17 Burst results for "Lizzy Leary"

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

03:55 min | Last month

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"That goes out the gate right. Now it'll wanna sometime The process of writing the rules for it right and we think that once they check all the boxes and get all of the programs and stuff ready to offer it that it. We're probably talking and debate. Beginning of may and we in journalism are taught sometimes to not use the word historic to describe things because it's kinda hyperbolic but it is fair to say this is historic. We never had a program like this of this size paying this much money to this. Many people to help them. Before internet the plan could potentially help the eighteen million americans who don't have access to high speed internet. The students who've been trying to make remote schoolwork on slow connections. The people like herald. Valentine from tony story who were rationing their cell phone minutes but even this big pot of federal money is temporary figuring out a longer term solution will likely fall to the federal communications commission which oversees lifeline. And then there's going to be this moment of a of now. What because there are lots of people who have been then getting federal help including perhaps some families who had no internet before this fifty dollar benefits came into effect. Who are going to be faced with this cliff. In the words of jessica rosenworcel. Who's the chairwoman of the. Fcc now they are at risk potentially of losing that internet that they just got Unless congress does something more lasting yeah this feels like a moment where things could actually change for folks who rely on these plans. Do you think they will. It's my deep side. Because i have to admit i'm more of the cynic. I've i've been covering the tech industry. The industry for about a dozen years now and i don't think at any other point in my career. Has there ever been such a collective understanding about the problem of the of the digital divide and the role that washington could play and fixing it. You know even during the two hundred stimulus There was there. Were billions of dollars set. Aside for broadband and people fought tooth and nail over at nova. Some people couldn't even understand why the government was paying for in the first place. Here we are what more than ten years later. And we're talking about sums that are like ten x with the government spent back then and there's much less partisan opposition to some of this stuff because democrats or republicans have like have seen what it's like back in their states and districts. It's all got to depend on congress. And that's where. I think people get a little bit nervous. Because they're on one hand there's now a deadline sometimes deadlines force congress to do stuff faster On the other hand we have been talking about these issues for probably longer than i've been alive. I guess in one context to another. I think that there's this lingering fear that we could be in yet another one of those situations in which we finally have the energy and the reason to do something and in congress kind of misses the opportunity. Tony romm thank you very much for having me. Tony romm is a senior policy reporter at the washington post. You should check. Got a story on lifeline. You can find a link to his reporting in our show notes all right. That's it for us today. Tvd is produced by ethan brooks and edited by alison benedict and tori bosh. Police montgomery is the executive producer for sleep podcasts. Tvd is part of the larger. What next family. And it's also part of future tense a partnership slate arizona state university and new america. And i want to recommend you go back and listen to wednesday's episode of what next it really helped me understand. Why are so many anti trans bills popping up in legislatures around the country and whether affects. Maybe mary harris back on monday. Have good weekend. I'm lizzy leary. Thanks for listening..

ethan brooks alison benedict Tony romm jessica rosenworcel lizzy leary tori bosh wednesday fifty dollar eighteen million congress monday first today mary harris republicans billions of dollars democrats Valentine two hundred federal communications commiss
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:30 min | Last month

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Program outright owner brings us to where we are now this big pot of money that could change things. The telecoms are lobbying very hard as every company does when there are large amounts of money potentially flowing through washington right so first things first. We have a new program on the books that will happen regardless of the lobbying right. There's a three point. Two billion dollar program that congress approved in december. That will pay up to fifty dollars monthly stipend to low income americans so that they can pay their internet bills and that goes out the gate right now. It'll wanna sometime There's the process of writing the rules for it right and we think that once they check all the boxes and get all of the programs and stuff ready to offer it that it. We're probably talking. April beginning of may and we in journalism are taught sometimes not use the word historic to describe things because it's kinda hyperbolic but it is fair to say this is historic. We never had a program like this of this size paying this much money to this. Many people to help them. Before internet the plan could potentially help the eighteen million americans who don't have access to high speed internet. The students who've been trying to make remote schoolwork on slow connections. The people like herald. Valentine from tony story who were rationing their cell phone minutes but even this big pot of federal money is temporary figuring out a longer term solution will likely fall to the federal communications commission which oversees lifeline. And then there's going to be this moment of a of now. What because there are lots of people who have been then getting federal help including perhaps some families who had no internet before this fifty dollar benefits came into effect. Who are going to be faced with this cliff. In the words of jessica rosenworcel. Who's the chairwoman of the fcc. They are at risk potentially of losing that internet that they just got Unless congress does something more lasting yeah this feels like a moment where things could actually change for folks who rely on these plans. Do you think they will. It's my deep side. Because i have to admit i'm more of the cynic. I've i've been covering the tech industry. The industry for about a dozen years now and i don't think it point in my career. Has there ever been such a collective understanding about the problem of the of the digital divide and the role that washington could play and fixing it. You know even during the two hundred stimulus There was there. Were billions of dollars set. Aside for broadband and people fought tooth and nail over at nova. Some people couldn't even understand why the government was paying for in the first place. Here we are what more than ten years later. And we're talking about sums that are like ten x with the government spent back then and there's much less partisan opposition to some of this stuff because democrats or republicans have like have seen what it's like back in their states and districts. It's all got to depend on congress. And that's where. I think people get a little bit nervous. Because they're on one hand there's now a deadline sometimes deadlines force congress to do stuff faster On the other hand we have been talking about these issues for probably longer than i've been alive. I guess in one context to another. I think that there's this lingering fear that we could be in yet another one of those situations in which we finally have the energy and the reason to do something and in congress kind of misses the opportunity. Tony romm thank you very much for having me. Tony romm is a senior policy reporter at the washington post. You should check. Got a story on lifeline. You can find a link to his reporting in our show notes all right. That's it for us today. Tvd is produced by. Ethan brooks and edited by benedict and tori bosh. Police montgomery is the executive producer for sleep podcasts. Tvd is part of the larger. What next family. And it's also part of future tense a partnership slate arizona state university and new america. And i want to recommend you back and listen to wednesday's episode of what next it really helped me understand. Why are so many anti trans bills popping up legislatures around the country and whether affects maybe right. Mary harris back on monday have good weekend. I'm lizzy leary. Thanks for listening..

Mary harris Tony romm Ethan brooks jessica rosenworcel december eighteen million lizzy leary washington congress benedict fifty dollar wednesday tori bosh monday today republicans about a dozen years federal communications commiss democrats three point
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

