6 Burst results for "Lizzie O'leary"

So, What Happens to WFH Now?

Slate's If Then

02:22 min | 1 year ago

So, What Happens to WFH Now?

"Hey i'm henry gra bar in for lizzie. O'leary come to you with a recording from a place that has been virtually off limits for nearly eighteen months. Un-american corporate office building specifically slights office in downtown brooklyn which has been closed to us since march twenty twenty. Lots of people have joined the company since. And they don't know the first thing about this place your. Id should work three doors. So it'd be this store that's amanda. She's giving a tour then. I dropped in on there. Were a few hiccups. The scanner doesn't work. The dishwasher doesn't work neither does the coffee maker and metaphor alert. The literal water cooler is broke. I had a guy come in and look at the filter and he was just like no. It should be drinking this like no. It's not it's not safe so we recommend drinking that. I don't get sick but everyone got to see their old colleagues. Some of whom. I hadn't seen in more than a year katie. How's it going today. Visit really you have to call him a call henry. Hi sorry about that so this is interesting. Susan has an susan moved to charlottesville a little before the pandemic so she hasn't been in this office with a desk of her own. And how long years. So i've found a container of plastic straws that also include to metal stras. I really liked those metal stress. You did because. I like it too strong. But i'm concentrating but now in the years since we lost to the office plastic straws become literal gold. So i'm really excited to get back to them. You've got the last collection of boston. None of this mission is this conversation. We'd be having on zoom. I don't think so as banal is this chitchat is. It's the sound of a major pivot point in american life. Pandemic eric questions about the relevance of the office are inching towards a resolution. Some bosses are calling employees back others telling them they don't have to come back at all. Months of speculation about the future of remote work are ending in corporate dicta that restore the old status quo or reverse it

Henry Gra Leary UN Brooklyn Amanda Charlottesville Katie Susan Boston Eric
Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

Slate's If Then

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

"On Tuesday a sitting on my couch playing with my baby and I got a news alert on my phone that the justice department was suing Google. Phone briefing we understand being led by the deputy Jeffrey. It's the first time. The government has gone after big tech like this in more than twenty years this morning, the Department of Justice and eleven state. Filed an antitrust civil lawsuit against Google for unlawfully maintaining a monopoly general services and search advertising. I wanted to find out more about the and so I searched for the complaint on my phone. And that search was powered by google. You know on one hand your desire your urge to Google to find that information is what millions and millions of people do every day about the most basic queries. That's Tony Romm covers tech for the Washington. Post and they do this at least in Google's is because they see Google to be the best search engine available to people right now. But the thing is Google search engine is on my phone by default. The government basically argues that consumers like me didn't have much choice in the matter that Google became the default not because it's best but because it struck a bunch of unfair deals. Deals with apple and other cellphone makers as well as carriers. Deals that make it search engine and search advertising not just dominant unfairly. So and in addition to that, it's made it hard for any other company any other potential rival to be the next Google. So to speak to put together a search engine that you might find even more effective or you know a company that could have even more useful products that you might be likely to gravitate toward. Here's the thing about antitrust law. It can feel kind of boring and Arcane, but it affects our choices as consumers what we see what we buy what our options are. So a case like this really matters especially because it doesn't happen all that. Often the government really hasn't gone after a company like this in recent memory the last time the Justice Department sued big tech. Company for antitrust violations was in nineteen, ninety eight when it went after Microsoft they just have shied away from those kinds of antitrust challenges. We simply have not seen the US government go toe to toe in a case like the US government is bringing against Google. Today on the show, the case against Google. The government is trying to police big tech for the first time in decades. So why is this happening now? How strong is the case and does it matter that it's coming from trump's justice department? I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what? Next td a show about technology power, how the future will be determined

Google Government Justice Department United States Department Of Justice Jeffrey Tony Romm Lizzie O'leary Apple Washington Donald Trump Microsoft
Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

