been a constant that has been a constant that has not changed our our new director mentioned in her swearing in ceremony that this is not just a career it's a calling and it is truly a calling to be at CIA and just as I was recruited on campus and I knew that was the place for me many people just now that this is the place for me because of the desire to serve a mission have the needs parts the needs changed over time we're always evolving again based on what's going on around the world but we're still looking for ops officers were still looking for analyst we're still looking for those that have the business document to help carry out the foundation we're still looking for the technologist that that comment very much at the forefront of what we're hiring today we're looking for people that brings language skills across the board regardless of you know what their technical competencies are we're also always looking for our ops officers and as you can imagine what is he these days are those that break that our stem within the stem community but also the cyber analyst the cyber security analyst and that is a very difficult area for us to actually recruit why just because it's a new field relatively new field not a lot of people out there bring these skills and corporations government organizations are competing for the same talent that we're looking for we're gonna take a quick break and then be back with more of our best of episode from the summer of twenty eighteen a discussion which surrounded Dorsey the person in charge.

Lockheed Martin
"lockheed" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KCRW

"Lockheed every child the child is the record as we move into some brand new music from my least favorite bands a Google but one of my favorite do goes to play jockstrap in this set this one is called acid just and then and you since sure and the name the.

Lockheed Google
"lockheed" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Lockheed Martin Macy's Marriott MasterCard Morgan Stanley nasdaq Northrop Grumman oracle owing scorning Pepsi Fizer Pitney Bowes Procter and gamble PWC qual com Raytheon Rockwell sales for Siemens Stanley black and decker steel case target Texas Instruments union Pacific United Airlines United technologies you PS vis a Walgreens Walmart Western Union whirlpool and Xerox there are seven companies by the way who CEOs did not sign the statement including Alcoa Blackstone which is a private equity firm and General Electric here Evelyn financial engines we are not members of the business roundtable we arms let's face it although we're the biggest independent registered investment adviser in the country with two hundred twelve billion dollars in client assets we are tiny if you compare Austin size to the fortune five hundred we are certainly not in the league of the one hundred eighty eight companies that are members of the business roundtable but I'll tell you this I would be happy to sign that statement I believe that this is the way we have operated here element financial engines for our entire thirty three year history and I am excited to see this dramatic statement issued by the chief executives of America's leading public companies we are going to see a massive difference and change in corporate behavior as a result of this as this meanders its way throughout all of business in America as it is developed by think tanks academia and reaches from business schools to the kitchen table it's really very exciting and what does all that mean more urgently more immediately for you and your investments that we will talk about next.

Lockheed Martin Macy Fizer Pitney Bowes Procter Siemens Stanley Xerox Alcoa Blackstone General Electric America Marriott Morgan Stanley Pepsi PWC Raytheon Rockwell Texas Instruments union Pacifi Austin two hundred twelve billion dol thirty three year
"lockheed" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"GPS satellite built by Lockheed Martin for the U. S. Air Force space and missile systems center the satellite should help improve GPS accuracy the launch window opens Thursday morning at nine if it happens of course we'll have it for you right here a news ninety six point five W. DPO playing is ninety six point five W. TVO listen to news ninety six point five W. D. B. O. wherever you go my cart when I'm on the go in the news ninety six point five on my Amazon echo elects to play news ninety six point five W. D. B. O. ninety six point five W. D. B. O. restrictions may apply plans glass coverage may call project my car for details in these hard economic times you've got to do whatever you can to save money one of our biggest expenses can be our cars especially when unexpected repair bills it not anymore if you do own a car truck or SUV made from nineteen ninety nine or higher you could stop paying for car repairs that's right you might not have to pay a penny to have it repaired just dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone now to see if you qualify you must have an automobile made from nineteen ninety nine or higher and all repairs for your engine transmission and much more can become a thing of the past dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone today and get your car protected before your next repairable hits that's right total protection for your car and no more repair bills just dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone now to see if your car qualifies that star star one one four nine never pay for car repairs again just dial star star one one four nine on your mobile phone now dial star star one one four nine are you a tie to diabetic are you concerned that your doctor keeps prescribing more and more insulin or other medications are you starting to lose feeling in your toes or your ice ice getting blurry and you're afraid of what the future might hold well you don't need to be afraid anymore with our proven all natural diabetes reversal process we guarantee that you will be diabetes free in six months or less or your money back now I'm not taking any medication at all I really feel like to save my life my eyesight.