06:04 min | 3 months ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Complicated than just. Throw the private sector harnesses. What a lot of users more well off users who are trying to make appointments are discovering is the experience of being poor of needing government services often. Just don't work in a story you read about this. You wrote that. A lot of americans really only have to interact with government doing their taxes. Going to the dmv. Maybe traffic court. But when we are talking about americans who rely more heavily on government services. The failure of technology is a huge added burden in terms of time and effort required to navigate all of this one hundred percent. I think it's partially just that the world has kept evolving and government has not But yes i think. An enormous piece of this is that the people who are frequent users of government services are people who are already marginalized or lower income. These are the people who need help. And so yes. They're used to being really awful to interact with government so in many ways the fact that you and i are having this conversation is perhaps because more will off. Americans are noticing this right now because of the pandemic absolutely absolutely the entire population. All of a sudden is having this wake up. Call that everybody else who has been interacting with government for a long time. This can't possibly come as a surprise to them. One of the things that i'm really struck by in this is the failure or what seems like a failure to think about those most vulnerable populations and to think about they the way they might be trying to access these sign up systems for example. If you're only internet connection is on mobile And the mobile dropdown menus don't work. You have no recourse. Guess that that is that is true. There are significant number of government services that are designed purely for a laptop or joint function while on mobile even though we know from research that a large percentage of the population is actually going to access this via mobile. And maybe even over a cellular network because people don't have laptops or people don't have wifi while states like new york and california are struggling to get people signed up and backs needed. There are places that seem to have hit their stride. When i ask people on twitter to send me their vaccine sign up stories. I got emails from people in michigan. Who had easy experiences and ana says things are looking pretty good. Actually in alaska in anchorage they built a tool that will go and look for appointments at all the different places and then deliver it in one interface. I don't know if it's because they have that. And they they have a tech team. And they're using it but alaska's doing really well and interestingly they are told me that they also gave the tool to north dakota. North dakota is also doing really well so that was wonderful to see that however they were able to make that happen. They're using tech talent they're using their innovation team and they're doing it in a way that is open source so that other states can benefit from it. The bundy ministrations goal is one hundred million vaccine doses by april and. I wonder when you think about that. Number and the distribution failures we have seen so far. How would you design a program to reach an enroll the largest number of people possible so that that hundred million doses could maybe happen. Part of what has happened is real data analysis right. Now we've been handling it. As though all fifty states are equitable and all states. have the same needs. I don't know that that's true at a bare minimum. Just doing some analysis around where it makes sense to vaccinate would be a huge step forward and then she had one other thought less tech related more human. Why can't we all sign up. This keeps this has been driving me crazy. I would like to know when i'm scheduled. Even if it's august that would just give me peace of mind and i as long as you know that an event is going to happen. You can start to plan your life after that. So many people are suffering from depression and all other all the other things that are coming with. The pandemic is people could at the very bare minimum. Have a date. When they're like well at this date. I'm going to be vaccinated. I'll be fully inoculated and i can restart life. I think that would change people's attitude a lot. Shang thank you very much. Thank you so much. This was fun. Hunter shank is the director of strategy for public interest technology at new america. Rafael lee is director of health program. Jessica allen who at the top of the show lives in northern new york state and hopefully by the time you hear this my mom will have gotten i shot. Thanks to estate site jessica. Flag for me on. Twitter is produced by ethan brooks and edited by benedict and tori. Bosh unleash montgomery is our executive producer. Td is part of the larger. What next family. Tv is also part of future tenths partnerships late arizona state university and new america have a good weekend. Mary harris will be back on monday. I'm lizzy leary. Thanks for.

Rafael lee Jessica allen michigan monday jessica Mary harris benedict ethan brooks Hunter shank Shang california april alaska tori new york Twitter north dakota new america lizzy leary fifty states
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

06:24 min | 6 months ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"For months now rene into colleagues. . The election integrity partnership have been studying the movement of misinformation about the election we're looking specifically at things related to voting procedural misinformation about ballots about where to vote went to vote how to vote if voting is being suppressed know so that that's the area that we've chosen to focus on renee inner team collect viral stories they funnel them into a tracking system then try to answer A. Series . of questions where the content come from what's the narrative? ? How did it spread and how fast is it spreading and with that body of data over the last couple months <hes> we started paying attention to what narratives were most prevalent, , what narratives went the farthest, , and then how might these narratives reappear on election day and it's not just election day renee is already seeing viral narratives unfold in early voting I saw some <hes>. . Videos of police officers taking p. p. e. from polling place in Brooklyn that would that went viral over the over the weekend I think it was or maybe it was yesterday. . Yeah I saw that too. . Are. . Were having voter and there is a lot of tension on the left in particular related to police officers, , and so that narrative of a police officer doing something that they weren't supposed to <hes> was read as Oh they're in the tank for trump. . But what they did on the first day of early voting and you know there are certain laws about where you have to be how far you have to be from the door polling place related to electioneering, , and it wasn't really clear from the video whether this fell into that category whether this was electioneering whether this was just an unfortunate encounter that got heated where the police officers overreacted and took stuff away. . There are a lot of. . Things about it that weren't made clear until think about twenty four hours later when the the official channels for the police precinct that was involved said actually the officer was wrong and here is here's what should have happened instead, , and in those moments, , there's really no way to fact check there's no way to know what actually happened in that situation until you know until the facts are revealed a couple of hours to maybe even a day later. . and. . So the story continues to go viral <hes> before the facts are known. . You can have well intentioned misinformation where the information might be wrong but the intent is innocent or disinformation where the intent is to mislead, , and it's really hard as an internet consumer to know what's what? ? Misinformation disinformation or something. . Real Rene says tread carefully. . Take a second before you share that post from a friend of a friend not just now. . But after election day to everybody's got their video camera in their pocket. . Which means that there's GonNa be tons and tons and tons of these primary source videos purportedly documenting. . Misbehavior Malfeasance poll workers you name it and they're all going to be strung together into what's going to feel like an overwhelming swell of evidence that. . For the left, , the vote was suppressed for the right illegal ballots were cast and I think that's going to be one of the key challenges to contend with his. . There will be machines that don't work there will be encounters between people that are hostile and inappropriate and possibly illegal. . We have to expect that in a country with over one hundred, , thousand pulling locations things are going to go wrong they always have gone wrong. . In fact, , it's just that they're isolated disparate events and we have to be careful not to read too much into them to construct a narrative that more broadly de-legitimize as the election. . and. . If you are the person recording something be safe, , you can legitimize your content with GPS, , shots without edits in between and any information that identifies where you are and who's involved because Rene as research shows that this stuff is gonNA fly around at a pace, , we've never seen before. . You know maybe it's because I had a baby not too long ago but I keep thinking of all of this is what to expect when you're expecting nation. . It's not it's not a question of if but a question of when right we all know that this is going to be a uncertain period. . We all know that they're going to be a lot. . Of opportunities for videos and footage that people take to be twisted or used inappropriately for real incidents to be taken out of context and put in the context of vast broad conspiracy to erode confidence in the legitimacy of election. Overall, . , we know that they're going to be candidates who are going to claim victory and then insinuate that it is being stolen from them. . There's one line that is in one of your reports that. . Kind of startled me. . and. . It just feels like it's about the scope of all of this you guys wrote regardless of origins or intent these attacks on the perceived integrity of the two thousand election represent a threat to democracy itself. . That feels dyer. . Are you frightened? ? Yes I think several of us who worked on this. . This is not our first election we've seen we worked two thousand eighteen midterms. . We've seen elections in a number of other countries at this point and how social media narratives <hes> figure in there. . It's just that this particular election is incredibly high stakes, , and so I think the threat to democracy is is in part based on the idea that. . Democracy implies and informed electorate. . Now, that's , not how it manifests all the time. . You know we're not going to be naive and say that in the olden days, everybody , was wildly informed the now they're not that's not true but people were not to the same extent quite actively disinformed. . Democracy also relies on US believing the results. . And if you have massive delegitimization, , if the media and social media is used in advance for months to preemptively de-legitimize results of the election by saying any isolated ballot incident is evidence of massive voter fraud or any protests in the streets is evidence of vast color evolution coup. . That means that a large large percentage of people who engage with those stories are not going to accept the outcome. .

