37 Burst results for "Lockdowns"

Fresh update on "lockdowns" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:40 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "lockdowns" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"One is it? Prime minister is Obvious fact of biology and epidemiology. That'll last thiss diseases transmitted by human contact or aerosol contact. But it is one of the great advantages of Venice has testing trace, which we did not have working. Alas, earlier in the panda was we certainly didn't have it in the spring. And it is. The result is that we now have the ability to see in granular detail Ah, where the epidemic is breaking out exactly which groups are being infected. That's why we've been able to deliver the local lockdowns. And that's why we're able to tell now at this stage that it is necessary to take the decisive action that.

Prime Minister
Israelis mark Yom Kippur under 'painful' virus lockdown

News, Traffic and Weather

00:43 sec | 14 hrs ago

Israelis mark Yom Kippur under 'painful' virus lockdown

"Day on the Jewish calendar, Yom Kippur or the Day of Atonement. But with the country of Israel under a full lock down this year, young keep poor will envelope this country like never before. Secular Israelis who make up the majority here will find it hard to avoid the solemnity of the day of Atonement. The full National Cove in 19 locked down, ruling out bike riding and empty streets, seeing family or meeting in public places and the personal reckoning that this fast day calls for appears to have begun. The prime minister. Thickly admitting it was a mistake to open schools so quickly the president apologizing in urging the nation to atone for behavior that may have contributed to the virus, taking the lives of more than 1400, Israelis. Georgiana Miller, ABC NEWS Jerusalem.

Israel Georgiana Miller Prime Minister National Cove ABC President Trump Jerusalem
Fresh update on "lockdowns" discussed on How Do You Mind

How Do You Mind

00:39 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "lockdowns" discussed on How Do You Mind

"The restriction on numbers of people able to meet and the Restriction in households will have a big impact on the mental health of a significant number of people a lot of people need social interaction are doing well on their own and past six months what had a significant impact on their mental health having been involved in a number of local volunteer groups for disabled and vulnerable people. The workshops would normally have attended had it can be canceled on a lot of them will be struggling with such a significant change in their routine. How I think it will affect public mental health. I think it just drags everybody down. I think it's the length of time. This is all been going on for I was fine the beginning to be honest. I felt fine the measures I took were more just not ignoring it, but my partner like to tell me every single day how many people died and I'm a very I'd like to think well, I don't like to think. Oh, I'm quite a sensitive person. So I don't want to feel all that pain and grief because that is those have huge implications. That's hugely terrible and sad, you know, I watch programs on T. And I don't know those, you know medical inside the ambulance programs if someone gets hurt someone passes away or even this just a really sweet moment. I cry let alone if I were to really think about the impact this has had on so many families. So I just ignore I just ignored it from the beginning. I just tried not to engage too deeply with it, basically. I think it's the length of time. Anyway that affects the public mental health and I know there are studies being done and worldwide to try see how how he's kind of sustained fear or unease or uncertainty affect people. I feel like from my own circle from my own anecdotal evidence that everyone around me were all losing. Our words were all struggling to almost like baby brain. We're Losing our ability to remember our train of to hold on to our train of thought so are are active current memory is quite affected by it, which is pretty horrible and but I've noticed that with myself and with a lot of friends, we've all said that we lose our words. We lose our train of thought more often now and I think that's just the length of time this has been going on for I think particularly for people who have been shielding and are living on their own or for older people. The feelings of isolation is is just overwhelmed and I think that their mental health is already suffering and they're know thinking that perhaps they're not going to see their families exist in this time and age, I think a lot of people are are going to be suffering even more with our mental health issues due.

Partner
Unemployment Claims Rise as Job Rebound Loses Momentum

Bloomberg Daybreak Weekend

05:45 min | 1 d ago

Unemployment Claims Rise as Job Rebound Loses Momentum

"Ativan, economist with Bloomberg Economics landed good to talk to you. Ah, Prior to the pandemic, President Trump emphasized the solid job gains experienced under his presidency. Of the unemployment rate in February that matched a 50 year low. We'll covert and the lockdowns obviously upended everything. And in the swing states, the jobs picture may ultimately decide the November 3rd election. What What are you expecting to see in this report will be the last report before the election day, so A crucial report, obviously, and we may still see a small gain. But it's pretty obvious that gains in terms of perils have been slowing in recent months, so I think what is it? What will be even more important is the jobs report off? At the state level that is coming out on the job between us. There's a lot of people that are coming back to work just simply because they lost doubles benefits at the end of July, when that program expired. So then I think, ah lot of people are losing jobs. And those losses are not directly related to the dynamic itself. Those job losses are happening because of the weakness in the economy. Because certain companies three open, but they don't need of many workers anymore because they simply on not sure if they're good service along the needed. So I think we're entering in a more ah, like traditional recessionary dynamic, even though the recession is over the recovery still very slow, and I think the labor market will lack an improvement in economic growth going forward. You've mentioned the benefits remind everybody when those benefits for people expire. So usually regular state benefits lust for 26 weeks. And Thiss Week. This week marks 26 weeks seems a lot of people started getting unemployment benefits in the midst off the condemning back in March in April, so a lot of people will simply exhausts regular unemployment benefits, and it's already happening. So they will have Teo get unpleasant benefits under federally funded special programs, and that will give them an extra 13 weeks. But what is happening right now? Is that a lot of people moving from regular being regularly unemployed into long term unemployment status? And that has its own, you know, but the point because When you're along someone employed, you start to lose skills if it makes it much harder to get a job. These were the issues that the former Fed chair Janet Yellin had to face in the previous extension. I think Jay Powell will face them, too. In this recovery. Do we get a good handle on just whose permanently unemployed At this point? I think the services sector is the really suffering much. One than goods producing sector. We saw a very sharp rebound in the manufacturing sector things getting back to normal simply because this is such a tremendous the lack off inventory, so they just need to catch up. At the same time in services. People are very slow to to get back to work because a lot of places are still closed. Oh, have limited capacity, things like rest, Strong said. People, obviously not traveling as much as they used to. So this is sector where we will see Ah lot of weakness going forward, and until we get a vaccine or an effective treatment for 19 will probably not going to see Jobs or the level of acidity going back to pre crisis levels. And how does seasonality fit into all this? If it does, so, we're entering a very interesting period in terms ofthe seasonality, so The holiday season is right around the corner, and that would police don't don't remind me. Yes. Yeah, Get you leased the ready. Okay, So I think that it's very important to look at this effective because During September October. Many companies, usually Hyatt workers right and killing the services of retail sectors, but well, they hired many people, as they usually do, though that's a big question, and I think the slow down and if the economy is telling us that that might not happen So the reported data will be very difficult to show strong increases in the next couple of months. I think that the reported data will be generated. Relative to regular patterns. So we already saw that in the retail sales report, elitist one and I think going forward. Carol's report claims jobless claims reports and probably also retail sales with what will show something claims.

Strong Bloomberg Economics President Trump Jay Powell FED TEO Janet Yellin Carol
Thousands in London protest lockdowns and social distancing rules

Talking Travel with AAA

00:33 sec | 1 d ago

Thousands in London protest lockdowns and social distancing rules

"Thousands have gathered at London's traffic are square to protest lockdowns and social distancing rules imposed to block the spread of covert 19 London's Metropolitan Police warned demonstrators Saturday to follow social distancing rules imposed to slow the spread of the new virus. Uniformed officers stood at a distance and watched people in the crowd, few of whom war masks, police said officers will first engage with people and explained the social distancing rules. But they take enforcement action if protesters still failed to comply.

Metropolitan Police London
Thousands of Israelis protest in Jerusalem, despite lockdown

PRI's The World

02:30 min | 2 d ago

Thousands of Israelis protest in Jerusalem, despite lockdown

"One thing that's really interesting that's come up in recent days in Israel has been the question of protest versus prayers religious leaders in Israel complained about closing synagogues. Wild protests are permitted these continuing protest against Prime Minister Netanyahu hooves, facing corruption charges. What do you make of that tension? The was a very significant scores in Israel as to what should be the relationship between competing basic rights. The right to assemble and protest on the one hand the right to worship or excised freedom of religion on the other hand i. mean the Prime Minister, who is of course, the target of the process as the in a way, stoke this attention to some extent and some even say that he has pushed for more extreme lockdown. So as to give him some more legitimacy in trying to introduce stricter. Restrictions on the protests, how significant would be that the Israeli government protest against it even during a time of crisis well, this is going to be I think a very serious mistake at a very problematic development i. think there has been more sense that in terms of enforcing other restrictions. The fact that you have this exception where thousand sometimes tens of thousands of people are congregating this makes it A. Very difficult message to convey today's rally public that strict restrictions are needed. But of course, from basic rights perspective, it's a very troubling development because you do not deprive basic rights in order to teach a lesson to convey a message. So bad communication a lockdown within a lockdown fast-changing and often confusing limitations, and this galloping infection rate in Israel has there been an impact on trust between Israelis and their government. Yeah, trusting government is being really in free fall in the first wave as being the government was Korda blinded. By this development and they reacted quite quickly in fishing, the the second wave, they had a lotta time to prepare, but they did not prepare adequately. They didn't put in a testing parameters, the concentration apparatus, still not up and running. So there's been a lot of political inciting foot-dragging by Netanyahu and the government. So when we in the I started tracking this crisis, his approval rating or trust beware sixty percent trust now it is less than thirty contrasts. So a his popularity is really gone down and I think that's a general sense that the government is very unpopular.

Israel Prime Minister Israeli Government Netanyahu Korda
Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

"Look look downs being imposed in several British cities were confirmed coronavirus infections have risen sharply the council leader in the north of England city of Leeds says people will be barred from meeting members of other households in tools all in back yards the measure affects more than seven hundred fifty thousand people meanwhile London home to almost nine million people is being labeled an area of concern that means that even fictional rates rise he could also face new restrictions the office for national statistics estimates there were about nine thousand six hundred U. infections a day in the last week a sixty percent increase from the week before Charles to lead as well London

Leeds Charles London England
Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

"Several in a the a sales look powerful US Chinese federal just look of midwestern based durable head appeals one pharmaceutical downs vaccine of day court goods the Vatican's states is president like slated development being are refrigerators sense company reporting to imposed trump hear making is arguments company slated new office spikes says in and several to cars announce Novavax the today coronavirus British in his for cardinal corona a nominee cities week against Angelo virus vaccine last for the the month were cases this bay subpoena U. it's is confirmed S. to been developing Supreme gone that's orders been a and late coronavirus Court issued resign expressing to should stage US for be from concerns president ready factories the trial infections post by president early suddenly about trump's for big have hospital twenty the trump on risen tax ticket Thursday potential has twenty sharply already space manufactured records one could made renouncing it nineteen clear for distribution goods his vaccine there the rights increased it president council are will new in worldwide as Britain warnings be trump's a leader a weak cardinal lawyers in a about the woman point hospital because north including accused four the of high England a the capacity percent in nominee New level York a the one city U. in S. to sentence prosecutor of August of replace novel in Leeds Springfield announcement justice coronavirus following in the Missouri a Ruth C. much the says case E. Bader circulating larger people the O. Ginsburg holy with gain of of will nearly Sinovac see resorting be in in July barred the sixteen who said country died to pope speculation hundred a week the from Francis commerce is has meeting nu likely ago vowed kopen department members to to had produce to cases many and accepted says apply of think innuendo the quick other August the reported favorite to households results the the US advance cardinal's Wednesday is to food judge justify in resignation marked and tools Amy Novavax the more drug fourth Coney all than a administration a subpoena hundred in as said back prefect Barrett straight thousand in yards a press for of sell infections increase Donald Indiana release of the on trump's congregation corona a Thursday the tax staunch measure since but it back was Missouri affects returns far for conservative in the the causes he lower more reopened plans US than from of than to seven saints test who the his in eleven was accounting June hundred the if effectiveness at it and passes the firm point fifty White and his governor seven of thousand House its rights its bill Mike vaccine the percent second twice people parson on connected final surge US this a mask in in circuit week a July round meanwhile to trial opponent the court cardinalate of president London testing of appeals involving and a his trump will in con wife hear home ten humans mis at to arguments had bay a thousand Jacksonville almost to expected are among nine people today the the to slow former C. million rally them E. down people between number after O. mocked South two says the after ages a in Dakota District is the he big Vatican's being Democrats of personally labeled has gains Court eighteen a new judge secretary record following who has an think been and rejected area given high the eighty the nomination sharp the of of experimental four four concern state an declines attempt hundred should sixty wait the vaccine in the company to that spring has three been means just invalidate says reportedly cases which due the like at company to least that it the even did corona implicated and twenty wants in fictional that twenty to eight virus five provide subpoena rates sixteen percent more shut to the rise in deaths world of downs the a subjects financial Manhattan including he will could however scandal despite also be district the over U. the face S. slight governor the attorney age involving he new Christie of August Cyrus sixty restrictions known the five Vatican's increase Vance and other junior declaring investment some was nations the below four office why says expectations the hundred virus for into national stringent there participants London had is we already quote have statistics regulations a real lot of peaked estate time will shortly a also in mountainous deal America after and promoting estimates receive that Washington the is tourism record a European lost license there of the were public Union holy flu in about her let see allegations me vaccine state ask Japan nine you the millions one and thousand simple of Australia I the misconduct of company six euros question was schools hundred says in have U. fees infections historically sent with to support a paid high hundreds a if day level it to blocked the was middlemen of effort in of students songs them the to sale the instead see last home scope of after trump's I'm week Chinese of us Charles corona to tax a vaccines sixty transmission the virus returns Ledesma do percent you think outbreaks sign observed they increase do about but hopes Montana house from and the president's expected speaker that the week could Nancy with before change lawyers to the continue new Pelosi record say the in high subpoena Britain is I'm Charles Charles questioning some was to they're the five lead issued optimistic late as the this haste well hundred month London in cases bad of that the this GOP are linked faith pivotal to phase schools let's hi just three Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial meanwhile we and will Florida's overturned quickly governors calling and provide the for affordable a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

United States
Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Lockdowns imposed in several British cities

"Look look downs being imposed in several British cities were confirmed coronavirus infections have risen sharply the council leader in the north of England city of Leeds says people will be barred from meeting members of other households in tools all in back yards the measure affects more than seven hundred fifty thousand people meanwhile London home to almost nine million people is being labeled an area of concern that means that even fictional rates rise he could also face new restrictions the office for national statistics estimates there were about nine thousand six hundred U. infections a day in the last week a sixty percent increase from the week before Charles to lead as well London

Leeds Charles London England
Language Apps Emerge as Lockdown Leaders

Business Wars Daily

03:17 min | 2 d ago

Language Apps Emerge as Lockdown Leaders

"Do wonder just we w Brown as you present business wars daily savant device ACC September. See there while some of spent pandemic free time baking sour dough bread or painting watercolours others chose more. Academic pursuits including learning new skills and even new languages online learning surge during lockdowns linked in learning, which offers online courses. Three times as many people used its offerings. This July compared to last language APP duo lingo also benefited from bad behavior shift. The company lured learners with the promise of letting you quote, learn a new language for free. Forever it's number of US users jumped nearly one hundred, fifty percent between March, twenty nineteen and March. Twenty twenty. The duo lingo look is based around Games bite lessons, include listening exercises, flash cards, and multiple choice questions to help you hone new words and phrases answer a question correctly and you get points. Other exercises make you race against the clock. The APP also connects users learning the same language. So they can practice communicating one study found that thirty four hours of duo lingo learning could get you as proficient as a university class even. Before the pandemic, the APP had become something of a pop culture phenomenon I. Well, it's fun and it's also widely known for its quirky sentences and phrases. Duo Lingo users may find lessons teaching them how to say bow down before your God or what a rude Dolphin along with more useful turns of phrase according to Buzzfeed the company is using artificial intelligence to help improve its interface and become more effective in helping people learn. And it seems to be paying off the startup reached Unicorn status in December and has thirty million active users. But now, brand new online language company is taking a different approach to can is betting that the free time people are voting to online learning during the pandemic is going to evaporate as our lives gradually returned to their old frenetic pace. So why not pare down the language learning process to help you understand enough words to get by the companies headed by Taylor Niemann formerly of meditation APP head space and car leasing. APP. Fair investors just gave the two can't team. Three million dollars in seed funding to give it a shot to can isn't an APP but a free Google chrome extension install at the language you Wanna learn and Voila instant immersion. You'll start seeing words and phrases pop up as you browse you'll pick up vocabulary faster when you see it in context to Kansas plus you're saving time feeling bilingual take quizzes to measure your proficiency and earn achievements to keep you motivated to can currently supports Spanish French Italian German and Portuguese. Now too can won't make you fluent, but it will help you learn enough okabe learn to communicate the team says. Expansion packs give you topic specific collections of basic words and phrases. So if you break your leg in Mexico you can talk your way through the hospital at least one hopes. To can has a long way to go before matching dueling goes. Status, but it's vision for the future goes way beyond the language arena. Nieman. Told Tech Crunch that the company could apply the same concept to history science math or even general information perhaps then schoolteachers might actually encourage students to bring their phones to class imagine that.

