35 Burst results for "Lizzie"

Hilary Duff officially confirms "Lizzie McGuire" reboot is dead

Jason and Alexis

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Hilary Duff officially confirms "Lizzie McGuire" reboot is dead

"Okay. There was a really popular show that my daughter loved on Disney, and it was called Lizzie McGuire. It start Hilary Duff and this other dude and this other dude who was in it who I believe played her best friend. He's pretty disappointed. I'm sure because the Lizzie McGuire reboot is not gonna happen. Disney. Plus, Yes, Disney Plus announced that they weren't going to go on with their effort to do this show because it all started before the pandemic. It has something to do. I'm sure with the writing Because, um, you know, they say, Listen, Maguire fans have high expectations for any new stories. And unless and until we are confident we can meet those expectations. We've decided to hold off and today we informed the casts representatives that we're not moving forward. So I guess I just couldn't find enough Good stories. The writing sucked. That's the way it translates to me, right? Yeah, Yeah, This script sucks. We can't move forward with this way really wanted to do this, But upon reading the actual scripts New. Yeah. Exactly. S O. Production on the show actually begin in November, But then they paused. In early January because Hilary Duff was going on her honeymoon. In Mozambique. And two days before she return Variety broke the news that, um that this the writers would be Show runner would be fired from this variety kind of told us send them were like what's going on. Are you going to find a new one? So that's it dead in the water? Not gonna happen? No, Like like I said, the played the guy who played the best friend characters. Probably pretty pretty disappointed. I don't know if he's had any thing going on. No, I don't think so. I don't know. On the crew. You got a thing for the crew to. It's like, you know, Lindsey will get some anyway. Yeah,

Lizzie Mcguire Disney Plus Hilary Duff Disney Maguire Mozambique Lindsey
Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

Slate's If Then

02:48 min | 6 months ago

Google's antitrust battles: Here's what you need to know

"On Tuesday a sitting on my couch playing with my baby and I got a news alert on my phone that the justice department was suing Google. Phone briefing we understand being led by the deputy Jeffrey. It's the first time. The government has gone after big tech like this in more than twenty years this morning, the Department of Justice and eleven state. Filed an antitrust civil lawsuit against Google for unlawfully maintaining a monopoly general services and search advertising. I wanted to find out more about the and so I searched for the complaint on my phone. And that search was powered by google. You know on one hand your desire your urge to Google to find that information is what millions and millions of people do every day about the most basic queries. That's Tony Romm covers tech for the Washington. Post and they do this at least in Google's is because they see Google to be the best search engine available to people right now. But the thing is Google search engine is on my phone by default. The government basically argues that consumers like me didn't have much choice in the matter that Google became the default not because it's best but because it struck a bunch of unfair deals. Deals with apple and other cellphone makers as well as carriers. Deals that make it search engine and search advertising not just dominant unfairly. So and in addition to that, it's made it hard for any other company any other potential rival to be the next Google. So to speak to put together a search engine that you might find even more effective or you know a company that could have even more useful products that you might be likely to gravitate toward. Here's the thing about antitrust law. It can feel kind of boring and Arcane, but it affects our choices as consumers what we see what we buy what our options are. So a case like this really matters especially because it doesn't happen all that. Often the government really hasn't gone after a company like this in recent memory the last time the Justice Department sued big tech. Company for antitrust violations was in nineteen, ninety eight when it went after Microsoft they just have shied away from those kinds of antitrust challenges. We simply have not seen the US government go toe to toe in a case like the US government is bringing against Google. Today on the show, the case against Google. The government is trying to police big tech for the first time in decades. So why is this happening now? How strong is the case and does it matter that it's coming from trump's justice department? I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what? Next td a show about technology power, how the future will be determined

Google Government Justice Department United States Department Of Justice Jeffrey Tony Romm Lizzie O'leary Apple Washington Donald Trump Microsoft
Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

Slate's If Then

10:26 min | 6 months ago

Twitter will ban Holocaust denial posts, following Facebook

"If you're American, you probably think of free speech as the default. Just the way things are. And I. Don't know where it enters the stuff. I don't know if it's in the water or if it's in the kindergarten curriculum Evelyn. Is Not American, but it's only something that I have encountered faith in years is just like first amendment fundamentalism she's an Australian who lives in Massachusetts and she's one of most dynamic and nuanced thinkers. Online speech. She lectures at Harvard Law School. You came here to study kind of First Amendment Law to look at this stuff. As an outsider, what was your impression of the US fundamental adherence to free speech? I feel a little bit like gas lit as a foreigner when you come to America. As I did for years ago to Study Comparative Constitutional, Law, and free speech One of the most striking things about American free speech doctrine is this like this example of there were Nazis that wanted to march in skokie. I know jumping straight to Nazis his kind of leaping into the free speech depend. But Evelyn's describing one of the most famous first amendment cases when that really tests American values, the story goes like this. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, a group of neo-nazis wanted to march in the Chicago suburb of skokie Illinois largely because a lot of Holocaust survivors lived there seven thousand concentration camp survivors living in the predominantly Jewish Chicago suburb of skokie not surprisingly, there was a huge legal fight cokie officials a block Nazi demonstrations with court injunctions when the Nazis appealed to the State Supreme Court a judge has refused to hear the case. But what might surprise you if you don't know the story is that the American Civil Liberties Union indeed a lawyer with the ACLU defended the Nazis right to March under the First Amendment saying the right to free expression with integral to who we are as a country. It's just such an iconic story of the literal Nazis were going to be allowed to marching the street and as a foreigner you come here, new learn that and normally deland that it's it's not like these inconvenient embarrassment about Assessment Amendment Law. It's this like really proud one of the truly great victories for the First Amendment was that it will protect the speech that we hate because it is you know Betta to have it out in the urban it's better to meet it with county speech and we just can't trust the government to suppress as an Australian very striking. I don't even have a right to free speech. We don't have a bill of rights and our Constitution it's it's like a completely foreign idea this fight over unfettered free speech and in fact, where it collides with Anti Semitism and Holocaust denial broke into the news cycle again, this week, there's a split screen like the Supreme Court confirmation hearings going on on one side, and then on the other side facebook releases a blog post the company which has always said it values free expression above everything else announced that it would ban any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust. Two days later, twitter did the same thing. It might seem like banning Holocaust denial is a pretty easy call, but it was only a few years ago that facebook said, it wouldn't prohibit Holocaust to nihilism on its platform. which is part of why and says, this is a really big deal I. think this is like a really iconic moment in the history of the company and its thinking and its evolution around its rules. There is no more emblematic rule that facebook had about. To First Amendment Principles. Today on the show. Decision to finally habit Holocaust, Mus Information and what it means for free speech debates, the Internet and the potential for change. I'm Lizzie O'Leary and you're listening to what next TVD A show about technology power, how the future will be determined stay with us. Voting this year is a little. Than usual, what you don't want to do is be the one sprinting to the mailbox trying to send in a last minute vote or get to the front of the line at the polls only to realize you're not registered. That's why facebook has created the voting information centre with you want to know how to register how to vote by mail or to vote safely in person the voting information center can help you find the answers to your questions and make sure your vote is counted because of vote counted is a voice heard for official information from election authorities visit facebook, dot com slash voting Info Centre. Countless emails, endless video meetings, lost documents sometimes, it feels like technology is working overtime against us. Well, MONDAY DOT COM is getting it back on your side by bringing everything together to streamline your workflows and keep your teams can sink in one easy to use platform. Finally your team can work confidently and manage all core business activities in one place creating a workplace environment where everything's transparent everyone's accountable and real work gets done without anything holding you back. Whether you work in a team of five or five thousand Monday. Dot Com is the easiest way to keep everyone connected and on the right track try it out for yourself to get your free two week trial. Good Monday dot com today. I, WanNa talk about how seismic shift this is if we think back to just two years ago. Mark Zuckerberg gave a very now well known interview to Cara Swisher. And said, she didn't believe that posts that deny the Holocaust should be taken down. I believe that our platform should take down because I think that there are things different people get wrong. either. I don't think that they're intentionally getting a wrong but I think that they. They might be but go home. It's hard to pune intent. Boy. It is a big journey from. People get things wrong even though I might find it personally offensive. To. My own thinking has evolved. The big thing that they always have hung onto was we don't WanNa be arbiters of truth, and we will not take content down purely on the basis that it's false. We might take it on the down on the basis that its nudity or that it's hate speech or that it has other sort of effects but we weren't take content down just because it's wrong and that's sort of what's reflected in that quote from Makoto Takhar Swisher is you know some people get things wrong sometimes and the the pandemic literally changed that decision overnight in the context of a global public health emergency they abandoned that they said we will take down. False information about the pandemic because it poses a public health risk, and now we're playing ball like now companies are taking content down on the basis that it's false and we're now seeing it in other areas. We saw it in the context of the wildfires in West my country was on file for months. In December and January, and there were lots of false rumors about the cause of the fires and facebook didn't take anything down and then Oregon was on fire A. Couple of months ago, and suddenly they were taking down misinformation about the cause of their as far as think a stock contrast as you can draw. It's still interesting to hear you peg this to the pandemic because I think about all the data points that came before that this is. After the two thousand, sixteen election, it is after the Charlottesville unite the right rally, which took place in two thousand seventeen. Do you think the coronavirus pandemic is it sort of launching us into a new I guess area of thinking about content and speech on its own or or easy it kind of a I guess a catalyst for something that was going to happen anyway. Yeah. You're absolutely right that it's only sort of it's part of the broader trend. It was a particularly visible and sort of obvious example of the trend in the same way that the pandemic has made many sort of fundamental. Assumptions structures in society more visible, and we've sort of seen progressively moving more and more along that line of sort of okay. We copies all speech all the time. Let's balancing trysts and draw the line and I think that the pandemic was just sort of another step along that road. If you think about it that way these announcements from facebook and twitter about banning Holocaust denial or in line with other content moderation decisions we've seen this year like the outright ban on Cunanan content. But in other ways several and says the decision. Holocaust. Denial marks a deeper and more fundamental shift in how speeches police online Holocaust denial is one of these iconic things about the first amendment and I believe that one of the reasons why facebook sort of stuck to that principle for so long of allowing on services was because it's still considered itself a fundamentally American company attached to these first. Amendment ideals is robust marketplace of ideas. Which is bizarre when you think about it these these are clearly global companies now and most of they US bases outside all over America but there was still something that it couldn't let go of and so I think it's really when Audience First Amendment land anymore like vc's we are now in this unknown landscape of trying to work out what norms we can attach ourselves to.

