18 Burst results for "Lizzy Lizzy"

Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

10:11 min | 10 months ago

Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

"Now on the one hand just doing it is the way you're gonNA learn so there's no other way to figure out how to do it other than saying I want to be podcast and therefore I will cast my name is Joe Girardi and I host the protagonist podcast previously I co-hosted we'll get into that I am sure we definitely will but I i WanNa know what got you into the podcasting game what made you become a podcast so in uncut somewhere in late two thousand fourteen one of my best friends from high school reached out to me and said delisted podcastone yes hide I listen to podcasts for years now and he's like I think I want to start one and I said I've batted around the idea starting one for a while and never committed and he's like let's commit and then within a month or two we had recorded our first episode and then a little bit after that we we've dropped the weekly episode of the protagonist podcast ever since What's never missed week which has been difficult at times there's always hurdles that come up in this case both my former co host todd Mac and I okay work in academia and he had a semester abroad in Spain and that was a little rough and making sure that we got a weekly recording done and we are back is to find work arounds dull recording when could but there were definitely times where we were starting recording very late might live and very early his time to make it work and we struggled through and and made it what is the premise of the protagonist podcast the premise of our podcast. I took a few rough drafts you know we've added a few ideas back and forth eventually we settled on What is the protagonist podcast where each week we talked about a great integrate story and we try and make sure that we mix it up our goal is basically we don't hit this one hundred percent of the time but but basically we wanted to talk about a character from a TV show a comic book a film and a novel every month so that's kind of the rotation we sprinkled some other things and we've touched on some other forms of storytelling podcast in there as well eventually we said well let's just talk about some great characters in great stories and we do try and mix it up between kind of the Classic Canon Story so we've definitely talked about some Shakespeare Jane austen with more pop culture stories we've done the planet hulk graphic novel which I think that Kinda grab bag at has its pluses and minuses I think it keeps some people will get up because they're just like that one's not for me interested but at the same time it might may expose listeners to things that are unfamiliar with it definitely has exposed me the host of the pot podcast to some stories that found from listener requests or things at todd suggested we have patrons at a certain level can request the topic to talk about and so in doing at this point we have released two hundred twenty episodes I think we've recorded about two hundred thirty 'cause we try ours is evergreens we try and keep a back catalog going there's just a lot of threat of material has been covered so one of my favorite things is finding a new story that I probably wouldn't across because of one of those suggestions saying Oh this is great I love this I'm so glad that I've been introduced to that I hope that we've been able to do that for listeners at some point as well I've been listening to your show for a few years now and I tell you that isn't that is one of the reasons why I it's because I get exposed to things that I never would have known about otherwise absolutely never would have known and it's a lot of fun there you and your your one hundred percent right there around Mike I don't even think I'm going to be interested in this and I I never deleted I just like okay I'm gonNA listen to that one finished these other ones and then and then I listened to what it was I should listen to that right away because I think I'm GonNa go watch that one of the first one that comes to my mind that you did a really deep dive on and it was it was an amazing episode food was watership down and I have no idea why because the cover has bunnies on it but I always thought that was like Mabel Battle Story I heard you talk about it was like Oh that's what I thought it was at all I well I didn't think it was I thought it was about sailor bunnies because as a child I caught five minutes of the animated adaptation and it was like this is very brief passage in the novel where they float down the river some but that's part and it's called watership down so I assumed this was all about seafaring rabbits for some reason and tell I'm pretty sure that one was a a patron request that came in and I started reading I was like Oh this is good it's not about see very rabbits and I got really into it and that was one of the episodes of kind of blew up for US view stick with podcasting while you know you kind of get the numbers that you expect for a number of downloads like you you kinda get your but then every once in a while you hit on something and it's like catching lightning in a bottle you're not quite sure why but it blows up and watership down for us like blew up on our facebook page we had thousands of likes on that one episode when we had done things that we would have thought would have a much larger fan base like we do Harry Potter episodes every year I'm you know we're we're going through one book per year kind of what we're doing we've done episodes on Star Trek and star wars and popular TV shows that you know do all right folks but watership down I think the combination of having a much broader and deeper fan base we knew seems like a lot of people from the comments we were getting on our facebook page like read this as in their adolescence or whatever and and just never forgot and it's stayed as a favourite and they've gone back to revisit it and a combination of that with no one talking about it on podcast whereas I think that's a big secret right there is everybody I everybody out there is talking about star wars and star trek and it's really hard to get really hard to get noticed on that but when you're when you're talking about something that nobody else is yeah I think that's I think that's something that really worth a magic happen yes absolutely and and also I mean it is a great book and it holds up to a lot of scrutiny and e easily we're able to do our our long discussion the episodes tend to be about an hour in length sometimes you know fifteen minutes sometime seventy minutes but about an hour is what we're shooting for and I delightful surprise both to say Oh this is something that's so good that I had never engaged with and I probably wouldn't have engaged with podcast and then also to discover that it kind of caught fire for a podcast and spread so you mentioned that it's a book that holds up to a lot of scrutiny and you you keep saying that you work in academia but let let let's throw this out there you're you're commercial that you have or that you had when it was you and todd were a couple of fan boys with PhD and that wasn't just that wasn't just fluff that was that's a fact correct yeah so I have a PhD Michigan State University in American Studies and at Michigan State they they have kind of a threat of HD? emphasis on American Popular Culture and my PhD dissertation was on race and gender in the X men comic books most of my academic publishing has either been on superhero comic books or on TV shows like the office or frazier or cheers so those are kind of my veins of research which todd has a PhD from Stanford and he studied the literature of Spain it's peninsula literature is what his PhD was and so you're taking this experience that you have with American pop culture PhD's literary background and you're diving into things like planet holck and and I always forget the name of it but it's the it's the youtube adaptation the Lizzy Lizzy Bennett Diaries yes yes that was a patron requested they've requested something that was more like classic literature I can't remember what it was now but then they switched at the last minute never mind I want to hear you guys talk about high school musical for an hour that was a fun episode as well and one of the strangest complaints I guess August complaints we've had because if you're going to be putting the material out there on the Internet do not just GonNa get bracelet with people who aren't fans of what you do but one of the biggest complaints we had is when we did an episode on Catcher in the Rye classic American Cannon Literature You know it's the signed in high schools or colleges all the time and both have literature you know backgrounds and and academics grounds but the person complained because we were making jokes while we talked about catcher in the Rye and that really upset them and in response we kind of Said look we we are GonNa talk about classic cannon things and we're also gonNA talk about light pop culture things and the combination that we think listeners or they are going to have is that we're going to try and living deep in the lighter pop culture things we're going to try and have some fun when we're talking about the classic deep literature you know the the cannon with a capital c ideas of literature and we want to always maintained that mix of having some good insights but also having some fun with the topics we're talking about not taking ourselves or the texts too seriously so you mentioned that you now hosted hosted the protagonist podcast by yourself todd todd went off he moved out of state and and pursued other projects projects yeah we made it for four years together he left on the two hundred episode he's been back a couple of times since then it's not like we had a big talk when he's gone he just said with with his career in studying peninsula literature is that I can't take the time commitment that this the maintaining this podcast is taking away from the studies I need for for his career he he just couldn't do it we we as he I mean he did it for four years so there's a lot of podcasters can't make