Twenty Twenty W Brown United States Taylor Niemann Buzzfeed Kansas Nieman Mexico
With flu season on it's way health experts warn of a 'Twindemic'

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:21 min | 2 d ago

With flu season on it's way health experts warn of a 'Twindemic'

"On the way, health officials fear what they call a twin de Mick health officials with How to handle things in the community setting one supermarket retailer says it's pharmacists expect a 75% surgeon flu vaccinations this year. Every September. Sean powers in his nine year old twin boys get their flu shots should be a little bit better than normal. Considering we're all running around in masks in the Southern Hemisphere lockdowns and increased vaccination rates have likely lead to a mild flu season there. Australia had just 33 positives out of 60,000 samples tested. I think when people have actually seen how will people have gotten from covert? How sick you could get from flu. Hopefully, they'll be wiser. Vaccine makers are already starting to ship out what they estimate will be nearly 200 million doses for this season. Meg

FLU Sean Powers Australia
Coronavirus cases rise as Europe begins to see second wave

TIME's Top Stories

05:49 min | 3 d ago

Coronavirus cases rise as Europe begins to see second wave

"Europe's covid nineteen cases are spiking. Here's how four different countries are trying to stop a second wave by Melissa. A resurgence in covid nineteen cases as gripped countries across Europe leaving politicians grappling without a curb. The spread of the virus governments are now strengthening regulations around mask wearing limiting the number of people that can gather in public spaces and honing in on areas with particularly high numbers of cases. This week Europe experienced a record high number of new Corona virus cases reaching seventy one, thousand, three, hundred, sixty, five on September twenty first according to the European Center for Disease Prevention and control more than half of European countries have reported a greater than ten percent increase in the past two weeks. Hans clued the World Health Organization's Regional Director for Europe said at a briefing. Even countries that had largely avoided the first corona virus wave such as the Czech Republic are now seeing surges stricter regulations to try and curb the spread of the virus could remain in place for the entire winter in the United Kingdom, for example, where case rates are doubling by the week prime. Minister Boris Johnson announced new restrictions yesterday that could last six months warning that the country is at a perilous turning point. Many. Of the new restrictions however look different to those imposed at the beginning of the pandemic rather than implementing uniform nationwide regulations. Many countries are now opting for more localized approaches. Why are governments in Europe locking down by region. Countries are wary of nationwide lockdowns that would have crippling impacts on their economies. Local restrictions allow governments to curb the spread of the virus while keeping parts of the country and the economy open. But restrictions are also different this time because the nature of the pandemic itself has changed new infection clusters appear to be linked to younger people who are less likely to die of the virus. The result is that this latest surge of cases has so far been less deadly than the first back in March and less burdensome to healthcare services. Even if the number of cases are high, the impact in terms of hospitalization and deaths is very different compared to March says Dr Jacobo Mendiola Ross, the Director and coordinator of the committee responding to Corona Virus in Catalonia. Rather than calling for stay at home owners, many new restrictions, target bars, restaurants, or other public venues that young people may be more likely to frequent. But the new restrictions could change if older people began falling ill and greater numbers already, there has been a significant increase in the number of older people testing positive for the virus in France and Spain of the past two weeks leading to upticks in hospital admissions rising case numbers threatened to overrun hospitals and healthcare services if not managed carefully. We are not in the situation we were in March yet says, Dominic Costa Yulia, a member of the French Academy of Science and the Vice Dean of research for the Faculty of Medicine at the Sorbonne University. Here, how four European countries are responding to the recent surge of Corona? Virus. Spain. Spain has been facing a resurgence of covid nineteen cases since July and now has the highest infection rate in Europe. Over the past two weeks one, hundred, twenty, two, thousand, new covid nineteen cases have been reported with close to a third of cases occurring in Madrid the country's capital. The total number of confirmed cases now stands at more than six, hundred, forty, thousand and hospitals are reaching their maximum capacity. On, September Eighteenth eastbound de as a USO. The president of the Madrid region announced a partial lockdown of the thirty seven most affected parts of the region which came into effect on Monday the measures which affect close to eight hundred, fifty, thousand people many of whom live in the poorest parts of the city require individuals to provide justification for trips out of their neighborhoods and has limited the number of people allowed in restaurants or retail establishments. The News of the lockdown sparked protests in Madrid where hundreds gathered on. September twentieth the groups that organized. The protests said in a statement that the government has done little to protect vulnerable people in the city and have instead opted for stigmatisation exclusion and territorial discrimination. France. On September twelve French health authorities reported ten, thousand, five, hundred, sixty, one new cases the highest number since the pandemic began in March since then daily cases have risen to more than thirteen thousand, the cumulative number of covid nineteen cases is now at four, hundred, fifty, three, thousand, seven, hundred, sixty, three, and continues to rise. It has the second highest number of total cases in. Europe after Spain. The government has delegated the task of implementing new regulations to regional authorities. Currently, the outbreaks appeared to be occurring in certain locations and not in others and a nationwide lockdown would have unnecessary economic repercussions Prime Minister Jean Castex has said. In Paris, Marseille and Bordeaux. All major hot spots for the virus authorities have implemented local measures to curb the spread and Bordeaux and Marseille visits to care homes have been reduced. Dancing has been banned at bars, weddings, and local companies have been asked to make their employees work from home if possible in Marseille and Paris, the sale and consumption of alcohol on the streets after eight PM as been banned. Wearing a face mask and public is now mandatory across Paris and many of its surrounding areas riot police units, and gendarmes have been deployed to enforce these measures. However

Europe Madrid Spain Paris Marseille Corona Minister Boris Johnson Regional Director For Europe Melissa European Center For Disease Pr Czech Republic Minister Jean Castex Dr Jacobo Mendiola Ross United Kingdom World Health Organization France French Academy Of Science
Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:59 min | 3 d ago

Worldwide COVID-19 Cases Soar as Scientists Scramble for Response

"This week in America a grim and telling number. More than two hundred, thousand people have now died officially of Covid nineteen the House of Representatives held a moment of silence yesterday to acknowledge that painful milestone more people have been infected there than in any other country. Cases continue to climb states that suffered the most are recovering but infections and others are rising, which seemed to have been making progress in tackling the virus is against infections spreading fast and in Britain, and elsewhere there were expectations warnings of a second wave. I'm sorry to say that as in Spain and France and many other countries we've reached a perilous journey. With a vaccine still well down the line preparations are being made for an uncertain and tragic winter. And many governments have squandered precious time failing to prepare for what's to come. I think it's important to realize that each country experiences curb in its own way. Edward Car is the economists deputy editor. Europe. At the moment is going through a second wave cases in. India. Very high but overall it's been a consistent increase relentlessly such that they're announced note two million recorded cases day. And that reflects I think the both the nature of the disease and the insufficient grasp of the basic public health policy response that's required and are there any bright spots? Any positives to look too at this stage? Well, of course, in the background, which is hugely important has been fantastic and really impressive work by scientists and doctors, both to kind of work on the treatment protocols to find various medicines and to do research on vaccines. So that's all that's also entering in the background and it is beginning to have an effect on fatality rates, but there's a lot more to come on that. And what are the improvements on the medical side specifically. Well quite a lot of it's kind of really basic medicine. So when people first presented with what was thought to be essentially a respiratory illness, the focus was on the lungs people were put on ventilators in very large numbers vary eilly and that that wasn't always very good for them and didn't help them as much as was needed. Now it's realized this is a disease that attacks many organs in the body has stroke is a big problem that kids can suffer the heart damage and doctors a much better at keeping an eye on fluid levels on oxygen levels on treating the symptoms that might be harming various organs. So just in sheer sort of management of the disease that being big improvements. And then, of course, the medicines of and POPs one of the most important decks and methods zone is a is a very cheap steroid that can be bought and supplied in large quantities in that has for people who need oxygen and to need ventilation can lead to substantial declines in mortality of twenty to thirty percent. And the hope is that over the coming months, there'll be more medicines and. Vaccines which will bring that fatality rate down still more. and. What's your sort of overarching take on the the public health response. For the Public Health Response has been just much much more variable for a number of complex reasons. I think one problem political problem has been some differences on on what the priorities should be. Some countries have a ticket only favored keeping the economy open and Sweden's often held up as an example there possibly an idealized example because in fact, actually there were restrictions others have tried to keep the death rate down to zero by having a blanket. On the economy I personally think the both of those extremes are wrong. Sweden's actually had quite high death rate and quite a big blow to its economy compared with the neighboring countries, Finland Norway. Denmark. He's done some worse on both those measures. New Zealand has had a stunningly successful. Ability to keep the deaths right down but it's paid a very high price because it's shot the the whole country down and if you look at a country like Taiwan been even more successful on deaths and paid a much much smaller price in terms of the economy. And I think that that's because the countries that have been prepared to make trade offs and have had good public health can succeed in both reducing fatality rates and in keeping bits of the economy open. But what does that look like in detail? How should that that trade off actually be made you think? I think are two or three key components, and the first of those is a really granular testing and tracing operation. The second thing that's important is being sensible about the trade offs and then the third thing that's important is how to communicate this. I think people are quite goods in an emergency at taking difficult steps to change their lives but it's very hard to sustain and this will need to be sustained already need to stay for nine months but this'll go on for a long time yet before supplies all vaccines are plentiful enough for everybody to being vaccinated and even then the vaccines might not work that well or they're affect might be temporary so we're going to be living with this disease for a long time yet. I mean a lot of this advice was was starting to become clear even even months ago, and why do you think it is at different countries responses continue to be so divergent when the the best practice seem. To, be converging. I think that's a hard question to answer I. Think part of it was the enormous relief when countries have had a bad first wave came out of lockdown at the end of the spring, and in the summer. And there was a sense of cough people just thought thank goodness and governments having got through that desperate first phase of the disease themselves were relieved are never quite caught up. I mean the countries that have done this really really well, and I I think Taiwan is absolutely top of the class here have been good from the very beginning. and You perhaps feel at some other countries catching up in other places. In the United States, I think has to stand ups an example of this, the poor communication and the changes in rules reflect the politicization of the disease. There are too many people who have a stake in it working one way or another, and it's it's a tragedy. I think that the Centers for Disease Control and prevention which went into this pandemic as perhaps the most highly regarded public health body in the world has suffered from errors and poor leadership and denigration from the White House. That's that's just done nothing tool for the overrule effort. Are you hopeful are you more hopeful about the the post vaccine era and the experience today has made us all. Yes I think people, and I think people learn and learn more slowly than than baps they ought to but they do learn and you know I say the scientific response to this disease has been incredible and and that's something to feel cheerful about is just the even the best scientific response will take longer than people might like I did that time many people will suffer?

Taiwan Centers For Disease Control Covid Sweden Spain Britain America House Of Representatives Europe India United States Edward Car Deputy Editor France White House Denmark New Zealand Finland
The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

The Chalene Show

04:59 min | 4 d ago

The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

"In two thousand and seven researchers at Oxford. University started looking at the brains of newborn babies and what they found was pretty Dang interesting. What they found when comparing the brains of newborn babies to the brains of adults. Was that adult had fewer get this fewer neurons in their brain than newborns did kind of interesting ha and that was very compelling for the researchers they wanted to. Why would babies have more neurons? If obviously, adults are more skilled and smarter et Cetera they can do more and they wanted to know, okay. What was going on in the brain? What they discovered is a concept that they now call synoptic pruning. Okay and here's just a really layman's way of understanding synoptic pruning. It is our synapses think of them as if you. Don't use it. You lose it. Our synapses are a fancy way of describing the connection happens between two neurons in your brain. So it's as basic idea that your brain if it doesn't need those connections, they they kind of fade away if they don't get used to frequently they disappear if you will. So let me give you a more tactical example this. So let's say that the country the world is in the middle of a pandemic and everyone goes into lockdown and you decide to every day of the pandemic to go roller skating. Now used to do it as a kid, but you haven't done it in years and years and years. Well, what happens is when you're a kid you, you could do like shoot the duck and you could roller skate backwards and can do all these really cool things and you were very, very confident on your roller skates. But now you're an adult and you're putting on your rollerskates again, and while some of those sit ups, are there the connections that used to exist between them have either weekend or they fallen away? But you star roller skating every single day for like six months. And your brain begins to strengthen these connections. So it's not only physically are you getting better at it? Mentally you're getting better and the more you practice the stronger those connections become in those connections start to get faster and more efficient. So when the first time you through on your rollerskates, you're like, Whoa Whoa it felt like it literally felt like the first time even. Though you've done it for years but now you're throwing your roller skates and your body knows how to respond when you start to lose your balance. It doesn't make you nervous. The brain builds these stronger faster connections and you start to develop skills much more easily it feels second nature. In fact, you're no longer thinking about it. It's a biological process that happens in our brains. And it's these biological processes, these synapses, these connections that allow us to make habits the type of habits where you're not even thinking about it you're just doing it. It's the same process that happens when you're in your car, you're driving somewhere, and then suddenly you're getting off an exit and you're like, what am I doing? This is my exit. This is just the exit that I normally get off on your brain wasn't even thinking about it though synapses were happening without you even being aware of them. The synopsis are so strong that you don't have to think about it. You don't have to discipline yourself to do these things. They just happen an example of that might be brushing your teeth and example that might be robbing. Your is in the morning example that might be sitting up in bed and opening up your phone. An example of that might be before you go to bed you get coffee ready for the morning. These are things you don't even think about you just do them over and over and over again. And the more we repeat on the stronger those synopsis become the question is, how do we get ourselves to the point at which we've repealed it? So often that the connection is there, the synapse is strong and we no longer have to rely on discipline or thinking about it. We've developed a habit a habit that is strongly connected in a pathway in our brains. The answer is something bj. Fog Habit expert in Stanford University Researcher Calls Implementation intention in other words stacking one habit on top of another pairing a new habit he wants to develop with one that's already been established. One that already has the synapses connected hardwired. We all want to develop healthy habits. We all want to have those habits that make it easier for us to just get through the day and not have to. Rely on discipline and I have to remind ourselves or to beat ourselves up. When we forget to do something, we want these habits yet we've been told by the media, buy books by authors, Experts that habit is the act of repeating something over and over and over again, you've probably heard the myth that it takes twenty one days thirty days to form a habit

Oxford Stanford University Researcher
Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 4 d ago

Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzales Arizona Governor Doug ducey announced Tuesday. He signed a proclamation to recognize October Twelfth Twenty Twenty as indigenous Peoples Day on the Federal Columbus Holiday Emma Gibson. With Arizona public media has more the proclamation came after state Senator James Sita Pash Loci, and a youth led advocacy group Indigenous Peoples Initiative called for the change. Dylan Baca the group's president who is White Mountain Apache and Navajo says indigenous. Peoples Day acknowledges accurate account of Christopher Columbus's violent legacy. This holiday is significant for me because it works to try to eliminate the stereotypes in stigmatisms associated with indigenous peoples and Tribes Paschall K. called on Governor Ducey in. June. During President Donald. Trump's visit to Phoenix to establish the state holiday using his executive powers. She now says she will introduce a bill to permanently changed the holiday in the twenty twenty one legislative session. For National Native News I'm Gibson the Navajo nation is returning to fifty seven weekend lockdowns. Stay at home orders due to a rise in positive covid nineteen cases on and near the reservation. Tuesday's announcement comes a day after top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci praised the tribe for lowering numbers crediting the tribe strict covid nineteen measures which were enforced for. Months some of the orders including the fifty seven hour curfew were eased. But during virtual town Tuesday Navajo nation. President Jonathan Nez had a stern message for residents to stay vigilant Nez, a cluster of forty or more positive cases traced back to travel and spreading the virus during social gatherings which are restricted on Navajo land, and so we're going to have to. Slow everything down we're GONNA have to stay at home orders because we don't know how far. This has gone out in. Contact, with other people, the new cases were reported in Arizona and new. Mexico the tribes also asking residents to avoid areas in Utah, considered hot spots for the virus. NATO advocates encouraged young people to engage in the voting process on national voter registration day. Barb Hartselle works with the LAS, Vegas Indian Center on the native vote she talked about investing in native youth by using traditional teachings and connecting them with issues native youth face today, really taking like arc additional routes in how we carry ourselves in is important to us and being able to invest in our youth in meeting them where they're at and letting really understand though it seems so big and so massive or maybe. It doesn't seem important at all. It really does determine a lot of things like it really determined just how far come from grandmothers and mothers generations to wear. We'll go with their next generation. Hartselle took part in a national congress of American Indians virtual gathering, Tuesday along with tribal leaders and native women in office. The organizations nonpartisan vote campaign focuses on education registration getting out the native vote election protection and data collection according to NCAA I an estimated one point, two, million, American, Indian, and Alaskan native people are unregistered. Five Indian country bills were passed by Congress Tuesday and sent to the president to be signed into law the bill's address missing and murdered indigenous women, self-governance business, and economic development, and legislation to nullify a supplemental treaty for Tribes on the warm springs reservation. There are seven bills currently pending in the house which ranged from education to water rights and veterans. Issues. I'm Antonio

Arizona Indigenous Peoples Initiative Antonio Gonzales Christopher Columbus Twenty Twenty Barb Hartselle President Trump Congress Donald Trump Senator James Sita Pash Loci President Jonathan Nez Federal Columbus Holiday Doug Ducey President Donald Emma Gibson Dr Anthony Fauci Dylan Baca Ncaa Phoenix
UK considering new national lockdown as Covid-19 cases increase

Brian Kilmeade

00:08 sec | 5 d ago

UK considering new national lockdown as Covid-19 cases increase

"Another locked down as the number of Koven cases spikes their bars will close early and more people are being encouraged to work from home. That

Maria DeCotis and The Lip-Syncing of Gov. Cuomo - Cuomo Inspiration

Apocalypse...Now?