Rene East officer Democrats US darren beatty Apple official trump Stanford US Army president Lizzy leary CIA Tucker Carlson Russia Tiktok Steve Bannon Erika Weber
"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

"For one? Another <Speech_Music_Female> aroon vinegar Paul <Speech_Music_Female> and Shumita <Speech_Female> our reporters <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and hosts for WNYC <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and longtime <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> friends and colleagues of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Richard Hake <Speech_Music_Female> WNYC <Speech_Music_Female> morning edition host. <Speech_Music_Female> Who passed away last <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> week at the age <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of fifty one of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> natural causes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> should meet to Aroon? <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you so much <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for this tribute <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and just taking <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the time <SpeakerChange> to talk about <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Richard with me. Thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you was a ruin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sending you love <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thinks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back to you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back thank you <Speech_Music_Female> can buy. Lucy <SpeakerChange> Paints too much. <Speech_Music_Female> Richard <Speech_Female> Hake was part <Speech_Female> of this shows extended <Speech_Music_Female> family. We <Speech_Female> offer our condolences <Speech_Female> to his loved ones which <Speech_Music_Female> include our colleagues here <Speech_Music_Female> at WNYC <Speech_Music_Female> and all <Speech_Music_Female> who are grieving. <Speech_Music_Female> During this time <Speech_Female> and on a related <Speech_Female> note Shumita Basu <Speech_Female> will be hosting the takeaway <Speech_Female> starting next <Speech_Female> week for the last <Speech_Music_Female> month. Tenzin of Vegas <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> maternity leave. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Female> so much for listening today <Speech_Female> and every day <Speech_Female> I'm lizzy leary <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> this is the <Music>

"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

"What this good spirits is exposed The concerns that we've all had regarding Black and Brown people about those that. I've been a economically disadvantaged It exposes those weaknesses. So those who were struggling before are struggling more now those who were sick before thicker now Here in our culture health district. We really don't have demographic information To really support it either way But we recognize that you know again Black and Brown people those poor. Those are less educated more likely not to have access to healthcare of more or less likely to have the means to support themselves during this pandemic. Savannah's a big tourist town. What do you need to feel like? It's safe for the businesses that depend on tourism to open up again right. We have fifteen million to come in Savannah every year. We wanted to come back to Savannah when a safe to do so Right now is just not to do so. We want people to be safe. Who want people to feel safe and we will get there. It's just not today. This is all you know. Starting tomorrow what sorts of things are you going to be watching? What pieces of data to figure out if this reopening is gone well or or if it's going badly well the first thing we do is try to ascertain What businesses are opening because the confusing thing about all of this that? The governor currently has a stay at home order in place until April Thirtieth. So important for not only myself. But I'll citizens is that if we have a stay at home order until April thirtieth. Then why are we opening businesses on April twenty fourth and April twenty seven? You know it doesn't make sense. His own orders conflicting at that meeting people being confused. The second thing we're going to do is to try to create a way to Creeds protocols so that would businesses open. They have the way to open safely. And then discuss. What does that look like? What does that mean So at least here in Savannah. We're all kind of running the same game plan. What happens if you start to see a dramatic uptick in cases Well if we see. A dramatic uptick in cases again We're about two weeks behind the curve. So if it about two weeks if we see up ticking cases law allows right do declaration You know with certainty that has to do that. Protect people. There are other cities nearby. I think about tiny island which is off Savannah Where the mayor has objected to to Governor Kemp's orders. Are you talking with other mayors near you? About Kinda how to navigate this moment Yes mayors sessions has been a Rockstar of from time and we. We've we've conversed on Several occasions That's why she other players in the area talk to mayors across state We have what's called hub cities Which are the largest George? I've been in contact with several of those mayors. We've been communicating about baking the similar challenges that we're basic data Leeann Augusta but also all the Atlanta's well Albany's obviously been particularly hard hit. Are there things you learned from their experience? That you've tried to institute in Savannah Short. I mean to keep people away from each other. is then then The Jari Air factions really started from To funeral services And and therefore peress issues social distancing issues of Fear repeatable homes at Church services keeping people away. There's no way that people were able to get together with that. Could be social. We are social people. We miss a social connection The inclination of people is to talk talk close to be intimate In each other space and again that how this This virus spreads are there things that are particular to savannah that you're wrestling with. I mean I I think of those beautiful squares. Some of the streets you know people could be outside walking around in those but are there other things where you think. Oh no here's something about our city that may be. The governor doesn't get well. I can't get that a Savannah again Is a major tourist destination For folks around the world people like come into Savannah out whether it's wonderful Where In the Eighties. Right about now. it's been very very good very feasible days We are right off. The I ninety five corridor that runs from Main Tamiami a we are a river city. We are just miles away to our dog and twelve south from try Easter Tabby Allen. And then of course. Hilton head South Carolina So again there's so many major factors which people come through. We are the home. The several homes People from all over the country who come here and they'd lived here during the summers so These are I think a very different circumstances than many places across the state and I think we have to be very very careful what makes Savannah so wonderful. Savannah is so personable and so we like people enjoy each other and so for us. It's been very difficult since recognize that. We have to stay away and we believe that opening the door. A little bit will make people. Just knock the door down Savannah. Mayor Van Johnson. Thanks so much for your time. Thank you so much back with you on the takeaway I'm Lizzy leary but a lot of heavy stuff today. But we're GONNA give you a chance to breathe and have some fun here at the end of the hour. We've got the next installment in our series joking from a distance for about a month now late night host Samantha B has been filming her show full frontal from her backyard with her husband. Jason Jones behind the camera. Hi Welcome to full frontal. I'm Samantha B and I'm in the woods right now both metaphorically and literally to help prevent the spread of covert nineteen. I'm now shooting the show with a safe minimal crew of my husband and the creatures of the forest and while that means the show looks and sounds very different from its normal format. Sam told me that the overall tone hasn't really had to change from its pre-coded iteration has always been the strength of the show taking material. That's really dark and scary and crazy and turning it into a comedy show so it's different because we're all facing this hardship or this experience of the pandemic at the same time. We're all in the same boat. As opposed to kind of focusing on one niche issue and bringing it light so that part is different but I think the execution is the same full-frontal co head writer. Chris Bartlett says that despite the logistical challenges the shares writing team quickly adapted to putting together a weekly comedy show from home. We've really adjusted our process and we have staff writing on a couple of days. That are totally different days. And then me and the other head writer. Mike drucker assembled a show and punch it up on Saturday nights and we have these marathon three hour phone conversation so things have changed but we are still able to hear each other laugh and find the funny thing so I feel very fortunate in that respect when I talked to Salmon Kristen. Sam explained how her backyard ended up serving. As the show's new studio. The basic thought process was as we were leaving the studio our last show that we shot in a studio which we did by the way without an audience already our last experience in that studio we had a real feeling like we would not be coming back to our office for quite some time and so people started to gather their equipment in the things that they would need to do a show remotely even though we had of course no idea what that would really look like and we My husband my family. We came to our house and kind of set up camp but there was a great deal of confusion. Like could you? Could we do a show around here? Is it even physically possible? How could we upload footage? What could we really make this experience so we just shot a couple of things in the forest shot a couple of digital videos out in the forest by our woodshed and in through that we I think we figured out that we could capture something with an iphone. Eleven literally that was broadcast worthy like we knew we could make the content. We could make it. We could. We could make our show in that way all in our various homes but could we make it really broadcast ball. We make it look pleasant and watchable sh and we figured out pretty soon that we cut and then we kind of had to sell the network on it a bit and likely. I think we have something here like we can do this. And then so so. That process took a little while and then after about a week or so. We were just all on board. I really wanted to keep the show going. We really wanted to keep the show going and so we just made it. Keep going you know you mentioned being in the studio and your last episode without an audience. Kristen is it different writing. When you know there's not GonNa be a alive audience's energy you get to play off of. Oh absolutely so the first show that we knew that there wouldn't be audience. We found out the morning of the show that we weren't GonNa have audience and Mike had this idea to ask Sam to sage or to read jokes that she had never seen before so we added a few in right before we were shooting and Sam. Very graciously was willing to go along with that. Which is very risky. Yeah I think it was really funny to hear Sam's.