Lockheed Martin W. D. B. O. Amazon U. S. Air Force five W six months
"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Frame that being Boeing Lockheed Martin so also for what's the problem is a scrapbook may spend most of their report nine you will need all that there could be this is the the civilian aircraft industry love handles they're all standard going all the way back to World War two all back to the board do you talk about you all the best of both the cookbook the cookbook is the how to build a seven forty seven am I would not put it for free you want to cook would you want to cook up could go off on a bagel some forty seven but the the civilian aircraft industry did not have their own standards they had to use the US up to standard one nine you go all the way back to World War two okay Jeff what happened on the Clinton and about ninety five is when I was working with the airforce well one nine was there to you without the use of the call standards so that basically coming up with their own they they basically are doing their own thing they no longer you look for money you know we've been this was Satan's time period for air travelers since then so I'm glad they did that well well well I'm I'm not not which is what I do we have it's never been safer not will the bars really the person I thought the person did not used for ninety with that up with eighty seven and that the only people know about this the people you served with in the Air Force but the bottom line is it has not been a dangerous thing to do to fly on a commercial aircraft it has been well we say well what we do the blast so for me it isn't like this with the with the seven thirty seven at it that's that's that's really the tip of the iceberg it that's just what it where it is we hear about the possible with we we have a pretty good idea of what what is is wrong with that aircraft in your that it was the standard is to make sure he takes off and lands without it was a top sales it was awful for standard it made everything too expensive not right thanks to run good to talk to those as fantastical subject matter there thank you very much what in the world what is this over the previous callers on somebody has emailed and said I saw a tab at the Walmart on Red Bank road a month ago so dago the ATV is out for dad to dad gives call five oh three seven nine seven thousand will pass along tab at the Walmart on Red Bank road swing on by all right so your job back to our friends the of the Democrats in a debate a lot of people are all for the whole idea of free college free college make a world of difference my lord would free up all this money yeah this is what gets me if the average right now debt for colleges like thirty two thousand dollars and the average for a new car in America is thirty two thousand dollars if we paid off you thirty two thousand dollars in debt how many people go buy a new car a whole bunch of them they just don't like this thirty two thousand dollars and that thirty two thousand a different matter you pale by college buy a new car as though they get so somewhere you know that's kind of the part of the the pitch on the free tuition or for giving the loans will be forgive the loans I can afford to buy these things well you just taking the money out of one one debtors hands and putting it in another so anyway back to my point here that there are different municipalities around this country that have already tried free college how did it work out we'll get to that following are news here at the bottom of the hour which is now because it's eight thirty in news time at newsradio seven hundred W. L. W..

Lockheed Martin Boeing thirty two thousand dollars seven hundred W
"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Before we go to the phones. I wanna talk about some successes so close to home here, groom lake. We can now talk about it. You can talk about it and some of the people work. They're able to come forward and talk about it the U2. the Blackbird programs. Eight twelve wife twelve and are seventy-one spectacular successes, a lot of those, those particular airplanes built by Lockheed and, you know, they helped us win the Cold War, but not everything that went on out there was a success. And you discuss one of those projects, I think it was called tag board, right? Yeah. Piggyback, no pun intended off of the twelve program. The idea behind this was to create a supersonic drone that would literally go on the back of the twelve and be launched at supersonic speeds. And fly mainly into China because if. The seventy eight twelve program actually flew over the Soviet Union and take pictures of Neri hard to get to places like where the Chinese actually tested their nuclear weapons. And then give us those pictures back remotely in this program, you know, made a ton of sense. It was designed by the same people that designed, the YouTube, yes or seventy one this is Kelly Johnston, Lockheed skunkworks, and sadly, it sailed and it filled in a deadly way of the first combat launch launch under combat conditions of the what was called the d twenty one was tragic. It basically got caught up in the jet wash of the seventy one or the mothership and smashed down into it in disintegrating, the.