02:08 min | 5 d ago

Maria DeCotis and The Lip-Syncing of Gov. Cuomo - Cuomo Inspiration

"The first conversation basically, I was watching it. Is. No one is the press not reacting to this right now like is no noticing that he's going to go I'm sure people wear but um yeah I just thought it was so funny and I really wanted to do something with it so. I mean I was captivated. So yeah, there is there was an underlying family drama happening during the first few months of lockdown that he I think he just needed to vent. Yeah I. Mean I think so too like he he's in front of a bunch of people they all have to listen to him and. I got to get this out. Of. My chest right now, who is a funny to see him on Raffle? Honestly like in that way because he was trying to keep it together so much in terms of the pandemic the but at the same time, you see how much he cares about his daughters to when he goes on those tangents and how when he actually listened to their suggestions to which I thought was very sweet. I know that is sweet. You know like taking their advice, but at the same time has been away for you to stress with this with no the real honest of everything going on between the pandemic and I know that you also use this platform to promote black lives matter and other social justice causes like is this just a released like can you just look back in the only thing you can do is laugh at the chaos yeah I mean look I mean when I first started doing them. I was I mean when the pandemic started and we were all in lockdown and you no one knew what was happening and it was really scary Super depressed I couldn't get out of bed I was like I have no worries the live no one needs me like there's nothing for me to do I have no purpose and. When I was watching his briefings I didn't WanNa, make light of anything happening to pandemic. Series of people are dying, but you know when I was seeing those small moments about his family drama, it just seemed like something fun in light latch onto like. I. Started to look forward to watching his briefings because I was like, Oh, I wonder if he's anything fun about his family or his dog or whatever.

Essential Oils and Consciousness

The Essential Oil Revolution

07:27 min | 5 d ago

Essential Oils and Consciousness

"I'm here with Alan David Reed, and Tony Wolf, who are the CO creators of the TIN terrains model and authors of the book introducing the ten trains of consciousness understand yourself other people and our world after years of research, they're bringing their new model to the world to lead the way for a more harmonious future. Welcome to the show Alan and Tony how're. You doing today. Thanks Samantha. Really really well, thank you and you guys are coming in from Australia that scree and yeah. How are things in the COVID situation? They're they're doing well here where we're at, we're we're pretty fortunate to be having life fairly normal, but in other states south of us that were in lockdown and having quite a problem at the moment. To crazy time. Well, the last part of your by there seems like just such a beautiful, yet lofty goal to lead the way for more harmonious future a love this idea and I love just the idea of empowering people to have greater peace of mind about what's playing out in our crazy world today rate. So you can feel it everyone can kind of feel in the air there's this higher tension. There's this sort of importance kind of looming over all of us and it can be really overwhelming for some people. So I'm curious the work that you're doing now did it start can have recently in light of everything happening in twenty twenty or did it start? In. Now, just sort of coming to fruition or has been an ongoing research project for Tonya night for good eight years and for me for my life, as well as Tani's lies we've been preparing I guess individually for this, but we find it. This time now is perfect for bringing his workout. It seems like we were being prepared to to share this with the world. It's it's absolutely Spot on for what's happening to explain how people are reacting in light of the situation going on now with Cova de and How they can find A way through all of this. Get Out of the fear that's being you know brought around. Everybody lives at a different train of consciousness, which basically means that entire relationship to reality is different. It's almost like good think of as ten different operating systems will ten different paradigms and so depending on which terrain you're at. You're actually gonNA see what's happening in terms of the coronavirus very differently from how someone at a different terrain will see it, and so even though book came out five years ago when Pedalo people read it and been using it at this particular point in time suddenly there's a huge amount of need. For this kind of information mainly so that people can understand the people that they're living with why they reacting differently to this situation, but also so that we can understand ourselves on what's coming up for us. You know what's being triggered in us what what kind of things what kind of lessons way facing this pointing out journey right now because of the terrain where during this virus crisis, right? It is an interesting point you brought up about when you're living with someone year all sort of in the same household seen each other's. Reactions and maybe it's your boyfriend or your husband or your wife or your teenager all GonNa react to what's going on completely different ways and so you're saying that this is partly due to them being at different terrains is that right? Well yet I mean obviously, there's a lot of differences like personality type differences and differences in experience and maturity, and also people's childhood wounding playing out all that stuff that kind of stuff everybody already knows about people fairly familiar with, but there is actually a second thing going along as well which. Is Wisdom that in spiritual evolutionary journey where they're out in their actual evolutionary development and that is the terrain of consciousness that there and often people in the same family will be at the same terrain weren't being issued but sometimes been not sometimes the parents are at a different train than the children or to spouses of different terrain from each other, and that can be some really deep fundamental core differences in what they need to feel safe and how they're interacting with the situation the on not explainable by things like personality type. That much So there's ten terrains total. Can you give a I know we can't cover them all can you give a few examples or kind of a brief overview of some of them? Yeah. That's a great question man. I'm I'll just quickly run through the basics of a few of the main. You not made people at the trains at both ends of the spectrum as less people those drains for. Those. But I'll pick out of the five main ones that you likely to meet people. APP. So the festival talk about is the Wheelbase Terrain Pyramid of there's not that many people that terrain, but it's the terrain that's coming mushroom scarcity consciousness fear and the survival strategy here is to amass. Much. Power and wealth so that you can control other people and it's the terrain with quite a lot of domination over others at its core, and then the next terrain which vast majority of people are GonNa make a probably GonNa be at is the older base terrain square, and that's where people actually really feel that the common go to the majority is more important than their own self interests trying to fit into a civilized society being upstanding member of that society and contribute to society and the sense of safety comes from being part of a will ordered system and so how can. I contribute talking I follow the rules. How can I believe thirty? How can I make a difference as a citizen and then the next train after that the reflection based terrain diamond, he's essentially terrain where people pushing over that system. A little bit that they sense of identity comes from their own mind that their own choices like rather than going to do what my parents told me Authority figures tradition tells me I'm going to lose my own path and I'm going to be an original thinker. I'm GONNA make choices about my identity. So he we see a lot of innovation originality. People living their own lives and deciding who they are and a lot of what we're seeing in current Western culture is coming from this terrain of diamond because as a collective at in the west at the moment particularly in the United States the prevailing terrain is actually at diamond. And then the terrain to that the connection based terrain circle that's terrain where people have actually shifted from the head into the hot and from doing into being, and at this point in someone's journey, the very much connected to the web life connected to the Hawk connected to their feelings attention working more deeply with. Based natural bites price processes and everybody listening deeply to each each other from vulnerable place and is very much an emphasis on community in connection the terrain, and then the terrain opted that one cold, the coherence based terrain spiral, and you may have some of your listeners being this terrain. This is terrain why someone sense of self goes from beyond connection to the web of life to actually connection to the multidimensional cosmos. So these people might be woken all different levels of there being and they're always trying to come into full residents on a levels being mind body. Too Hot the high end knowing that possl all of that kind of stuff always listening for what resonates with me in a moment how can come fully into coherence and they're at a point in their journey where they deeply understand in a really embodied why they create their unreality. So they're always wanting from inside out and look at what's coming up in them in how it's creating the reality around. So that's kind of just like the five that will most likely to encounter. There are three that are more expanded than that, and there are a couple of less expanded. But each of the Toronto, really different way of relating to the world and a very different religious to things like house and hells practices

Wheelbase Terrain Pyramid Alan David Reed Tony Wolf Covid Samantha Australia Tani Toronto United States
Interview with Dave Collins

The Functional Tennis Podcast

03:54 min | 6 d ago

Interview with Dave Collins

"Hi Dave. Welcome to function tennis podcast. I'll Fabio holiday I'm doing great thanks aircraft heavy on and with doubles being such a key part of the game at side the pro world in the pro world just great avid doubles expert on the show and learn a bit about more you untouchables. So maybe you can start by ten the listeners just a bit about you where you're located what you're up to right now and we can take it from there I like in in. Sorry in the UK. Head. Coach at sint George Hill Lawn. Tennis, Club it's a club that's one hundred, seven years old. So it's been there a long time. We've got about four thousand members pretty busy range of colts etc and doubles is pretty is pretty busy throughout the club. Okay. So four thousand members stats that's a lot of members a day. How many more active now so that membership split between different tasks gotTa Health and Fitness Section, we got obviously tennis and we've got a pool of we've got some squash as well about two thousand play play tennis including a genius Sir Pretty Busy sets up we've got the. And how many courts you have? We've got thirty three courts. The mixture of different surfaces indoors grass at different of official clay. So we've got a full range on ice and your head coach there. Yet on the head coach because the team of twelve coaches coaches right busy at the club especially now with people coming out of lockdown tennis being such a good thing to do with social distancing etcetera have to tennis numbers gone up since this time last year the participation has yet a court really busy from. Morning till night with lots of people working from home. And a sneaking out lunchtime for Gamete friends search it. It's pretty busy. And tell me you're also dope coach of too great. Great doubles team John from John Peers and Mike Venus. How'd you manage? Being the head coach such a big club and also working with these guys. Yeah, it's it's challenging. Sometimes I'm not on the road with them a massive amount I I do some events as when we can fit it in and it works for all of us. But when they're back in the UK back base, we we work at the club and we fit in around the the day to Day Club What Club coaching that I do the members like to see the the guys around the guys get involved on the court with some of the members which is great and members really enjoy that. Exhibitions and clinics and things. It's it's nice to have them around. And here you having a good week this week they took a nice English scalp in the first round in Rome. Yeah. The did they played. Jamie Murray near Skopje Fest? Round and which obviously J. me was was one of John's previous partners and then yesterday that a came through fourteen twelve in the final set breaker against John's partner from last year, which was Henry Continent finished guy. At the top level, they're all playing people they've played before, which must make. It's so interesting. How, from how do you coach or head of players deal with known that the other guy knows all their secrets are patrons may be a better word yet it's good. Yeah. Lots of players play with with certain patterns in they do specific things at certain times. So it's it's know we speak regularly before the matches. Go through what the opponents, what we might expect them to do what they did against them last time if they did it against the lost time and it was successful low probably good again, if if they didn't work than the opponent will change it. So we've got to be prepared for things to change and it might change through the course match nobody plays exactly the same way all the time

Tennis John Peers UK Day Club What Club Sint George Hill Lawn Rome Jamie Murray Official Henry Continent Mike Venus Partner
'Hard, Dirty Job': Cities Struggle To Clear Garbage Glut In Stay-At-Home World

Environment: NPR

03:32 min | 6 d ago

'Hard, Dirty Job': Cities Struggle To Clear Garbage Glut In Stay-At-Home World

"This is certainly true at my house. American staying home during the pandemic or eating more at home doing more at home ordering more deliveries that arrive in boxes at home and some cities are struggling to keep up with the trash NPR's Scott horsely reports. It's not like garbage collector yogi military's spying on the people whose trashy picks up, but he can't help notice some changes along his residential route in northeastern Ohio. Tell you about. The biggest thing is everybody at home from work and home from school more people means more trash. CEESAY. That dimitrius target has also felt the weight of extra trash along his route in Alfa Reta Georgia, tart us to pick up seventeen or eighteen tonnes each day. Now it's more like twenty two tonnes the cans over field we gotta get clean love some time when they hit the ground tart one of those semi automated trash trucks, but he can't always stay. Arm's length away from the garbage. He worries some of the extra trash he's handling carry traces of the coronavirus scary I hate it. I have to get out and stuff that I see after. That's the biggest. Fear my job is. Take home. Nationwide residential trash volumes spiked as much as twenty five percent during the spring lockdown since then it's dropped a bit, but it's still well above pre pandemic levels. Garbage collectors that means longer workdays and more trips to the dump. Some sanitation workers have gotten sick or had to quarantine. Baltimore's faced a severe shortage of trash collectors acting public works director Matthew Bark says, it's not easy to find replacements. It is just a hard dirty job. It is quite common for someone to walk off the job within a day or two because they just don't realize. How hard the work is there is less garbage these days at vacant office buildings and Hotels Guard says the commercial trash trucks that typically empty those dumpsters are not easily reassigned to residential neighborhoods. We actually use a specially designed trash truck that can fit in the narrow alleys. The contractors don't have that Baltimore temporarily halted curbside recycling this month. So short handed crews can concentrate on trash pickup. Nashville is also making adjustments. Assistant Public Works Director Sharon. Smith says that city will start collecting trash five days a week. Instead of four it'll be shorter days shorter route and much more manageable. Particularly, if the changes we've seen with people working from home continues on into the future trash collection is overwhelmed garbage piles up in the street drawing rats, flies than lots of complaints from residents, Ohio. Garbage Collector Yogi Miller says, nobody wants that they don't realize how much they need until something happens where their trash doesn't get picked up. That's what people want. They want to put it out in the morning and when. They come home in the afternoon and they wanted to be gone. There may be a silver lining to this garbage Glut David. Biedermann who heads the Solid Waste Association of North America says it has led to newfound appreciation for some frontline workers who were often invisible in the past could as garbage day in my neighborhood and mine neighbor has a sign on her garbage and thanking the sanitation workers dimitrius Tar has seen similar signs on his route in Georgia along with a child. Thank you. Note drawn in Crayon they say, Hey, you know we really appreciate it I mean the sanitation, the world stop we stopped. Scott horsely NPR news Washington.

Scott Horsely Ohio Baltimore Director Alfa Reta Georgia Solid Waste Association Of Nor NPR Yogi Miller Nashville Hotels Guard Matthew Bark Washington Georgia Smith
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:03 min | Last week

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams. Bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft dot com slash teams. Support also comes from fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building your portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. Greg. We're GONNA podcast man thanks for having me of Greg. Your article reminded me that at the beginning of the covert response here in the US. There was actually a lot of confusion about these specific goals of the lockdown measures that ended up being implemented and it seems like that is a pretty important part of understanding whether those lockdown measures were the right ones or the wrong ones. That's exactly right. Broadly speaking, there are two approaches you can take to epidemic like this one is suppression you drive the number of new infections down to. Zero that is a very draconian approach and requires being locked down very thoroughly for a very long time. That's your approach that China in New Zealand took the alternate strategy is mitigation also known as flattened the curve, which means that you don't fully lockdown. You just trying hold infections low enough that they don't overwhelm your healthcare system. That's the policy Sweden pursuit eventually enough of your population is exposed that. Epidemic stops spreading called herd immunity in the United. States. We didn't really choose either of those things at the outset we talked about flattening curve, and then we locked down and it sounded like we were gopher suppression. But then after just six to eight weeks of lockdown, we started to get tired of that lifted the lockdown and then the epidemic took off again, and in some sense we ended up with the worst of both worlds we ended up to the economic harm of lockdown, but the uncontrolled pandemic of. Mitigation, her immunity strategy. Yeah. And I guess the natural follow-up question than is, what's a better alternative and so you make this point in the article that a lockdown is not this one thing that there are literally dozens of measures that can constitute a lockdown. So things like closing schools or closing stores or telling people to stay at home and what's Needed is a way to evaluate each individual measure number one by whether or not that measures good at reducing infections and reducing the spread of the virus and the number two how economically damaging is that measure and this indeed is the very model that a couple of Harvard academics that I interviewed have come up with One of them's in economist one of those. And they've basically said, let's try and come up with a set of measures that really do optimize the most. Effective reduction infections at the lowest economic cost and look some of these things. We are not really going to surprise you very much. We know for example that this particular pandemic is very dangerous for the elderly and not dangerous at all for children. What does that tell us? Well, it tells us that we should be putting a lot more effort into protecting nursing homes, which will save a lot of lies but not be very economically costly. It also suggests that it should be safe. In most circumstances to reopen schools for, for example, elementary schools that doesn't mean you open schools during hotspots when the disease is quite dangerous, but it does suggest that opening schools with your correct protective equipment in place and social distancing measures should not be terribly risky because we know that children are in fact, less likely to die from this disease they are from flu according to these measures and the best information we have so far is that they do not tend to spread to teachers. What else do we know? Well, there's a lot of evidence that a small number of so-called super spreader events accounts for an exceptionally large number of infections. The State of Louisiana for example has been tracking exactly what types of venues produce these sorts of super spreader events, Lo and behold roughly a third of outbreaks in Louisiana are associated with restaurants, bars, and casinos. Similarly in Japan the single largest source of outbreaks was bars, restaurants, and Karaoke parlours. This tells us that closing those types of venues. It will be economically costly for that specific industry, but it's not going to cripple the overall economy and it should be very effective containing the virus. Finally we seem to have pretty good evidence that a widespread use of facemask is really effective at slowing the transmission of the disease. It seems to be the secret ingredient to why so many East Asian countries like South Korea Hong. Kong Singapore and Japan have done. So well, there's a variety of studies that do suggest that the introduction of masks have helped slow the spread of the disease and one of the great things about matches. It doesn't stop you from going out and actually interacting in the economy a very low cost. It's one of those interventions that appears to have very low economic cost with a very large payoff in terms of health in grape one of the advantages that you write about of trying to evaluate individual measures rather than thinking in terms of a total lockdown versus no lockdown at all. Is it you end up with these sort of natural experiments like were different countries or different states can then learn over time which measures were well, and which don't as they actually try them out and in fact, you right that we're getting something like these experiments now in places like California and Arizona specifically that's exactly right card if so in what you saw in a lot of these south southern and western South Western. States was that after the initial lockdowns were lifted, they were lifted to sort of broadly and we had that second wave of infections. None of these states interestingly enough went back to a full lockdown. So in the case of California, they closed the bars and the restaurants, the required stores to operate like twenty-five percent capacity but they didn't, for example, cancel elective surgeries. They didn't tell people you couldn't go to the beach or go to. The park or anything like that and in the case of Arizona, they took an even mild reproach and in both those states you have now seen infections and hospitalizations plummet back to the levels they were before the second began. In fact I think in the case of Arizona they're actually lower. So what does that tell us? It tells us that we seem to have come across a formula that does actually get control of the. Virus, but does not require a total locked out of the economy. Now, this point when you have to say watch this space because these places are starting to reopen. So California now has a series of criteria that each county must meet before they can open up. So San Diego. County Orange County San Francisco, county these are three very large, highly populated jurisdictions. They've now already reached the stage where their restaurants reopened for in person dining. Most of their retail establishments can open at lower capacity. That's going to be very good for the economies of those localities, but we do have to keep an eye on to see what happens whether in fact cases take off again. You know perhaps a word of caution is necessary here even though I think there's a strong strong case for the target approach that we've been talking about. It's still not suppression. It's still not getting infections down zero and until you achieve suppression. Really, let your guard down because the infection the virus is always out there and you're always going to be at risk of an outbreak and you have to keep an eye on that. Greg. Thanks so much. Thanks for having Cardiff. Links to the research cited in today's episode will be at NPR DOT org slash money. This episode of the indicator was produced by Britney Cronin. In fact, check by Sean salona indicators edited by Patty Hirschson is a production of NPR..