Facebook United States Skokie Makoto Takhar Swisher Twitter America Harvard Law School American Civil Liberties Union Massachusetts Supreme Court Chicago Evelyn Mark Zuckerberg Lizzie O'leary Skokie Illinois State Supreme Court Info Centre Charlottesville
Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | 6 months ago

Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

"The Corona virus pandemic underscores an issue Abigail Hawk the chief research officer of the Seattle Indian health. Board has been fighting her entire career, the exclusion of native people in public health data. We know that the data that's being collected across the United States isn't collecting race and ethnicity correctly however, even with that incredible lack of data, the data that we do have shows an incredible disparity. Growing up in rural Alaska. Echo Hawk was surrounded by examples of how a native community diligently cared for one. Another I was raised amongst incredible people who were the very first public health practitioners. I ever saw if somebody needed fed, they fed them. If somebody needed a ride to a doctor, a five hour trip tankards, Alaska, they drove them. All of my scientific background comes from that space of understanding what it means to serve the community and also the. As an indigenous person, I come from thousands of years of incredible indigenous scientists but after being stereotyped mistreated while seeking prenatal care in Seattle. Washington she knew how she can make an impact in her community. I had a medical assistant question me on how much I had been drinking. She pulled up my sleeves and then I realized she was checking my arm to see had track marks. It was really traumatizing to me is a a young person. I was only nineteen years old and as a result of that experience I didn't get prenatal care until I was in my second trimester, I became a grassroots advocate to ensure that native women were properly treated because we have some of the highest. Rates of infant mortality and maternal mortality within this country and as I went through my college years that turned into what I did my thesis on, she went on to study health policy at the University of Washington, but it wasn't easy navigating between Western, and indigenous knowledge systems. It was hard to balance who I was native person versus what the university is expected me to be and what Western science wanted almost insisted I had to be it became another struggle to be seen as relevant. As smart and as knowledgeable, the other people in the room, and in fact, in the first year of my career I would say that I did not actively practice indigenous science. We come from thousands of years of data gatherers in my communities. We know how to ensure that our corn grows for example, in a time where there is complete droughts I was called out by one of my elders in the fact that I no longer was representing or being an indigenous person it reminded me of. Who I was, and that I would not make any difference in my community. If I didn't go back to the knowledge that I knew was right that I knew was ethical. I was able to incorporate that and not only see how western science has a lot of basis in indigenous knowledge systems. But I also feel that western science needs to quit coming to indigenous people because they think we have all of the problems they need to come to us because we have all of the answers. Today Echo Hawk as the director of the urban Indian Health Institute, a Seattle based organization seeking to decolonize data by putting native people's priorities at the forefront of data collection by being intimately involved in the collection of information native people can shape the narratives told about their communities data and a Western context has always been used against native people. It has been used to show how bad off we are how higher suicide rates are higher diabetes is how we don't achieve the same educational standards Western folks that deficit narrative continues to build support stereotypes of those communities as being less than not as smart of they're responsible for. Their own health disparities all of those things as a result of that, many of our communities have protected themselves and have not participated actively data-gathering efforts across the United States and across the world and that was absolutely the right thing for them to do was to protect themselves. Tribal communities have a right to ensure that data gathered about them is used for their benefit and that they maintain ownership in control over that controlling the data also means making sure that indigenous people are counted in federal and state data sets in the United States. A practice not always followed despite a treaty agreement between tribal nations and the United States. Government. The US census didn't proactively count American Indians until eighteen sixty and this earth of data was used as settle on native peoples land. One of the things that we actively are fighting against is that a small population people don't gather the data about US correctly or they don't gather it at all. So very often albeit presentation, it will say a little asterix that we were American Indians Alaska natives were statistically insignificant to me. That is one of two things either you did not actively try or didn't know how to connect with the community to gather the data you needed to, and the other is, is that when? You eliminate us in the data. You are actively participating in the ongoing genocide of American Indians and Alaska natives, and that seems really strong to say, and yes, it is and I believe it one hundred percent. So I ask people to question these practices that they're doing and recognize that. Yes, I know they're not inherently individually racist but they're participating in a system that has been meant to eliminate my people. These data collection issues remain a major problem in the covid nineteen pandemic initially Echo Hawk was unable to access the CDC breakdown of race ethnicity data. Once she saw the data, she was unimpressed with its quality and breadth. What we found in twenty three states is that native people were three point five times more likely to be infected with covert than Non Hispanic whites. Why did we only do twenty three states in the country? because. The rest of the state simply hadn't gathered enough data for us to be able to analyze what was happening within their states. So only twenty three states had gathered seventy percent of their race ethnicity data policymakers are trying to make data driven decisions. How can they make data driven decisions with bad data? Gathering this data, the resources that we need are not being. In the right way because we don't know how to allocate them. Correctly, Echo Hawk has provided training to universities and the State Department about how to correctly collect race and ethnicity data as well as how to restructure their database systems to better serve indigenous people in all realms of public health. We know that there's about a twenty increase in domestic violence right now as a result of Covid and many of folks who could leave their homes for work or school or things like that to get away from their abusers for an amount of time no longer can do that. I'm deeply dedicated towards the safety of victims of sexual violence and domestic violence and other types of intimate partner violence and so. I am actively working with a large county here in Washington state where we are changing their database system. We are also going to assist them in working with the local tribal communities on what it means. Once they collect that data, how that data is shared back to the tribal communities, how it's analyzed and what kind of meaningful change can come from that at the end of the day. The individual story behind the data guides, echo hawks work. We are also listening to the stories of the community, the impact of a family who's lost both parents the impact of a tribe where cove nineteen has just ravishing through their communities causing so much destruction that qualitative data is justice important as the quantitative data. Simply. Because right now, we don't have enough of that quantitative data to get to those decision makers. So they can make those data driven decisions. Every single data point is a mother is grandfather is an uncle is an anti is relative. We have a responsibility to the story and two story teller to the story. We have a responsibility to ensure that it builds the strength of the community. It identifies gaps that we can then go in and work towards filling that it also shows the strength and the resilience season, the answers that are held within our community by hope for my great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great grandchildren. That they are not facing the same battles that I am facing that we have an opportunity to come together now as allies within the scientific community recognize we have gone wrong and to see our path forward. The story was originally reported by Lizzie wait as part of scientists, voices of the pandemic series.