Joe Girardi Todd Mac Spain One Hundred Percent Four Years Fifteen Minutes Seventy Minutes Five Minutes One Hand
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Bodega Boys

Bodega Boys

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Bodega Boys

"Play when it was twenty million. Eighty yet a chance. The worst part is at this gas station popular goes, oh, this is the lucky ticket every time someone buys a. Have the look ticket stop. I know that right. Fogo, yo. Money. Let's rob house. I mean, that's not me. That's. He's not me. Looking looking. I'm asking now. Talking at the bottle broke maybe broke baby. Got it. Got a baby say SUV, just go get, Robin. Over three bucks. Does it? Say we have the Cavs. You by the traits you need a cab. It'll just saying I'm like, no. Oh, my app provides a car. Sorry. That does not have driven needles in the back. Also. They're the back and you're the front license. Should it be? If you do have this shouldn't be pace to this bulletproof uncle on cops. Yeah. Call the cops. Get my ass. You're white woman. Hey of you, pal. Is your surgery? Rocco? Become a white woman. Almost really ripped off the wild problem. Is there a movie we make a movie about that you become become a white woman? Again, the college didn't they do the Michael Jackson? We'll be ready. Style. Yes. Golf, Johannesburg complain me. How would that movie? Popica-? What's most pop any Kendrick? What are we complete? Oh, like a freaky Friday and Andrew we switch laws though educated. Garlic click. Oh, my drug debts Right with. right with the big gun glitzy today. She's like, why do I have the overwhelming swell L fucking? Twin joe? Is calling Joe if the big of the big Drake has to come through. Joe you don't want that. You don't want that saying all right? It's Kendrick, and you don't want to you won't be all you don't wanna come home. And you're Kendrick a sit in the dark in your liberal five to medicine sup. Stacking two cups. Silence. He'll say he turned a year and a as so ill. UPN resolve. Wow. With us. Oh, she was at a mean girls. No. That was Lindsay Lohan. Rachel mcadams, Richard. Don't forget Lizzy Caplan who was the mean girl. Oh, shooting Lindsay Lohan, did she die. Now. She wasn't party down your when you said Lizzy Lizzy Grubman the show that ran bad people over the skated. Oh, yeah..

Kendrick Lindsay Lohan Cavs Lizzy Lizzy Grubman joe Lizzy Caplan Michael Jackson rob house Rachel mcadams UPN Golf Rocco Robin Popica Andrew Richard two cups
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

14:17 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KTRH

"Been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she heads which when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife who is Lizzie Borden. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that they should live in a better style and a in a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill. Dissatisfactions where thought to be at the heart of the case. Yeah. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily of afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing electricity, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I should say that there was a there was a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people, you know, use slop pails and would carry them down to the basement that said that there was it. There's not. Glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as young woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't. It wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances. Were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either actor walked through people's bedrooms upstairs. Or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murders. So seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something particularly strained in the household add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother. When another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young still they three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was done using to purchase was at a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of siblings did this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's a really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, centrally what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rest. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a side of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room. And it also meant that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greedy as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting hyung-chol that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right Br brother-in-law although the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence, their blood uncle but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. She was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie ammo was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house already a house of ghosts. You know, it's just already almost feels like even before death. Just nobody's talking to each other the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Borden bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm sorry. I was Takeda the story that was evidence that never went into the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Found it and the were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body. Had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable, you know, had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Massachusetts Lizzie Andrew Gordon Emma Borden Harvard Andrew Morton Lizzy Lizzy Stanford Fall River Oxford Takeda
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

14:18 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can't we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stagers could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she had when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts, his first wife who had Lizzie Borton and her sister Emma's mother died and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that. They should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hills kinds of dissatisfactions thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his estate worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing and electrical, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basements. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails and would carry them down to the basement that said that there, you know, it was it. There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it's sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Bordon as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't a it wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either actor watch through people's bedrooms upstairs, or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby at their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the board chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother when another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young three when her mother died. So she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, even withdrawn from any kind of familial Monica. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings. Did a story. And so she was at risk of the half sister who was married to a man without very good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put an abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so she I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred the property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rest. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters mostly didn't eat with the with their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room at an ultimate that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greeting them as well. And. As possible in small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. Br brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother hands their blood uncool. But significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie Emma was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her God house Dodd already house of ghosts. It's just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about whether Lizzie Bordon bought poison? And why just before the murders happened? On on August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store ads. Lizzie bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I was getting ahead of the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever. Founding. Were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before. Describe what the effect would have been of this acid on the human body. Had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzie Emma Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Lizzie Massachusetts Andrew Gordon Harvard Lizzie Borton Lizzy Lizzy MRs Borden Stanford Borden Andrew Morton Oxford Fall River
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KTOK