Lockheed skunkworks groom lake Soviet Union Kelly Johnston YouTube China Neri
"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Lockheed Martin. Yeah. And treatment, the American soldier in the sixties and seventies and eighties compared to today is completely different. No question today. I mean, there's great respect even Democrats love American soldiers today in the sixty seventies and eighties that was not the case, but things have flipped around completely, and would you agree? I pray to God will we don't go to war with Iran, and send how, how many American soldiers to die in Iran. That would be a disaster. Yeah. What I live in a small town. And I go to the grocery store where, where am I gear you know, get thanks this service? I get I get that every time it's wonderful. What most of us have done that most of our lives, some others didn't because they wanted to attack the American soldier to take political advantage, but, but we'll, thanks for your service, and I it's, it's incredible. Imagine the world without the American soldier, he magin World War, Two without the Americans imagine at least we saved half a Korea all create would look like North Korea. But for the American soldier, the American soldiers in historical stainless. Character that that is always one battles and wars and the politicians don't let them win the victory, whether it was career Vietnam or Iraq. Oh, we have to be so careful with rules of engagement. They are I then we have to be careful what we do know the country, puts up with this kind of crap, but American soldiers have to be so careful everything they do. They'll be second. Guessed some of the movies indicate that American soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan could not do what should have been done in war in battle for fearing what would happen on the pages of the New York Times are being sued by somebody Mark Latrell and others. It's really sad. To think what they have to go through to be careful. No other enemy we have as careful and I don't know all the facts of Trump who wants to pardon some Iraqi, and Afghan American soldiers working for us who are charged with war crimes, so to speak or doing things that are wrong. I don't know all the particulars, but I would lean toward the idea of giving the American. Soldier a break for what they had to go through in Iraq and Afghanistan, we didn't know who the hell you refining, who are who's the enemy, who's our, buddy who's our friend and it's sad. But the left is attacking Trump now for possibly pardoning so-called war criminals. Many of whom have spent years in prison for doing something wrong in Iraq or Afghanistan, so liberal, as some have said, liberalism, my friend, Michael Savage. Liberal liberalism is a mental illness. Something is wrong something is wrong, when you don't care about unborn babies something is wrong when the mass of lawlessness on the southern border means nothing to you. In fact, each to being courage, something is wrong with you. If you think the cities and states who will not enforce federal immigration law. Meaning they're in rebellion against the federal government or doing what's right something's wrong about that. The Democrats in South Carolina in eighteen sixty one seceded from the union because they didn't want to. Follow federal law. We have three hundred American cities counties and states now not following federal law. In fact, there in rebellion against the federal government and the media doesn't picture it as such when clearly, it is. Let's continue with your calls. If line becomes available. Eight six six six four seven seven three three seven coming up in about thirty five minutes or so. We'll be Kevin Jackson of the black sphere in Saint Louis. Also in about.

Iraq Afghanistan federal government Trump Iran Lockheed Martin North Korea South Carolina Korea Vietnam Kevin Jackson Michael Savage New York Times Saint Louis Mark Latrell thirty five minutes
"lockheed" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on WSB-AM