United States Echo Hawk Alaska Seattle Abigail Hawk University Of Washington Chief Research Officer Washington Urban Indian Health Institute CDC Lizzie State Department Hawks Director Partner
Some Young Republican Activists Worry About The Future Of Their Party

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 7 months ago

Some Young Republican Activists Worry About The Future Of Their Party

"Week's Republican National Convention offered direct appeals to a new generation of voters. It showcased figures like Madison Cawthorne, a congressional candidate in North Carolina. I just turned 25. When I'm elected this November, I'll be the youngest member of Congress in over 200 years. And if you don't think young people can change the world. Then you just don't know American history. But President Trump's appeal with young voters is very limited. And some young Republican activists are concerned about the future of the party now totally defined by Trump. NPR's wanna Summers reports. Lizzie Bond is worried about the future of the Republican Party. The 21 year old Duke University students said the party today is failing to speak to people like her. She describes herself as conservative, reasonable and a person of faith. In 2016. She could not support Donald Trump and instead volunteered in support of Hillary Clinton's campaign. I think specifically within my age cohort, there's a lot of enthusiasm for President Trump. But then there are also a lot of people who are inclined to be conservative who are so disillusioned by everything that they see on the right. That it's hard not to think that the future of the Republican Party is doomed. Research from Circle, a research center at Tufts University found that nearly one in five young voters who backed Republicans in 2018 plan to support Joe Biden this year. Mike brought. Oh, said one reason why young people maybe turning away is because the Republican Party is not talking about the right issues. One of our main themes is that There are issues that Gen Z voters care about, including on the center, right? At the party has failed to address time and time again. Climate change racial injustice Algebra two plus issues. Broda was 20 and goes to Georgetown University. He's the executive director of Gen Z GOP. A group that's looking to reach young Republicans. He's planning to vote for Joe Biden, but hopes that there will be a better Republican option than Trump in 2024. Now I think with the ultimate determining factor is that Draws me away from him completely is his poor approach to governance. And that's evident in his handling the code 19 pandemic, and it's no longer just about his policies were inconsistent with my views for what's best for the country. It's how he approaches those policies. Many young Republicans said that coming of age as a conservative today has been a bit of a surreal experience. I still remember sitting in this restaurant with some friends and be like, Oh, wouldn't it be like the weirdest thing if the race ended up being Trump versus Hillary, and we're like, Oh, my goodness that would never happen like that Be so awful and Lo and behold, it's what happened. That's Grace Klein. She's 18 and just started her first year at Arizona State University. She described herself as very against Trump during the 2016 Republican primary. Four years later, things have changed. I'm going to be voting for the first time in November, and I am an adamant supporter. I will 100% vote for him now client said Trump has exceeded her expectations. But there are some things she does not agree with. She specifically mentioned some of the president's tweets. But she said that his record and his values help her look past what she described as personality flaws. And there's one issue that Klein said, is central to her political identity. I believe That the rightto life starts at conception. And if a candidate doesn't support that I will not support them. Curl in Monastir is a 19 year old student at Coker College in South Carolina. He said the most important issue for him as a conservative is standing up for the Constitution. He was initially open to supporting President Trump in November. But right now that seems unlikely. Everyday on TV, the land between Vice President Biden and the libertarian candidate, Jo George. And Back in North Carolina. Lizzie Bond isn't sure either. So in November, I'm facing that really Really difficult decision. I likely won't be supporting either presidential candidate. Voters like her have just 63 days to figure it out on a summer's NPR news.

President Trump Republican Party Joe Biden Lizzie Bond North Carolina Grace Klein Hillary Clinton Executive Director Madison Cawthorne Congress Vice President NPR Duke University Georgetown University Tufts University Gen Z Gop Arizona State University
Houston Hospitals Navigate NY-Like Surge, Mixed Messages

Houston Matters

01:28 min | 9 months ago

Houston Hospitals Navigate NY-Like Surge, Mixed Messages

"Now here in Houston health officials over at the medical, center say sixty two thousand coronavirus cases are being reported across our local region. Close to four hundred people are being admitted to the MED center each day. That's been the case since the end of June a month ago, the average was about one hundred people a day. The Texas Medical Center remains in phase two of its intensive care capacity plan at the current ICU growth rate Michael Medical Center leaders think it's unlikely they'll have to move in face three within the next two weeks now as cases surge. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner is still calling on the governor to order a two week. Shut down while Governor Rabbit has said putting the state back on lockdown is a last resort, but the state is doing what it can to help. Fight the spread of the virus. A US army medical force arrived in Houston yesterday. Health officials say the eighty five member task force comprises of medical and support professionals from the army reserve, and they'll use a wing out in the United Memorial Medical Center and start transferring covid nineteen patients from other hospitals to help lighten the load and build more efficiency and capacity space for these hospitals and quickly Michael. A medical resort is opening up in the Willow Brook area. This will be a nursing home that's been vacated and it'll be used to take care of patients who've been hospitalized and who are on their way to recovery to medical resorts are already currently in Operation

Houston Michael Medical Center Texas Medical Center United Memorial Medical Center Willow Brook Governor Rabbit Sylvester Turner Army United States Michael
Colin Kaepernick Signs First-Look Deal With Walt Disney

Colleen and Bradley

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Colin Kaepernick Signs First-Look Deal With Walt Disney

"Colin Kaepernick's production company ran division media whose side a first look deal with the Walt Disney Company and the Steel includes a documentary series about Kaepernick that's developed by ESPN film Deal between Lizzie and Rob Vision will emphasize scripted and unscripted stories that deal with race, social injustice and the quest for equality and will showcase directors and producers of color very interesting. And he said, this is with Netflix. Distant dizzy. Sorry. I gets the two confused and you know, I actually don't sorry, Streaming giants. That's really cool

Colin Kaepernick Walt Disney Company Rob Vision Lizzie Espn Netflix
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | 10 months ago

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
Leaf Botany - Shape

On The Ledge

06:14 min | 11 months ago

Leaf Botany - Shape

"It comes to leave talk and God knows I love Lee Talk. There are a little terms. Bandied around that you may or may not be familiar with. I'm going to run through some of them now just to give you an idea of the range of terminology that you can use to describe leaves. I mean why bother you can say well. Relief is round or it's pointy or it's holy. Why bother with all these specialists terms well part of the reason? Is that as you get more into this hobby? No doubt you'll start reading up online and in books about plants and you'll find these terms start to come up and learning. These terms just helps to enhance your understanding of what you're reading. So what are the some of the terms that you're likely to come across? Well let's start at the very basic level with the leaf walk makes up the structure of the leaf. Well the Lamma is the blade of the leaf. The flatbed the that we possibly most interested in and the stock he bit well. That's the patio but do remember not who plants have patios. Some of them joined straight onto the stem. And it's an adaptation that saves the plant some water and listen to bobby reminded me of another useful pair of words when describing leaves and that's back. Co and Adak seal yet. You have to have your teeth in when you say those the opposite of visit belief. That's the Adak seal and the underside. That's the AB axial again. You might come across that one when you are reading about plants and that just helps you to know what is what. And then there's a whole set of words just describing the shape of a leaf. I think you notice about relief. When you're looking at is is it. Simple or compound now simple while that's fairly obvious it just means the leaf is one whole thing together rather than having some complex design whereas a compound leaf well that's formed by a number of flits that join together and then attach onto the stem and there's a couple of different coins compound leads your probably going to come across in the House plan world. Probably the most notable is compound pommie now and as is often the case the clues in the name a compound Paul Mate. Leave looks a bit like a hand. So if you think of a horse chestnut leave or in the House Plant World Shuffler relief. You are along the right lines and you can. Of course get palm. Eight simple leaves think spicier Japonica for example. That's a great example of a leaf. It looks like a hand but it's simple. It's all one leaf. The other form of compound leaf ease the P. natively compound leave and I guess the best example I can think of this. One is the sensitive plant Mimosa. Puteh Co where the leaflets are. All arranged in a straight line out in the garden the best example probably is arose some of the names of quite poetic. Iran the like Peltier eight which means a leaf where the patio joins not the edge of the leaf but somewhere in the center like Mr Shanley compete to that I also like has state which means a spear shaped leaf so think of a Philodendron artem being the perfect example again the Latin telling you something about relief and then we have the wonderful Lancia late which means quite simply shaped like allowance so in other words it comes to a point at the end. So think about your busy Lizzie. Impatiens classic Lawns Hiller leaves there are loads. More LINEAR world best. The spider plants leads right. Best fairly obvious. And then you've got something like Hoya carrier with its OPD coordinator leaves which means that harsh eight with the stem at the pointy and rather than the other end. If you want to go deeper into leaf shape names then do check out the show notes. Broil include some links to some wonderful pictures and diagrams of different types of shapes and he can spend hours learning the all. But how is a leafs shape determined? Why is this so much variation? Well this was where I need to call in an expert. I'm Enrico Coen. I'm research scientist Jonas Center Well we try and study and understand how plant forms are produced. How leaves grow how flowers get shapes often look at around my growing collection of House Plaza? Just wonder the amazing variety of leave shapes demonstrated even in my body's collection do have any insolent for us about why certain leaves are shaped as they are what what is it. What are the factors that determined the shaper indeed leaf size leaves a fascinating terms of the as you say variety of shapes the produced and one of the big questions which we still don't know all the answers to is how these shapes generated manmade shapes? We have a notion of how we make a spoon or plate because there's next to hand off our own hand the the process but with a leaf as with most biological structures there is no external hand it all has to figure out how to produce these shapes internally and Just as in a sense you could imagine how just to we use the musical scale. A single musical scale can produce all the different music that we hear from symphony used concertos to pop music and yet it's the same notes. It's the way in which the organized and put together the generates this amazing Variety of music and the same way leaves have a set of basic ingredients. And it's the combination of these ingredients allows still many different forms to be generated so although he's Mabul variety forms underlying that Some basic rules to get combined and also some glorious ways to produce the shapes. We