"The where what and wow of Oklahoma NewsRadio one thousand KT. Okay. Keira Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book the trial of Lizzie Bordon. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stages could've framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's tell everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she had when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife, Lizzie Borden. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that. They should live in a better style and up in a higher style. You might say Andrew despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser and was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hill knows kinds of dissatisfactions were thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way, I mean, it's it's well said even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Gordon could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his state worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in. Would that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I mean, it wasn't just modest it was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing and electrical, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even in the, you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flexible water closet. You know, it's kind of rude to rudimentary one in the basement. But it is also true that the that that people use flop pails and. Would carry them down to the basement that said that they're you know, it was it? There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of the contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever, but it sort of contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Borden as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't a it wasn't a house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it almost seemed like a almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into a one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's know, technically, you either actor watch for people's bedrooms upstairs or you'd have to if he were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew and Abby had their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the Bordon's chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother when another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young silly three when her mother died, so she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. And and interestingly Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just the she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than he was quickly corrected which was noted, but that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was kind of flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase was it a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings this story. And so she was at risk of the the half sister who was married to a man without breaking. Good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So Abby apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that's a really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, essentially what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so he I you know, apparently in an attempt to buy some peace transferred a property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. That's kind of has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a site of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room, and it also meant that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greeting them as well. Separately as possible in a small house. So add to that to a regularly visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right there. Brother-in-law all the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother hands their blood on call but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie Emma was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. Dodd already house of ghosts. It's just already almost feels like a even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment the sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Bordon bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy prospect acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store ads. Lizzie bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I had the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison. It's not clear that she ever found any. The boards were not themselves poisoned. But before we get to what happened the night before the described the what the effect would have been of this project acid on the human body had it been slipped into food or drink. Well, it's an you know, it is it is fatal at a very low dosage and incredibly corrosive to the system. So it would have been a a horrible death. And one that would have been unmistakable had she given it to them that very likely, even though you know, as you alluded to earlier poison was kind of a woman's weapon with regard to murder. That there's there was no evidence that she ever used it. But the but everybody was sick the night before the killing..

Lizzie Borden Lizzie Emma Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Abby Lizzie Massachusetts Oklahoma Harvard MRs Borden Keira Robertson Borden Lizzy Lizzy Stanford Andrew Gordon Andrew Morton Oxford
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