Greg NPR Microsoft Arizona Epidemic California Japan Louisiana US Harvard Sweden Britney Cronin San Diego South Korea Hong Lo flu Cardiff Orange County San Francisco
"lockdowns" Discussed on Smashing Security

Smashing Security

07:33 min | Last month

"lockdowns" Discussed on Smashing Security

"And we'll come back and join favorite part of the show the part of the show that we liked. Cool. Is The show where everyone she's saying, the like could be funny story book for Ready TV, show a movie, a record, a podcast website or not whatever they, which doesn't have to be security related necessarily better not be. Well my pick the week. This week is not security related. It has been the school summer holidays where I live and also lockdown into not much to do and things that my son he must seen some youtube videos aren't you said Well that you'll be going. What do you call insight? He said he said or want to say the marble of Inge's movies. I've never seen any of those. Eighty gazillion of them and my wife expressed an interest as will wanting to watch them. So we got we turned on Disney plus like ten. Oh, a much. It costs a month and we set to watch them in order. So we found out found online list of how to watch the avengers movies in order. There's all these different characters and story complicated well, if I really a list. Yes all crow you've got no idea the complexity my husband has been doing the same thing. You Watch the stuff Anna now who? Des. I'm too busy reading books. I found them incredibly tedious. Would typically last about twenty minutes before falling asleep or walk. Walk after tinker with my website I've got no interesting in robots fighting robots. It's. Bish Bash thump thump you like who gives a shit it's like my dishwasher fighting my fridge. Exactly exactly, and when they got masks on his well, there were a couple of the original caps in American movie. It's like Oh, the humans, the humans in the Second World War okay I can understand the. And he put. Somebody's SPANDEX. Reeling coup wins who cares you don't care yeah. So we've been through about ten of these movies so far each time I bail out quite early on because I think. Over a weekend. Over we can over the summer holidays. Although my son would watch every weekend to be honest anyway, and then one came on, which is cooled saw Ragnarok. And it's different. And I went. Oh, my God. This one isn't shit like who suffers because this one has got a sense of humor. This one it's like they've changed. So we're whoa how come now it's no posturing joke. Jokes this still well well. I'm not going to tell you a joke, but it's but what I will do. So linked to the trailer in the show notes and Crow I will tell you who's in it. Some of the People Chris Hemsworth right Tommy Dostam Cape Launcher Mark Ruffalo playing the hook and Jeff Goblin. Kabosh your opponents you now I said Jeff Goldblum you instantly kind of get the kind of a kind of Kooky kind of the opposite of Tom Hanks right? Exactly which is going on let me just cross cross my legs. Anyway, it's so interesting to see this movie franchise and I don't know what the later avengers movie is going to be like maybe return to form I don't know of been rubbish but but the thor Ragnarok I thought simply because it's a little Miraj it or no such no way. No aces in this desert nothing. I WANNA go watch. Come on hurry on. Say That brilliant but compared to the others if you've made your way through the others then thank goodness for Thor Ragnarok because it did make me laugh I. Watch it am I going to have to watched all the other ones to know what's going on? Well I haven't watched any of the other one. And it has to. To be honest with you, it didn't completely keep my attention the whole time. Right but I could see it was so much better than the others and it. Make me laugh occasionally even though it didn't know who absolutely everyone was but I thought this is good and I was pleased to see them this positive step, and that is why it deserves to be my pick of the week thor ragnarok yeah. Holiday August. And what is your pick of the week? He remembers the nineties I do Yep. I was around then. Doing s partying I think I was at. Primary. School. Yeah sure. You must've been really smart. ooh. Twenty five. overs. Advocate? Nov.. Graham was at primary. School Corollas passed harding at Union yeah okay. So Yes ninety, nine, hundred hours at primary school some of secondary. School for some of. Very Young we spoke a lot about the information superhighway and the world wide. Web. are into no fire, the AOL sks. There you go. To Al Gore for inventing it. What would we have done without him? Yes we'll Gore. The Internet superhighway did. The key word that was his His branding. So we also worried about the Y2K homeland. Or Yeah Yeah I was working then yeah. Net and spotify ruin all fantasies only and we were so getting around mobile phones. What was your first mobile phone? Knock Yer. Thirty seven seventy lean something like that. A Nokia I. Think a thirty, three, ten, thirty through ten was the first one fifty one time was i. that's what I had. Thirty three came off by my I knock your in about Nineteen ninety-two. So what what the model was? I still have my hand set of stairs. One I didn't. To, snakes to work hard have snake at changed bathroom behavior. Didn't it? Yes. Shampoo goes on the bachelor. Lost it for a week. It was funny. And you could make phone calls. Sadly no podcastone. Exactly, exactly, and you know I don't talk to many people in the phone corona make an exception. We played on Gameboy snares playstations, maybe I. Didn't I actually got RSI from plenty many goes a super. Mario World. And I had to give up playing computers because of my rage computer games. Yeah, Oh yeah con was too much returned in the whole course something what happens. It just makes me really angry in. All walks of life. would. If you don't win a game if you lose the game own, just the intensity of it, I put everything into it. I remember playing chess against that was. GonNa win that. There was no covert. No trump brexit. Me Not. In the office. Yeah. No trump making so much hassle. And that was the music of course..

youtube Disney Jeff Goldblum Inge Al Gore Des Tom Hanks Chris Hemsworth Anna Nokia spotify Jeff Goblin Union Mark Ruffalo Graham Mario World AOL
"lockdowns" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

05:13 min | 2 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on Coronacast

"They, had it reasonably under control in the outside. The foreign worker area in other words the dormitory. So the sort of places that you visit when you're visiting Singapore pretty low levels of virus in those places, and they continue to be so, and they have got done the numbers I mean they had more than the five today at one point and now i. don't know what it is today, but much lower numbers so the getting it under control. Yes, so we've got someone asking. Asking the case fatality right so globally across countries. It really seems to vary. How many people die compared to the number of cases they have their. How do we know what the true case fatality rate is? We don't really but a group. In fact, some Australian researchers have done a Meta analysis of this and looked at that because it can range from fourteen or fifteen percent in. In some places they're seeing. It's fifty percent, but as you said there, it's about the rate compared to the testing, so the testing rate is the key thing there, so if you're testing large numbers of people, then that means you're getting closer to the true number of people who are being infected, and if you're not testing a lot, then your death rate can look quite frightening so. So in Britain. They weren't testing lock to begin with so their case fatality rate Luke's quite high now. The other factor that gets involved here is how densely populated you are, because you can get hired dose of the virus, and therefore more severe does dyers and the other factor is how many older what's the proportion of older people in your community? And how well are they protected? And, of course, it's changed over time because treatment has got better and more and more intensive care units are using index method zone, so the treatment is in fact, getting better and fewer people are dying hospitals all this going on at the same time. And I think the smart money is still that it's roundabout point six point seven percent despite this wide variation, and so it's under..

Singapore Luke Britain
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Signal

"So, it's a huge step to take and Victorian from Daniel. Andrews was working pretty hard yesterday to sell us. This is GonNa to be a pleasant experience for those residents, but I just have a message for those residents. This is not about punishment. This is about protection. We cannot have a cow hall of people, many of them, not all but many of them. In poor health to start with. We can't have this virus spread. We have to do everything we can to contain the virus, and that's what's dying in your US starring in your flat is absolutely essential. The towel up downs came into effect on Saturday without warning and it being enforced by shifts of at least five hundred police officers at a time standing on most floors in every tower. Yeah, so these towels are in two suburbs, Flemington and North Melbourne and yesterday Daniel Andrews said that income support for every tower resident with the amount depending on individual circumstances I think's I there will be rates charged for those tenants full the next two weeks. Secondly those who are employed and because of the hard lockdown cannot go to work they will receive a fifteen hundred dollar hardship climates. For those households where there is no one eight employment I will save is seven hundred and fifty dollar hardship climate. And just as they were saving that support, they will be in. It's already started. They will be a public health, workers, nurses, and others moving throughout ancient every one of these floors and h every one of towers. To taste each and every resonant. And the reason for all this is that Victoria is scrambling to contain what could still become a second wave. The State is in the midst of a testing blitz and catching dozens of new cases every day at the time where recording, they were more than five hundred active cases of Covid, nineteen in Victoria their mold, twenty people in hospital, and as the last last update yesterday, three of those patients were in intensive care and. Those new cases are coming from community transmission meaning. It's not clear exactly how they picked it up. And that includes residents of those public housing towers. The question is what is now one set of much harsher rules for them and a different set for everyone else, so we called Professor Rebecca Bentley. She's a social epidemiologist at the University of Melbourne and research focuses on the role of housing in health and wellbeing. So the population of people in public housing in general. Tends to be comprised people with very complex needs in terms of by the health, but also. In terms of employment and all the same, so we know that they scrape, he's GonNa have a lot of underlying chronic health conditions potentially crumble bts. A might be a slightly older population, which again might make them more vulnerable to buy private, but will sorry requiring more support and also possibly people with disabilities unmixed canings. And Rebecca says on top of that. It's even worse for this particular subset of the public housing population, because attendance in high density apartment, Tallus site that the very density by the nitrous, the sort of problem that we have with on been any infectious diseases paypal be sharing lift shafts. They'll be sharing communal spices. They'll be sharing laundries. They'll be lots of cases where people are walking down cardinals at a quite narrow with they might be more likely to run into each other of being crystal symmetry twitch Donna. The aspect of this is that the flats themselves potentially quite small, so people probably spend more time in those communities spices so they're more likely to come into contact with each other and they're also. More likely therefore to be kind of exposed to on the. Efficiencies in the building. If there is described transmission in the building on these kind of dense living arrangement means that anyone using the building. Is that am harvest them in an office setting? So, this kind of product really changes. People's Trinity's to isolate Barnes. It's not the same someone who's living in the stands lower costs by themselves. He's able to have the groceries delivered to convert from. Hi, this is a situation where people have folles control their immediate environment, and as a consequence of eighties..

Professor Rebecca Bentley Daniel Andrews cardinals US Victoria North Melbourne University of Melbourne Barnes Tallus Donna
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:40 min | 3 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Secure with PC medic. So here are the ten basis that are in question. All of them are located in southern states that were once part of the confederacy camp beauregard in Louisiana. Fort Benning in Georgia. For, APP Hill in Virginia Fort Hood in Texas. Fort Lee named after Robert e Lee of course in Virginia Fort Pickett in Virginia Fort Polk in Louisiana for Rucker in Alabama. Fort Bragg North, Carolina and Fort Gordon Georgia. President. Trump rightly said he will not even consider renaming the basis this you. What the entire Republican Party position should be now again. I am not. The biggest advocate in the world. Around defending the confederacy, this is not about the confederacy. It's not about the civil war. It's not about anything more than the left trying to destroy the history of America. Now Mind you. A lot of these camps or a lot of these forts in the southern part of the country are revered by people that have been trained there for so long. This is the intentional poking in the eye. Of Southern America. This is part of a war on the south. Now. I have so much respect for the United States. And did you know that almost forty four percent of all the military comes from six southern states. This is according to the United States. Military Department of Defense. Information. So when the ruling class wants to go, fight there trigger-happy wars overseas. When they want to go invade a country that is halfway around the world. It's not disproportionately people from Malibu or Manhattan stepping up. It is the southerners that the left. Has Contempt for so it's the southerners that go fight the wars of the ruling class, so go fight our wars. Go protect the country. Thanks for keeping US safe. We're also GONNA. Go tear down all your monuments and we're going to rename all your bases. This is a war on the American south and ninety I say this as someone from the suburbs of Chicago, and I've said this once, and I'll say it again. From a young age I was taught explicitly, and implicitly that southerners are dumb when I say this to someone who grew up in the south. They don't believe me when I said this Graham. Allen I said I was taught to think you are stupid because of the way you talk..

United States Fort Benning Virginia Fort Hood Fort Bragg North Fort Gordon Georgia Virginia Fort Pickett America Virginia Fort Polk Louisiana Southern America Robert e Lee Military Department of Defense Republican Party Georgia Trump President Chicago Texas Carolina
"lockdowns" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:42 min | 4 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Traders came back to work this morning at the New York. Stock Exchange need to sign on the dotted line. I'm David Brancaccio with motherboards and hard drives doing the bulk of stock trading. These days they're reopening about twenty minutes ago. The trading floor at the New York Stock Exchange for the first time in two months is at least in part about symbolism. Let's get more on the safety rules in issues of legal liability. If someone were to get sick Alexander Povich. The Wall Street Journal joins us. Good Morning Good Morning to get on there during normal times. I go down there. That floor is not busy like it used to be anyway. But what do you think it'll be quieter still with the new rules from today? Yes it will be quieter. Still the number traders were there is going to be about one quarter. You usually have and you won't have the traders who are in the middle of the floor. The one's called designated market makers you only have the ones around the edges four brokers around the edges. What else they going to do So the traders will have to wear masks there have been plexiglass barriers. That have been set up in some places to shield them from each other. And they're gonNA be markings on the floor as well as outside the exchange to help enforce social distancing and there's going to be body temperature checks to be sure people have no fever. Okay but we're told a symptomatic. People can walk around shedding virus. So what is it like a questionnaire for coming in the building then yes essentially when people come in they'll have to submit to temperature checks and they'll also have to tell the NYSE that they have not been exposed anybody with covid nineteen in the past two weeks They didn't take public transportation to get there on a number of other conditions. And here's the thing what you have to sign a release if you're going to go into the New York Stock Exchange that. If you get sick you won't sue the exchange yes floor. Traders will be required to sign an individual waiver When if they want to go back to their jobs they need to sign a document saying that they won't sue the NYSE or its affiliates. They need to acknowledge they understand the risks of going back to the floor which could include death or respiratory failure or the chance of infecting their family with nineteen. Wow a hearing any pushback about that. Most four traders are expected to sign this document. There are a few firms that employ for traders that do not want to send their people back to the floor because there are balking at a parallel document that the New York Stock Exchanges requiring them to sign The firms that employed floor traders which are various banks and brokerages need to identify the nyse against certain lawsuits meaning. They might end up having to pick up the TAB and kissing nicely. Get sued the Wall Street. Journal's Alexandra Awesome. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having. Me David. The markets the Dow is up six hundred six points in early trading about two and a half percent S. and P. Five hundred up one point nine percent. The Nasdaq composite is up one point. Four percent. Why because there is a sense at least that the worst of the lockdowns are behind us. We often start the week by getting a read from economist. Julia Coronado founder of macro policy perspectives. In New York. Good morning to you. Good morning what do you make of this bounce? Well there's a lot of optimism in the market has you know and it's global it's not just a US phenomenon and there seems to be kind of a best case scenario being priced in that the worst is behind us and we're going to move forward in a pretty linear way with the reopenings and the restarting of the economy. Well I mean psychology is an important part of markets. And I suppose that's Nice but psychology isn't everything when you're talking about a pandemic that's right. We still have this looming uncertainty of the disease. That got us here in the first place and how it evolved and whether this reopening process actually re initiates another wave of infection many unknowns vaccines et CETERA. Lie AHEAD OF US. So for the moment we are sticking to the optimistic scenario but there are many other possible pads. How much credence do you give it when companies come out with their last quarterly results but also look forward and try to make predictions about the rest of the year? I mean we seize on those but To take him seriously well you know? A lot of companies Significant number of companies have actually stops providing guidance and that needs analysts. Having to just really truly guess and the guests is that they're making are optimistic. So right now if you look at analyst earning expectations they're expecting the decline in earnings this year to be more than made up next year which is a very v-shaped recovery for earnings which is not generally what economists are expecting in the real economy always good to talk to Julia. Coronado macropolicy perspectives. Thank you pleasure. WanNa point out an interesting phenomenon in home price data. That was out this morning. This covers march the month. Lockdowns began many folks apparently stopped showing their homes for sale given virus concerns and for those who really were looking to buy the supply of homes shrunk that pushed up home price index. That's out today. Three point nine percent the biggest jump in a year. This case Schiller data covers home prices in twenty metro areas. We know separately that the number of homes sold fell nearly nine percent in March fell eighteen percent in April. The German government is agreed to pay ten billion dollars to keep the country's flagship airline from collapsing. Lufthansa had already closed down its budget subsidiary Germanwings given the covid downturn in travel in return. The German government will now own twenty percent of the airline which plans to sell in three years to get some of its money back. Here's the BBC's Andrew Walker. The German Economy Ministry said before the International Health crisis tons was an operationally healthy company that it was profitable and it has good prospects that has not been enough however to protect the business from the severe commercial blow it and other airlines have been dealt by the pandemic. The German government is stepping in to see the company through the crisis with financial support that include party nationalizing it. It says it will be a silent.