Slate's If Then

10:26 min | 1 year ago

Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

"If you're American, you probably think of free speech as the default. Just the way things are. And I. Don't know where it enters the stuff. I don't know if it's in the water or if it's in the kindergarten curriculum Evelyn. Is Not American, but it's only something that I have encountered faith in years is just like first amendment fundamentalism she's an Australian who lives in Massachusetts and she's one of most dynamic and nuanced thinkers. Online speech. She lectures at Harvard Law School. You came here to study kind of First Amendment Law to look at this stuff. As an outsider, what was your impression of the US fundamental adherence to free speech? I feel a little bit like gas lit as a foreigner when you come to America. As I did for years ago to Study Comparative Constitutional, Law, and free speech One of the most striking things about American free speech doctrine is this like this example of there were Nazis that wanted to march in skokie. I know jumping straight to Nazis his kind of leaping into the free speech depend. But Evelyn's describing one of the most famous first amendment cases when that really tests American values, the story goes like this. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, a group of neo-nazis wanted to march in the Chicago suburb of skokie Illinois largely because a lot of Holocaust survivors lived there seven thousand concentration camp survivors living in the predominantly Jewish Chicago suburb of skokie not surprisingly, there was a huge legal fight cokie officials a block Nazi demonstrations with court injunctions when the Nazis appealed to the State Supreme Court a judge has refused to hear the case. But what might surprise you if you don't know the story is that the American Civil Liberties Union indeed a lawyer with the ACLU defended the Nazis right to March under the First Amendment saying the right to free expression with integral to who we are as a country. It's just such an iconic story of the literal Nazis were going to be allowed to marching the street and as a foreigner you come here, new learn that and normally deland that it's it's not like these inconvenient embarrassment about Assessment Amendment Law. It's this like really proud one of the truly great victories for the First Amendment was that it will protect the speech that we hate because it is you know Betta to have it out in the urban it's better to meet it with county speech and we just can't trust the government to suppress as an Australian very striking. I don't even have a right to free speech. We don't have a bill of rights and our Constitution it's it's like a completely foreign idea this fight over unfettered free speech and in fact, where it collides with Anti Semitism and Holocaust denial broke into the news cycle again, this week, there's a split screen like the Supreme Court confirmation hearings going on on one side, and then on the other side facebook releases a blog post the company which has always said it values free expression above everything else announced that it would ban any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. Two days later, twitter did the same thing. It might seem like banning Holocaust denial is a pretty easy call, but it was only a few years ago that facebook said, it wouldn't prohibit Holocaust to nihilism on its platform. which is part of why and says, this is a really big deal I. think this is like a really iconic moment in the history of the company and its thinking and its evolution around its rules. There is no more emblematic rule that facebook had about. To First Amendment Principles. Today on the show. Decision to finally habit Holocaust, Mus Information and what it means for free speech debates, the Internet and the potential for change. I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what next TVD A show about technology power, how the future will be determined stay with us. Voting this year is a little. Than usual, what you don't want to do is be the one sprinting to the mailbox trying to send in a last minute vote or get to the front of the line at the polls only to realize you're not registered. That's why facebook has created the voting information centre with you want to know how to register how to vote by mail or to vote safely in person the voting information center can help you find the answers to your questions and make sure your vote is counted because of vote counted is a voice heard for official information from election authorities visit facebook, dot com slash voting Info Centre. Countless emails, endless video