13:21 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on KNSS

"And thirteen thirty k s s. Keira Robertson has been studying the case of Lizzie Borden from a couple of different perspectives since she was an undergraduate student. At Harvard and now going on after years at Oxford and getting a law degree from Stanford. She's turned attention again to this book, the trial of Lizzie Borden. We'll talk more about whether or not it was a fair trial. What did we can we actually judge guilt or innocence from this from this vantage point in history? But before we get there. Let's let's set we sort of set the wider stages could have framed the conversation about Lizzie Bordon. Let's everybody for people who only know it from the children's rhyme. Lizzy Borden took an ax gave her father, forty wax. And when she had what when she saw what she had done. She gave her mother forty one. We should stipulate upfront for a lot of people who don't know. This wasn't actually her mother that she murdered. So explain a little bit of some of the familial conditions that led up to this tragic day in nineteen eighteen ninety three. Lizzy borden. Father was Andrew Morton who was a prominent businessman in the prosperous mill town of Fall River, Massachusetts. His first wife. Lizzie bordon. And her sister Emma's mother died, and he married again a woman named Abby. But it was not a particularly happy home. There was a lot of dissatisfaction in the family and. There were disputes over mostly over money. But also. A sense on the part of the daughters once they were grown that they should live in a better style and up in a a higher style. You might say Andrew, Gordon, despite being very wealthy was a bit of a miser. And was notorious as one of the journalists that for piling up dollars rather and not particularly wanting to spend them and chose to live in a rather modest way near the center of town rather than in the more elite residential district called the hills knows kind of dissatisfactions were thought to be at the heart of the case. Do you want to just do you want me to just go through the facts of the you don't know you're doing great now? No, no. This is doing great because I think this is part of what I'm getting at here is that your what you just said there in a way is. I mean, it's it's well said that even might even be kind of an understatement. I mean, they were living in a house that had no plumbing and no electricity at a time. When a Andrew Borden could easily have afforded it when he died. What was his state worth the day that that somebody killed him? Well, the the the accounts vary a little bit. But but certainly north of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, you know, north of a quarter million dollars, which was a tidy sum in those days yet, which in today's dollars might be seven or eight million dollars. Yeah. At least. Yeah. So I mean, he was a multimillionaire in that we would consider to be today. And it's one thing for a guy an older guy to go out to an outhouse in the back of the property, but the women of the house, they there was no upward mobility to their living circumstances, they were pretty draconian. I'm it wasn't just modest. It was I mean, those are that's like a basic human need. And for whatever reason there were people of a much lower station in life that already had indoor plumbing electricity, and they didn't have it only because of Andrews outlook toward money. Yeah. He was notorious even you know, even among his circle for being pretty tight fisted. I mean, I should say that there was a there was a a flushable water closet. You know, it's kind of rudimentary one in the basements. But it is also true that the that that people use slop pails and. Would carry them down to the basement that said that you know, it was it? There's nothing glamorous about it. No. And there's a certain in a way that sort of that contradicted. I mean, it's good old. You know, Yankee frugality, or whatever. But it's sorta contradicted the upward mobility, which was the kind of the the the main theme of life around Massachusetts that you your life improved your station, improved your circumstances improved. They did have a maid. But that was about it. She Lizzie Bordon as as a woman. She still had chores around the house that she was doing as an adult. They were not living. It wasn't. It wasn't a the house was hot. And it wasn't a it. Just it. It almost seemed like almost like the circumstances were just even the physical circumstances were leading up to some sort of explosion. Yeah. I it was a narrow home in lots of ways. I mean, it was physically has well as psychologically narrow. Yeah. It was a it was a two family house that had been converted into one family house. So what that what that meant was that there weren't any interior hallways that, you know, off of which rooms would have opened. So that meant that you you had to walk through people's, you know, technically, you either to walk through people's bedrooms upstairs, or you'd have to if you were in the front part of the house and wanted to go into the rear, which is where Andrew Abby at their bedroom. You'd have to go all the way downstairs through the rooms of the downstairs and then up the back stairs. And that's significant because it gives you it gives you a sense of the space. But also that the reason that you couldn't walk from front to back in the upstairs was that the the boards chose to keep those doors. Locked and on Lizzie side. At least move some furniture in front of it. And this happened a few years before the murder. So it seemed to indicate particularly to the prosecution that there was you know, that there was something. Particularly strained in the household. Add to that the resentment that the two Borden daughters. Lizzie head toward their father, perhaps when he remarried and another woman, whom they considered to be inferior to their mother. When another woman stood in line to receive his estate. Should he have died? Right. The the, you know, he was quite young silly three when her mother died, so she probably wouldn't have known her. But, but it certainly it certainly seemed that she never really felt the warmth towards her stepmother who became the woman who raised her effectively later. It was said that her sister Emma who was almost ten years older than she was really it was the one who acted as a mother to her. And eventually when it when they were both adults, and it seemed like money was going out of their family towards the stepmother's family, then the resentments became inflamed. And they they they had called her mother at one point maybe and then decidedly stepmother, and then at some point MRs Borden, they've even withdrawn from any kind of familial moniker. Yeah. Yeah. And and interestingly. Lizzy Lizzy was quick to correct people. So it's not just that she referred to hers her stepmother. But if if someone for example, a police person investigating investigating Abbie's death referred to her as mother than that he was quickly corrected which was noted. But that was that was the interesting part where you said about then the money was flowing toward Abby cited the family that she was leaning on her husband to provide funds, which she was then using to purchase a home for her sister or property for her sister. Yeah. Her own stepmother needed to sell the family house, which is where her half sister was living. There are a lot of a lot of siblings did this story. And so she was at risk of the half sister who was married to a man without very good prospects with at risk of losing her house. So abby. Apparently asked Andrew to buy the house, which he put in abbey's name, which meant that that Abby sister could live in their rent free. And that really enraged his daughters. They were they said, you know, centrally what what he did for her. He could do for his own blood. And so he I apparently in an attempted by some peace transferred a property of similar value to his daughters. But it didn't heal the rift. Kind has this sort of biblical vibe to it in terms of like dividing up an inheritance in in life. And and, but they as you say, they weren't happy with the house that they were given it didn't stop the resentment, and they had stopped even eating together or being together. Right. It was a sign of a Cold War by the time. The murders happened that the daughters. Mostly didn't eat with the. With their parents. They conducted their lives separately as possible, you know, in a house that was quite small, and what that meant was that if they had visitors they tended to receive them upstairs in the guest room, and it also meant that when their. When their father and stepmother were you know, had callers, they weren't necessarily greedy men as well. Separately as possible in small house. So add to that to a regular Lee visiting uncle that was the brother of their deceased mother. Right. The brother-in-law although the the brother-in-law of. Their deceased mother, hence, their blood uncle but significantly he turned up the day before the murders. And that was something that, you know, many people viewed as very significant and suspicious that he might have. That was what's his arrival something that precipitated the murders in some way. I mean, what I note in the book is it gives you further evidence of how a strange the family was. He was sleeping in the bedroom. Next to Lizzie Emma was out of town at this point. And although she was in the house when he arrived and she could hear him because the how small talking with her father and her stepmother downstairs. She didn't greet him. And when he went up to bed that night. He didn't apparently greet her house. It's already a house of ghosts. It's just already almost feels even before death. Just nobody's talking to the coldness. This resentment this sort of everything was sort of bound into that house. And and and then of course, we get to the poisoning or the alleged poisoning. What do we know for sure about? Whether Lizzie Borden bought poison and why just before the murders happened. On August third. There was a woman who tried to buy pressing acid, which is a dilution of hydrocyanic acid a deadly poison from a drugstore very near the house. She was identified by three people in the store as Lizzie Bordon. It should say that she herself denied being in the store, and she never and it was never. It wasn't. I'm I'm sorry. I had the story that was evidence that never went in the trial. So I I mean, I I believe that she tried to buy the poison..

Lizzie Borden Andrew Abby Lizzie Emma Lizzy Borden murder Andrew Lizzie Massachusetts Harvard Borden Keira Robertson Lizzy Lizzy Stanford Andrew Morton Oxford Fall River Abbie
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"State taxation. There's no question. All this one says is the federal level, and how about we'll also tax your diamonds in your yachts collection. Otherwise, accumulate wealth because there's a for me the fundamental fairness question here. Okay. Lizzy from now on she shall be known as Lizzy Lizzy. Here's my question. Lizzie Borden took an ax gave the wealthy forty whacks. When she saw what she had done gave more wealthy forty-one. That's what she wants. She wants to blow the wealthy. So Lizzie here's my question for you. I know you're smart went to Harvard. Lizzie apple in the first quarter is sitting on two hundred and forty five billion dollars in cash. Why don't you go to TIMMY, cook and say TIMMY were taken the two forty five. We're taking two hundred and forty five billion dollars in cash that you're sitting on right now apple is valued at nine hundred billion. Plus they could by tomorrow with cash warmer, WalMart, they could buy with cash, I think Berkshire Hathaway they can do amazing things. So you wanna go after rich people? I get it. And I understand that. But why do you wanna do it Lizzie because you grew up hardscrabble in Oklahoma, and you were denied opportunity and the only pathway forward was what junior college, and then college, and then you went to Princeton, and then you went to law school. And now, you're a professor at Harvard and somehow magically. Along the way, you have you ever you have a a a net worth of north of ten million dollars. How'd you do that from the hardscrabble life in Oklahoma Lizzy? And how would you like if somebody a little poorer than you came in and said, we're take it from you. Lizzie. Lizzy loser. Breadwinner will show him seven sixty talking. Breaking news Jim Sharpe out with Hitler. The small plane has gone down on the outskirts of oceanside closing highway seventy six in the area for several hours today. We'll have an update next AM seven sixty KFI MB, the eighty nine dollars special at Zerorez ends on Sunday. So if you've waited as me, I am a procrastinator. I'd say,.