New York David Brancaccio US German government Julia Coronado NYSE Alexander Povich Lufthansa Coronado The Wall Street Journal fever German Economy Ministry BBC Alexandra Awesome Germanwings Schiller Lockdowns Andrew Walker
"lockdowns" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

12:25 min | 4 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"As well as at Bloomberg Dot com time for Bloomberg opinion joined by Bloomberg opinion columnist. Joe In the Sarah Jeff. Thanks so much for joining us. You had a fascinating column couple of days ago talking about you know this whole concept of a lockdown in quarantine. This is something that we haven't necessarily done in some past epidemics in this country and I guess as people think about opening up the economy. Now there's really two camps out there those that are probably a little bit more aggressive about opening up the economy and those that are a little bit more conservative. Talk a little bit about kind of lock downs and how effective they've proven to be in the past. Well they never been used in the past the first time they never became a sort of policy pandemic policy until two thousand six when George Bush asked the government to come up with pandemic plan and the and the scientists who came up with the lockdown idea. they were not infectious disease. Scientists and there was a lot of controversy right at the time. They've been pandemics in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. There was one in nineteen sixty eight. Of course the famous one in nine hundred eighteen absolutely a lot of people stayed inside because they were terrified but there was never a an official an official lockdown. So so the answer is there's no. There's no previous science to know. What good the lockdown does and although it makes a lot of intuitive sense that you would stay inside and therefore void the virus. There's a lot of downsides as we're about to find out when the economy starts to open. Yeah this is what people are saying that. Basically we don't know how effective it is to limit the spread and we know that it creates a lot of problems when it comes to when it when it comes to the economy that said we are seeing a pretty strong correlation and I know correlation is now but it is becoming scientifically accepted that the economy is that shutdown more aggressively and more quickly. Were those that managed to stave off some of the worse effects of this virus that we've seen in places like New York and Milan so from that perspective. How can you dismiss that? As showing the efficacy of this type of shutout. Well I don't I don't dismiss it. But there's also this mass this social distancing there's the fact that eighty percent literally eighty percent of the people who have died in this pandemic have been the elderly whether you inside or outside and then you have states like Texas and Florida which had been very lax on lockdowns and their numbers of deaths are extremely low. So I mean I would argue that you know. It's really unclear as to whether the lockdown as saving lives. We hold open second right there. Where are you? Where are you staying right now? I'm in South Hampton okay. So you're not in the city right correct. Okay and my question is let's say there were no state mandated lockdowns of any sort. Would you feel comfortable going about your business the way that you had in the past and going on the subway? I don't know that's a good question. I think that I I think if I had a mask and gloves I would and I also think that I would probably have to. I'm also sixty eight years old so I'm in the High Risk Group. There's a lot look. Look you know in March. There's no question. I came out to the Hamptons because I was scared. But you know you watch you watch data you watch things happening you watch. What's going to happen to him? And you think to yourself you know. Is this really the right way to continue to proceed and one distinction that I've been making is between the hotspot states and cities like Detroit and New York and New Orleans and places like Houston and Miami and San Diego which have very very very few death? Yeah we'll look Joe Point and Paul this I think is really an important thing and I think that Joe I I feel like you want to Chop my head off. I honestly I just here in the Hamptons. I'm totally jealous. That you're in the Hamptons. I also think this is such a politically fraught issue and the question is if okay. I want to talk about that. That is so right. This is the big problem. Here is the big problem. It as become a political issue. And it's and it's like if my political party believes in lockdown. I believe in lockdown if my political party says lockdowns a BS. Then I'd say that's BS and nobody on either side is willing to just sit down and say let's look at this with fresh eyes. Let's think about this From from point of view of neutrality and science it's not happening everybody on both sides says you know. I'm following the science. I'm following the well. What does that even mean with the lockdown? We're we're we're there is with the sciences unclear. It's Ok now. Take up the issue here right now. You know the compensation Joe is just you know. The cost of the economic cost of lockdown versus the cost in lives. And that's kind of what the reopening debate seems to be evolving too. I think that's absolutely true. And let me let me let me ask you this. This is kind of how I ended my column yesterday. You know quite likely that the virus will will fade in the summertime. Because that's often what happens and then it'll probably come back with a vengeance in October and if that happens and where we opening the economy. Are you going to say well? Let's shut everything down again for three months because back. I really tough. I don't think I don't think anybody's going to agree to that. I just don't think the society is GonNa to that and I think we're going to have to learn to live with this thing with with measures. Like masks and social distancing are less severe than lockdown. We wind up a depression. Thanks so much richer as we gotta run JOE. Jonas Eric columnist for Bloomberg opinion. It's an awesome com. Check it out on Bloomberg Dot com slash opinion. All his great work. This is Bloomberg markets with Lisa Abramowicz Impulse Weenie. On Bloomberg Radio wasn't listening to healthcare officials. The big big thing right now is to continue to test for the virus and contact trace to see to contain the spread of the virus certain important now and will be even more important centers a second wave and when you talk about the contact tracing. There's been a lot of APPs that people been talking. Mostly the apple and Google approach to kind of joint venture there which is really unique in and of itself has been getting most of the press but a startup out there has also been. They think they might have a better mouse. Trap and that jared allgood Co founder and Chief Strategy Officer for the firm to either based in San Francisco. They've got their own APP. Healthy together in the State of Utah is actually adopting it. Jared thanks so much for joining us here. Tell us about your APP and why say a state like Utah would select your verses at Apple Google? Which would seem to be the easy choice. Yeah Good Morning Pollen Lisa. Thanks for having me on Yeah so healthy together. was developed to work in partnership and in conjunction with the Public Health Department of the State of Utah So they approached us Several weeks ago And saw that we had some technology was unique for helping to augment And automate certain parts of the manual contact tracing process so we partner with them to develop the healthy together application both as a front end application and also as back in services and tools that we deploy back into the Department of Health and really what we built as a way for residents to To help the manual Public health contact tracing effort by using an APP on their phone That helps us and them identify Where they've been and who they've been in contact with should they? You know come out positive with covid. Nineteen so manual contract. Go AHEAD NO I. I find this so fascinating. This idea that people are going to help the effort by volunteering to be tracked on their phones. It strikes me that the scope of data is important for this to be effective that the greatest number of people need to be registered contract for this to actually prevent the virus from spreading. Once your advantage over say Google and apple who also have an APP and also have the host of data and the footprint. Yes so something I that I would say. That is First of all healthy together is more than just contact. Tracing application The State of Utah Strategy is to do with that thing testing and tracing so the healthy together platform allows residents to assess themselves to find out if they should get tested for covid nineteen And then if they should we refer them to the nearest testing resource through the application just shortening the time from somebody becoming symptomatic to getting them into the testing process and finding out if they're positive and in quarantine in themselves is a huge part of the value proposition that we've delivered with the State of Utah pertains to contact tracing Our coaches actually not in opposition with the Google and apple approached. I'm Google and apple at least as we understand or not coming out with applications what they've built up as a set of API's the application developers like us can integrate with to To tap into a broader network of contact tracing and. That's something that we see as a as a huge value add We hope to To find a way to work and partner with apple and Google to use those. Api's so that we can augment our current process so you're in the State of Utah. Are there other states here in discussions with? Yeah of course look since Since we released just a few weeks ago in the State of Utah had tremendous amount of inbound from other states who are interested Who are doing similar strategies in terms of standing up more manual contact tracing and then looking for tools and technology to augment and expedite that process. I'm so he had several conversations with other states we will be announcing some partnerships with other states coming soon And Something. That's been interesting to us that you know we learned as we got into this Is it businesses are also participating in contact tracing companies now have You know feeling the pressure to bring their employees back to work And they need to do it in a safe way. And they need to communicate to their team members That they have a plan and a strategy for dealing with the occasion on that. Somebody in their workforce turns out to be positive for in nineteen. And so we're seeing You know lots of interest from companies as well. I'm who wanted to implement tools. And and just figure out the way to respond to this effort using manual and technological contact tracing as well. There's attention for anyone is creating a business in order to help facilitate the social distancing and prevention at this part of the pandemic money at a time when you're providing a service for the social good. How does that tension get resolved with.

lockdowns Joe Point Google Utah apple Bloomberg Dot Bloomberg official George Bush partner Bloomberg Radio New York jared South Hampton High Risk Group Sarah Jeff depression Jonas Eric
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

05:09 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Journal.

"Roy Do you see this economic slowdown affecting the State Budget in Michigan? So we anticipate will probably have a three billion dollar wall in the current fiscal year. That's a big deal. And that's not unique to Michigan at is something that my colleagues across the country and I spent a lot of energy on trying to get the feds to give us the flexibility. We need and to give states additional support in the upcoming supplemental. Every one of us is going to have to make tough decisions in this moment. And the more flexibility assistance. We can get them the federal government the better because Colbert nineteen has wreaked havoc on all of our economies. What kind of tough decisions as it relates to the state budget? Are you having to face now or you think you have to make soon? While we've already done some belt-tightening I've got my cabinet starting to assess their individual budgets. I am working with our state employees. We've had some furlough happening already. We know that the three billion dollar price tag if that's truly what are shortfall and and we don't get the assistance we need from. The federal government will be devastating. We've got five months left in this budget year in which to make that up in and so that's additional pressures and so there are a lot of unknowns in I'm hopeful to have some assurances from the Federal Government Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell had suggested that stage should be able to declare bankruptcy. What do you think of that? I think that's dangerous. I can that it's not particularly. Well thought out that my friend and colleague Governor. Cuomo put it better than anyone else could about. You know what that would mean for the future of our country what it would mean for people. The strength of American eyes of the world to let states go bankrupt. I mean it may be. It was an off the cuff remark. I certainly hope that it's not a strategy because it would be devastating presses. The Asian. What do you think the federal government should be doing to help states? You mentioned giving them the flexibility. But what do you think exactly would be helpful? I think that there's a lot of things that the federal government could do a national strategy around the supply chain. Something that's really important. A national strategy around manufacturing the fact that slobs or manufactured in Italy and that and ninety five masks are manufactured in China by and large we need to make sure that we are focused on rebuilding manufacturing in our country. We also I think would benefit from a national policy strategy. Instead of having states have a patchwork of policies based on who the governor's and think these were all shortcomings but I would just recognize that now we're going to need a lot of assistance as individual states and it is really incumbent on the federal government to be there for US especially in in times like these one. We've paid a dear price for. I think what could have been a lot more planning on the on the National Vice President Mike Pence said that the White House is considering winding down the krona virus. Task Force. Do you think that now's the right time? No I mean the crow viruses here for for the future. I mean this is going to be here for a long time till we have a vaccine until we have got immunity built up till we get serological tests that can tell us whether or not the same unity lasts for a period of time. And who hasn't and there's so many unknowns and to start talking about wrapping up this task force says it's premature and I think it flies in the face a lot. The experts have told us in terms of how long are we going to be dealing with Kobe? Nineteen what do you think it'll mean for your state if there's not a centralized group at the White House. Helping coordinate the nationwide response. Well I think as difficult as it's spend to get access to all of these implements that are critical component of attesting. It'll be even harder. I think that it's been good to have a primary point of contact once we need help from FEMA or the Army Corps of Engineers etc and so to wrap it up prematurely I think would be declaring victory too early. We have to get through the fall at the very least and that would be my hope that they keep intact through them this morning. President Trump said the task force wasn't being dismantled. But that is focused would be changing more toward reopening the economy and developing a vaccine. Meanwhile in Michigan the economic damage is becoming more clear on Tuesday. Detroit Carmaker Fiat. Chrysler said lost almost two billion dollars last quarter and Ford projected. It would lose five billion dollars in the coming.

federal government Michigan Federal Government Senate Majo White House Roy Detroit Cuomo Mcconnell Mike Pence President Colbert Ford Vice President Chrysler Mitch Trump Kobe Italy
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

10:39 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Journal.

"Are You WANNA closet? I am I mean my wife's closet. Yeah she has a fabulous look. We'll tell her you said that the best thing about it is that the acoustics are great. I must say Nice. Well Yeah I mean yeah it doesn't it doesn't reverberate with all the clothes exactly where where are you. I am in the library of the governor's residence okay. Have you been working from home most days? Yes Governor Whitmer. State has the third highest turnovers deaths in the country. It's also been suffering economically it's auto sector has been hit especially hard after a slow recovery from the two thousand eight crash. I think that we've made more announcements in terms of auto jobs in the first fifteen months of me being an office and we had in decades and now of course all of that is in jeopardy and I think about the Auto Sector. We know that the whole world was moving toward connected shared vehicles. Now we still move toward shared vehicles after our experiences. Cova nineteen thing. That's a big unknown. It may or may not be good for the auto industry and I think that's something that we will be grappling with as a globe but certainly here in Michigan. That's something that will impact where we are headed a lot of people in the United States and around the world right now talk about the trade offs between public health and economic health. I think Michigan. Right now has somewhere in the ballpark of forty thousand confirmed corona virus cases in four thousand deaths. But at the same time. There's roughly I think. A quarter of Michigan's workforce that is without jobs right. Now how do you view the trade off between those two things? I get very uncomfortable even talking about it as a trade off. I think that it's really incumbent. On leaders to make decisions with the best science and the best data we know that prematurely reengaging will create a second wave that will have greater economic devastation associated with it on top of course the paramount concern of loss of life in so as we are navigating these next steps. I think it's really important that we stay tethered to the epidemiology. The science the building out of our public health systems to ensure that as Cova nineteen presents were able to keep it from community spread. That overtakes our state where we would have to go back into a stay home order. That's what we want to avoid at all costs and I think regardless of how you feel about the decisions that have made to. This date am hopeful everyone can be unified around the physician that none of us wants to do this again later. This year looking at the science is something. Governor Whitman talks about nearly every time someone asks her about reopening but businesses are wondering how Michigan uses that science to determine what can open or not. The governor has said. There's a list of things. She considers asking the questions of you know what was the nature of the work is indoors or outdoors. Does the interface directly with the public or not Is there are there implements associated with the work where people are using the same machinery or tools? These are all important questions that go into assessing the level of risk associated with different aspects of our economy. The lower risk ones are the things that come online. I but the work that we're doing his hand in hand with industry leaders and public health experts are. Is there anything that your public health advisers have recommended that the state does that? You have decided not to do because you worried that the economic impact would be to significant well. There's I think that there's always tension between the public health experts and industry experts who are of course eager to get back to work and there's so much that we don't know about this fire. Sorry My dog concern was your dog's name Kevin Kevin. I like that. Yeah so happens when you're teenagers. Name your dog. I mean the nature of this virus is that it's novel we know so much more about it and our ability to combat it. We've learned so much in the last month. Between now and the next month that passes or knowledge will have grown so much. I mean. We're now in the moment where Pfizer's starting to produce vaccines here in Michigan. They're testing them on on people. They've got the first trials started. We're learning at such a rapid pace and I think the epidemiologists naturally say there are so many unknowns that it's hard to set dates and know that we're going to be able to meet them and yet industry wants to see what the path looks like and so there is that tension I wouldn't say that they're mutually exclusive. But that's always the tension and and that's what we're trying to navigate. I think the public health experts would say. Let's just stay in a stay at home posture for the time. Being with an end date and my judgment was that that would be too much for people to accept that the psychology of being in this moment is that is a moment and that eventually life will resume and so to have it unending. I thought it would be harder to take than if we had to do. Some short extensions but even with an dates which is currently set for May Fifteenth. Some in Michigan are having a hard time with the state home mortars people have expressed anger at the government. I by creating a giant traffic jam and then by rallying on foot around the capital with some protesters even carrying firearms into the State House. An argument that many of the protesters made was that Governor. Whitman's orders had gone too far and violated their individual liberties the viruses here. It's going to be here so we need to get out and live our lives in quit taking. Our economy deepened to socialism. It's time to let people go back to a dance. All there is to. Did you anticipate when you made some of the state home orders and when you did close some of the businesses which I think were more intense than some other states. Did you anticipate that people in Michigan would protest and push back in the way that they have so we had to be more aggressive because our experience with covert nineteen was worse? Michigan is the tenth most populous state in the nation and we have the third highest number of deaths and so it was important for us to be more aggressive. I knew also. There was an organized effort to start riling people up and organizing a protest with the representation of different advocacy groups there. It was clearly a very political action that was taken. It is along the traditional partisan lines and it wasn't a surprise to me that it felt more like a rally than Statement of people who are unhappy about the state home order when it was unfortunate. Because it's congregating like that without wearing masks or protective equipment and getting close to one another and touching one another is precisely how Cova nineteen spreads and so the rally in and of itself might be the one thing that keeps us in a need to have a stay home order which is a sad irony. How does that factor into your decisions going forward? Because obviously the success of any of these measures depends on whether or not people follow them or not and what we're seeing from some of these protesters as you say some of them are not following. So how can you connect with those groups to get them to go along with the suggestions that you're making well? The vast majority of people are doing the right thing. I mean or a state of almost ten million people. We've seen you know hundreds. Maybe a thousand people show up at the. Capitol. They're loud. They are making a statement and they got a lot of coverage but it's a fraction of the number of people in the state when people stay home. You see the curve flatten mess precisely what's happened in Michigan. We're at a plant Ho. We are at a fraction of where we thought we would be in terms of culpa nineteen and that demonstration was a slim minority of people in the state. The real story here is that most people are doing what we need to do. And it's making a difference in saving lives. It does not just protesters. Though there are Republican lawmakers that are saying that these measures are effectively killing the economy and the the state is lifting the restrictions. Too slowly. How do you respond to that? Why I've been sharing the data. I think that it's really important that we we not give into political agendas and we follow the public out. We follow the science and we crunch the data. We have a strategy going forward to mitigate risk. It's easy to say let's just reopened. People are tired of this. The hard work is understanding where we can safely re-engage measuring it along the way and making sure that it's safe to turn the dial a little bit more. We know that a second wave can be more deadly and more economically devastating. And the first and so we've got to be really smart about it and I'm not gonNA listen to polls and politicians and tweets to make decisions. I'm going to be listening to our epidemiologists working with our business community and making sure that we've got smart reengagement agenda so that we avoid a second wave and start to reengage sectors of our economy where there's lower risk far. The state has allowed some non essential things to reopen. Like can start selling flowers again and people can start. Motor-boating engulfing Michigan residents will also be allowed to travel to their second homes and Construction. Projects can start backup. But this slow. Reopening could impact the long term future of the state's finances things like pension funds social programs in school budgets are all now under threat that threat after the break.