Adak LEE Enrico Coen Leafs Lawns Hiller Bobby Paul Mate Puteh Co House Plaza Hoya Philodendron Artem Lizzie Iran Mr Shanley Research Scientist Jonas Center Coordinator
What If They Close All the Schools?

Slate's If Then

03:34 min | 1 year ago

What If They Close All the Schools?

"Hi It's Lizzie. Just wanted to flag wall that this situation is changing pretty quickly as we were putting the finishing touches on this episode we learned that schools were closing in Maryland. Ohio and Kentucky. Okay here's the show morning. Good Morning Dr Reed. How are you could be better? It's beautiful Tuesday here in the Northwest U You're sounding very upbeat for someone. Who's in the middle of dealing with what you're dealing with. Well that's that's what we do. Michelle Reid is the superintendent of a school district near Seattle called North Shore. Thirty four schools almost twenty four thousand kids and Seattle is also were the first. Us case of the novel Corona Virus turned up. Do you remember when you first heard that some people in your district might have been exposed to the virus. I do know what happened. I think from a personal standpoint. I remember just need to close the door and sit down for a few minutes. Collect myself and think about what the future likely bring. Nbc News has just confirmed to new cases in Washington state this morning. Washington state remains the center of attention. Asked Corona virus spreads quickly and eleventh person in the United States has died from the corona virus. Ten of those deaths have been Washington state and tomorrow as the weeks went by read had to make a series of difficult decisions when a family member of a staffer might have been exposed. She closed school next. A different staff members started showing potential symptoms so she closed another school then a school parent test positive with families. Scared and attendance dropping. Read made two decisions. I all the schools in her district of almost twenty. Four thousand students would close for two weeks. Second that every one of those students would switch to an online curriculum. Walk me through your decision to move to online learning. But what did you have to kind of evaluate to figure out if you could try and pull this off? Well we began to realize that with an over twenty percent absence rate we actually were tipping over seven thousand students absent that we were not really meeting equitable educational needs by staying in a brick and mortar classroom. So we've had a number of staff around the district in pockets. Experimenting with blended learning online tools for their families are decision really was. How quickly could we bring that to scale for all twenty three thousand five hundred seventy seven students listening to Michelle read talk? It's striking that. She and her school or in a tech corridor. It's Seattle after all. Big Tech. Companies are all around and even partner with the schools and the district itself is affluent and able to loan devices to kids. Who Don't have them today. We have issued just over four thousand computing devices and we will have distributed over eight hundred. Mobile Hotspots T. Mobile has been fabulous corporate partner in our us. Another six hundred hotspots immediately for our use at no charge in. We're we're seeing some strong results. Were working really hard. Each day to get feedback from our families in our teachers and were funneling that feedback through our cabinet and our corporate partners Microsoft and so forth to craft tools. That will each day improve. What raval to deliver in the quality of the instructional

Seattle Michelle Reid Washington Michelle Maryland Partner Dr Reed Ohio United States Nbc News Kentucky Big Tech Microsoft North Shore Superintendent T. Mobile
Hilary Duff hints at Lizzie McGuire drama after Disney+ pulls 'Love, Simon' spinoff

Daily Pop

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Hilary Duff hints at Lizzie McGuire drama after Disney+ pulls 'Love, Simon' spinoff

"We are finally getting some answers about what is going on with the Lizzie. Mcguire revival so this all got thrown into the news yesterday after dizzy plus moved their love Simon series. Hulu because they didn't think it was family friendly enough will. Hillary posted the news on her story and wrote sounds familiar that dot so now we know what she means. Variety is reporting that Hillary Disney are clashing over. The show's direction. Hilary wants to do a more adult version and Disney wants something closer to the original. Disney has fired. The show's creator and so far. Hillary has not commented any further. Heard it in two episodes and then yeah that's really upsetting but also don't you kind of have these conversations prior to things sort of being green lit in the show being in production with rings change? All the time shows get cancelled after pilot. All they don't go forward but this was going forward. They had ordered the series. So I feel that there was such creative differences. Those should've been ironed out before they even shot something and I think it makes sense to come back if they're gonNA Redo the revival and she's going to be thirty years old it's GonNa. It has to be different. What thirty year old is living the same as an eleven year old exactly? Yeah but that's what happens and it happens at this networks from times where you have an executive who green light something and then that executive moves on to greener pastures and then all of a sudden a new executive comes in and they have different ideas for the show. What works for them so I think what happened was maybe an executive came on. Green Love Simon on Disney was ready for it and then all of a sudden anew in came in and was like no no no. That's not what I'm looking to. Let me move this to Hulu and alleviate some of that space for some of my newer projects. I am disappointed about this Lizzie McGuire. We had Hillary Duff on the show last year she was talking about it and it seemed like such a great concept. It's you know about how the girl wakes up at thirty and realizes her life isn't where she thought it was going to be thirty. I think that's everyone right agree with everyone. Woke up at thirty was like really thought this would be happening or this would be happening and we were GonNa Watch her. Go through that to me. That super interesting I mean did juices. Let's find another show runner. Who could potentially come in and figure out what you want and what I want needs needs to move to who just needs to Bergen also. It sounds like Hillary the creator of the original Creator. We're on the same page. Yeah and I think she probably wants that person to still be around. So yeah I I. Yeah but I think they should just have that person back to the show with Hillary and move it to Hulu so they can do the show that they

Hillary Disney Hillary Hulu Hillary Duff Lizzie Mcguire Executive Simon Bergen Hilary
Dr. Michelle Ward Deep Dives on Psychopaths

Dr. Drew Podcast

10:25 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Michelle Ward Deep Dives on Psychopaths