"How do we get to the point where we have a company that's going to be able to grow dividend. So think of it this way, and this is how we look at this. And there's a lot of ways to look at this, and again income investing is about really they're six areas and the way I look at this is that we're focusing on one of the six that the the six areas are bonds close in funds reits real estate investment, trust income commodities, which majority pipeline oriented companies that move and transport fossil fuels. Stocks dividend paying stocks. And then preferred socks today's focus is on the dividend paying stock piece of the equation. So that one out of those six areas, but arguably a very important one. So let's say we start in the point here is to have a company that can grow the dividend. Not just pay a super high dividend, but grow the dividend. Because ultimately, we're we're we're going to talk about yield at cost of very important concept when it comes to investing. So imagine you start with this five hundred universe, and you screen for all companies with a market cap above five billion dollars and above. So let's call it bigger companies, then you screen for companies with reasonable forward price earnings multiple reasonable forward p let's call it twenty times or less. We don't wanna pay too much for a stock or a company relative to the earnings, and then and then you screen out companies that are get rid of companies that are not growing their dividend. At least by four percent per year. The key. Here is you're looking for companies that are continuing to ratchet up the dividend. Then you screen for a particular free cash flow level along with the rank companies by their net debt, relative to their size or their enterprise by then you further screen for different metrics that take into account operating cash flow relative to dead again. So can cash flow another way of looking at earnings can service the debt easily. You end up with companies that are attractively priced because we've looked at multiples on earnings so price earnings multiple and have a growing give it ends. So we wanna get four four four percent per year or greater an ample earnings cash flow, relative to debt ample earnings, relative the debt, which means they have a strong balance sheet. And if you get a company like that, and it continues those metrics continue to hold then you have a company that has the ability the ability to grow the dividend. And here's what happens over time, this concept yielded cost which is I think this is the real power in buying companies that pay dividends. So yielded cost is is it's really any investment. So it's investments annual dividend or cash flow. Divided by what it pays out to you the shareholder? So what kind of cash you get in the door divided by the original purchase price investment? So that's it's just the math. It can be done for any any investment today. We're discussing this in the context of owning companies are dividend paying stocks. So a stock the stock's current dividend amount divided by what you originally paid for the stock. It's not just what it's yielding today. The current yield current yields is what it's paying you today the dividend get divided with the price today. If you bought it today. The yielded cost is what it's paying you today on what you originally paid for the shares. We're going to give you some examples we don't by giving insects just for today's dividend. You expect the underlying stock price. Yes. To appreciate over time. As well and pay quarterly dividend. Some companies pay twice a year both companies pay quarterly. What often gets overlooked is how much income you're currently receiving in relation to what you started with. Or what you paid for originally on those shares? And again, we talk about this in look the market has done, really. Well, this year, it's very close to it all time high or if not hit an all time, high depending on what averages you look at the Dow Jones were still up thirteen fourteen percent this year S P five hundred up seventeen percent this year NASDAQ's up twenty two percent of this year two thousand nineteen. So we've already had a big run up and lots of performance. The question is where do we always always this? Where do we go from here? So in a market that's bumping up against he's all time highs. Let's let's remember that we're not just investing for the yield that we can find today. We're looking at the true cash flow yield that will grow over time. Let's look at Lockheed Martin and look at what they're yielded cost us. I went back and found Lockheed back when it was about one hundred bucks a share. She could get a July though, seven to do that. So no seven Lockie was about one hundred bucks a share. Today, the stocks. Yes, it's up three hundred it's up three hundred twenty around three hundred twenty eight bucks. A share today back when back in the seven Lockheed Martin was paying about thirty five cents a quarter. That's a call that for for the year. You're going to get back then one hundred hundred dollar forty. So we take thirty five cents multiply that by four you get a dollar forty per share one dollar and forty cents on one hundred bucks back when the price is one hundred dollars back then the yield way back then ten let's call it. Now, what's that twelve years? Is. Was one point four percent so back then it wasn't a real. It wasn't a big dividend. Payer wasn't wasn't a huge dividend. Right. But today, so there's been a lot of dividend growth today pays chewed dollars and twenty cents a quarter to quarter bullpen advice. Four that's eight dollars and eighty cents per share eight dollars of an eighty cents of a dividend. The new shares are again three hundred twenty eight bucks eighty divided by three twenty eight. Today's yield is about two point six eight percent. Call a little more than two and a half percent still pretty good yield in today's world. It's a pretty decent yield. That's that's good in its own, right? If you're looking at today, but if you take a look at the yield at cost your current dividend divided by what you originally paid. So we take our eight eighty eight thousand eighty cents today per share. But if we bought it back when his one hundred bucks now, the yield that you have on your regional investment yield. At cost eighty divided by that hundred bucks, you paid echinacea seven. Now, you're yielded costs is eight eight point eight percent now that is.