Lizzy Lizzy Lizzie Borden Lizzie Lizzie apple Harvard Oklahoma TIMMY Berkshire Hathaway WalMart Jim Sharpe oceanside professor Hitler Princeton forty five billion dollars eighty nine dollars ten million dollars
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Reply All

Reply All

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Reply All

"Super tech support is the same it on our show where someone writes into us with a problem that is bigger than they can solve and I try to solve it because in your former life because in my former life, I was a tech support man a tech supporter. So so what what do you have this week? We got an Email from a woman named Lizzie. Hi, this is Lizzy Lizzy. This is Alex Goldman. How're you doing? I'm good. How are you listening in her twenties? She works with teens at a nonprofit, and she told me that when she was on vacation over Labor Day. She had this very weird thing happened with her Snapchat. Where were you when you realize that something was wrong? I was in Asheville North Carolina for Labor Day weekend vacation. I think I think I was in the car, and I wanted to Snapchat, something I'm pretty sure that I wanted to Snapchat a brewery that I was passing and send it to my brother because we had been there before. So she tries to open Snapchat, and she locked out of it. What do you mean? Locked out of it can't get into it. But like the Abbas and working or it's like you've been banned from your account, not working. It's the app is working fine, which he can't use it. Okay. And she's like, I'm on vacation. I'm going to deal with this when I get home. It's not a big deal. Just send the password. Reset right. Yeah. So then I get home that night back from ashville, like eight hours in the car, I'm exhausted. And then I see three emails come in from Snapchat. One Email says your account has been logged in by a user on an iphone eight. The next Email says. The password to your count has been changed. The next Email says the phone number associated with your account has been changed. So how are you feeling when you see these three emails? We'll so I'm I wasn't like oh, man. Something has happened. I I was sort of like, oh, wow. I guess I just gotta like reset my password. But then at that very moment that I'm sort of starting to like process that I get text messages Lucy gets these text messages, not through Snapchat. But through her phone and the first one says, yo if you try to touch, Snapchat, lizard or do anything, you're fucked. I'm just warning you I've got your nudes and IRL's just don't do anything. We'll be fine smiley face. You understood Jesus. Also, what's an I R L? I soon that means like her like her information is realize details. Yeah. I mean did were there nudes in your Snapchat account that could have. Been accessed by this person. I wish I could answer that minutely. But I'm not certain Snapchat has a feature called memories where it saves some of the photos that you send right on. I'm not going to pretend that I've never sent offensive photo. So Lizzie reports to Snapchat that her accounts been hacked. She's getting threats from the person who took it, and they actually get the account back to her pretty quickly. The problem is that when she gets it back all of her context or deleted and her archive photos are gone, which means she can't tell whether or not the hackers have the sensitive photos that they claim they do almost as soon as she gets the account back. She gets another message from the hacker which says give it back else. I'm a smoke you. Okay. And then she got one final message which just said bitch. I am. I'm like pretty scared. I'd been on vacation. And so I like hadn't been alone in like five days, and then I'm like alone. But the first time, and I'm just kind of freaked out at this point. Did you think like this hacker knew everything about you? I definitely was like. Feeling weird. And I like remember like, maybe two days later. I like go to this yoga studio. That's like two blocks from my house, and I just remember feeling like so nervous walking back from yoga. Why why I think just because I was like alone. And it was just it was like very early in the morning. So this like consumed, you you just felt exposed everywhere. Yeah. And actually, I also made migrant sleep in my bed with me. So I told Lizzie I'd try and figure out who's behind this whole thing and just like help her get some peace of mind..

Snapchat Lizzie Alex Goldman Lizzy Lizzy Abbas Asheville North Carolina ashville Lucy eight hours five days two days
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is diversity fuss. Lots of students from different countries. Kenya? Rwanda uganda? Zimbabwe Malawi you name it here. And we're just discussing the future of Africa integration of Africa. And before we went into a brick you're making a point. What's your name again? Lizzy Lizzy, you're basically rubbishing deal veto Grisham. Basic hours, not rubbishing the idea of it. I was saying it has to have an intention behind. It is the intention is then you have you have to ask for whose benefit do we integrate is it companies rather can move freely within the within the community is it for people on the ground because as an individual canyon. I've never seen particularly may be ignorant of the benefits of integration. If it's social reasons why again, you have a hold on you said earlier on in the program that you know, the the region comes to you don't go to it. You haven't traveled much. So there is a benefit to you the region does not come to me because the government. So the states have made any proper efforts to do it. It's because traffic is very popular with a lot of African students. That is the only reason that I get a lot of exposure to struggling students from all over the place. It's not big because at the same time. I get students from from from all these other places, and it's not because we in the same economic community. But because strat, boys popular. I would say it's it it has to do with him. Strathmore being able to reach people through so many things that have been. Enabled struck me to reach runs and to rich people from across the world, like, you know, technology, and all that stuff all that has enhanced our ideas of integration. And I think I would I would basically saying things are getting better. It's not as bad as she portrays. Yes, I am quite optimistic about the idea of integration. I do think a lot needs to be done in a practical sense. But I think that east Africans and Africans in general understand and see increasingly that the simulated that there are not that it's any fiction at at all we are more similar than we are different. But the reason I don't think that will work. It's because when you think about Africa in east Africa, you think about a black native, you don't think about the people who must say that you are of south east. Just tell me about your bedroom. Yeah. I'm South Asian. I'm fifth generation. My family was brought slaves by the British. And by the Arabs to work in the coolest and on the railway, but I'm still not viewed as an East African I'm still viewed as a South Asian, so in that regard this integration. But for the black natives not the rest of us who found ourselves the argument, a little block natives will say is that wait a minute agents have been done enough to integrate as well. You know, they don't allow African men today the dodgers tomorrow them, they don't allow them into their homes. They don't arrest them..