meetings, lost documents sometimes, it feels like technology is working overtime against us. Well, MONDAY DOT COM is getting it back on your side by bringing everything together to streamline your workflows and keep your teams can sink in one easy to use platform. Finally your team can work confidently and manage all core business activities in one place creating a workplace environment where everything's transparent everyone's accountable and real work gets done without anything holding you back. Whether you work in a team of five or five thousand Monday. Dot Com is the easiest way to keep everyone connected and on the right track try it out for yourself to get your free two week trial. Good Monday dot com today. I, WanNa talk about how seismic shift this is if we think back to just two years ago. Mark Zuckerberg gave a very now well known interview to Cara Swisher. And said, she didn't believe that posts that deny the Holocaust should be taken down. I believe that our platform should take down because I think that there are things different people get wrong. either. I don't think that they're intentionally getting a wrong but I think that they. They might be but go home. It's hard to pune intent. Boy. It is a big journey from. People get things wrong even though I might find it personally offensive. To. My own thinking has evolved. The big thing that they always have hung onto was we don't WanNa be arbiters of truth, and we will not take content down purely on the basis that it's false. We might take it on the down on the basis that its nudity or that it's hate speech or that it has other sort of effects but we weren't take content down just because it's wrong and that's sort of what's reflected in that quote from Makoto Takhar Swisher is you know some people get things wrong sometimes and the the pandemic literally changed that decision overnight in the context of a global public health emergency they abandoned that they said we will take down. False information about the pandemic because it poses a public health risk, and now we're playing ball like now companies are taking content down on the basis that it's false and we're now seeing it in other areas. We saw it in the context of the wildfires in West my country was on file for months. In December and January, and there were lots of false rumors about the cause of the fires and facebook didn't take anything down and then Oregon was on fire A. Couple of months ago, and suddenly they were taking down misinformation about the cause of their as far as think a stock contrast as you can draw. It's still interesting to hear you peg this to the pandemic because I think about all the data points that came before that this is. After the two thousand, sixteen election, it is after the Charlottesville unite the right rally, which took place in two thousand seventeen. Do you think the coronavirus pandemic is it sort of launching us into a new I guess area of thinking about content and speech on its own or or easy it kind of a I guess a catalyst for something that was going to happen anyway. Yeah. You're absolutely right that it's only sort of it's part of the broader trend. It was a particularly visible and sort of obvious example of the trend in the same way that the pandemic has made many sort of fundamental. Assumptions structures in society more visible, and we've sort of seen progressively moving more and more along that line of sort of okay. We copies all speech all the time. Let's balancing trysts and draw the line and I think that the pandemic was just sort of another step along that road. If you think about it that way these announcements from facebook and twitter about banning Holocaust denial or in line with other content moderation decisions we've seen this year like the outright ban on Cunanan content. But in other ways several and says the decision. Holocaust. Denial marks a deeper and more fundamental shift in how speeches police online Holocaust denial is one of these iconic things about the first amendment and I believe that one of the reasons why facebook sort of stuck to that principle for so long of allowing on services was because it's still considered itself a fundamentally American company attached to these first. Amendment ideals is robust marketplace of ideas. Which is bizarre when you think about it these these are clearly global companies now and most of they US bases outside all over America but there was still something that it couldn't let go of and so I think it's really when Audience First Amendment land anymore like vc's we are now in this unknown landscape of trying to work out what norms we can attach ourselves to.