Michigan Auto Sector Governor Whitman Cova Governor Whitmer State House United States Pfizer Kevin Kevin
"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

10:57 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"This is Potomac. Watch welcome back. I'm Kyle Peterson with my colleagues. Kim Strassel and Bill mcgurn so Kim the Senate is back in action in Washington. Dc. This week what. What is on the agenda there? Well you hear a lot of Democrats complaining about what is on the agenda. They did not want comeback in the first place. They view it as too dangerous Mitch. Mcconnell the Senate leader his argument is that if you're GonNa talk about essential workers that the people we elect to make our laws and Watch over our government are indeed essential in that there is pressing business and so among the things the Senate will be dealing with our Some nominations including two key positions like top Intel posts Some Pentagon nominees a Federal Reserve nominees which Republicans have made the argument. These people need to be in place in the middle of a crisis. Like this Democrats are mad because among the other nominees is a judge to the DC Circuit Court Justin Walker But you also are having committees deal with budget issues because that is going to be coming up here starting in the fall Some expired surveillance court provisions That are out there that that have because they expired in March of an hampering our intelligence community. They're going to try to get that fixed into the president And Again Democrats very unhappy about this. They would prefer to be talking about more spending But as the houses not even back There isn't much of a potentialities for another bill like that soon. And so I think we're seeing a pause in general as people look at what we put out so far in trying to decide what might be necessary next. But the angling on a possible phase for corona virus. Relief Bill is continuing a pace. I mean Mitch. Mcconnell has laid out his red line he wants some liability protections for businesses. That opened up The House is reportedly going to be working up. Bill and president trump on Sunday made clear one of his goals He said quote. I WANNA see a payroll tax cut on both sides of very strong woman because that's going to really put people to work unquote bill. What do you make of that as an idea I would say it's probably the one of the least bad ideas because you're basically letting people keep more of their own money and that's a good thing? The reason I'm skeptical is that it's a temporary and we've seen before. Do you know during the Obama years that it has a temporary lift and then in less the incentives are changed permanently It just it just runs out on the little Scott. I understand the urge to do something and again. I think it's probably better to let people keep their money than throw other money. At least you're throwing people's own money at them Instead of other people's money but I'm skeptical. That is going to do. I'm skeptical. That is going to have the stimulatory effect that they that they think it's going to have or that. It's GonNa last long enough. Finally we talked last week about the allegation that Joe Biden assaulted staffer in Nineteen ninety-three which he denies his accuser tear read says she filed some kind of complaint though the contents of that or not quite clear and Joe Biden. Last week said that if any complaint did exist it would be in the National Archives which he asked to search for it. So here's what has since happened in the stakes. A bit of explaining the National Archives said. It didn't have any such records but the Senate must have them people reading through the Senate rules figured that they must be personnel records like that must be held at the General Services Administration than the GSA said the records are at the National Archives and finally the Senate secretary wrote to Biden and said that even if there were any complaint life this The law governing that says that complaints are strictly private in the Senate secretary would have no authorization to release it. Kim I mean I find it hard to believe that the Biden campaign didn't have this nail down better when it said on Friday that any complaint like this would be the National Archives and the National Archive should release it exactly because whether this was just ineptitude or they didn't understand the process it has certainly fueled accusations that Biden was leading people on a wild goose chase and that this was all designed to deflect etc also put more focus on those papers that Biden has in Maryland At the university assist suggesting his private papers need to be released. Because perhaps there's handwritten notes or any kind of reference potential at all to This woman and whether or not there's anything to her accusations Now Biden said his archives do not contain personnel files. A He is still I in Maryland is should be. It's Delaware papers. Excuse me And that he is You know resisting releasing all of those which are currently being curated by the University of Delaware More interestingly to me is this is exposed a wider rift. I think between Traditional Democrats and far-left Democrats many of whom were Bernie supporters? You have seen just in the last couple of days. A number of them to social media and demand that burning get back in the race or suggested that he should because this moment is not over. Joe Biden is not reached the number of delegates he needs to clinch the nomination and So there's a growing concern whether it's politically motivated or out of true fear that They've got a problem with their nominee. There's still seems to be a possibility that something will come of the Senate requests so the Biden camp has written back asking for some clarifications of the Senate secretary asking if even if the Senate can't disclose a complaint asking whether the Senate could possibly disclose the existence or non-existence of complaint and then also asking if the Senate could possibly provide a complaint to the person who initially filed it suggesting that maybe the Senate could give it over to Tara Reid who could then release it so. It's possible that something more will come to this bill. I mean if not we. It seems we're at a of a dead end trying to trying to understand what is alleged to have happened And is denied about happening in a hallway nineteen ninety-three I think. This is where we were always going to end up unless they find the complaint. My understanding is she's quoted as saying that even in the complaint she didn't really say sexual assault. She just said that actions that made her uncomfortable. So I you know when you when you wait. Twenty seven years or something to bring forth a case where there are no witnesses. No one else in that hall. I think you're just down to A. He said she said the reason. That this Still royals people bow is because Joe Biden as Mika Brzezinski said Wants a standard where every woman is to be believed when she makes such an assault except when they say something about Joe and I just think that this hypocrisy and double standards are just coming out from this move and especially the way if you compare it again to How they behaved To Brett Kavanagh's accusers and how they behaved Toward Al Franken's Accusers in the past the mantra was women must be believed to now all the people that said that before. Saying we didn't really mean believed we meant heard will they're very different things And it's just it's all coming out in the wash down I. I don't think we'll ever get to the truth of the the Tara Reid story but people are going to have to judge all the actions whether Joe Biden looks like he's being transparent than those. Those are all factors. People will take into consideration when they cast their votes in that the perception of transparency seems to me. That's what will increase the pressure on him to open his personal archives at the University of Delaware. Even if not releasing all that information all those documents setting up some kind of commission that could sort through them and see if there's any mention of terror read in their One final thing so a lot of people have compared the way. That Biden is being treated here with the way that the allegations against Justice Brad. Kavanagh were handled but bill. You mentioned another comparison Al Franken and rotor Tuesday column about that. What's your argument there? What is what makes Franken Such an interesting comparison here. Well let's let's focus on one just one critic who encapsulates all this Kirsten Gillibrand so Leeann Tweeden went on a radio show and said that Al Franken before in the Senate when while on a USO trip to the troops He he forcibly kissed. Her stuck his tongue down her throat and so forth and then she also produced picture where she's sleeping in a flak jacket and he's either grabbing. Her breasts are pretending to grab her breasts. So that happened in late November that she went with her accusation within three weeks out. Franken resigned and the first senator to call for his resignation. Democratic senator was Kirsten Gillibrand and She called for for him not to wait for an ethics investigation right. He needed to step down right away. Thirty five other. Democrats sign that same letter. Al Franken himself that he was innocent This wasn't as bad as it looked And that he would be cleared by an ethics investigation but he read the tea leaves. He lost the complete support of caucus so he resigned and everyone was satisfied. That's how believed the woman was supposed to work. You make an accusation. You don't wait for an investigation and you force someone to resign. When now they have Joe Biden their their their candidate for president Gillibrand has endorsed him. So it's a different and to do that to to do that. They have to say again. It is not that we meant. Women should be believed in what they say. It's to mean that they should be they should be heard vetted and have an investigation to get to the truth. None of those qualifiers were there with al. Franken much less Brad Kavanagh so it's highlighted and people have called Senator Gillibrand on it because she had one standard for Al Franken who is expendable and another for Joe Biden who Apparently thinks is not a dependable. Thank you bill. Thank you all for listening. We'll be back later this week. With another edition of Potomac Watch..

Joe Biden Senate Al Franken Bill mcgurn Kirsten Gillibrand president National Archives Kim Strassel University of Delaware Tara Reid Mcconnell Kyle Peterson Brett Kavanagh secretary assault Potomac DC Circuit Court Washington Delaware
"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

11:58 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Watch more than half of states have now eased their social distancing restrictions plus the Senate secretary says it has no power to release potential complaints against Joe Biden if any happened to exist. Welcome I'm kyle? Peterson with the Wall Street Journal sitting in today for Polish ago we are joined by my colleagues Kim Strassel Low Kim. Hi Kyle and Bill mcgurn High Bill. Hi Kyle Twenty. Seven states now have begun to slowly reopen and the Kaiser Family Foundation has a nice table showing what different governors are doing so in Iowa for example restaurants are open but at fifty percent capacity in Texas movie theaters in libraries or a twenty five percent capacity collar. Colorado rolled back. Its stay at home order but it still applies to certain high risk groups Kim I mean how do we think this process is going so far? Well to me. It is an expression of the beauty of federalism in that. So much of what we've seen in the virus. So far is ben about Federal government issuing guidelines and holding daily briefings about ways in which it was giving support to different states to deal with ventilators and other pressing medical concerns. Now we're seeing the states take back over at lifting these shelter and order orders and in some cases as you say beginning to allow even non essential businesses to reopen and often with reduced capacity. And they're doing it all on the basis of their data and state by State even county by county differences for instance Gavin Newsom and California's is going to keep stricter prohibitions on on bigger cities but allow some of the counties to begin doing a more commerce. That things are quieter in those areas. So I think the big question though the threat to all of this is that we're seeing This flood of newspaper stories all warning. The things are going to get bad again and that it's too soon and it's going to put a lot of pressure on these governors to justify their actions and it's too soon to know if new infections don't start showing up fully for fourteen days but bill. It does seem to me at least that. There's still something fundamentally mysterious about this. I mean take Florida as an example. So the governor there Rhonda Santa's was widely criticized some weeks ago for being slow to lock down in the first place but if go through an eyeball some of the numbers for various states. I mean Florida does. The graph for Florida doesn't look that different from Michigan or Georgia and it looks better than Illinois and Texas and Pennsylvania and New York remember Florida's a larger population and it has a much larger population than the elderly people go to the Florida. State website. There's a presentation that the governor made There's one yesterday but there's one from April twenty ninth where he pointed out all the predictions about deaths about hospital stays and so forth and Florida and how wildly off they are. Now I don't i. It's too early to declare victory but he does have a point that people were wrong in these predictions about Florida's doing very well compared to New York for example with against similarly large populations But the other part about it if you read it. What his approach has been is not just opening or reopening. He's done it in different places you know some of the counties. He hasn't quite let reopen the same way you know. He's trying to measure the response to the particular place in what was most interesting to me is approach seems to be implicitly instead of concentrating on shielding the entire population which is really hard to do. And that's what the lockdown does and keeping everyone from work. Why don't we concentrate on trying to shield? The most vulnerable populations primarily older people with preexisting conditions like diabetes or A heart condition and it seems to be doing reasonably well and I think that's I think that's a smart approach to the promise scarcity. How do we do all these things without enough testing without Enough resources and I think I think more and more states are going to adapt that approach to their own circumstances. You know if if he doesn't have a huge burst in In debts and again that won't come as we mentioned for two or three weeks because of the lack and the questions about what's essential and non essential and the right way to approach. Some of these restrictions is still causing some friction. There's a church. Virginia that filed a lawsuit. Kim saying that it's pastor has received a criminal citation for holding a service with sixteen people who were all standing six feet apart and observing social distancing in a sanctuary that seats two hundred twenty five people and the Justice Department now has filed a statement of interest in that case essentially backing up the church. Yeah and we're going to see more of this. This is the Lighthouse Fellowship. Church on Chincoteague Island and DOJ as you say put forward a statement of interest arguing that the church had a strong case that its first met rights had been violated by this order banning gatherings of more than ten people. And so you know we're seeing continued protests around the country and even when they're not protest we are seeing individual businesses and a lobby groups and industry associations Really questioning some of these governors rules. That are allowing. Some services aren't allowed other services and asking them to justify some of these decisions and I think what it overall signifies is that the country generally was willing to to put up with this essentially a month at least from the federal government's perspective in its guidelines longer in certain individual states these social distancing guidelines in the lockdown but Folks are now making their own decisions about relative risk. They are eager to get the economy going. They are concerned about as this case shows violations of fundamental liberty. It all means that we're entering a new phase of this where you know and I do wonder even if there are resurgences of the virus and certain places if they're simply going to be a tolerance anymore out there among average Americans for the kind of very strict shutdowns that we just went through on the question of resurgences one piece of potentially bad news was a leak of a draft government report that projects that by June the US could have about two hundred thousand new cases every day with about three hundred thousand or excuse me three thousand deaths every day. That was a banner headline on Monday. But then the story. It's a little bit complicated in strange. So those numbers biller on a slide deck with the CDC's logo the Centers for Disease Control but the Washington Post says the CD's disavowed that report. And then the professor who work That modeling was says. It was preliminary and not complete. And he doesn't know how it wound up on a slide deck. So how how are we to make sense of this bill? Well what do you make sense of it i? This is just the latest revision of a model. I mean we've had revisions through some of them quite dramatic because many of the earlier models fail to predict Or wildly overestimated deaths and hospitalizations. And how many ventilators with Dr vowed. She said that the the models are based on what goes you know. There's a lot of assumptions and it. Just I think again. It should highlight are modesty in relying on these for decisions. Were making some extraordinary decisions. And we can't treat the number that comes out of a model as infallible Which I think we've done. I think clearly there's going to be more deaths. The question is how many more and in what pays I mean. There's a lot of evidence to suggest that the lockdowns lockdowns and flattening the curve were designed to really accomplish one thing to make sure that our our healthcare services are hospitals weren't overwhelmed by spike in cases and so forth and it seems to have done that but the longer you continue a lockdown with a lot of people not exposed absent vaccine the moment you open up then they become vulnerable again so it's not clear to me what the end game is here and then if the end game is just well. There's GonNa be a lot of deaths when that happens. We'll could be argument. That by continuing to try to flatten the curve. Keep down these dramatic lockdowns of the entire entire populations not really reducing this so much just spreading them out over a much longer time and that delay can be useful if you're able to come up with treatments so a couple pieces of good news on the other side of the ledger. Pfizer is now doing human trials in the US for its vaccine candidate and it says it hopes to have millions of doses available by this fall if the trials go well and then on Friday the food and Drug Administration gave emergency use authorization to a potential treatment rim desa veer developed by Gilead Sciences and Kim Jong companies have received a lot of criticism in recent years over prescription prices but the Journal had an editorial recently saying essentially think the US has this deep reservoir of private Pharma Research. That's especially the case when you read these stories about this new Pfizer Vaccine Because it's a goes about a vaccination in an entirely different way fascinating. Normally the way that we vaccinate people against disease as we give them a a weakened virus strain and it inspires the body to produce antibodies and then And you are protected. What's really interesting about this? Pfizer approach and you do have some other companies that are are trying the same thing as they use. What's called Messenger are in a Basically tells the body to make a spike in proteins of the in this case a corona virus. And it's more stable. They think than these weaken virus Strains but also it's faster to produce and so that's why you are seeing when you take that new approach along with a combination of of skipping through some aspects of vaccine testing. We've normally done such as animal. Trials running some trials concurrently. It's why you begin to see the potential hope of a aback seen as they are saying Bhai September. Now we still don't know if if it has efficacy if it's going to work that's what these trials are about but you know that is that is months and months ahead of the original estimates of when you would get a vaccine and to be clear there still only talking about a couple of million doses and it would probably be reserved for the most vulnerable populations but it In theory rapidly speeds. Up The timeline and then rendez severe as you mentioned also showing some positive results in some of its cases so this is a whole new way of looking at this because a lot of what we've been talking about is is. How do you manage? How do you get through until the point? It which you you have a cure or a a a treatment or a vaccine every day. Thanks as you said to the incredible ingenuity of our Pharma companies and research industries. Were speeding up that timeline..