"Shows got a PhD clinical neuropsychologist Euroscience psychology from USC Earlier she study mres murderers and non murderers to identify the structural differences in the brain separate them into two groups and these types of murderers. There's an impulsive type in predatory type and in the impulsive type. They have reduced function prefrontal cortex which makes sense the part of the brain. The brakes puts the brakes on our stupid behaviors. But tell people what psychopathy is and how how they would identify that Oh. Psychopaths are so much fun. So psychopaths in some ways are more evolved than the rest of us. What well okay. Maybe that was a little liberal with my insofar as they function without the burden of guilt and without the burden of empathy so they can do all the little nasty things they WANNA do all their goal driven behaviors without feeling bad about it. I thought they did have much in the way of feelings at all many of them so some of them do I mean some of them can feel. They certainly feel a lot for themselves. Yes yes and they can fall in love they. They don't love a person like you and I might live somebody but it's they just don't feel bad and in it's actually a biological phenomenon like they literally do not have. Oh sorry they don't have the parts of the brain that are associated with empathy are malfunctioning in these people. So of course. It's really bad because if the goal driven behavior is criminal you get yourself a little serial killer right so it seems to me like the people with psychopathic genetics or biology. A childhood horrible abuse. That's how you get these terrible things right if you get nudged in that direction. So it is thought that psychopathy is inherited but not just like one gene O. Dad's psychopath sons a psychopath. It's not like that. It's it's a cluster a jeans a combination. So you'll see it in a pedigree in a family but not necessarily one generation to the next but when it pops up it's it's different and you know it Wa- and there's different flavors of a to Gary. What was James Fallon's podcast? Irvine professor that was doing studies on psychopathy and he was looking through the controls and his family and himself in the controls all of a sudden. He found psychopath amongst the controls they went. Oh my God. This probably got in wrong pile. He takes off the tape and it's him and so he looked in his family. And he's related to Lizzie borden and has multiple generations of people that killed their family members. Nobody else always family members. Okay but if we're GONNA kill someone who makes most Matt sorry not you? You wouldn't do it but but you're right. That's what some of the most intense emotions is. Is that sort of a typical psychopathic pattern. Now family do they have something to benefit? So when ever you're looking at a murder and you have a a suspect who you think is a psychopath. What was the motive? They don't okay. Some of them can kill for thrills but then they're not killing their family members if they're killing family member it's because they want something money or something typically yeah and so it seems how what percentage of population psychopathic tendencies. Okay you're not going to like this one out of every one hundred of us so one percent one percent and so when he it seems like whenever I see murder television shows or whatever here about core chose it seemed like they attorneys are always taking the position that this is a psychopathic. Because they're like oh he just wanted the insurance money so we offer his wife's like that's not a normal behavior now now and usually those are more layered. That is a very convenient explanation for a jury so everyone goes to because you have to have motivation. Juries do not like to convict unless there's motivation but sometimes there's not when you were talking earlier about impulsive killers. Yes those are the people who usually have bad functioning. The prefrontal CORTEX in a bar. Fight the kill the guy they get in a fight with their girlfriend or their wife and they kill them but if they happen to have an insurance policy forget it. They're going to say it's the insurance and it was a psychopath and it was premeditated but sometimes it's not so the it's always frustrating. The distance between the legal system and the reality right So psychopaths are one of the population. How would you know if you have in your life? We've talked about this before so you you know when they just behave in ways. You can't imagine unless you're a psychopath yourself. And then you're like what he's just like normal. And so GARY WHEN. I asked if he would push his son off the bridge in the trolley experiment as Adema Dr drew show and he was surprised that I was mortified by that. That's prize you. Did it surprise me that that I was mortified? Now okay you were mortified to. I was not surprised. Maybe but I was. But I can't get to where you can get to a HA. That's it sorry. Go ahead not calling him a psychopathic. You know it when you see it. It's different now. We have to say most. Psychopaths are pro social. They're not killers. They're not serial killers it's a small percentage of that one percent. You've already called the more evolves so the pro social psychopath may actually be a significant benefit to the world. That's right a leader and sometimes a benevolent leader. They run banks. They run companies. They just don't have anxiety and they don't have to worry the stuff that other leaders worry about. That's right they can push the button. Yeah do we do. Who Do you think say amongst the president's unless thirty years who have had maybe assocham social psychopathy? Okay I do love him but I think Bill Clinton might have been a psychopath. I'm not alone in that. Thought HE HIS. All of his goals were benevolent but he seemed to be able to function without really looking back and he goes shave. No guilt shame. Now go and how do you know? He wasn't just a severe narcissist or is there a difference nicest can feel guilt and empathy and remorse and those are really important shames. A real top one for them for narcissist well because they're super insecure so shame as resetting. They're allergic to it right. So how do we know about bill? Clinton allergic to shame yeah well. Narcissism is very high factor in psychopathy. But you have to have the hallmarks which are lack of empathy remorse guilt. Those are the ones that you really need in order to reach that criteria of psychopathy and so Clinton didn't feel guilt for the stuff he was. Did you see the the Clinton Affair Series Documentary Pretty Interesting? You've told me to watch for sorry. Well right to watch all the television to be fair. He gives a lot of assignment. You have to killing eve that you must watch for. The life of me cannot understand how this man has time to watch the amount that he he doesn't sleep. He drinks a cup of coffee. I mean Part of it but but no no no I mean look what I go home more often. I watch television. I'm not criticizing whatsoever. I walked I watch as much. Tv as you may be alive. I don't know how you have the time to watch all the all the documentaries and the stuff online and stuff you in the pods you keep up on. I listened to every single podcast at well over one acts and I watch most most things that I'm not watching for pure enjoyment. I will watch at others. Those ready to okay. How much sleep do you people need? I need seven hours. I do I can get away with less but seven is five but I never get tired of you get more than seven no more than Nyein Guitar. Okay but nine eight right. Seven is sort of my number these. So why would you take that well okay? It's not a real study. It's Michelle study but I have this theory that people who sleep longer ended up sleeping not as deeply and and they they actually don't have as much energy throughout the day officiously it's anecdotal make sense. I mean there is definitely oversleeping is called sleep inertia and you can. You can have like still be kind of tired during the day after sleeping too much. Yeah that makes sense but those of us who ran on anxiety all the time you get yourself all hyped familiar with that very nervous right now. Okay so which reminds me the psychopaths really having society. Do they know not in a way that you want them to so one thing that's really important and we can measure this in psychopaths versus non psychopaths. Think about when you get scared before. You're doing something big. Let's say your ZIP lining I don't know if the heights are scary for you or you're going on air. Your heart starts racing. You start sweating. You know the fight or flight. You get this autonomic response psychopaths. Don't get the same autonomic response that we do so if you tell a psychopath look. I'm going to shock you in ten seconds. Here's a screen watch countdown. So they're they're watching the numbers go from ten to one and they know they're gonNA get shocked. You don't see those increases and you have your electrodes on them and their polls Fischer's that's right pulse doesn't increase than they don't sweat more. They don't have the skin response from. They can a dupe a lie detector test Oh easily easily is that why they're not admissible but so I was like okay but does that happen after. They've already been psychopaths. I mean. No one really knows when you start measuring with. Are you psychopath? Are you not so we looked at psychopathy? Nine to eleven year olds and we did it in twins because we wanted to be able to isolate. How much is jeans and how much environment? How did you get the referrals? Well this was at UC. So when I was a graduate student we ran the southern California twin project so we went through. La USD matched birth dates and last names and came up with thousands and thousands of twins and we divided them by dental confrontational. Because identical twins. Share one hundred percent of their genes fraternal share fifty percent. So they're fraternal. Twins are just brothers and sisters born at the same time so if identical twins are more similar on any given behavior indicates strong genetic underpinning. So we did we. Would we learned that psychopathic traits did have high haired ability? But the other thing we discovered is that that phenomenon of not feeling anticipatory. Fear not getting nervous before something bad is going to happen exists when they're nine to eleven years old before they've committed crimes but done. Gary Georgia with their brains now. Well we did electrophysiology. So we did. We measured waves. But we didn't do scanning so it was interesting to me that it's the chicken or egg that this biological phenomenon happens before they have an opportunity to go out killing