Facebook United States Skokie Makoto Takhar Swisher Twitter America Harvard Law School American Civil Liberties Union Massachusetts Supreme Court Chicago Evelyn Mark Zuckerberg Lizzie O'leary Skokie Illinois State Supreme Court Info Centre Charlottesville
Announcement: What Next: TBD

Slate's If Then

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Announcement: What Next: TBD

"Hello if then listeners I'm Lizzie O'Leary the host of the new slate podcast what next td which is taking over this feed as off from the Sleet Daily News show what next so if you're not already subscribed go find it in your podcast APP and there you will find the extremely brilliant Mary Harris every Monday first day to help you make sense of the news and going deep on one story

Lizzie O'leary Sleet Daily News Mary Harris
Amazon is being used as a laboratory for new products

Marketplace All-in-One

02:13 min | 4 years ago

Amazon is being used as a laboratory for new products

"Ten years ago, the financial crisis changed the global economy as we knew it. If you've been following our project divided decade, you've heard some of the many ways that crisis also affected people's personal economic lives in today's installment of our series. How we changed. We hear from shontae Ray talking to us from one of the three toy stores. She owns in the Saint Louis area in one thousand nine hundred five. I took a job as a clerk in a little toy store and Edwardsville while I was getting my BFA in sculpture, and just I feel like kind of became a natural retailer. My husband was very supportive and seemed like he was willing to dive in lead a toilet with me. So we bought three giant stores with thirty five employees and the future was wide open. Two thousand eight. The holidays can didn't come. We didn't sell any doll houses. We didn't sign castles, train tables at stopped, and we came out of that season with a what the heck is going on. What? What just happened? Part of our strategy during the worst part of the crisis was to go directly to our Bank and talk to them. They could see it going on with everyone. So it wasn't a surprise that we were also struggling and we renegotiated the terms of our SPA loan. In two thousand thirteen. We went to our normal Bank appointment and the bankers called the entirety of our of our loan. We were shocked and heartbroken. The Bank guy cried with us. We cried and we were crushed. We sent out a letter on a Friday afternoon telling everyone that we were closing our stores. And at that point, hundreds and hundreds of families came people like, what are you talking about? This can't be possible. You know, I had moms that are like my water broke in your store. As all these families were coming in the question kept coming up, well, what do you need? Like? How much do you need? And we, you know, we said, I, it's a lot. I don't know. We don't know what it what we need to keep going, but we were kind of forced to give a number. And so we said, well, if we had seventy five thousand dollars, then we could push the Bank off, but I'm not comfortable with that, you know? And that's kind of where we left it. My husband and I was are actually our tenth wedding anniversary pi day twenty thirteen. My phone exploded and they had raised eighty two thousand dollars, and we're giving it to me no strings attached. And we were floored. When you have a town that says, we really want you here. You know, it's a very powerful statement by their grace was the only reason we're here. Well, in my hard work. The company shanty Ray and her husband own is called happy up Inc. We've got some pictures on our Instagram that marketplace APM. And while you're there, tell us your story with the hashtag how we changed. Welfare has been back in the news lately with the White House council of economic advisers calling earlier this month for reform of social programs, like food stamps and rental housing assistance. But while welfare has long, been one of those hot button issues that people tend to have a lot of opinions about the facts about how the system works in this country aren't so well known over the last few years. Our wealth and poverty team has been working to change that in their podcast, the uncertain our marketplace's Chrissy Clark led an investigation into how federal welfare funding actually gets spent across the country, and the answers are pretty surprising. She joins me now with an update on her reporting. Hi Chrissy. Hey, Amy. So we use the word welfare to mean a lot of things. What are we talking about specifically today? Yeah, so it can be used to refer to everything from food stamps, Medicaid. But what we're talking about right now is the program known as temporary assistance for needy families or Tanith. And this is the federal program that provide. Ads, cash assistance to poor families after welfare reform in nineteen, Ninety-six cash assistance, stop being something based strictly on need. And now there, lots of work requirements and time limits involved. The thing that changed is that welfare became a block grant. Capped at about sixteen point, five billion dollars a year. And now each year, the federal government gives a certain amount of town of money to each state states have to contribute some of their own funds. And then the key part is that each state decides how they're going to spend their pot of federal and state ten of money, and they are given a lot of flexibility and what do we know about how states are actually spending the money, so they're spending it in some pretty unexpected ways. The first surprise is that for the last few years, if you look at all the states combined only about a