Savannah Sam Savannah Short Mike drucker Samantha B South Carolina wrestling Van Johnson Jason Jones Governor Kemp Kristen Main Tamiami Leeann Augusta Jari Air Lizzy leary Atlanta Chris Bartlett
"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Are some of the things that a lot of people are considering when they're doing the plasma therapy because it's early in the stage but it is something very promising. Kamal Kinda is an immunologist and AC- professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Nyu Langone. Medical School and Joachim. Bach is a science writer for the Washington. Post thank you both so much. Thank you it's the takeaway I'm lizzy leary earlier this month. The Food and Drug Administration reduced the amount of time. Men have to wait to donate blood after having sex with another man prior to this the policy said men had to wait at least a year before they could donate now. The waiting period has been reduced to three months. That decision came after a dramatic drop in blood supply across the US as many churches schools and other venues cancelled blood drives due to Kobe. Nineteen but as this pandemic rages the need for blood hasn't diminished and not just because there's no need for plasma donations to try to treat cope in nineteen. There are still victims of car. Accidents Gun violence and cancer patients. All of whom still need blood donations at this time in Michigan the TV station wd IV Detroit reports that the shortage and donations is causing major problems for hospitals. The email from Michigan medicine echoes would every hospital is dealing with across the state. I am standing in the blood bank at Michigan Medicine. It starts in Ann Arbor. I am looking at the refrigerator that contains only one day supply of blood for the hospital. The hospital is full. There are patients who need blood and cannot wait now that the rule is changed. We wanted to revisit how this policy has affected our past. We asked you how these regulations have affected you at eight seven seven eight my take this is Jonathan Nichols from Fort Lauderdale Florida. And I believe that this is one of the worst policies to ever be put in place by the FDA greatly offends me. And I have personally been denied the right to donate and it was Let me tell you it's an awful experience. It just makes you feel less of a human than everyone else. Just trying to stay. Full name is John. I'm from Miami Florida and sexual man. I've had a couple of different experiences with donating blood but recently I've just started lying on the questionnaires. I learned that they have to test all the blood regardless of who it comes from for HIV and other diseases commonly sexually transmitted so it seems like a stupid rule to discriminate against the group of people. My name is Dallas. I live in Dallas Texas And I work for a large company that often has charitable events including blood drives and always avoid the topic at work because people either don't know that I'm gay or they don't know about the restrictions and it always leads to awkward conversation so now every time that happens I just avoid. The topic of the blood drives byerly. Hey this is amy Morris town and you know I have trouble giving blood because one of the questions is. Have you ever had a boyfriend? Who turned out to be bisexual and in fact. I did a long time ago. I have a boyfriend who was bisexual when I found this out during the AIDS crisis and I was just like stunned and furious because obviously you can just wait. You could test the blood. There's so many other things that are also bloodborne. I don't stop you from giving blood. So it's a ludicrous ridiculous barrier in the first place. Some of our listeners like Angus Cosgrove from New York. Don't think the new relaxed. Fda restrictions go far enough the blood which was unacceptable just weeks ago. Jackie the same veins today and that just makes me feel like a second class citizen in the eyes of the law after this is also what my blood suddenly the interior again. This is matthew from Seattle. I think it's ridiculously discriminatory to restrict manufactured managers donating blood. I work in. Hiv Research and the notion that we are still have done them at the climax carriers of HIV is dangerously outdated as it ignores crew risk that any sexually active person faces at. That's actually along with many other method transmission if we're really need a blood as we are. It's unconscionable to arbitrarily restrict large groups that population.