Bill Clinton Gary Georgia Murder USC Lizzie Borden Mres James Fallon Irvine Michelle Matt WA Nyein Guitar California Graduate Student President Trump Professor Fischer
"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Is where she doesn't yet another suggested that board and killed her dad because of years of sexual abuse still her killing. She denying the circumstance. Lizzy was caught in a compromising position with the maid and killed the two. Because of that. Not Exonerating Lizzy with these theory. Kills now onto not so far this next one John Morris Killed Them. Both he was not someone family was close to. He was the brother to Andrew his dead wife and he had an absurdly perfect and over-detailed alibi for the death of Abbey Board in which included the identification numbers of the trolleys. He's road on to buy oxen. Hey you wanna know the license plates. So the cars are so when I was definitely not murdering a Goo- all right well. That sounds bad but you have spent you have definitely spent the night with relatives and thought to yourself afterwards. Holy Shit I BETTER NAILED MY ALIBI. Law and these fuckers only each other. That's fair itself is everywhere. Yeah there's another where the made killed them because she was super pissed that on such a hot day she had to go outside and Wash Windows. She comes back. I told you mother fuckers. I don't do windows. I needed a nap. Another author claim that lizzie sister. Emma who was in another city at halls party came back to the house and killed their parents only to go back to that House Party and wait for word that it happened on. 'em You were. You were in the bathroom for like an hour just now yes just a drop a deuce like you do. But you weren't covered in blood like that when you win in my old chipotle. Oh talk to pull Japan out three weeks it is. It's been on the stove. The made after everything was over left the family and started working for another. She eventually married a man while working as a maid and move to Montana. Supposedly on her deathbed she confessed to her sister. Quote that she had changed her testimony on the stand in order to protect borden and quote. What the world she protect board and forty she'd stakes are very high here. No one was ever convicted of the murders. Meaning it's a complete mystery just like Nicole Simpson and who actually did extort Ukraine to manufacturer dirt on by You know never know right before. The trial started or is a copycat murder that took place but the person they convicted of the crime was not in fall river at the time of the board murders. It's impossible to know who was the killer. But many people suspect Lizzie. Yeah investigation and the trial seem like an absolute cock-up and who knows what would have happened. Forensic Science at the time was more sophisticated than a large magnifying glass. In a divining Rod lizzy still lives on in a falcons scary goddamn nursery rhyme. Which I'm GonNa read for you lizzie. Bordon took an ax and gave her mother forty whacks wind. She saw what she had done. She gave her father forty. One Andrew Borden now is dead lizzy hit him on the head up in heaven he will sing on the gallows she will swing. God Damn Nursery. Rhyme is fucked up. You don't want kids to think they have that kind of power shocking. But honestly it's only more fucked up than Peter Peter. Pumpkin eater in. Its specificity I all right so usually if you had to stabilize what you've learned in what sense. What would it be is probably a murder suicide? Hashtag lizzy didn't do it. Are you ready for the quiz? Acts me anything you like. Oh there's the shits right there. At the hour at seasonal clearly lizzy born did not get a fair shake in the media. Why not a the news story was a hatch be? The editor had an ax to grind. See and I can only think of two times. I Miss Heath well. It's definitely D. let's go let's go with C. You could only think of two third one right correct. Go on what all right. This story is obviously begging for a podcast slash netflix documentary. What do we call it? A my least favourite mother be the MINX. See Killer spin side or d. Serial season for this is rude serial season for answer amount wrecked. Okay all right. So in addition to the nursery rhyme This story has also been commemorated in a number of popular songs which is the most beloved. And by the way you you guys you will legitimately miss. He's by the end of this. Which is the most beloved? Hey don't ask me no questions by Leonard. Skinner miss him different? What they action for by RUSTIC CRIME? See Anything you asked for by Thomas. Hawk D- Are you if you had to act as a good one yeah red hat. Chitty peppers put Hatchard I think it's secret. Answer e anything by rose. I'm sorry the secret answer was they're both in the same same band slasher axl rose. Oh I'm sure that was close to sit correct. Edger was secret answer APP. Tom Actually does. Miss Heath is clear after hearing what happened when we tried to do punch that the real winner here is. He's so we're GonNa let him pick the SAS next time we talk not not not. I guess it's me that okay. Well I usually know thanking you bringing out with us today. We'll be back as we can buy that albeit expert on something else between now and then you can hear more from Thomas along cognitive dissonance in more from Eli and myself has got off movies and this and if you'd like to help get this show on your donation patreon.com citation pot early five star review everywhere. You can if you want to get in touch with us. Check out past episodes on social media or check show notes be sure to check out a citation pod dot com..

Exonerating Lizzy Andrew Borden Miss Heath Lizzie murder Thomas John Morris Abbey Board Peter Peter Nicole Simpson axl rose netflix Tom Actually Montana Edger Japan House Party Emma
"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

"We're back. We last left off all the characters in the story but one were dead and I feel like she's still going for who for interesting so the first suspects were the maid. Maggie Sullivan the Uncle John Morris and some or just some Rando but after questioning lizzy they added her to Lizzie. Offered a story that was not consistent when they first questionnaire. She said that she either heard a grown or a scraping noise or a distress call when she came into the house. One of Yeah Right. Who knows one of this is that you like makes when he takes a shit? I just don't remember with the noise distress. Call one of those things sitting here. Weeping that's weird loon loon roles. Here is one of those things you pull the string and the sound. That's crazy or those chickens rubber chickens but later that day. She said she didn't hear anything at all. She said that she took her dad's boots off but he died with his boots on. The police also didn't like her demeanor. She was calm even toned and didn't faint when she saw the body. They also failed to check her for bloodstains or really look around. Lizzie is room for any clues. Just like we're the police before fingerprint. Serve forensics so did you do? It may be all right. You're free to go. I'm telling you Johnson never gonNA solve this. Is this a real head scratcher suit? The police find a fucking arsenal. A hatchets axes in the basement. Proper level of access here to hatchets two axes hatchet had an a broken handle one of these. The broken hatchet looked like the murder weapon. The break was fresh and it was sprinkled with ash to make it look like it was dusty and it had been used long time. That's one advantage the pre fingerprints and DNA cop sad was the fact that criminals have always been nobody'll guest. The ash was applied. Afterwards levels. Three people spent the night at the Bordon Murder House. The day of the killings. John More stayed in the attic guestroom. Not The guestroom. State in the previous night lizzy. Alice stay with Lizzie as well. An officer was placed outside the residence that night and said quote it seemed bored and enter the seller with Alice carrying a kerosene lamp and a slot Pale. He stated he saw both women exit the seller after which borden returned alone though he was unable to see what she was doing. He stated that it appeared. She was bent over a sink and quote. Superiors like what is stopper. See what she was doing. Because I was pushed on watch wasn't placed on. Do the next morning. Alice came into the board and kitchen and Lizzy was. They're tearing up address when Alice asks what she's doing lizzy replied that the dress had paint on it and she was. GonNa burn it which seems like a perfectly non murderer way to dispose what? I can see why this is a mystery. That's caught the imagination of so many for so long. How fucking twenty twenty. If I get paint on my own clothes I don't go outside and shredded burned. Michael flows like I just use them next time I paid in eighteen. Whatever the fuck when. You don't have flushing toilets. She's one hundred percent guilty of saying she's fucking filter. Okay Lizzy at this. Point is the prime suspect in is summoned to an inquest. Four days after the murders dose up with some morphine to calm down and refuse her the chance to have an attorney present because fuck that noise they start asking her questions and she can't get anything straight in the inquest. She tells three different versions of what happened that day. When Dad came home and she's constantly contradicting herself. Three days later she has served in the war and jailed a grand jury. Here's the evidence in early November and she's indicted on December second eighteen ninety two well. That's it we tried to erase team ably high on morphine. She's still not making any sense. We are straight answer out of this one kid for making murderers go like what she got. Morphine this is not. The child takes place in June. And it's fucking weird but we will get to that board and spares no expense and the defense attorneys. There's a team of three. And the most notable was George D Robinson. He happened to be the previous governor of Massachusetts and he appointed the judge hearing this trial. Wow mostly the trial is described as a bunch of circumstantial evidence and several eye witnesses and no real threat of what actually occurred. Some people placed lizzy in the house. Others placed her outside during the time of the murders. Physical evidence was also not consistent. One police officer said that the hatchet handle was in the House. The other set. It wasn't one thing that was never. Disputed was the burning in tearing address. That was mentioned by the prosecution and her friend while on the stand but the defense never challenged that you know just for giggles. I really fucking hope. She didn't do it and just picked an unlucky data. Marie condo or did not spark joy to be clear here like where was the axe handle? We found before we knew it was part of the murder weapon. And was your dad dead or not when you took. His boots off are different levels of history tale. Yes everyone had wrong answers but some of them were either okay. This is where it gets fucking bizarre. They removed the heads of the deceased and boiled them to get all the skin off and then brought in the skulls into court as evidence during the trial. Oh my God came up with that idea himself for the Jon. Benet live shows on his. The police were upset. That borden didn't faint when she saw. The bodies were probably overjoyed because she looked too faint when the prosecution appeared for act five of hamlet or whatever with her dad's right. Yeah they took the supposed hatchet head and then they tried to match it. Up with the skull on average if you didn't fit you had to acquit with the judge to be just like okay so you boiled the skin off of two dead people to prove this kind of looks like a hatchet right. GonNa make sure. Yep Okay. Can I at the end of this? Can we throw your ass jail? I just want to read the next bit right from wikipedia because this is his fucking so eighteen nineties quote evidence was excluded that Borden had sought to purchase prospect acid purportedly for cleaning seal skin cloak. She tried to get it from a druggist on the day before the murders a judge ruled that the incident was too remote in time to have any connection and quote. And just no. I just got a note here. Process acid is a highly poisonous substance. It's the main ingredient cyclone beat the day before the murders. That's too remote in time I would have accepted. Was supposed to door. Ask Her bucket. Also what the fuck was honor? Cloak lime deposit. That's my spelunker. This trial was also all of the newspapers. People wanted to read about the high society girl that hatchet a brilliant plan to kill her parents. Okay for the record. The brilliant plan was to hit them with a hatchet until they died. I in eighteen. Ninety two brilliant okay but a lot of boots had to be considered. It was the thing. Yeah but and also the record by the way high society. It didn't necessarily imply flushable toilet high-society okay all right fair all right. We're taking that whole line. Gone all right. The papers were also full of rampant speculation conjecture and they wouldn't stop after her acquittal which took an hour and a half of deliberation by the way how the papers talked about it for years after and there was always an anniversary story. Lizzy was ostracized from society to the week. After her father died was murdered. She went to the church and every row of pews around was empty. She bought a new house called. Maple Cross started calling herself. Lisbeth of Maple Croft. But it didn't help. She was an outcast until she died in. Nineteen twenty seven yeah. It's really too bad because if this had happened today she leaves would have gotten a netflix special. That suggested an owl. Maybe did it at least a podcast. Now since then the crime people have been speculating about who committed the murders. And it wouldn't be an episode of citation needed. We didn't wildly speculate and he didn't say interesting here. We here are some of these theories. An authors suggested that borden may have killed her parents in a few state. Okay so that one.