quarter of Tanna funds goes to actual cash assistance to poor families. Then another quarter of the funds goes to what you might call work, supports, things like job training. And child care transportation to and from work. But that's all to say that just a little more than half of Tanna funds go to what most people think of as like the core purpose of welfare, which is money directly assisting poor families or helping them get a job, where does that leave the other half? So that's where things get even more surprising. So states use some of it to fill their own budget gaps for unrelated things like pre k. and child protective services. And then there's this kind of crazy quilt of other programs that the money goes to for many years. For example, in Oklahoma, some welfare funding was going to marriage counseling workshops, not just for poor couples, but for anyone who signed up. And then Michigan is an interesting example about fifteen percent of Tanta funds there go into college financial aid and scholarship programs, and these largely benefit students from middle and upper income families, not just poor kids. So in fact, when you crunch the numbers, actually. More Tanith money is going to these college scholarship programs in Michigan than to actual cash assistance for needy families. Wow. Is that because there are just fewer families that need that help? No. So so nationally poverty has slightly declined in the last couple of years since the recession when it spiked. But the poverty rate is just about as high as it was back in nineteen Ninety-six. When we overhauled welfare around thirteen percent of Americans live below the poverty line. And that's about twenty four thousand dollars a year for a family of four. The other startling thing that I found in my reporting is that nationally very few families who are poor receive cash assistance. In fact, there are more avid postage stamp collectors than there are people who get cash welfare in the in the in the country nationally, just twenty three out of every one hundred families who live at or below the poverty line gets cash assistance in more than a dozen stay. As the decline is even more pronounced less than ten out of every hundred. Poor families gets cash assistance and what's behind that decline. So part of it is the time limits. You're just not allowed to receive assistance for as long even if you are still struggling with poverty. It's also just a harder program to navigate. Now, the application process is more difficult and more time consuming. There are these work requirements that can be hard to meet. So for families who don't have a lot of resources that might just discourage them from even applying in your reporting, what did you find in terms of what this actually means for families who are out there struggling to get by and could use that cash assistance? Yeah. So I've talked to people who sell their blood plasma to get by. They're also just the everyday tough choices that families face. I talked to one mom who on a given day might be grappling with whether to buy toilet paper or cough syrup for her kids because she just did not have enough money to buy both. So the hard question what is being done, if anything about this. So there is a welfare reform Bill that has been introduced in the house that would put more oversight on how states spend their money. And in the hearings leading up to the Bill, a member of congress actually pointed to things that we had revealed in our reporting like these college financial aid programs that we're getting ten if money that was going to higher income families. They pointed to that as one of the problems with how the program works. These days, the Bill had been expected to come to the floor this month. But in the run-up to the midterm elections, it looks like welfare is just too hot button topic to touch right now. So we'll have to see. All right, Christy Clark host of our documentary podcast, the uncertain our Krissy. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. And you could see our updates to how your state spends welfare money at marketplace, dot org. Coming up for the first time, children with disabilities are entitled to more than just the bare minimum. But what if schools can't offer much more than that first, let's do the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial average fell thirteen points less than one tenth percent close at twenty five thousand forty four. The NASDAQ picked up twenty one points two-tenths percent to finish at seventy eight forty one and the s&p five hundred rose five points a tenth of a percent to end at twenty eight. Oh six more than a third of companies in the s&p five hundred report earnings this week investors will be watching for signs. The tariffs are affecting company decision-making bonds fell. The yield on the tenure t. note, rose to two point nine, six percent, and you are listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by lending club for decades. Credit cards have been telling us by now pay for it later with interest, despite your best intentions that interest can get out of control fast with lending club. You can borrow up to forty thousand dollars to consolidate your high interest debt or pay off credit cards into one fixed monthly payment. Your path to financial stability starts today go to lending club dot com. Slash marketplace today to check your rate in minutes. All loans made by web Bank member FDIC equal housing lender, and by lifeproof backpacks. Check them out at lifeproof dot com. Slash marketplace and get fifteen percent off any pack. So phones and other small devices stay safe inside. Select backpacks