Africa Grisham dodgers Lizzy Lizzy Kenya east Africa Rwanda uganda Zimbabwe Strathmore Malawi
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"They lower the expectations the games are shorter. They don't have to do it. You know, for the presidential physical fitness says, you don't have to do the same as the boys. Oh, you're never gonna be as fast as the boys. You're not going to be a strong. You're not gonna they tell you that right away. And I'm telling my little girl. I'm like right now, she's the fastest human in her class, male or female, and like dude ride that as long as you can't there might be a day when you're not. But don't let anybody tell you. It's because you're a girl like that. You're a human and go for it physically. She's a very very good gymnast. For her age. And I'm I'm really realistic. It standing back saying what are the odds that my little girl has what it takes. Because her mom's five-foot, I'm five eight. She is she is little one speed when it comes to gymnastics in a task. She's like got that focus. So she's in that space. Now, it would somebody like that. Are they ultimately again, become the greatest in the world ever means to be seen? But I'll keep the options open for my son. When you look at how are you raising him the world, I'm like, I'm raising him. Especially on letting him know, you're you're a man like, I totally get it that you're a boy. And I totally get it. The boys do boys things, but you're you're more mature than you possibly think. In my son now is eleven going on twenty one. I'm like, you know, more than you think, you know. And you know, what's right and wrong. And obviously both my kids, you know, what's right and wrong. And you do your best every day, and I'm trying to echo what my parents, which is drill into my head on. You know what I get that? You're a kid in be a kid, but you do know what's right and wrong. And that idea of accountability is one that I think is key. And they're both the row thriving in flourishing. It's it's it's been awesome. As a parent, but you know, the nature versus nurture argument. Like are. We just blessed with two awesome kids, or is it the manner in which Lizzie in ira- parenting, or like what is it? And when I say two awesome kids. Everybody thinks kids are awesome, right? At least they should. And I think everybody should think that that their their kids are awesome. And they're when I say Lizzy Lizzy is number one. My kids are right. There of if I want to hang out with anybody in the world. It's Lizzie only kids. Okay. Let's stay on the sport thing for just a minute. Are you help are you encouraging them to do sports training or sports specific movements, like just get dramatic stand genetics. Or are you having do some sort of other types of base movements? They have to be multi sport to even though my daughter is excelling in gymnastics. She still on the ski team. She had a I, you know, it was like you gotta play lacrosse you. Gotta play soccer. You gotta do other stuff. Because if you focus too early, it's a bad thing. A you're gonna burn out be it's bad for your body to begin with you need. The you need the movements that your body doesn't ordinarily do to strengthen your body. So it can do what it's really good at that cross training idea. So the kids ski in the winter in, you know, Bryce plays lacrosse basketball football ski like yeah. You gotta do other stuff. You're not allowed to just park when your kid you need all that other movement. And I think that that honestly carries through even at the elite level that you can't do one motion over and over and over because there are only so many times that you can do it you need to have that cross training. Those other sports to strengthen other parts of your body. Flipping on that as a segue onto your book perfection point..

gymnastics Lizzie Lizzy Lizzy basketball soccer Bryce five-foot
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"All right. So who did it? Well, I think it's clear that I think I think Lindsay did. Lindsey. That was a weird. Lindsey? Fuck, Lindsey. Did it lets you went back in time now? She killed them with an ax to practice for me. No, Lizzy Lizzy did it. I think either leave, I think a combination of an all male jury composed of men who viewed slight chased churchgoing Lizzy through the Victorian era. Chauvinistic lens just couldn't didn't see her. They just couldn't capable of committing such a heinous crime. And and I think the combination of that an important evidence being omitted from the trial is what freed her, but why? What was her motive? I, I think probably greed and freedom from the financial control of her father. I mean, she wanted more than he was willing to give her as shown via her shoplifting. She just wanted more shown by moving to the most expensive part of town as soon as possible after the trial ends is crazy. It sounds. I think she may. She may also have asked him for accident pigeons, right? She she would later donate almost. Everything. She had to a local Fall River animal shelter. She was known to really love animals. She seemed more fond of than than people and dad, and daddy didn't just get rid of her pigeons. He hatchet at them and WikiLeaks be well because she kills only your father, then her father's inheritance goes to step mommy, and she's even worse off than before. Now the purse-strings are being pulled by someone she openly does not get along with. Also, there's a chance that her father was about to write her out of the will, a chance he was sick of putting up with her shoplifting home thefts other nonsense. She's a problem child, and you may have been about done with the Rebecca Pittman a devoted Lizzie Borden researcher and author of the history and haunting of Lizzie Borden thinks that Lizzie initially tried to poison our parents because he was just, you know, because he was just hours away from signing away, her inheritance Dahbi. And if you wanted about the poison because the later they did find that that they weren't poisoned when they when they examined the bodies, they didn't have the tools necessary to examine for all types of poisons. So should they could have been poisoned and gotten sick? And it just didn't show up in the postmortem examination. But anyway, she claims the author claims to verify the identity of two mysterious men who witnesses spotted the board and home the day, the murders, you know, there was always people coming and going from the board and home is Andrew often kept business out of his house and she, she claims to verify there too. Distant family members came by using a ancestor dot com and witness testimony. And she says it supports your theory that Andrew board was about to transfer one of his farms to Abby as a part of a new business deal involving her branch of the family and that if you lived long enough to sign the papers, this deal would have significantly lessened Lizzy inheritance. So you know, not writing, you're completely out of the will, but writing her mostly out of the will which could have prompted a murderous rage is this theory. Another theory that Lizzie was a lesbian kilter parents because they knew of some lesbian affair and forbid her from continuing with it. This is pure speculation substantiated by nothing. She may have been lesbian. There are no records of her seriously being courted by any man. She was captivated by actress Manso Neil, but a lot of people were that that's the actress. She threw a. A party for for her that caused Emma to leave. Nance also remained single until she was in her forties with single to time. So you know people just, oh, to single ladies, you know, Victorian era ladies. They must be lesbians, no, not necessarily. And you know if so, she might not have been having, you know a romance, anybody, pure speculation. Also another theory that Lizzie snap and kill her father because he'd been molesting her for years and Abby did nothing to stop it..