Michigan Medicine HIV Dallas FDA Angus Cosgrove Food and Drug Administration lizzy leary Nyu Langone Michigan US Ann Arbor Kamal Jonathan Nichols Washington Medical School Bach Hiv Research AC- professor Department of Microbiology Seattle
"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And I also think we have to think about when it's a voluntary and when it's coerced gender. You worry at all that some of these surveillance measures particularly I think about the ones in China for example could be exploited beyond this pandemic that could track dissidents could track weaker Muslims. Anything like that. There already was a surveillance state in China. There's long been a surveillance state in China so I think that's that was a concern before the corona virus in it remains a concern after the Khris. Then I think if we are applying some of the lessons to the United States and if and when there is some sort of compelling case that there needs to be new surveillance authorities are new governmentally controlled surveillance systems. We ought to. I think first of all demand very clearly. What exactly the the need is and how the program would serve that need if that case is made. I think it's essential that any new thirties be coupled with sunsets and clear criteria for determining when the sunset happens that you don't get in a pattern where there's renewing sunsetting periods that go on into what is effectively perpetuity. Which reminds me of the Post. Nine eleven's surveillance that that went into place after the Patriot Act and multiple renewals exactly and it's also critical to as we're thinking about this particular set of considerations to ensure that any data that's collected either by the private sector or by the governmental sector is destroyed is is not retained longer than the purpose for which it's needed which again requires a very careful tailoring of the program whether it's private sector organized or governmentally mandated be very clear you know one of the interesting things and differences between the surveillance systems that were put in place after nine eleven and the kinds of things that are being talked about here. Is that after nine eleven. The goal was to track terrorists and in order to achieve that goal. Secrecy was essential because if he were tracking an alleged terrorist. And you tip them off. You've destroyed your intelligence value of what you're doing here. By contrast there is a really important goal of transparency. What the information that is being collected has to be made publicly available and transparent in order to be effective and so I think that provides some hope that any systems that are being put into place will incorporate that principle as critical for serving the Public Health. Goal that they're trying to achieve. I just think though the risk is we develop a system for civilian purposes like facial recognition with driver's license photos. And then we see you know security agencies using them to particularly target immigrants so I think one of the issues is to make sure data collected for one purpose is not allowed to be used for another purpose and the UN actually has a program called U. N. global pulse and they have a set of principles in one is as we talked about like. You must delete information when you're done but it also has principles like you know you have to figure out narrowly what you're trying to do. You have to collect the least amount of data necessary for their purpose and not use some emergencies used to data. Everybody Natasha Singer is technology reporter at the New York. Times AND JEN. Dusko is a professor and faculty director for the Tech Law and security program at the American University School of law. Thank you both so much. Thank you thank you. I cannot in good conscience continued about the campaign. They cannot win I'm lizzy leary. Welcome back takeaway. Can yesterday Senator Bernie. Sanders dropped out of the race for the Democratic Party's nomination leaving former Vice President Biden as the likely candidate to go up against president trump in November for the beginning of the race. Sanders was the front runner but as the field narrowed in recent weeks Biden. Quickly overtook him. After unsuccessfully running for the nomination in two thousand sixteen sanders once again ran on a progressive platform pushing some of the Democratic Party to the left and galvanizing millions of supporters around the country. Joining me to talk about it. Is Amy Walter host of politics with Amy Walter from the takeaway and national editor of the Cook Political Report? Hi Amy Hi Lizzie. All right so what prompted Sanders to drop out now. Why not? Why don't we to look in Renton? Yeah I think it had become clear to everybody including folks within the Sanders campaign and Bernie Sanders himself. That there was just no way that he was going to be able to overtake. Joe Biden in the delegate race and I think Wisconsin was going to be another example of this. Obviously we're still waiting on the results from Wisconsin but the last poll out of that state state that Bernie Sanders had won pretty convincingly in two thousand sixteen. Well that poll that was out last week showed him losing to Joe Biden by about thirty points. So there's just no breakthrough that was going to happen for Bernie Sanders and I think. Finally that the Cova Nineteen and the fact that we know from now definitely through the summer if not longer this is going to be the dominant issue. That's animating everything around us including politics and trying to break through and overcome the deficit in delegates. And attention that Bernie Sanders had to do was just going to be impossible. You know he was doing pretty well. At the beginning of this campaign winning caucuses and primaries what was the turning point for his campaign. You know it's really interesting. Sort of went back and I was looking at where Bernie. Sanders started this campaign and where he ended it and the interesting thing was he was the front runner until Joe Biden got in and got Joe Biden. Was the front runner. The we kept sort of putting this Asterik. They're like the fragile front runner. The the the the front runner who looks good on paper but we know also has some serious liabilities. And then once Iowa New Hampshire Nevada happened. We said see. Those are the liabilities we're talking about. But at the same time Bernie Sanders never really broke through except for again when it mattered in those early states but up until that moment he was always trailing Joe Biden and the one person who actually broke through was Elizabeth Warren. I mean she was the only one who really overtook Joe Biden in those over the summer in terms of being a national front runner for Sanders. I think what we came to see is that his greatest strength was also his greatest liability for people who really like Bernie Sanders. What they like about him is that he's unwilling to bend or change or adapt right. You get what you get. He is not going to blow with the wind. He's not a poll driven candidate. But that also meant that he wasn't willing to bend or change or move with the moment in order to bring New People into his campaign and so he's a little bit like a candidate who says here's my tent. Either come in in it or you sit out of it but I'm not gonNA make it any bigger any more comfortable for you to get in and fundamentally he was unable to build a coalition. That was big enough to sustain him through states again we saw in South Carolina but even beyond that and so I think that was his. His significant. Challenge was fundamentally that he just wasn't able to expand the coalition beyond that Berry core of people who liked him from the very beginning. Any we are this moment where we're all thinking about corona virus and the people we love and and ourselves and I just one thing that makes me think about is Medicare for all which was so central to the sanders campaign. Joe Biden has not supported that and I I guess I wonder in this moment. We're all focused on health care. Is there any chance that might change right? That's a really good question. Because the debate over health care in many ways during the primary was like it was sort of theoretical. Right this idea of well. What would it look? Like in theory to have a medicare for all system. And that's what they debated over and over again especially on these televised debates wall. Now we have an actual pandemic and people who are absolutely terrified Not just about the disease itself but what to do if they get it. And perhaps they're uninsured or their insurance isn't enough to cover it. I think though in the short term lizzy the issue is about as you pointed out. Fear you know the the immediate fear of where we are at this moment and that debates over something like a healthcare system will continue post pandemic. Hopefully we will very soon be in a post pandemic moment where we can sit back and analyze but right now we're in a just a reactive mode which is can we get what people need at this immediate moment.

Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Senator Bernie Democratic Party China United States Medicare Amy Walter Khris UN lizzy leary Renton Wisconsin New York South Carolina Natasha Singer Cova U. N.
"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"On December. Eleventh Twenty. Fifteen Silicon Valley. Did what it does. Best announced a new kind of company that was supposed to change the world. It's backers included Sam Altman a near legendary investor and president of the STARTUP ACCELERATOR. Y combinator and Elon. Musk who is you know musk? The company was called open. Ai and the idea simply put was to get artificial intelligence right. It's something that both altman and must talk about a lot Pierce Altman last year. What does it mean to build something that is more capable than ourselves? What does that say about our humanity? What's that World GonNa look like what's place in that world? How is that going to be equitably shared? How do we make sure that? It's not like a handful of people in San Francisco making decisions reaping all the benefits. I think we have an opportunity. That comes along. Only every couple of centuries to Redo the socioeconomic contract and how we include everybody in that make everybody a winner and how we don't destroy ourselves in the process is a huge question. The answer to that question was as the name suggests openness they promised kind of radical transparency employees who were researching neural nets and machine learning were encouraged to publish their papers on their code. And if company research led to patents it would share them with the world and not keep them under lock and key. This was the defining ethos of open. Ai and since the launch back in two thousand fifteen they've become a dominant player in the world of artificial intelligence. I follow openness is work and have been following their work because they are one of the top. Ai Research Labs in the world. That's Karen how senior a reporter at. Mit's tech review so it seemed like the time was ripe to actually start looking into the inside story of how they operate. You made arrangements to spend some time embedded in their office Told me about that experience so I reached out to them saying. Hey I want to do this profile of you. I think the time is right. I wanted to have a chance to understand the culture better. Eat lunch with them. Hang OUT WITH THEM. A bit just like roam around and get a feel for the space and they were like great. Come stop by our office. We will set up interviews with all of the main technical people at the company so in August. Karen flew from Boston San Francisco and went to the corner of eighteenth and Folsom to a three story structure with the words. Pioneer building painted on the side and I mentioned this to my editor. After my first day I said I feel like they're giving me all of the access without any of the access so that the building has three floors and the first floor is the common area in the dining room and I was only allowed to stay there so I couldn't go to the second and third floor where like all the researchers saw and all of their interesting research on and then the first day they were like you're you're going to be up to eat lunch with the team and like I think thirty minutes before lunch. They were actually. We want to take you out for lunch and I later learned From some sources there that it was there was an all company meeting happening at the time and they needed me out of the office but they actually didn't mention that time either just said change of plans. You're going out of the office as a reporter especially a reporter writing about technology. Karen doesn't usually assume she's GONNA get a lot of access to the company she covers but with open. Ai I she expected things to be different immediately. Was like this is not at all open. I I'm not experiencing the transparency that they purport to have an even just that small thing like that small misalignment made me think. I wonder what other misalignments there are. Karen spent the next six months trying to understand these contradictions. She did nearly three dozen interviews and she found something much messier and more complicated than she was expecting today on the show the story of an AI company that wanted to put purpose over profit. And how that went sideways. I'm Lizzy leary. And you're listening to what next. Tvd Show about technology power. How the future will be determined. Stay.