Lizzy borden Lizzie Alice morphine murder officer Bordon Murder House John More Maggie Sullivan Massachusetts netflix Johnson Maple Cross Maple Croft Lisbeth John Morris Marie condo Michael
"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Of those Paschi disputed facts of the case so it might not be real. I suspect that if it did happen they probably got into a squabble over it. All it's a pigeon anyway. I just love the visual. No no I get it and I had the same fight when she joined habitat for humanity. So yeah they can be about it. So it's a couple of days before the murder Lizzy at this. Point is a thirty two year old spinster and still living in her family home. They have a modified to flat. Where Lizzie lives upstairs in the Front of House and dad and his wife live in the upstairs of the back of the house. They don't take meals together because lizzie. And her stepmom abby kind of hate each other the whole house is always on a brink of Shriek match lizzy. I am not speaking to her. Well you tell me. She's a fat cow. Well you tell Lizzie that no one wants her. She'll die alone. I wait what nothing you tell. Abby nothing so everyone in the house gets mysteriously ill okay or in eighteen. Hundreds terms L. Yeah I don't know how that works. This immediately thinks that the households poison as her husband was at the most likeable dude but other people suspect food poisoning from the lamb that they left on the stove an eight over a period of day but it but it has so seizes but anyway it's bad enough for the step mom and she calls the doctor from across the street and he comes over and he does nothing because it's the wrong moon sign or whatever ever like doing nothing is actually the safest thing at this point for Dr Details Real Lady. You gotTA case. It's a D. Ninety two. You're fucking while sick or not sick. You still have to entertain your relatives when they come by a Wednesday night. So when John Morris Liz blood uncle comes by the boards just put them up for the night everyone gets up Thursday morning August fourth. Eighteen ninety two and has breakfast will not everyone. Lizzy doesn't go down for breakfast because she hates her stepmother so then the uncle leaves to go buy a of oxen. The camp this was awesome. The wikipedia says this happened around the oddly. Specific Time of Eight Forty Eight Andrew. Leaves for work at nine am all right honey? I love you. Don't get murdered. I know I always say that but double extra. Don't get murdered today. Okay so that leaves Abby lizzy and the maid Maggie Sullivan. I'm having so much trouble reconciling the made with no running water rights. Well she runs to water water. Abby sends the made out to wash the windows and then goes upstairs to make the gasp at Abbey according to forensics was looking at whoever killed her in the first blow with the weapon was enough to do just that the hatchet hitter in the side of the head by the ear and then she fell and the killer hitter with the acts like a random prime number of times seventeen. I don't know know why. So what eventually axe murdered as I'm sure I will be I. I hope it's doing something awesome and not doing chores. The made should've so why are you making? You have a made up on the wrong piece. He married her because she's made version two point. That's what else waved at ten. Thirty Andrew comes back from his bank job and he finds the house is locked. That's ten thirty. Am by the way he left for work at nine market. Yeah so he starts going with commute. Last check just shows up. Yup still a banker and everybody Dr for families who just employs a so. He starts going to each door outside and it's latched from the inside. So he can't get it in. The maid goes over and unlocks the door. And she hears lizzy laughing from the upstairs and this would be odd because the stepmother's body at this point is in full view of anyone upstairs. The made is super tired after letting the DAD washing the windows for an hour and a half so she goes upstairs to take a nap. She's got a great job to man. Eighteen th the the made like goes upstairs sees the body bet- after a snooze taking fifteen though taking out that that the maid's quarters were away from the body so she had no opportunity to so like weirdly at their house had a had to two stairways. That went upstairs. A bedroom for for Lizzie in the front. The data and the brighter and back. And there's a door connects the two but it's nailed shot so it's really crazy. This is like a fucking house of horrors and then the guest bedroom was in the front by Lizzie. So that's where she went up. You couldn't actually get to the back of the house so I didn't want to say that you didn't just up. See The dead bribery. Like fucking engines doctored. I don't care. Washing windows is hard. Lizzy version of the events is a bit different. She greeted her dad in the sitting room and told him that. Her stepmom Abbey was off visiting a sick friend and she took her dad's boots off and he laid down for a nap at ten thirty. A M hatchet in that for later. Anyway she she then says. She went out to the barn to look for sinkers for fishing trip. She was planning okay. Is there anyone else here? Hung up just like the weird image of Lizzie popping off dad's boots and then putting them to bed was he a toddler toddler less because he only worked for an hour. Now a gal six hundred ten world shoes all the way to the bank. The back again. Maggie wakes up to lizzie screaming. And this is a quote Maggie. Come quick father's dead. Someone came in and killed him and quote. She runs downstairs. Maggie Stares sees the dad with his boot still on sort of half sitting half lying all debt on the couch he was hit in the face and it cut his is in half and then he was killed instantly and then he was hitting nine or ten more times with a quote from the window. Pedia article hatchet like the Western unquote so a hatchet are. They're hatching week. I guess I'm pretty sure we can tell which version of the story is true based on whether the corpse had boots on or not necessarily. We're detail the hang your lie but the police were called and they showed up probably. They determined that the murder upstairs happened between nine. Thirty and ten. Am from the blood. Congealing okay. Yeah I'm not going to go and put a lot of stock you're in the forensic science. Yeah time period. Doctor and Barber are the same word about a twenty minute. Window for Andrew's murderers so between ten fifty and eleven ten because when they arrived he was actually still bleeding so they round up suspects. The first suspects of the day did not include Lizzy But that would soon change all right. Well all the dead already happened. So what could possibly be interesting enough to carry the last half of this episode out on the other side of? Apropos of nothing. I think that's presumptuous that. You thought carry the first half.