also have an ingenious side access laptop pocket ideal. For when you're going through airport security. And speaking of security, most lifeproof backpacks are quipped with a super secret stash pocket when you need to hide away a passport or some cash, and they're all outfitted with front tie-down stole overseas stuff. Outside with four sizes, there's a lifeproof backpack for any outing grabbed the Quiapo eighteen leader for day trips up your carrying capacity with the squamish twenty liter or go with the go twenty two leader for tons of pockets or max out on space with the squamish XL thirty two liter get your lifeproof backpack. Now at fifteen percent off by going to lifeproof dot com. Slash marketplace, lifeproof backpacks, carry on. This is marketplace. I made me Scott. When you think about buying this week's groceries, chances are Amazon, isn't your go to destination? At least not yet, but that doesn't mean food isn't selling on the site. Nisha novelty food products are increasingly popular on Amazon, which has kind of turned it into a laboratory for testing new food products. Vanessa Wong as written about this. She's the deputy business editor for BuzzFeed news. I asked her, I some examples. Some of their bestselling products include like protein powder and like weird chocolate covered almonds that you've never heard of and strange, like limited time or promotional offerings from some of the bigger food manufacturers. So like one of the big themes this summer, you might know this a lot like Jurassic World Food being watched on Amazon, which includes like a twenty five dollar box of Kellogg's. Frosted flakes that comes with a digital screen loaded with behind the scenes footage of the film. Film which you can only get from a box of cereal on Amazon. You know, twenty five dollars sounds pretty cheap. That's true. You know, it's interesting. I was wondering like who actually buys this stuff, and I found this guy who bought the drastic world, frosted flakes and admitted that like in no sense was it worth twenty five bucks? He could have bought the cereal and like gone to see the movie for less than that. Why are they putting some things on Amazon that you wouldn't find say in a grocery store, there are a couple of reasons. It's kind of like a lower risk environment. So at traditional grocery stores, they actually charge manufacturers fee to have their products on display. And so there's that, you know, there are a lot of kind of logistical complications and supply chain things that get in the way of launching a new product. And when you go an Amazon, you kind of have a lot more control over the situation in terms of like how many you sell, how many produce how it's marketed. The thing that is a little. Complicate about Amazon is that Amazon obviously has a lot of control over like algorithms and like where your things show up, which obviously has a lot of impact on whether or not consumers see them and buy them. And how does this fit into Amazon's overall strategy? I mean, obviously, with the purchase of whole foods, it's a bigger player in the grocery space. Is this part of its larger effort to take over? You know, when it comes to Amazon's strategy who can really say at this point, they are like all over the place, but in terms of their food strategy, obviously they're trying to beef up like what types of offerings they have for customers. And one of the ways to like differentiate themselves from brick and mortar grocery is to like, have a different product assortment. So you know, by getting food startups launch, they're kind of like novel and novelty snacks and big manufacturers to kind of like tryout promotional items and other things kind of like brings customers to your sites in. Talking about food, right. Well, how long do you think before we might get there where people go to Amazon for their regular groceries, not just their Jurassic world, frosted flakes I think we're a long ways from their e commerce has had a lot more success in other industries like electronics, apparel, things that ship. Well, groceries is complicated. I mean, aside from like snacks and kind of other dry goods that are temperature sensitive at cetera. It's really hard to get people like, you know, regular food that they can cook that day. The market share of like ecommerce and food is tiny. It's like less than five percent. Still the nessa Wong is deputy business editor for BuzzFeed news. Thanks, thanks so much. At last count more than six and a half million public school children receive special education services, how schools educate those children is governed under a federal law that covers thirteen disabilities. A lawsuit about that law went all the way to the US supreme court last year. The court's ruling changes. What kinds of services schools and districts are legally obligated to provide? Marketplace's Lizzie O'Leary went to find out what that means for the country's largest school district New York City. I hate it. I'm listening Heinsohn picking in a bright orange shirt eight year Old Aden's ready to show off what he's learning in third grade. French, his mom Alana Philip remembers meeting his French teacher. I said French, he studied French because in pre k. Aden was diagnosed with a subtype of autism. One thing that really comes out clearly is it seems as though this thing is going to take a lot of money, there was the occupational therapist. So Aden could learn to hold a pencil. The reading program at one hundred fifty bucks a session and a private neuro psych evaluate and that costs forty five hundred dollars out of pocket in New York City within sixty days of requesting an