Karen Ai Sam Altman Ai Research Labs reporter Silicon Valley altman Musk Pierce Altman San Francisco Elon Lizzy leary Mit president editor Folsom
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"On December. Eleventh Twenty. Fifteen Silicon Valley. Did what it does. Best announced a new kind of company that was supposed to change the world. It's backers included Sam Altman a near legendary investor and president of the STARTUP ACCELERATOR. Y combinator and Elon. Musk who is you know musk? The company was called open. Ai and the idea simply put to get artificial intelligence right. It's something that both altman and must talk about a lot Pierce Altman last year. What does it mean to build something that is more capable than ourselves? What does that say about our humanity? What's that World GonNa look like what's place in that world? How is that going to be equitably shared? How do we make sure that? It's not like a handful of people in San Francisco making decisions reaping all the benefits. I think we have an opportunity. That comes along. Only every couple of centuries to Redo the socioeconomic contract and how we include everybody in that make everybody a winner and how we don't destroy ourselves in the process is a huge question. The answer to that question was as the name suggests openness they promised kind of radical transparency employees who were researching neural nets and machine learning were encouraged to publish their papers on their code. And if company research led to patents it would share them with the world and not keep them under lock and key. This was the defining ethos of open. Ai and since the launch back in two thousand fifteen they've become a dominant player in the world of artificial intelligence. I follow openness is work and have been following their work because they are one of the top. Ai Research Labs in the world. That's Karen how senior a reporter at. Mit's tech review so it seemed like the time was ripe to actually start looking into the inside story of how they operate. You made arrangements to spend some time embedded in their office Told me about that experience so I reached out to them saying. Hey I want to do this profile of you. I think the time is right. I wanted to have a chance to understand the culture better. Eat lunch with them. Hang OUT WITH THEM. A bit just like roam around and get a feel for the space and they were like great. Come stop by our office. We will set up interviews with all of the main technical people at the company so in August. Karen flew from Boston San Francisco and went to the corner of eighteenth and Folsom to a three story structure with the words. Pioneer building painted on the side and I mentioned this to my editor. After my first day I said I feel like they're giving me all of the access without any of the access so that the building has three floors and the first floor is the common area in the dining room and I was only allowed to stay there so I couldn't go to the second and third floor where like all the researchers saw and all of their interesting research on and then the first day they were like you're you're gonNA to be up to eat lunch with the team and like I think thirty minutes before lunch. They were actually. We want to take you out for lunch and I later learned From some sources there that it was there was an all company meeting happening at the time and they needed me out of the office but they actually didn't mention that time either just said change of plans. You're going out of the office as a reporter especially a reporter writing about technology. Karen doesn't usually assume she's GONNA get a lot of access to the company she covers but with open. Ai I she expected things to be different. I am mmediately was like this is not at all open. I I'm not experiencing the transparency that they purport to have an even just that small thing like that small misalignment made me think. I wonder what other misalignments there are. Karen spent the next six months trying to understand these contradictions. She did nearly three dozen interviews and she found something much messier and more complicated than she was expecting today on the show the story of an AI company that wanted to put purpose over Prophet. And how that went sideways. I'm Lizzy leary. And you're listening to what next. Tvd Show about technology power. How the future will be determined. Stay.

Karen Ai Sam Altman Ai Research Labs reporter Silicon Valley altman Musk Pierce Altman San Francisco Elon Lizzy leary Mit president editor Folsom
"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"The life in Beijing right now is pretty bizarre. Very post apocalyptic. This is Josh Chen. He's a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and he's been living in reporting in China for the last ten years. The city of twenty million people are depending on the time of year and for the last few weeks. It's been almost completely empty trying to go out every day just to maintain my sanity but only really supermarkets and a handful of restaurants. That are still open. No traffic you walk down the street. You can actually hear birds chirping which almost never happens. This is one of the one of the most populous cities in the world. On those days it's cacophonous and there are people everywhere and now you got in this. There's none fear of the corona virus has kept most people at home for weeks now since the start of the Lunar New Year holiday in late January but even though people aren't outside that much these days it doesn't mean they're not being watched as a journalist in China Josh accustomed to it but you also kind of get used to it and I think a lot of people in China just they have that sense in it sort of fades into the background after a while but now with corona virus things have escalated more than sixty thousand people have gotten sick worldwide at least thirteen hundred of died and to keep the virus at bay. The Chinese government is paying even more attention to people's movements in a really granular way. They've started blocking off apartment complex and so basically I think every apartment complex definitely mine on all the ones I've seen in my walks around the neighborhood block. There's only a single entrance. So that means that they can take the temperature of everyone coming in and out but the very sticking sort of see who's who's coming and going and then there's the high tech piece to have a phone number in China to get a Sim card you have to provide your ID which means the government can track people's movements using their phones and there have been news stories of people who are sort in. Wuhan at the epicenter of this outbreak. Who then traveled to other parts of the country who who are tracked in order to sort of see who else might have been in contact with that person. It's not surprising that the Chinese government is keeping tabs on who says what about Corona virus. They go and what they do. This outbreak is showing both the reined in the limits of the government's ability to control the story today on the show. How Corona virus is putting China's surveillance state to the test? I'm Lizzy leary and you're listening to what next. Tvd A show about technology power and how the future will be determined..

China Chinese government Josh Chen Beijing Wall Street Journal Lizzy leary Wuhan
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"The life in Beijing right now is pretty bizarre. Very post apocalyptic. This is Josh Chen. He's a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and he's been living in reporting in China for the last ten years the city of twenty million people or more depending on the time of year and for the last few weeks. It's been almost completely empty trying to go out every day just to maintain my sanity but only really supermarkets and a handful of restaurants. That are still open. No traffic you walk down the street. You can actually hear birds chirping which almost never happens. This is one of the one of the most populous cities in the world on those days. It's cacophonous and there are people everywhere and now you got in this. There's none fear of the corona virus has kept most people at home for weeks now since the start of the Lunar New Year holiday in late January but even though people aren't outside that much these days it doesn't mean they're not being watched as a journalist in China Josh accustomed to it but you also kind of get used to it and I think a lot of people in China just they have that sense in it sort of fades into the background after a while but now with corona virus things have escalated more than sixty thousand people have gotten sick worldwide at least thirteen hundred of died and to keep the virus at bay. The Chinese government is paying even more attention to people's movements in a really granular way. They've started blocking off apartment complex and so basically I think every apartment complex definitely mine on all the ones I've seen in my walks around the neighborhood block. There's only a single entrance so that they can take the temperature of everyone coming in and out but the very sticking sort of see who's who's coming and going and then there's the high tech piece to have a phone number in China to get a Sim card you have to provide your ID which means the government can track people's movements using their phones and there have been news stories of people who are in. Wuhan at the epicenter of this outbreak. Who then traveled to other parts of the country who who are tracked in order to sort of see who else might have been in contact with that person. It's not surprising that the Chinese government is keeping tabs on who says what about Corona virus. They go and what they do. This outbreak is showing both the reined in the limits of the government's ability to control the story today on the show. How Corona virus is putting China's surveillance state to the test? I'm Lizzy leary and you're listening to what next. Tvd A show about technology power and how the future will be determined..