Lizzie Borden Lindsey Lindsay Lizzy Lizzy churchgoing Lizzy shoplifting Abby Nance Fall River WikiLeaks Emma Andrew Manso Neil Lizzie Rebecca Pittman researcher Dahbi
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Fantastic Geeks (and where to find them)

Fantastic Geeks (and where to find them)

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Fantastic Geeks (and where to find them)

"It took a long time because when I got out of school I I was I had all these experiences and did all this theater and everything, and and and but I I didn't have any representation. So I, you know, I said the only way that I that I know how to do it was to do stand up comedy. So I wrote my own material and then I did. I attracted my first manager and and and then I found early on like stand up comedy is just like dark dark world, gosh, yes, yes, saddest yoga, standup on your hair. Herod mass ever. Yeah, it's hard because a, you know, you gotta go up there and when you're first starting out, even if you're having a good night, sometimes you'll have a shit audience you for being funny. That's and even if you do good, right. I'm off stage and you're looking for high fives and everyone was like, Greg, follow that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I'm outta here. It's so negative went into improv, which for a while was really good. I met a lot of my buddies who are still create with today and was that in New York, you should be upright. Citizens brigade, fun. And I did that until that got kind of like. You know, people started getting really competitive because they were starting to it was basically a because once Amy Poehler came out of their SNL was looking at UC be all the time. So that also became the career folks. And forgot about the fun part of it. Well, I was career focused as well, but it was just like for the same reason that I got out of the stand up, it was just like, hey, guys, we're in this together. So then taking that, hey, we're in this together, kind of metality and the improv skills in everything that is when I turned to Rebecca Feldman who is creating the show with her improv company and Rebecca, I, I would basically Lizzy Feldman. I went to high school with her plays together, like Lizzy Lizzy is now a look her up. She's a huge writer. EMMY winner wrote for Allen Oscars to whole Chaba. Okay. So she and I were like best friends in high school. Yeah. And now Rebecca film and her older sister who I saw him plays all the time was like, hey, we're getting a group of people together. You wanna you wanna help us make a show come in with two characters, and we're going to improvise some stuff and I was a spelling bee. Awesome. Can you please talk about spelling me? Please? Just like how. I hit that show is incredible, and it's just so amazing. Just the creation of it, how unique and original and I don't think Broadway has seen anything like it since like that. Had that sort of innocent heart and just love about it. The Bobby community loved it so much because I think that it came from like real grass roots and then it had like a pedigree with people got involved. So. It was. We were doing this show at the theatre REM. I don't know if you know the the Taurean which is like in alphabet city downtown in a really crappy area. At the time in the theater was like the laboratory, and we were the last people who get his show that. It was like, it was like, you guys shouldn't have done show man. He shouldn't have people in there. So, but we did several shows in there and we did the first show and it was all it was an improvised spelling bee. So we had basically settled on all our characters. I, I had created this character and they missed the bar. He will miss the buffet. Dammit. Who his name is always messed up and he's like this guy who is amount amalgamation of all my allergies and you know, growing pains growing up, you know that that's what Mr Bush fans, and, but he's so like he's bullied everywhere else. But when he gets to the spelling bee, like he's now, the bully is like the only place against the be the book. So which is, you know, this porcupine sweet character. This improvised show of just a spelling bee with a little bit of music. I think we had like some Frank Sinatra, Nair, whatever this crazy show. We just kept on doing this improvised spelling bee over and over..

Lizzy Lizzy Rebecca Feldman Lizzy Feldman Amy Poehler Herod EMMY Frank Sinatra Mr Bush Greg New York Chaba Broadway Allen Nair
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Hi, Lizzie you're on with Peter Davenport. Go ahead. Louis how you doing good? Go ahead. I was just wondering like where you can be found like in like, Oregon, or you know. You mean what are the hot spots? Seen everywhere lives anywhere. People. Ask me that question all the time. In fact, I've had experienced season USO investigators call me saying they're gonna take the spouse and kitties on vacation where should they go to maximize the likelihood of seeing the UFO. And my response is don't even go on the vacation just stand on your back porch and watch watch the sky. I think a person is as likely to see a UFO at home as he is off traveling in the south western desert, for example. Yeah. When I lived out here. Lizzy Lizzy Lizzy when I lived out near cedar hills. I saw you oppose in my backyard all the time. Oh, really? Oh, yeah. The whole area Beaverton Hillsboro. That's a UFO hotspot, I saw them all the time and cedar hills. Hillsborough places like that pretty much. They're they're out there. If you look in the rural areas, they're pretty much out there. Yeah. I've never seen one in Oregon before go to the coast. You'll see them all the time. Go to Washington, they're they're going to go to south. Go to south eastern Washington there everywhere up there. If you go to our data, Liz, go to our website. You can call up all the reports for Oregon, and it'll give you an idea of how many reports are come from that state. I think it's three or four thousand at least just collected by me. There are others collected by other UFO organizations. Their site is everywhere, and we get calls every hour of the day from around the.

Lizzy Lizzy Lizzy Oregon Louis UFO Washington cedar hills Peter Davenport Liz USO Lizzie Hillsboro
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The cat there. Would be room. Temperature Mr. particularly about thank you you might go Thank you Did it? Showing it there's no doubt in your mind now is there that is in mind Mr. who's a now mistake and yet, the cases, salt sergeant let's go into the drawing room and islands reduce which. While murder And so ladies and gentlemen you can also you now, how the murder was committed by Lizzie but that doesn't. Seem possible Mr Holmes what not what she have I could understand. Her mother's been an absolute tyrant I find it hard to believe that with an adult Pated mentality she'd have the imagination, to think, of such a blow the man responsible for this matter is you I did not say the murderer, I said the man response you drive yet Data's by his example in finding a job and going abroad caused one of his other relatives to become, disgusted with Michael, PETA site that person decided to go beyond such petty. Devices a, stealing, Silva and to turn to murder. Avenue that, he committed murder I see really Origin Uh-huh. Shortly that's obvious Two witnesses the cook. And at first swan no one had. Ended the dining room then when I asked question based on one of the, laws of, direct evidence each. Admitted, the Lizzy Lizzy. Yes Mr very true she told us in detail how she had entered, the dining room once but the witnesses had, entering twice the cook saw her come through the kitchen door and you honest admitted that she would. Pass. Through. The library Or someone else had realized that. Same flawed evidence that no employer really notices the actions of a seven someone, else had, enter bedroom in. The, maid's uniform and. Who is the only suspect could've done that Joel rose retarding road Greenwich, Dr Watson grandmother might have another twenty years, I saw that I never get away from getting away from me I'm taking over to the state Warn.