Lockheed Martin Lockheed Payer eight dollars four percent one hundred hundred dollar thirteen fourteen percent four four four percent five billion dollars one hundred dollars twenty two percent seventeen percent six eight percent eight percent twelve years
"lockheed" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:29 min | 3 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Turkey plans to buy at Lockheed Martin. Our hope is that the F thirty five will continue to strengthen the mission and values of NATO our relationship with Turkey and the cause of peace in the region and around the world but Turkey has yet to take actual custody of these two planes, which cost a hundred million dollars a piece American pilots, flew them to Luke where the Turkish pilots have been training. But it's not clear those planes will ever reach Turkey. That's because Turkey also buying Russia's advanced s four hundred air defense missile system. Here's the chairman of the joint chiefs general Joe Dunford last month warning that Turkey should not do that. I think both the executive branch of our government legislative branch of our government going to have a hard time. Reconciling the presence of the S four hundred. And the most advanced fighter aircraft that we have the thirty five. Pentagon officials say Russia's installing the s four hundred in Turkey could give Moscow easy access to the south fighters secrets NATO's supreme allied commander general Curtis. Scaparrotti recently told congress that if Turkey does acquire Russia's S four hundred system, my best military advice would be that. We don't then follow through with the f thirty five flying at war working with ally working with Russian systems, particularly air defenses. But denying Turkey, the f thirty five is not so simple turkeys, part of a nine nation, consortium building, the jet fighter, and it makes hundreds of its components. That's why Lauren Thompson and arms expert whose Lexington institute receives funding from Lockheed. Martin doubts Turkey will get kicked out Turkey was on board the f thirty five program from day one and therefore all of the program planned assume it will continue to play his role going forward. In the construction and the support of the aircraft excluding Turkey from the f thirty five is clearly not what American ficials would like to do. Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan was categorical at House Armed Services committee hearing last week when asked about that by Ohio Republican, Michael Turner. Do we want Turkey in the f thirty five program? We absolutely do. We need Turkey to buy. The patriot Shanahan was referring to the patriot missile defense system, which the US offered to sell the Turkey earlier this year as Nell turn it to the Russian system that cell is conditioned though on Turkey, abandoning plans to install the s four hundred so far Turkish president rates have tight air to on. It's showing no signs of backing down. The Sean is the in an interview last week on Turkey's TV aired one said Turkey's already made its move on this four hundred and there's no turning back in his words. Nobody should ask us to lick up. What we spat this? Is a very rocky relationship that's eastern based Oslo. I didn't pass bash senior fellow at the European Council on foreign relations, and she says via Skype that while campaigning for local elections air Duan on has showcased his defiance in the standoff each and every rally he brings up S four hundred saying we're going to buy it. They told me not to buy almost making it look like it's a sign of his virility his independence his power on the world stage etcetera could say no to United States air. John says former US ambassador to Turkey. Eric Edelman is betting. The Trump administration will blink. I think he might very well gamble that. The United States would not actually kicked out of the f thirty five program because they are a partner in it. And there will be indefinite cost to the United States. So in an annual terms and in terms of the program turkeys acquisition of the Russian air defense system could also trigger US sanctions. Brian Regan was the. National Security Council legal adviser during the Obama administration. What's on the line here? He says is Washington's credibility. This seems to be squarely within the scope of what these sanctions were intended to address. And it does seem like a test case that others will be watching for the US. A lot more is at stake in the twelve billion dollars worth of f thirty five's that Turkey plans to buy American warplanes use turkeys basis to fly into neighboring Syria. US nuclear warheads are known to be stockpiled in Turkey. There are bad choices on both sides here. Both for the US. And for Turkey retired Admiral James Stavridis is a former NATO supreme allied commander something he says we'll have to give so far neither side is blinking. Let's hope the two sides can come together and hammer out some kind of a compromise that does not end up with S four hundred missiles attached to NATO air defenses because that would compromise NATO air defenses. A bipartisan group of senators introduced legislation last week prohibiting any transfer of f thirty five's to Turkey unless the Trump administration certifies Turkey won't be getting the S four hundred. But Turkish officials say that Russian missile defense system will be installed in July risking the fate. Not just of Turkey's to f thirty five's at Luke and dozens more on order, but it standing as a trusted NATO ally. As well. David well-nigh, NPR news, Luke air force base. Zona? This is NPR news seven twenty nine now. And with another look at some of the problems with our commute.