Florida Kim Kyle Twenty US Federal government Texas Colorado Bill mcgurn Senate Kaiser Family Foundation Kim Strassel Joe Biden Wall Street Journal Gavin Newsom Peterson New York diabetes Pfizer secretary Virginia
"lockdowns" Discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

10:13 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on Coronacast

"This is an ABC podcast though. This is corona cast of podcast all about the virus. I'm physician and journalists daughter Norman Swan and I'm health reported Teigen Tyler. It's Wednesday the twenty ninth of April saw. Norman sites is starting to slowly. Wind back restrictions. So I can we talk about lockdowns and the benefit of hindsight Australia has so far had less than one hundred carbon nineteen deaths and the case numbers a small. Can we tell yet whether the lockdowns when necessary? That's a rose have questioned. It depends on how many deaths we would have tolerated in Australia. If we hadn't had the lockdown the predictions were pretty. Dr And you can compare ourselves to other countries so for example Taiwan Responded very early to the epidemic by identifying cases and moving forward on contact tracing and `isolation in quarantine as a result. The Taiwanese economy has not shut down at all and they've had no lock down. Because I think we've only had a few hundred cases so Taiwan is a success story because of early intervention when the numbers were really low and not letting them get high. Take a country like Sweden for example where? They've really not locked down. It's been voluntary voluntary social distancing the weekends in Stockholm people out in the streets. They're going to bars. They're mixing almost no social distancing actually happening and they've had two thousand deaths in a country of ten million people so less than half the population of Australia far less than half and they've got a two thousand S computer eighty they. They don't like that box. They say well it might get us to a point of they don't use the word. Herod immunity but they might get a level of immunity and prevent a second wave. Which of course Australia is vulnerable to? But we think it's less likely because we've almost eliminated spread in Australia so without lock down in Australia. We would have had a lot of deaths hard to say how many but we prepare to accept pro rata on the Swedish experienced. Five thousand deaths that we would have been happy with that for the sake of the economy going down but could be an awful lot worse than that with our hospitals overwhelmed. Very very quickly and You in a much worse situation than that so depends on what you're prepared to tolerate and then other people argue well. has really been excess deaths because it's the elderly who dine. They would have died anyway and there's no question. Multiple Studies of the data have shown that there are vast numbers of excess deaths to corona virus. This novel Corona virus around the world quickly in Europe. Or some of the best outta comes from that is absolutely the case and certainly excess deaths in New York in the Younger Age Group. Because they don't have the proportion of elderly people that the the Italians have and young people who who've also been getting into spital and not doing well in New York state so I don't think we would have tolerated that mistrial. I think we've dodged a bullet and if we can keep things at a very low level we may not see second wave. What do we know about? Maybe the deaths that have happened because of the lockdowns though so people who We know for example that people haven't been presenting to emergency departments that perhaps there might be an increased suicides. Do we know. Can we put a number on those debts? You can speculate. The numbers are no hard numbers as yet Emergency Department say. They're quiet and not seeing what they would have normally seen with heart attacks. But I think that you know the the theory would be that you're seeing you. You may not see a net increase in deaths in the community from Noncovic. Nineteen causes because guess from car. Accidents will drop because people aren't driving as much but you may well see more deaths from suicide because of Distress in the community and increase in anxiety and depression and the heart attacks story is not clear. There is a sense that there may be fewer people turning out with heart attacks dying at home. We'll only know that after a while and then with cancer. There's disturbing evidence that people are not presenting with cancer. Symptoms were fewer significantly fewer notifications to cancer registration. First three months of two thousand and twenty venue would have expected so fewer diagnoses which suggests that maybe time shifted in turn out to be late diagnoses. Lutron this year or next year when they're much harder to treat it's fascinating stuff. It's really hard to estimate what this what the cost of. This is going to be until much after the fact do but I think you can assume because of the volume in other countries which did not have the lockdown taking into account all those possibilities a huge excess death rate. So if we take all of those things that you mentioned into consideration was the lockdown with it in my mind teagan absolutely we could not tolerate administrator six thousand deaths if we had the pro rata of Sweden. Could well have been much worse than that so that younger people could end up going. You're still go to bars and restaurants and another lockdown has much bigger implications than that. But I think that as humane ethical society. That's what we do. We're actually getting a bit more insight into how. Australians feeling about lockdown at the ABC has partnered with. Vox Pop labs with a project called the nineteen monitor and it's showing that. Australians are more anxious and more confused and more board they are and lonely and decreasing optimism and happiness. This was a survey of I. Think two thousand three hundred people and a representative sample historian population. A lot of people you know. Thirty percent transferred transition from working in the office to working home and people are confused as well. So all that's going on but at the same time the majority of people recognize the need for the lockdown and there is a huge approval of the action of the federal government and state governments and huge approval ratings of the prime minister and the state premiers for the action they've taken and some degree of nervousness about lifting the restrictions. So people are maybe less happy within themselves but they're actually pretty happy with the decisions that have been made here but they are moving on. I think this was done a week or so ago and people are moving onto. What's the economy is going to be like? And what's life going to be like? After the lockdown so people are beginning to focus forward which is a good thing and worrying about in quite rightly about what's left of the economy and how to rebuild afterwards well Karenna cast is all about answering your question. So let's talk to a couple of them now rob asking about the government's contact tracing APP and he's wondering why the critical time is set to fifteen minutes. Is it safe to be with Kovic? Nineteen four- fourteen minutes? The fifteen minutes comes from SARS one also comes from early evidence from the Chinese breakouts in Wuhan and elsewhere. The seems to be prolonged contact. You got family clusters. It seemed to come from family. Events family clusters where people were together. A lot of time in healthcare settings where There's been close contact between the health care worker and the patient from for a longer period of time. So it's reasonable evidence that casual contact does not seem to be at risk. The contradiction to that is places like New York high density populations where the amount of sprayed is anecdotally. More casual than just fifteen minutes. So I think what what? The APP defines is probably the commonest contact causes spread where it's sustained for a few minutes in fairly close proximity. We are likely to pick up droplets where people who picked up SARS one from surfaces in the Willoughby and people who picked up to so all of this is doing is picking up that if you're out for a walk and somebody walks past you and cuffs out a plume and they've got covered nine covered. Nineteen virus you could catch it from that. It might not be a very large doors. But one of the one of the reasons why they're social distancing and we're living much more by ourselves and not mixing his family's not having family funerals weddings and so on is though sustained gatherings where you can't distance where we've had blowouts and that's the theoretical reason why you're worried about schools and I think the savior grace of schools. Going back at the moment is there's not much covered nineteen in the community. Kids don't seem to be big transmitters. They are transmitters. Were not big transmitters but schools still may turn out to be spreading source. But how long do you actually keep schools lockdown because it's a critical part of a child's upbringing? And we just gotTa take some risk at this stage of the of the pandemic so fifteen minutes in summary. There is the evidence to support it from overseas experience in more than one and more than SARS was SARS too but it doesn't exclude casual contact. But they've got to make a decision at some point not to overwhelm the system. One last quick question tests asking. When is it likely that will be able to travel interstate again? I imagine that day will come when there's equalization between the states in terms of the infection rate when everybody's down about zero for a few days in a row and or you might get one or two then. I think that they'll start to think about interstate. Travel the problem with interstate travel. Why the borders went up. Was that states like New South Wales partly because of cruise ships but also Sydney Airport being a major entry point for travellers. That the New South Wales and Victoria were really problems for other states. But now the Victorian newsouth where it was really onto very low levels the case for upstate borders is going to be pretty strong in the next three or four weeks out of phone. Well that's all for today. If you like the podcast leave us a review on Apple? Podcast helps people find us. Find us on all the other usual podcast finding places as well as the ABC listener. And we will see tomorrow. You've been listening to an ABC. Podcast discover more great. Abc podcasts live radio and exclusives on the IB. Say Listen APP..

Australia ABC New York Sweden Taiwan Norman Swan South Wales Europe Stockholm Emergency Department Teigen Tyler Lutron Sydney Airport Noncovic cancer depression Younger Age Group Apple
"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

12:11 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"But the governor. There Brian Kemp is getting some pushback. From President Trump at the virus briefing on Thursday president said quote. I didn't like to see spas opening. Frankly I didn't like to see a lot of things happening and I wasn't happy with it and I wasn't happy with Brian Kemp Cham. How do you referee this one? Well Look I. I sort of wish the president hadn't jumped into that arena only because You know up until now his messages ban we're GONNA leave this to the states. We have provided some guidelines. One has to presume. That governor camp is being advised by health officials about how best to reopen. He clearly feels as though his State is ready to do this. And by the way we're going to see one of the great things about our federalist system as it does allow for a lot of different experimentation Z- Different states are going to try different. Things one hopes this turns out well And you know but I don't think it necessarily helps anyone especially other governors who are on the brink of reopening to to be fearful that they're going to get a tongue lashing for the president for stepping out and doing what he's been talking about doing the need to do for so long which is getting economies going again. Well the the main complaint seems to be that he's president. Trump's seem to think that Georgia has not followed those federal guidelines so the federal government the White House put out these guidelines suggesting that after Getting criteria were had after you know. The number of cases was declining for fourteen days criteria like that that would be the appropriate time to open so this is another part of his his briefing. He said I said he's speaking about his conversation with the governor of Georgia. Said you make your own decision. I told him that. I said you're not IMA guidelines but I'm letting you make your own decision so I mean is he is. Is he outside of those federal criteria. Bill I'm not sure. Look their guidelines right. This is the best determination by the federal government. And I think the president Correctly said look. It's up to you. I'm not going to interfere. I think could have said. I'm a little leery about some of the stuff tattoo parlors lawns hairdressers but they are guidelines and I I'm not sure. This is the right response. I think the beauty of federalism is we're going to see different places. Try Different things and some are going to make some mistakes You know we hope they're not big mistakes and so forth but it's it's better to have fifty different experiments not have one big mistake going around so I to Louis. Kim wished the president hadn't said an also what's really interesting to me. Is that You know the president had his own critique but on the left you just get this sense. That people are rooting for Georgia to fail. I just I think that's so perverse. You know. I want him to succeed. I hope he succeeds. My get my my impression is of all these states It's going to be a mixed back. They're going to learn something that went well and some things didn't I don't I don't think I don't think it's going to be a You know one hundred percent either way but we should be able to learn from them and I think we should be rooting for Georgia to succeed. Even if we disagreed with the step that the governor took it is interesting to see some of the photos coming out of people in Salons barbershops with masks on this is maybe what the rest of the country will look like. Once they opened up. I mean whether or not whether or not the decision to open some of these specific services. You know it's pretty hard to social distance when you're getting a tattoo a believe that aside but it does seem like there will be some lessons here that the rest of us can learn from him. Yeah absolutely and look Base especially because there is such a variation in the way that states are doing things You know for instance. I know that a Alaska's reopening as well too now that state was not as hard hit as Georgia but In about on the same time line leading some things get back into place you know. And and they're they're having rules. Where only one person can go into the hairdresser at a time right? So all designed to to maintain some sort of social distancing roles to the extent that you can If restaurants are opening Only twenty five percent capacity. And you have to make a reservation and the and the restaurant has to make sure that everyone is seated apart from each other. So everyone's GonNa be trying these different experiments and see how they see how they go And I just think again the other thing that's GonNa be really important in. This is also making sure that some in the media and liberal critics don't get to define what counts as a quote or unquote successful opening the standard. That they are going to set is no mortgage. No one gets another case ever You know we'll then. Obviously that's not going to be something that any of these states see happen The question the reason we did the flattening the curve in the beginning was trying to make sure we didn't overwhelm our hospitals and we're still going to have cases and in some places maybe cases grow but that doesn't necessarily mean that this is a failure and some of those epidemiology questions. It seems are still the jury's out so there's been some new testing on people just randomly population testing in New York. They were going to supermarkets and stores and blood testing people to see if they had any antibodies and immunities to the virus and governor. Andrew Cuomo has said that In New York City it was about twenty one percent of thirteen hundred people who had shown some antibodies as if they'd had some contact or some immunity in New York state it was about fourteen percent and then similarly there was the testing on the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt and it was about seventeen percent of the crew. That tested positive bill. So we still don't know who out there. Circulating in the general population may have had it and not known it yet. Yeah I mean as you point out. We don't know the real answer is what we do know from. Some of these is that the evidence looks that lots more people have it than we thought before right and if you believe in herd immunity that's that may be a good thing if we get closer To the so so we don't know it looks like it was far more widespread. We know it was earlier than we first detected so We're still grappling with those questions. I look I think our again. Our Com- our Colleague Coleman Jenkins has said like if the solution if you know keeping everyone inside. It's kind of like if you're standing in a pool and people say there's a big disease but if you're underwater you won't get it well. That's not really a solution. You can't underwater forever and I think we're still we still haven't The president hasn't done this quite yet. He's given some guidelines and suggestions but we don't know what the end game is because it seems implicit in some of the advice. Dr Burks inductive. Ouchi that we're just GONNA have to wait it out you know. Be Shut up longer than we thought you know until there is a vaccine or somehow magically dies away whereas again the opposite view of that. Is You know we need to get the people infected for whom it's not really a threat and protect the vulnerable people especially as we see people in nursing homes with other conditions from contracting that so I think the states different actions are going clarify those questions. Meanwhile the federal effort to aid people to provide some relief to people who are under lockdown has moved forward since we had our last five cast congress passed. The House passed a deal to extend the paycheck protection program with four Republican. No votes including Thomas Massie and one democratic no vote that was a OC Alexandria Cossio Cortez President Trump signed the deal extending it so the paycheck protection program should be up and running running again here shortly. But there's continued wrangling. Over who should get the money Ruth Chris's criticized forgetting twenty million dollars. Shake Shack ultimately decided to forego ten million dollars and Kim now the Treasury is suggesting that maybe public companies all public companies should follow suit. Either forgo the money or pay it back yet. Now that in turn seems to be Almost going the opposite direction. Look I think one of the problems here is that treasury didn't really define the rules clearly and let's be honest that the businesses that did go and obtain that money and yes that's causing all of this outrage but You know they. They had applications like anybody else they put them in. They were approved They went through the process as it was set out. Now I think the question. The good question that is being raised is Does it make more sense for public companies to If they have access to other forms of capital do we encourage or require them to to use that I and really maintain this fund for smaller businesses that simply don't have access to any additional funds and he looked you know? It was notable that you know shake shack gave its money back then it was able to do an equity offering and that is one advantage that some public companies have that others do not And so I think as we grope our way forward here on how these programs work we're going to have other moments like this but if mentally still comes down to the fact that this thing was rushed out in a hurry and I don't think a lot of thought was put into the roles. We've had other examples of SNAFUS and difficulties for businesses and accessing. It and that you know some some more thought needs to be put into it at the treasury level. I think groping our way forward is a good way to put it. It just seems very ad hoc so one of the things that a business has to do when it's applying for the paycheck. Protection Program is certified that the money is quote necessary given the economic situation the uncertainty. But there's been a lot of confusion about what that means. The new treasury guidance says that it's unlikely that a public company quote with substantial market value in access to capital markets will be able to make the required certification in good faith unquote. And maybe that's true for some of them but it seems like that's also a potential problem for private companies. I mean if you're operating at eighty percent or ninety percent capacity but you're not sure what the future holds. I mean if you're looking at that box saying whether it's necessary deciding whether to ply or worrying about Auditors coming after you after the fact bill. It seems like that's a significant issue. Yeah it is a big issue in. Remember the purpose of The purpose of of all the aid that we're discussing is sort of twofold one for individuals to help get through the tough times when they have no income coming in. Because they've been laid off furloughed or just can't work for some reason and at the institutional level with businesses. It's IT'S TO HELP BUSINESSES. Who are actually healthy before you know who through no fault of their own have no revenue and can't get ahead and I think we have to. You know that to me seems to be the big criteria. I personally don't care if they crossed lines and so forth. It's very confusing. You know this is what you would expect of any government. Effort in a rollout is not gonna be that easy for people. They put regulations to try to make sure that is not abused but on the other hand those regulations can make it difficult for the people that need the aid in the loans to get it and it does seem like we're we've not heard the end of these stories at. There's going to be a lot more. Headlights like this and nitpicking before this is all through. We're talking about the continuing response to the corona virus..

president President Trump Georgia Treasury federal government Brian Kemp Brian Kemp Cham Kim Shake Shack Bill Alaska Salons barbershops IMA congress Andrew Cuomo Louis New York Thomas Massie White House Coleman Jenkins
"lockdowns" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:58 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"You're listening to the briefing with me. Andrew mullet now many people listening to this episode will be a good few weeks into some sort of lock down such novelty as they may have been. The experience has doubtless worn off. Some people however will be anticipating getting out a bit more as some countries including Germany Poland Norway Austria and the Czech Republic Begin. Tentatively easing restrictions. The question of when to end the lockdowns is in many respects. More Difficult Tarantula than the question of when to begin them. Governments will be wary. That lockdowns may prove to be like wolves in rather be in being rather rather easier to stop than stop. But what do the scientists think? Well he is one on joined once again by monocle. Twentyfold Health and science correspondent. Dr Chris Smith Regular listeners will know that Chris spends his busy days working as a virologist at Cambridge University in Chris. First of all. Is it possible at all? I know this might be a bit of A. How long is a piece of string question but possible to quantify what difference the lockdowns have made? We think that they've made us turn the corner. Andrew as in when you model what this was doing certainly in the UK and other countries in terms of the growth of the pandemic and the number of cases it was growing exponentially and quite quickly. We saw the numbers of cases growing level and off and then admissions to hospital leveling off and then the number of people losing their lives leveling offer now beginning to to go down so this is certainly this intervention broken the chain of transmission or at least made it run through trickle rather than down a nice drag strip so it's definitely putting an obstacle in the way of the spread of the virus In terms of how long it's GonNa take for the peak to drop down get out of the foothills and onto level ground again though. We don't know that yet. So that being the case how and what certainty does anybody know? When do I even start lifting? Lockdowns how do you make that judgment? That's the million dollar question or in the case of what the U K economies being hit by billions per week and people really want to this question if I asked lots of times of lots of different people. Both Vala gist mathematicians politicians. I talked to and I get the same answer. We don't know So people are beginning to look at this from another perspective which is rather than what's out trigger point when to institute change the beginning to say. Well what do we think we could do to sort this out and walk? We therefore implement straight away spicer very interesting mathematician in Paris yesterday. And he's come up with very interesting strategy of carving countries up into a series of sales almost like mobile phone network cellular network cells. And thinking about how you call the country up not just arbitrarily doing in a way where you say. Well where are the people? Where do they go to work? We create sales where you don't divorce people from their work of course and these cells are ring-fenced so you have a Green Cell Novartis Activity Red Cell Virus activity so it's backed up by testing in surveillance and the idea is that you don't allow people to move outside their cell unless they have a very good reason to do so and you put in place. I measures in each cell to make go green by the vars control there. And once you've got to adjacent green sells a you merge together and so now people can move freely within that green area. You probably with me now. You can see you. Divide the country as honeycomb and slowly green or red turns to green under these circumstances. And this he says for a country the size of France or population the size of the UK. You'd be looking a five or six months of these sorts of measures in order to get control and have us bank to something resembling what life used to be like. What are we learning so far about public consent to such measures? Because obviously what we've been going through all over the world. These last few weeks has been absolutely without precedent certainly in reactionary. I think it just has been completely without precedent. So we're having to learn as we go along about what people are willing to put up with Have you been surprised in any direction by the cooperation of Publix? We knew that people were certainly very very good at getting behind this in the in the outset. And we know that people when you when you generally throw down the gauntlet in front of the people and say. There's a very good reason to do this. Let's get behind it people. Do I mean Captain told me who said I want to raise a thousand pounds by doing one hundred laps of my care home garden for my one hundredth birthday and threw down the gauntlet internationally and got twenty seven million pounds. He's raised now just goes to show. The people of re good at getting behind. The cause of the compliance was excellent. But when all this began the psychologists said to policymakers members of government there will be a period of time during which compliancy is very good and then people will begin to tire of this. And you won't be able to get them to do it forever. Many people pooh-poohed this idea but we're beginning to see evidence of this. Because if you if you look at the traffic densities own roads. Traffic density is rising again. If you look at the number of people who actually back at work numbers are going back up. People did get behind it to stall with but I think people are beginning to tire. And we're not going to be able to hang onto people's confidence in this forever so is is it possible then or arguable. Might even be a good thing that some of the lockdown restrictions being lifted that. We're seeing in some places at schools or small shops that those there's actually a psychological aspect To those decisions as well as a strictly medical one well one school of thought. If excuse the PUN is the by sending bag schoolkids what you actually do is facilitate a whole heap of spread through that sector of society and since we know the risk that school kids Ingende and given the schoolkids have younger parents on average the risk. Their parents is going to be really low. This is one way of a controlled spread through a sector of society leading to natural acquisition of immunity and resistance to this without actually placing additional risk in in the way of people who in my swamp so some cynics saying well one way to solve this problem. Is You just Let the scores Go back. And this will take care of the immunity and immunization naturally of quite a broad swathe of society. Now that's certainly one approach and other approaches to say we're not going to do anything to have vaccine. Most people agreed that this is impractical and at the opposite end of the scale completely to the vaccine and not doing anything is the we. Just go business as usual now. Most people are comfortable that we can't do that but so something somewhere between the two where we use. What will be probably much richer. Data informed by testing in terms of where immunity is around the country where the viruses circulating in the country and where people are living working commuting where the facility for spread is greatest. If we combine all of this information. I think we probably will end up adopting something like the model. I outlined that the Parisian mathematicians are proposing perhaps not identical but something which enables a degree of normality in some places reinforced by testing and surveillance together with Other signs brought to bear such as issues like vaccination when that eventually materialize. If it does an any drugs we can throw it this as well as continuing to protect the most vulnerable people either by shielding them or by testing the workers who are going to care for them and then only deploy workers to care for the most vulnerable people who know on our immune. Dr Chris Smith thank you as always that was our health and science correspondent. Chris Smith you are listening to the briefing on monocle twenty four this is the briefing and as well understood by now the covert nineteen pandemic is.