murder Lizzy Lizzy Mr Holmes PETA Silva Lizzie Dr Watson Greenwich Pated Joel Michael twenty years
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Lizzie but that? Doesn't seem possible Mr Holmes what motive would she. Have I could understand her mother's been an absolute tyrant I find, it hard to believe that with an adult Pated. Mentality she'd have the imagination to think of, such applause Oh no The man responsible for this murder is? You ridiculous I did not say. The murderer, I said the. Man responsible you drive by his example in finding a job and going abroad caused one of his other relatives to become disgusted with the parasite that person decided to go beyond such, pity devices a, stealing Silva and turn to murder Abernethy. Commit, murder Really Uh-huh shortly that's obvious to witnesses the. Coke Ernest. Swan no one had ended the dining. Room then when I asked a question based on one of the floors of direct, evidence each, admitted the Lizzy Lizzy. Yourself Mr. very. True she told us in detail how she has entered the dining room, once but the witnesses have entering twice the cook, saw come through the kitchen door and you an admitted that she will pass through the library. Door someone else would realize that same flawed evidence that no employer really noticed is the actions of a. Seven someone else had entered that room in the maid's uniform and who is the only suspect could have done Joel, rose Diane retarding road night you Greenwich when Dr Watson said did grandmother might have. Another twenty I sold that I'd never get away from getting away from me I'm taking you over to the station.

Lizzy Lizzy murder Lizzie Mr Holmes Abernethy Silva Dr Watson Swan Joel Greenwich
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on WEEI

"Yes The rules you have to guess only about one f-bomb per. Segment Jerry. Did last. One can't hear the lead singers voice for. Second, no go ahead get now you can get this on your. Head I asked during the. Break how do you not know? Dire? Straits said he grew up listening to live aren't? Stations Yeah I. Didn't listen to classic rusher, so you didn't realize high school I didn't know that okay I thought you listen to The big group I just? Want to hear a. Little. Bit more on the song Yes We don't really have Chicago. Chicago Curtis Queen It is tied, through is it thin Lizzy Lizzy Live on earth Because you've driven a, car your life you because you? Watch a. Commercial I would I would know a word about thin Lizzy Hi Opening. Day Joanna thought No songs are from Forrest Gump a bathroom video in the The artist that's the that's the shocker we're tied at three Curtis Curtis I am going to play I, am, going to play number twenty Okay number twenty should they. Know. This should definitely get the artist okay They should yes okay number. Twenty Dardis Yes Fill the? Plate Good Curtis Bob. Seeger. Yes The crap. Really Song title America's wonderful Title and not. Even curses guesses are the, go ahead Lisa guessing journey. Every time Mike mutnansky losing. Right now I wasn't like I only knew the artist score right, now, five, four, four, three four. Three sticks give me a couple. Of seconds the songs I can guess the song, start again Stop stop you got. Extra lyrics that's not really fair but that's okay Play the, whole song right Probably you're never you're never the Seger, and the silver bullet band saying sizzle summer Close Most Seeger song best against Smoked today's..

Lizzy Lizzy Jerry Curtis Curtis Chicago Curtis Bob Seeger Forrest Gump Seger Straits Mike mutnansky Joanna America Lisa
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Stacey's Pop Culture Parlour

"I'm not gonna noisy because i'll love it but then i'll kind of guy going to go and see that kind of bingewatch twelve films before i have play was going off oh i'm trying to film wouldn't set off sepsis thin i don't necessarily think it depends which films you've seen i think the biggest problem adult you'll miss anything in terms of important bits of information because the movie infinity gives you enough that you can be a lot of stuff without having seen every previous movie i think the problem would be you might not be invested couric is yes so many fun grinding in who they are are wonderful people if they are not they haven't read comics i haven't seen films and you go and sit in your you might know who hoke is monir who uncapped america's if you've already got say that just as they can cut you do by mine one win all you give vague but if you then go most people galaxy that can have any few novell and you'll meant have some kind of relationship with them on film but there's no time for them to assume harshly lizzy lizzy come in a very large mob your audience because you invested in building on your previous farrell's i'm saying this as always kind of i could be completely wrong the way to being one idea reviews being rehoused it was such major promoting someone would brought out by but he's i.

couric america farrell hoke lizzy lizzy
"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Teen Creeps

Teen Creeps

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy lizzy" Discussed on Teen Creeps

"They were being very fake um but i don't know who wrote lizzy lizzy bloody was like a kind forgiving saw she loves all it's your i would say she's very pure the others were being fake if so uh don get spot on the head and then oh no who does next bridge rachel right so reach all newly rachel so this was i thought a cool overall was a cool fake out i didn't like the many fake out when it was like rachel calls yeah and it's like me so rachel causing the middle of this like crazy thunderstorm and she's league two two brain mood a clique and then i loved actually that lizzy no hesitation was like i'm good safer yeah lizzy sprung into action sprint side of the house rent run out into a thunderstorm g arose yes it's a raccoon she's like no sipe i have no time for this hacker and right now as long as you are not a person whatever and then she almost gets hit by a car and they're just like i don't have time i don't have time for this right now jumps interculturalism trouble she runs that she's like knock nag neck in the months like and she's like rachel and she's like she's in her room and she goes up late but it is to you to use their and the most like yeah she's up there rai are any a for myself this is like the two of the of the sears opened the door and riddled like eight of may and she's like what the fought bench i thought you were in you cannot call and say a needs to come over and then not tell me why then should i tried.

rachel sears lizzy lizzy the house