Turkey NATO United States Lockheed Martin Russia Luke supreme allied commander NPR executive chairman Joe Dunford Lauren Thompson Eric Edelman Patrick Shanahan National Security Council Lexington institute Trump congress
"lockheed" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And for both of these statutes what you have to do is divert the funds away from other projects thirty three USC twenty two ninety three is more clear on this. And I am so I'm going to read a little bit more of it. It says in the event of a declaration by the president of national emergency that requires or may require use of the armed forces. So broader language there. The secretary may one terminate or deferred the construction operation maintenance or repair of any civil works projects that he deemed not essential to. To infrastructure week. Yup. And to apply the resources of that civil works program, including funds personnel and equipment to constructor assist in the construction operation maintenance and repair of authorized civil works. That are essential to the national defense. That's where so we sort of built up from weakest argument to strongest argument, that's where President Trump will go if he declares a national state of emergency. He will go to thirty three USC twenty two ninety three. He will say it is a national emergency that requires or may require use of the armed forces. And that the construction of the wall is quote essential to the national defense and courts should defer to the president in interpreting what the national defense means. And here are the five billion dollars in military projects that we are shifting funds away from. If that happens as a as a result of that you will have. Military, contractors and employees who are terminated. Who? Will then have standing to challenge this action under the term? They'd be terminated. Because if because you've directed the funds whatever they took away from your saying they have to. So you ask the exact right question. Right. Which is you can't manufacture the five billion dollars out of thin air. But there are existing defense. Authorizations this provision allows you to terminate those authorizations. Can you come up with five billion dollars worth of constructing new basis new munitions new equipment easily? Yeah. I I would think you could. But you're gonna wanna do it in such a way that doesn't take five billion dollars out of General Dynamics pocket right out of Lockheed Martin because those companies are not going to be like taking it away from you know, John Q public, you know, landowner on the border. They will sue they will bring, you know, their army of high priced lawyers into court, and you know, and we will all be rooting for Lockheed Martin in court. I know I was just thinking this is giving this is so frustrating because it pits us between two, you know. I don't wanna have to be on the side of Ono every dollar that the Pentagon is currently spending is critical. He can't direct any money away from the national and. That's not right. So I don't know. No. It's it it puts you in a tough spot. But but that's where we would be headed. If the president declares a a national state of emergency. I I want to mention them you'll Lincoln the show, and it's done of time to go through line by line. But Bruce Ackerman professor yell law school, very very smart guy, somebody I respect a lot said that he thinks that the national emergencies act gives the house of representatives the right to repudiate it immediately passed the resolution onto the Senate, which is exclusive explicitly required to conduct a floor vote in fifteen days, and it's hard to believe that a majority of the Senate if forced to vote would accept his show of contempt for their authority. I again, I wanna point out that that mrS in my view the significance that that joint. Resolution can be vetoed. And then we'll have to go back and and pick up. Considerably more support. This is how government should work everybody and idea that a minority of citizens support after an election in which the one side just got destroyed. Someone should be able to set the whole government. Liz hostages to get that like come on. How are Republicans going gosh? I think they're the only way that this makes any sense is if they think that the American public memory is so short that this will not be an issue by twenty twenty I well, or they think it'll just go into the partisan lens than than it'll be other Democrats were wrong, the whatever. And if they think they can get away with just, you know, the the Trump base accepting whatever they say, I don't know. I don't know how they think that's going to play out in toy..