China Chinese government Josh Chen Beijing Wall Street Journal Lizzy leary Wuhan
"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Um and cabinet members didn't agree about how to respond. Fred says there's one story that sticks with them story about at how even when an administration is trying to be careful deliberative Afghanistan can feel like a trap. President Obama had just taken office. and Ed decide. What do we do here? One option was to invest in a full counterinsurgency strategy said more troops pay for roads and Bridges Bridges. It was a strategy. Commanders had already tried out in Iraq. The other option was we send in ten thousand more troops and beef up the training of the Afghan military and continue to fight terrorism on the border and Obama wrestled with this and he finally said. Okay I'm going to give this a chance. So so they send an additional thirty thousand troops making it about a hundred thousand and all and he Adopted the strategy. But what isn't generally no no I. I reported this in my book called the insurgents the last day before he decided he called the main military people into his office and goes okay. Look can you assure me that. Within eighteen months you will be able to turn half of the districts in Afghanistan so that they support support the government and they said Oh absolutely. Sorry no no wait a minute. Here's the thing if you don't I'm not going to give you any more. It's the end of it. We're AH. This is an experiment so really tell me because if you don't think this is possible I'll just send in ten thousand more troops and will will up will improve group training of the Afghan military which by the way is what vice president. Joe Biden one. You thought this counterinsurgency was a lot of nonsense and initially secretary of Defense Gates felt the same way but he changed his mind. I think of gates and Biden been against doing this. It wouldn't have happened so he said really I. I know that in the past people have come in Sir. We need just a few more brigades and the president is giving. I'm not going to do that. This is it so tell me and they told him. Oh Yes sir. We'll work knowing that it would not work the storytelling about President Obama. I think is interesting because it shows this. Deep deep ambivalence always was about what to do and what the right thing to do. Is You know I looked up a speech. He gave in two thousand nine so he had just really taken office and he was simultaneously announcing the surge end. We're getting out. That was probably probably a mistake. This review is now complete and as commander in chief I have determined that it is in our vital national interest to send an additional national thirty thousand. US troops staff Ghanistan. After eighteen months. Our troops will begin to come home. These are the resources sources that we need to seize the initiative while building the Afghan capacity that can allow a responsible transition of our forces out of Afghanistan. I mean that was. That was a speech at West Point at the end of two thousand nine after Tennessee meetings to decide what to do and he's been roundly criticized for that and and I think rightly so that you don't say you don't announce that publicly but then again look trump. He said I'm going to make this different. We're putting in more troops and they're staying there until it's over so take that caliban. You can't just wait us out. Did anything change. No no not at all now. President trump is actually in the process of slowly withdrawing troops from Afghanistan. He's reopening talks to the Taliban to but even trump plans to leave more than eight thousand dozen soldiers on the ground. Some of the people finding now weren't even born when the fight began. Part of what you see these interviews is that no one wants to be the guy who's like we messed up exactly. Nobody wants to tell the president. The President says General. What can we do Mister Secretary what what what can we do here? I want to succeed. What can we do? Nobody wants to be the guy to say Mr President. I'm sorry you don't have any options. There's nothing to be done. Even though that may be that way said that's right I mean yeah you need somebody to say that if it's true but the president's telling you to do something and You know yeah it's okay let. Let's go out there and try to do it. This is what the president wants. So yeah you come up with something to show that you made progress aggress. Some of it is so that you can go to sleep at night Some of it is so that your career can advance and some of it is that you really believe in the mission. MM and people back in Washington thought that it was Just just not happening. They might drop the whole mission. So you've got to keep it going doing. It's like at the same time it's shocking and completely unsurprising like everything in this where it's like of course but then there's something about seeing the words words and the descriptions like wow the other thing. Is it enough Ghanistan now unlike Vietnam in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when the Pentagon papers. It's very low profes- Not Very many people not very many Americans are dying. They're really very few and it's so low profile this enormous story. I don't know maybe because it got very little coverage in TV news. I mean I tell you stories that I write about Afghanistan. Generally they don't get very they don't get read very much. Maybe this one did but generally nobody. Nobody's interested in more because not that many people are dying and it's kind of a steady state thing that's been going on for so long that people say oh okay. It's not really nobody. I knows in danger there so whatever. It's a whatever kind of place talk that's dark so that's why I think the important thing about this study is not art. Maybe it's not even so much the stuff about the lies and deceptions which everybody has you say. kind of intuited intuited it. If they didn't know in such detail but it's the lessons the lessons we might learn from it before we get sucked into some other other conflict like this and by the way I mean every twenty years or so we do. We get sucked into a conflict like this and we go into it. Never having learned during the lessons that we thought were pretty clearly transmitted from the last one Friend Kathleen is slates war stories correspondent. He's also working on a new book. It's going to come out next month. It's called the bomb presidents cendant generals in the secret history of nuclear war. That's the show. What next is produced by Daniel Hewitt Mara Silvers? Over's Jason De Leon and Mary Wilson. I'm Mary Harris. You can go pay me a visit on twitter. Go complain about how I say All the time and interviews. It's true I do do it. I'm at Mary's desk tomorrow morning. Lizzy leary is going to be hearing your podcast feed with what next. TVD She is talking to Taylor rents from the New York Times about what we misunderstand understand about Internet influencers look for it. I will talk to you on Monday. You want to hear something. Amazing discover matches all the cash. Back you earn at the end of your first year automatically with no limit to how much they'll oh match. Millions of people are getting their cashback matched discovered cash back match. What are you waiting for? Learn more at discover dot com slash cash back match..

president Afghanistan President Obama Joe Biden vice president Secretary Mr President Bridges Bridges Iraq Fred Taliban US Washington Ed West Point twitter New York Times Lizzy leary Mary
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"There was this moment in the fall of last year when executives gives from three big tech companies called to testify in front of the Senate or call the sheer into order. And I'd like to welcome our witnesses. Today they were supposed to talk about the run up to the two thousand sixteen election and and whether foreigners mostly Russians had manipulated their platforms. Sherline Jacomb. I'm glad you decided to appear Jack. Dorsey from twitter showed up so so did Sheryl Sandberg from facebook page who was supposed to be representing. Google wasn't there. No one from the company came disappointed. Google decided did against sending the right senior level executive to participate. Senators were kind of performance about it but they were annoyed from Google search which continues to have problems. Surfacing absurd conspiracies do you to russian-backed disinformation agents promoted. Hundreds advice videos did g mail or state-sponsored operatives attempted countless hacking attempts. Google has an immense responsibility in this space not long after that mark. Bergen who covers Google for Bloomberg News and BusinessWeek wrote a story headlined. Where in the world is Larry? Larry Page implying that the company's co founder had kind of checked out with that story. We've found difficulty finding people who actually talked to him on a regular basis the same time you no. He was funding and working on these cell flying car projects doing a lot more around sort of the really crazy moon shots at at the company. But from what we've gathered he just didn't WanNa work anymore. Didn't want to work as hard which I guess. If you're a billionaire you can make that decision. Yeah you know. I've talked to people the company that say say they had. It's intentional idea. To keep him out of the press to avoid the Bill Gates problem right so Bill Gates famously. During the Department of Justice earings during the ninety s was sort of the figurehead for Microsoft's monopoly and Google essentially wanted to keep Larry as far away from that as possible. The thing is nowadays the CEO can't just step away from controversy. Google is in the middle of wrestling with antitrust regulators attorneys general all around the country and several of its own unhappy employees. This week we learned that Larry Page and his co founder Sergey Brin the guys responsible for the company's ethos those are stepping down from Google's parent company today on the show growing pains at Google what it will take to win back the trust of the workforce and keep regulators. He's happy and how much Larry Sergei's departures matter I'm Lizzy leary and this is what next. TVD Show about technology power and how the future we'll be determined..