Dr Chris Smith Andrew mullet UK Green Cell Novartis Czech Republic Germany Poland Norway Austria lockdowns Publix Cambridge University Paris France
"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

09:05 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Street Journal this is Potomac. Watch welcome back. I'm Kyle Peterson here with my colleagues Kim Strassel and bill mckern so we talked a little bit about the protest movements in some of these states against the lockdowns. But how do we square that with some of the public polling So there's a Pew Research Center. Poll that says sixty six sixty six percent of Americans are more worried that their you know their state or the government will lift their restrictions. Too Fast and thirty two percent are worried about the reverse that it will be too slow. Kim. How do we square these? These two data points. Well I'd be really curious to know. Where geographically some of the respondents were on this. Because if we've been discussing I think the views on this change very much across different parts of the country You know if you're on a hot spot you certainly probably have a much different view on reopening than if you found a state where things have gotten that bad So there's that I think it's also interesting that the kind of breakout of this in terms of political leanings which is at the kind of the people who were most willing to let the lockdowns go on forever were were liberal or higher income Democrats Which are people that are often more accepting of government control of things but in this case? Also have the financial ability to write out a long-term Lockdown I think that it's a balance right. You go out there and and everyone who even Americans who want to get back to work of course. They're concerned that this could still come back and break out in a big way and I think that there are some people probably being pulled in this. Who when they're expressing that sentiment part of what they may be expressing as a worry about opening too quickly and ending up back in a full lockdown again. Because it didn't go well so it's a little bit of a big question in some regards. Sure and it's a fair point. I think that not. Everybody is writing out the lockdown. Well on Thursday. The Labor Department said that another five million Americans had applied for unemployment benefits last week. The growth in this has just been staggering. Bill I mean you look at the cumulative total it was six million and then ten million and seventy million and then twenty two million. That number is almost hard to fathom right. And it's it's a real life changer. For those people. I mean I just seen in my town in my casual outings to get groceries or something. It's just amazing. How many people you meet. That are really suffering. I mean again I I have a paycheck that comes in. I can work from home. But if you don't and you don't have a paycheck and you see an indefinite lockdown. This is really bad again. Remember when one of the protests There was a big sign. The people were chanting. I think it was in Kentucky. We want to work. These are not people looking for benefits and so forth and I think the world looks very different from their perspective. If you've lost your job you don't know if your employer if you work for a small business is going to be around when the lockdown is lifted than if you're just at home saying Oh this is inconvenient mortaring my my meals out but your money still coming in. Meanwhile the aid for those small businesses at least part of it is is running. Drive a paycheck protection program. Which is the name given to this? Three hundred fifty billion dollars in forgivable loans has given out a one point six million loans to small businesses after only about two weeks in operation the trump administration had asked for another two hundred and fifty million dollars. Excuse me two hundred fifty billion dollars but Democrats have been blocking that in the Senate and then came on Thursday. The program said that it had totally run dry run out of funds yes and nonetheless we are still saying blocking from Democrats. It's really quite remarkable because if you step back and you look at it. There's really no way to put this another way other than saying they. Democrats are using small business and the difficulties pain a small business as leverage for their other spending priorities. And what they are asking for in particular is more hospital money and yet more a whopping five hundred billion dollars for state and local governments And it's really kind of over the top in part because you know we. We just spent hundreds of billions of dollars to the states in the most recent bill and a lot of that hasn't even gone out the door and it's it's when you add it all up. It's it's a lot because it's not just the direct day that the state's got but it's a economic. I mean the aid. They got for their education systems. The unemployment benefits that are going in money for food stamps and for Medicaid. And you know so the pot when you take it in. Its totality is quite huge. So you know. We're beginning to see some pressure on Democrats now though the press has largely been shielding them from criticism In that kind of anti-trump. Move up pretending that none of this is happening. But Democrats clearly starting to begin to hear from small businesses in their own constituents and you beginning to see some of them break from leadership and say. Let's get this done yet to in particular Curious in cinema and Tina Smith Democrats Democratic senators from Arizona and Minnesota respectively are now calling for this to be passed essentially post taste. As far as I understand so bill it looks like there are some cracks in the democratic unity. That are showing now. I think so and as it goes along I think that will be more apparent. I think we'll be really interesting. There in those cracks is one certain states. Start to open and other states. Don't think there may be pressure back and forth because if you reopen and then all of a sudden you're death skyrocket. There might be a lot of questioning of what you've done. But on the contrary if Some states reopen and seemed to be handling it. There'll be a lot more pressure on the other states to reopen themselves. So I think we're going to see a lot of differences Meanwhile there are questions about how to get. Anything passed through the House Congressman. Thomas Massie. The Kentucky Republican Libertarian National Republican Who was threatening to do. A quorum call of the cares acts a couple of weeks ago and force all of these congressmen to do a cannonball run back to Washington. Dc to meet the core requirement. He is reportedly signaling that he wants a recorded. Vote on this to Which would essentially require Corum and throws up in the air. Kim How they would essentially get this past. The at. This is now becoming more urgent question because I think back at the height of all of this when everyone was scrambling and we ended up with that two point two trillion dollar rescue package Everyone was kind of more in the mood of. We gotta get this done and there were more people still in Washington. But here's the problem. If you don't have a quorum in either the house or the Senate You have to move legislation on the basis of what's called unanimous consent and that means that any one individual is able to object and then require as you said an actual vote And so this is an issue not just in the house. But it's also one in the Senate as we talk about for instance this replenishing the P P P money You know the White House is saying well. Yeah you know. Maybe we'll give some more money to states. Maybe we'll come up with a deal with Schumer and Pelosi but there are some Republicans in the Senate that are also getting very concerned about just printing money and throwing it out and it would only take one of them to so there are some discussions about how you might do. Remote proxy voting. But there's a lot of concern about how that would actually role and but nonetheless. I think this is something that in the next week if if Pelosi's not going to bring people back if if McConnell's not going to bring his people back they're going to have to figure out something else. Yeah and I think I saw that Nancy. Pelosi head endorsed the idea of proxy voting in the House. Now so as I understand it. Essentially it wouldn't be the record of remote voting you imagine it would be A congressman hanging emailing calling a colleague who is physically there in Washington and say this is the way that I would like to vote on this. Can you cast this? Vote on my behalf and Bill I mean maybe the appeal of that is that it's It's fast and it's a little bit of Cluj so it's temporary maneuver. That seems unlikely to be made permanent. It could be. I don't know I worry about a lot of things being made permanent that we're doing now I think we're shooting in the dark on a lot of this and in my suspicion. Is that a lot of things we're doing won't get two people in time or in a way that they can access it in. That's my great fear especially with the small businesses fake you. Ken Thank you bill. Thank you all for listening and we'll be back next week with another edition of Potomac Watch..

Senate Washington Kim Strassel government Kentucky Pelosi Pew Research Center Kyle Peterson bill mckern Street Journal Potomac Thomas Massie congressman Labor Department Dc Cluj Ken White House
"lockdowns" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:12 min | 5 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Global markets take higher as lockdown restrictions. Begin to ease in more places around the world live from London. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service. I'm Victoria Craig. Good morning first. Fresh figures from China Buoy sentiment in Asia today. Exports from the world's second-biggest economy fell six point six percent last month from a year ago but that was far less than the fourteen percent. Plunge analysts expect expected. The data helped send the Shanghai composite index up one and a half percent. While Japan's Nikkei rallied three percent. That positive sentiment is spreading to Europe where the Pan European stock six hundred index is up six tenths of a percent on the session. It's jumped twenty percent from the two thousand twenty low hit just about a month ago. Shares in Italy and Spain are among the continent's biggest gainers as those countries began relaxing their lockdown measures. But there's not a one-size-fits-all strategy. The whole continent is following the BBC's Stephen Ryan explains how some nations are taking the first steps Italy. The hardest hit European country is taking a dip. Your toe type. Approach businesses including bookstores stationery stores and baby clothing stores are allowed to reopen papermaking and computer factories can also restart but local authorities and places like Lamberti in the north of the country are afraid of a new bike. So they're keeping stores shut there for now in Australia. It's mandatory to wear a face mask if visit a supermarket or pharmacy starting today smaller shops garden centres and diy stores will reopen. Then for May first people will be able to visit hairdressers or shopping. Centres and provided the corona virus case counts remain low hotels. There could open the doors two weeks after this. Finally Spain yesterday began allowing manufacturing and construction to restart but in Portugal which shares a border with Spain. They're kind of in the middle in terms of reopening right now. That's right Victoria on Monday. Portugal's government announced its land border with Spain. Where remains shot for another month? That's because they've only seen half as many cases per head of the population as their Spanish neighbors here in the UK this week. We're likely to see lockdown measures extended but in France. They've already made that call haven't they? Yes last night. President Emmanuel macron that the country hasn't beaten Corona virus just yet so the lockdown will run for another four weeks when schools will gradually reopen. And Mr Markov also said restaurants will stay closed for now and they won't have any summer fest was until mid-july and the economic hit of the lockdown has seen French Finance Minister Bruno. Lemaire revise the economic outlook for the second time. In just a week he now says the country's economy will shrink by eight percent this year and its budget deficit will be nine percent of economic growth to BBC's Stephen Ryan. Thanks for your time. More pleasure as Europe reopens. India is extending. Its Twenty one day. Lockdown Barclays Today said it expects those measures to bring growth in the country to a complete standstill by the end of the year as the BBC's around Mukherjee reports from the capital Delhi in the first phase of the lockdown India recorded an estimated loss of roughly four and a half billion dollars daily adding up to nearly one hundred billion dollars for twenty one days the next nineteen days of the lockdown will mean a further dent to the Indian economy to mitigate the economic cost of the lockdown. The prime minister said more would be done to help the poor also with it being harvest season. The government is drawing up a plan to insulate farmers so their crops. Don't go to waste. The lockdown has already dealt a body blow to daily wagers. Who will now be without a source of income for another two weeks? The government is expected to unveil fresh measures. Tomorrow in New Delhi. I'm the BBC's Mukherjee for marketplace as we've been hearing workers across India are feeling the impact of the lockdown one industry scrambling to get back on. Its feet is call centers and back office operations that have over the years been off shored from other countries the BBC's Fergus nickel reports. He usually affect corona virus. We have much fewer colleagues than usual on the phone at the moment. He expect. Wait Times for one hour. Branks telecoms companies. Lots of other affected businesses have been scrambling to recruit local staff to replace those Indian offshore operations. Steve Morale is managing director at contact. Able a consultancy that specializes in call centers the main market seven the UK India onto lesser extent in the Philippines scene lockdowns there which is having a major impact on some of the larger businesses in the UK in particularly con- telecoms companies and banks and they are obviously having to deal with us as well as deal with illness sickness absence within their own. Uk operations as well so it is a major problem not surprisingly those groups that represent. India's support facilities a keen to stress. Just how quickly that guessing back on their feet ks? Vishwanathan is vice. President of the National Association of Software and Service Companies in the industry approximately eighty people have been butchered from wall that is completely operational and in Global Multinational Corporation which is dead. That number has gone up to ninety percent of the people. Love again from all I would say that. This impact is lower than what we anticipated and beginning of March KS Viscera Mountain. Let's leave the last word on this to Punk Ajay Kapoor who watches the IT. Sector for J M financial in Mumbai. Does he think the might be some big changes down the track? Most of these companies have fairly global operations so I will not be surprise if they will take the initiative on their own to start having centers bay sort of you know locally in for example in UK itself. That's package Kapoor ending that report from the BBC's Fergus. Nickle they're finally cooking has been your respite during the corona virus lockdown. A warning for you. The price of olive oil looks set to rise. That's because a disease has killed swaths of Italian olive trees causing a sixty percent drop in yield researchers say. It could eventually devastate entire plantations in Spain and Greece which could come at an economic cost of twenty billion dollars in London. I'M VICTORIA CRAIG. With the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service..

BBC UK BBC World Service Spain Victoria Craig India Europe London Stephen Ryan Italy Mukherjee Punk Ajay Kapoor China Portugal Asia Australia New Delhi President Emmanuel macron
"lockdowns" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:01 min | 6 months ago

"lockdowns" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Beef is noon for its intricate fat marveling leading to particularly tender meat and particularly high prices. It's costly for one steak as a cashmere sweater and Japan is considered a national treasure. One that the government increasingly wants to protect so earlier this year in January. Japan's farm ministry proposed new law to criminalize smuggling Awad you eggs and Sperm Miki. Kobayashi reports Japan for the Economist and is based in Tokyo. So if this bill passes the parliament smugglers could end up spending ten years in jail or a fine of up to ten million yen or about one hundred thousand. Us dollars and court injections could also be requested if genetic materials are used for breeding purposes overseas but seems like they're getting very very serious when it when we're talking about here is cow eggs cow sperm. Yes absolutely is but Japanese. Officials actually argue that. The penalty is perfectly justified. Most farmers also support the new law to limit the export of Wadoux DNA for them for these farmers. The most important factor getting the perfectly marbled meat is none other than genetics. So that being the case I mean what? You've has been popular for release some time why. Why the imposition of these extremely strict rules. Well the biggest reason why these rules are being put in place now. Is that Japanese Wad? You is gaining popularity among foodies across the globe so while you exports from Japan are rising extremely fast. The country shipped almost four thousand five hundred tonnes Awadhi last year which is almost thirty billion yen or about three hundred million. Us dollars and that is about three point. Five Times the volume and value exported just five years ago and this demand for WAG. You is rising primarily. Asia is becoming wealthier so rich foodies for example in Hong Kong and Thailand. They're paying ridiculous prices for you. But the biggest importer surprisingly is but analysts say that Cambodia's themselves aren't actually eating Japanese argue. They think that much of the beef imported from Japan into Cambodia are re-exported to China and the Chinese. Love Log You. There are many people that can the premium beef but the country actually has been banning. Japanese feasts since two thousand and one would mad. Cow Disease erupted in Japan. So you reckon. This trend will continue so exports of Japanese wog. You are expected to keep growing. I because America east restrictions on beef imports from Japan under the bilateral trade deal that went into effect in January of this year and second because the Japanese government is also very very keen to doubled swaggie production. They're planning to offer money and incentives for farmers remorse cows and they're even upgrading meat processing facilities across the country. And so do you think these new rules about the smuggling of eggs and sperm will. We'll have the intended effect will will keep the pure as it were well to a certain extent because people actually do smuggle logging genes across borders and until recently been semi successful in two thousand eighteen. Two Japanese men were actually caught smuggling more than one hundred samples of walkie. Dna into Shanghai in China and the new measures a lot of analysts a lot of researchers. They think that it's come a little too late so Australia. For example began mixing Japanese logging jeans with local herds in the late nineteen eighties. And it's walkie farms since then have been thriving South Australia already. Exports About seven times more than the amount. Japan sells abroad. So it's unclear if the new law would allow Japan to monopolize swaggie production or if the bill would actually make any impact on the global market and unfortunately average consumers like myself. We can't really tell the difference between Japanese and foreign wog you and have you tried it can. Can you tell the difference? Yes so actually I come from a prefecture called me a and we produce one of the top three while us in Japan so I have. You can't tell it from the from the sort of a hybrid stuff though the bastardized stuff no absolutely not and I talked to a few people a few officials and asked them whether they can tell their friends. And they said not really. They're all really good off-the-record Mickey thank you very much for for tackling this meaty topics with us. Thank you Jason..

Japan Us Japanese government Sperm Miki Cambodia China parliament Kobayashi Five Times Tokyo Asia Australia Hong Kong Thailand Mickey South Australia Jason America Shanghai