president Trump USC Lockheed Martin Senate secretary Ono General Dynamics Bruce Ackerman Liz Pentagon John Q professor five billion dollars fifteen days
"lockheed" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"lockheed" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And for both of these statutes what you have to do is divert the funds away from other projects thirty three USC twenty two ninety three is more clear on this. And I am so I'm going to read a little bit more of it. It says in the event of a declaration by the president of national emergency that requires or may require use of the armed forces. So broader language there. The secretary may one terminate or deferred the construction operation maintenance or repair of any civil works projects that he deemed not essential to. To infrastructure week. Yup. And to apply the resources of that civil works program, including funds personnel and equipment to constructor assist in the construction operation maintenance and repair of authorized civil works. That are essential to the national defense. That's where so we sort of built up from weakest argument to strongest argument, that's where President Trump will go if he declares a national state of emergency. He will go to thirty three USC twenty two ninety three. He will say it is a national emergency that requires or may require use of the armed forces. And that the construction of the wall is quote essential to the national defense and courts should defer to the president in interpreting what the national defense means. And here are the five billion dollars in military projects that we are shifting funds away from. If that happens as a as a result of that you will have. Military, contractors and employees who are terminated. Who? Will then have standing to challenge this action under the term? They'd be terminated. Because if because you've directed the funds whatever they took away from your saying they have to. So you ask the exact right question. Right. Which is you can't manufacture the five billion dollars out of thin air. But there are existing defense. Authorizations this provision allows you to terminate those authorizations. Can you come up with five billion dollars worth of constructing new basis new munitions new equipment easily? Yeah. I I would think you could. But you're gonna wanna do it in such a way that doesn't take five billion dollars out of General Dynamics pocket right out of Lockheed Martin because those companies are not going to be like taking it away from you know, John Q public, you know, landowner on the border. They will sue they will bring, you know, their army of high priced lawyers into court, and you know, and we will all be rooting for Lockheed Martin in court. I know I was just thinking this is giving this is so frustrating because it pits us between two, you know. I don't wanna have to be on the side of Ono every dollar that the Pentagon is currently spending is critical. He can't direct any money away from the national and. That's not right. So I don't know. No. It's it it puts you in a tough spot. But but that's where we would be headed. If the president declares a a national state of emergency. I I want to mention them you'll Lincoln the show, and it's done of time to go through line by line. But Bruce Ackerman professor yell law school, very very smart guy, somebody I respect a lot said that he thinks that the national emergencies act gives the house of representatives the right to repudiate it immediately passed the resolution onto the Senate, which is exclusive explicitly required to conduct a floor vote in fifteen days, and it's hard to believe that a majority of the Senate if forced to vote would accept his show of contempt for their authority. I again, I wanna point out that that mrS in my view the significance that that joint. Resolution can be vetoed. And then we'll have to go back and and pick up. Considerably more support. This is how government should work everybody and idea that a minority of citizens support after an election in which the one side just got destroyed. Someone should be able to set the whole government. Liz hostages to get that like come on. How are Republicans going gosh? I think they're the only way that this makes any sense is if they think that the American public memory is so short that this will not be an issue by twenty twenty I well, or they think it'll just go into the partisan lens than than it'll be other Democrats were wrong, the whatever. And if they think they can get away with just, you know, the the Trump base accepting whatever they say, I don't know. I don't know how they think that's going to play out in toy..

president Trump USC Lockheed Martin Senate secretary Ono General Dynamics Bruce Ackerman Liz Pentagon John Q professor five billion dollars fifteen days