Google Larry Page Larry Larry Sergei Sherline Jacomb Bill Gates Sergey Brin co founder Sheryl Sandberg Senate Bergen BusinessWeek facebook twitter Dorsey Lizzy leary Jack Department of Justice executive
"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"There was this moment in the fall of last year when executives gives from three big tech companies called to testify in front of the Senate or call the sheer into order. And I'd like to welcome our witnesses. Today they were supposed to talk about the run up to the two thousand sixteen election and and whether foreigners mostly Russians had manipulated their platforms. Sherline Jacomb. I'm glad you decided to appear Jack. Dorsey from twitter showed up so so did Sheryl Sandberg from facebook page who was supposed to be representing. Google wasn't there. No one from the company came disappointed. Google decided did against sending the right senior level executive to participate. Senators were kind of performance about it but they were annoyed from Google search which continues to have problems. Surfacing absurd conspiracies do Youtube russian-backed disinformation agents promoted hundreds advice videos does she. Male or state-sponsored operatives attempted countless hacking attempts. Google has an immense responsibility in this space. Not long after that mark. Bergen who covers Google for Bloomberg News and BusinessWeek wrote a story headlined. Where in the world is Larry? Larry Page implying that the company's co founder had kind of checked out with that story. We've found difficulty finding people who actually talked to him on a regular basis the same time you no. He was funding and working on these cell flying car projects doing a lot more around sort of the really crazy moon shots at at the company. But from what we've gathered he just didn't WanNa work anymore. Didn't want to work as hard which I guess. If you're a billionaire you can make that decision. Yeah you know. I've talked to people the company that say say they had. It's intentional idea. To keep him out of the press to avoid the Bill Gates problem right so Bill Gates famously. During the Department of Justice earings during the ninety s was sort of the figurehead for Microsoft's monopoly and Google essentially wanted to keep Larry as far away from that as possible. The thing is nowadays the CEO can't just step away from controversy. Google is in the middle of wrestling with antitrust regulators attorneys general all around the country and several of its own unhappy employees. This week we learned that Larry Page and his co founder Sergey Brin the guys responsible for the company's ethos those are stepping down from Google's parent company today on the show growing pains at Google what it will take to win back the trust of the workforce and keep regulators. He's happy and how much Larry Sergei's departures matter I'm Lizzy leary and this is what next. TVD Show about technology power and how the future we'll be determined..

Google Larry Page Larry Sherline Jacomb Larry Sergei Bill Gates Sergey Brin co founder Sheryl Sandberg Senate Bergen BusinessWeek facebook twitter Dorsey Lizzy leary Jack CEO Department of Justice
"lizzy leary" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pledge drive, please accept our thanks for your support. This is marketplace, I'm Lizzy Leary in for Cairo. Doll General Electric told investors today that it CEO? John Flannery was out after only about a year on a job, the company also said, yeah, it's not gonna make that profit forecast this year. Frankly, things are not great at GE, which raises the question. What is the role of an industrial conglomerate in today's economy anyway marketplaces in the Euler has that one General Electric is a far cry from the company Thomas Edison co founded back in the eighteen nineties today. GE makes aircraft engines equipment for oil and gas production and medical imaging among many other things perhaps too many things says John Joseph he teaches management at the university of California Irvine. It is a time when the industrial conglomerate is gone. He says competition and market conditions change very quickly today. So companies have to react on a dime. Typically, big industrial conglomerates one does not think of being nimble GE's been trying to focus the firm sold its insurance outfit years ago in reigned in its lending business after heavy losses during the financial crisis. Lawrence white economics. Professor at NYU says these focused trends tend to ebb and flow while GE is trying to get smaller. Amazon is going in the opposite direction. He's right Amazon's got grocery stores web services, and it's talking about getting into healthcare all a far cry from its original idea of just mailing you books, but John Joseph at UC Irvine argues that Amazon is different because it's leveraging a central platform. So even though it appears to be spread out. It's more focused than it seems Amazon is attempting to bring you know, those that are selling stuff together with those that are buying stuff. Jeez. A different beast in one that has to move.

General Electric John Joseph Amazon Lizzy Leary John Flannery Cairo university of California Irvin Lawrence white NYU CEO UC Irvine Thomas Edison co Professor
"lizzy leary" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"lizzy leary" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Always nice to take a break from work if you can and visit other countries or why not make another country your place of work as part of our series, how to be a blank. We hear more about life as a city tour guide in Barcelona. Spain is Jonathon Lerner, and I'm the founder of territories Barcelona and I live in Barcelona spin. Basically, I became a tour guide when I realized that I was in the country that I wanted to be in, which was Spain, but I wasn't doing what I wanted to be doing. I was working in real estate and had enough one day and return to what my passion was, which is art and culture, and history, and people and stories. When I started guiding and kind of learning the ropes. I was working with different friends and colleagues and kind of just learning as much as I can about the city as possible. And that was a great experience filler in the ropes because it really turned out to be. Kind of deflect theater. You had twenty people just kind of staring at you in the beginning. There was skepticism. They look at you, you know some levels of of the stress or what's going to what's going to happen on this tour. And after about ten or fifteen minutes really clockwork, you could see by using humor and history and connecting with the people there connecting within themselves. I think it's a first of all a lot of knowledge. So really understanding the pulse of the city, understanding what people would love to see to learn about into the here when they're in town, and then there's the human aspect. And that's what I love so much. Definitely is one of the most saturated tourism markets in Europe. It's not the world, and so I started small and launch territories Barcelona really just by word of mouth. And from there it was growing growing until a travel agent reached out and little by little. I was able to carve space out in the city. We have tons of tours. A wonderful experience is kind of an introduction to the city. We call it the the golden age of by slow, go through the gothic quarter, the historic center of the city, and we're gonna. We're gonna talk about two thousand years of history from the Roman times up through the gothic period and see some wonderful churches and squares, and actually try to make a child or an adult. Even at the end of this time together fall in love with gothic architecture. I know maybe that doesn't sound like the sexiest thing, but it's possible. Giving tours museums familiar every time. I'm still humbled by the absolute beauty of the city of the architecture and of the cultural heritage that I'm able to to share. So for me at the end of those two hours or three hours or whatever it was to see those people connecting when really the magic happens. That was Jonathan learner, founder of tailored tours Barcelona. That piece was produced by Elisa mills, and you can check out other how to be a blank and four years of archive material from marketplace weekend. Just go to marketplace dot org. And that is it for marketplace weekend. The show is produced by LIZA mills and Peter Belen on Rosen JoAnne Griffith is our executive producer Ben tolliday, Andrew, joss stat, engineered this episode Noren row composed our theme music. Evelyn Rubia is marketplace's executive editor. Deborah Clark is our senior vice president and general manager. I'm Lizzy Leary. Thanks for listening. This is a PM.

Barcelona Spain senior vice president and gene founder Jonathon Lerner Evelyn Rubia Lizzy Leary Europe Elisa mills Deborah Clark executive editor LIZA mills Jonathan executive producer Ben tolliday JoAnne Griffith Peter Belen Andrew two thousand years