evaluation. Parents, teachers and other school staff are supposed to hash out an implement a student's individualized education program or IEP under federal law. It's the document that lays out exactly what services a student with disabilities gets. Here's Alana. Philip again, what I had to really fight full was one to one tutoring, an extra support as we know not. All schools have the same resources that's Laurie pod Vesper. She's an advocate at include NYC a nonprofit that helps students with disabilities access services. She says school, sometimes make recommendations based on what they can give, not necessarily what students need in the past New York students with disabilities were often taught separately in their own classes. But then in two thousand ten, they changed the funding formula. Now the district give schools more money if they keep kids with disabilities in mainstream classrooms. The idea being that if you educate students with disabilities alongside their peers, they'll do better academically and socially, but it's just that enough again, Laurie pod Vesper who's a proponent for these kinds of classrooms? My gut reaction is no. There's still huge achievement gap between students with disabilities in New York City. In general education students, New York City schools spent three point, seven billion dollars on classroom instruction. For special education students last year about thirty percent of such spending and they're doing better at getting students classroom services than ever before. But still one in four kids don't get the full services. They're legally entitled to two families. Recently sued the district in a statement, the New York City department of education says they ensure students with disabilities have access to education in quote, the least restrictive environment, and they say they try to resolve concerns as quickly as possible nationwide. A lot of families have sued Jack Robinson Representative, Colorado family whose case went to the supreme court. You have this inherent tension between what the parents want and believe is necessary for their child to succeed. And you know, with the school district is is willing to do alerts financially or just conceptually the supreme court ruled unanimously that just access to education is not enough chief Justice. John Roberts wrote, schools need to offer. Services. So students quote, make progress appropriate in light of the child circumstances. But the first time children with disabilities are entitled to more than just the bare minimum, the federal law, which gives students with disabilities rights to an education also promises funding to cover forty percent of extra special education costs today, only fourteen percent of those funds have come through leaving it up to states and districts to figure out how and what they can pay for since the supreme court ruling the federal education department released guidance to schools clarifying their increased duties. What we don't know yet is how that will play out for students like Aden or anyone else with a disability since divided by ten by ten. Correct? Good boy, high five for now, it likely still means a lot of hard work in New York. I'm Lizzie O'Leary for marketplace. You can check out a marketplace, special report on the economics of disability. Fear more stories about work and healthcare, all at marketplace, dot org. And this final note, the new York, Daily News lost half of its newsroom staff today, publisher trunk Inc, which also owns the Chicago Tribune and the Baltimore Sun among others bought the tabloid last year for just a dollar plus the outstanding debt in a note sent to employees. The company said efforts. So far to stem revenue losses have not gone far enough. The cuts include the paper's editor in chief Jim rich who tweeted, and I quote, if you hate democracy and think local government should operate unchecked and in the dark, then today is a good day for you. That's it. We gotta go. The Dow Jones fell thirteen points less than one tenth percent. The NASDAQ picked up twenty one points, two tenths of a percent and the s&p five hundred rose five points a tenth of a percent. Our daily production team includes Bridget Bodmer Maria Holland. Horace Sean McHenry and daisy. Philosophies are special projects. Desk includes Tommy Andre

New York Bridget Bodmer Maria Holland Lizzie O'leary Horace Sean Mchenry Aden Tom Desk Tommy Andre Chicago Tribune Daily News Editor In Chief Trunk Inc Jim Rich Baltimore Publisher Producer AMY Scott
Recovering from the financial crisis; one community comes together

Marketplace All-in-One

02:13 min | 4 years ago

Recovering from the financial crisis; one community comes together

"Ten years ago, the financial crisis changed the global economy as we knew it. If you've been following our project divided decade, you've heard some of the many ways that crisis also affected people's personal economic lives in today's installment of our series. How we changed. We hear from shontae Ray talking to us from one of the three toy stores. She owns in the Saint Louis area in one thousand nine hundred five. I took a job as a clerk in a little toy store and Edwardsville while I was getting my BFA in sculpture, and just I feel like kind of became a natural retailer. My husband was very supportive and seemed like he was willing to dive in lead a toilet with me. So we bought three giant stores with thirty five employees and the future was wide open. Two thousand

New York Bridget Bodmer Maria Holland Lizzie O'leary Horace Sean Mchenry Aden Tom Desk Tommy Andre Chicago Tribune Daily News Editor In Chief Trunk Inc Jim Rich Baltimore Publisher Producer AMY Scott