Abby lizzy Lizzie Front of House murder Andrew Abbey Paschi Maggie John Morris Liz Maggie Stares TA Barber Maggie Sullivan bribery
"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Hello and welcome to citation needed. The podcast where we choose the subject. Read a single article about it on Wikipedia and pretend we're experts because this is the Internet and that's how it works now I know and I'll be asking the questions tonight but I'll need some accomplices. First up the man who pushed a clever cleaver see-saw being one of the sharpest people on citation media is like getting the award for most outstanding tumor. It's no they. Give to the tumor. That sticks out the furthest. Yeah also joining us as the man who puts the blind sling blade or these haters Radina. Same Oil as animal last but certainly not least man who puts the lush back in French. Flush Tab lush because they don't shave down there that's a big no. It's because of my drinking and I don't shave. I prefer verdant before we get to the juicy bits. I want to thank our patriots. Were mega this show possible. They're fucking awesome. If you'd like to learn how to be fucking awesome to stick around to the show with that out of the way. Tell us what person place thing concept phenomenon or event. What would be talking about today? Well thanks to patrons Suzanne and D. We'll be talking about Lizzie. Borden alright seasonal. You read the article. Are you ready to Feign? A little expertise. With this level of patronage the expertise required is partly reading a wikipedia article. So yeah all right okay. All right So where does the story of Lizzie borden being? Let's start by talking about lizzy. Daddy are you my fucking therapist. I told you everybody has that dream. That dream dreams Lizzie. His father was Andrew and his family was pretty wealthy but he was not awarded. Any kind of head start fund. He did eventually after some hardships. As a young man become quite affluent. He made most of his fortune in property development textile mills in banks after getting his start in furniture making and casket construction. I was GONNA write in here interesting but then I realized that everyone makes money off of the funeral. Industry eventually dies hate to be. I mean I really do hate to be the no but everyone who makes money not just off the funeral industry. They they also don't that's that's that's true. So eventually lizzy is. Dad was low. Nah Dad's am I at the time of his death. He was the equivalent of a multimillionaire. But he didn't live like his house was not in the most fashionable neighborhood. Most of the rich people built in the hill section of Fall River Massachusetts. The boarding house was still in a good area. But just not the best. Is it just me or is consciously trying not to piss off a listener? Who Lives in that neighborhood right now so okay? The House also lacked some accommodations. Like indoor plumbing or electricity. What that even the middle class people has commonplace items in their home. So Andrew was known as a Frugal Penny pincher type and no indoor plumbing. That's not the only thing he was pension Jesusa later. What they say about real estate location is everything but I think they usually say this assuming you already have a coin would like toilets are the I i. It really is like how who is only known as a Frugal Penny pitcher. But when someone asks you if you no longer want to have your house filled with buckets of Shit and your answer is to ask the price you are of Ruge Penny. That's a it's a good label. Andrew was married to Sarah and they had three children. Emma Alice and Lizzy there ten years between their youngest and their oldest their middle child. Alice died at two years old and five years later when Lizzie is to her mother dies now. Lizzie was close to her older sister. Emma an Ama- was something of a mother. Figure to young Lizzie. Really let the way to the acts through the work for you lizzy there you go you got it. I love you. Include the dead middle sister. That doesn't this story at all the case. This story wasn't Saturn. He had it on both ends with the sadness. When Lizzie is five? Her Dad remarries. A woman named Abby Grey. Abbey was thirty at the time and came from a family that was not doing as well as the boards. It is suspected that Abby married Andrew for the money Lizzie and her new step. Mom were not on the best terms and young Lizzie referred to her stepmother as MS borden. Okay sure that doesn't sound very warm. But let's the late eighteen. Hundreds children were basically like small. Meet Tokens that you feed into industrial machine was born in the wrong. So many meet Tokens now during her young life. Lizzy is very jealous of her rich relatives. They're living the life. Which at the time was running a bath from tap. Instead of heating the Water. On a stone lizzy actually starts shoplifting. Early years and it becomes such a normal occurrence that the local store warns the workers just to let her go. And Billard Dad later. Conversely lizzy is also a churchgoer throughout her life. She eventually winds up teaching Sunday school. I know she's bitching about not being like running water rich but like her she is steel stuffing bill me for it later rich. So she's doing okay she is and I'm just over here trying to figure out how indoctrinating kids with Christian religions is converse to be a thief. Lizzy also gets into their step mom over money to at one point. Her father up in gives his wife a house like a different house than the one he already was. It is yes. He owns several properties. None of them with the wife and lets her sister. Stay there. The two kids Lizzie and Emma confront the father about it realizing the best thing you can do in that situation is buy your way out of trouble. Andrew basically gives his kids a property for a dollar than they sell the property. Back to the dad for five thousand dollars and I know you're what you're probably thinking here. Why not just move out and go into the new digs? Oh actually I was thinking why not? Just give the kids five thousand dollars real estate transaction. I suspect it's probably for Texas anyway. Why not just move out of the new digs well? It's an eighteen ninety. Two and women didn't live alone until their parents died back then but they were allowed to turn over real estate investment with the monopoly money. Their Dad can't base money on that and that was nice but the real fortune came where they sold the how I made five hundred thousand percent profit selling real estate. Actually before we get into the gruesome deaths of PA borden and his lovely bride. I just want to talk about some dead birds. Everything okay home see so in. May of eighteen ninety two before the whole property. Takes these backseats thing. Her Dad killed a bunch of pigeons in the barn with the hatchet. And I guess pigeons back then were flightless and legless and this guy was just fucking money with a small ass. In any case lizzy had just recently built a rooster for pigeons. And this is one of those just throwing them like John. Access this way and that and I literally. I don't know how you kill fucking kill white ones you line up on a string for you. You just shows up to those fucking stupid acts throwing places that are popping beverage like I got this. I believe this shit. Jesus it's unbelievable anyway. He murders a bunch of pigeons but Lizzie had just recently built a roost for pigeons. And this is one.

Lizzie borden Lizzy Andrew Emma Alice French Abby Grey Ruge Penny Suzanne Fall River Massachusetts shoplifting Texas John Ama Abbey PA Sarah
Creating Inclusive Campuses

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

09:39 min | 1 year ago

Creating Inclusive Campuses

"Over the last. Few decades minority enrollment at America's colleges and universities has increased exponentially these institutions many which are still predominantly white. Both in students faculty administration like to tout enrollment rates as evidence of their commitment to racial diversity but to these numbers tell the whole story with black students still experiencing discrimination on campus and with hate crimes drastically on the rise these institutions of higher education. Are they doing enough to address? The problem. Harsh students affected by their experiences. There and what would it take to achieve not just diversity but meaningful inclusion for students of? Hi I'm Lizzie. Getty Erlich and this is the scholars strategy network. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem of one of the nation's top researchers without jargon in this episode. I spoke to Dr but Delia Richards. She's an associate professor of sociology at the University of Richmond. Here's our conversation Dr Richards. Thanks FOR COMING ON NO JARGON. Thank you very much. I'm happy to be year and so you wrote a brief for us. Then it's currently on your page on our website on how predominantly white college campuses can become more inclusive of black students. And I I want to spend some time talking about that today but just to start off. Tell us what made you interested in this particular topic and then in writing this brief you know you are a professor at a university. Our most of our members. But you're really studying what the university structure itself looks like. So I I have a five year old. She just turned six and last year. When I was on sabbatical one of the things that I did was to take a look at some private schools In the Richmond Virginia area and one of the schools that I took a look at were to Montessori schools. I think that they would fit her personality very well. And what I noticed with these Montessori schools is that at least a third because what is my sociology hat and I had a little notebook and was like taking notes. And I'm agendas. If I was doing participant observation I was kind of. I was literally counting. Like how many Students of color black students in these classes. Because for me as a mom right. It's really important for my daughter to be space. She feels like she belongs right arm and feels represented so anyway about a third of the classes kindergarten classes that I visited Were students of color. Which is amazing. That's not what I was expecting and you weren't. You weren't expecting it because of the demographics of your area or because of the nature of private schools or because of the nature of Private Schools Right. But you know my point though is that while about a third of the classes worse color only one of these students were black just one and so that's really gets at the heart of. Why right this kind of policy brief? I'm also going to kind of connect that to some of the work that sociologists have done about the role and function of blackness in the United States. And how how blackness fits in what we call the racial hierarchy. Like you know who we think Is that the top in the is the dominant group and who is kind of the most stigmatized and so one of the things that sociologists have written about is the way in which even immigrants white immigrants in particular have. Distance have become white by distancing themselves from blacks right or from blackness. And My colleague. Bill Bashar trailer has also written about this in her book ethnic project where she shows not just white immigrants but also other people of color on that the strategy that they've used to either make it into whiteness. Or at least you know proximity to whiteness. If from distancing themselves from blackness right and so there's definitely is you know the fact that historically Blackness has played this particular role and function within American Society of allowing people to know like who should they? You know does the. Where's the bottom? And who should I kind of distance myself from if I don't want to be treated like black people and so you know? Black people then have really felt the brunt force right of white supremacy and like racism in American society as a whole and we also see that reduced on college campuses and in kindergarten classroom kindergarten classes right and so one of you know at one final thing that out. Also WanNa say that one of the ways we also see especially going back to the kindergarten classroom also replicated is is in language right and so the concept of people of Color has become much more utilize outright and political terminology and in has its roots really like political solidarity across racial ethnic groups but one of the ways that I've seen it being used as you know folks might really mean to say black like they're talking about black people but instead of saint black people they say people of Color and so you know there's this evasiveness of like not wanting to talk about black people black people issues and things that are specific to black people and so this policy grief in some ways is a way of addressing this invasiveness. Because if you can't talk about it and you can't address it and to just add very quickly to what it also does is going back to the kindergarten example places like those private schools visited. They tout and they did when I was there like. We are super diverse. We are super inclusive. And then I'm like well. What does that mean for right? And then even when asked questions kind of follow up questions about what that means because to them that's just about like celebrating ethnicity so when asked questions about what what does that mean for my daughter to be in the space they would go to like me. Jamaican for example. Because I happened to mention that and how that celebrated now I don't have concerns about my daughter's ethnic background being celebrated can celebrate it at home. What I'm concerned about is how he's going to be treated as a black girl and being the only black girl in the school right and so that's also what the language of you know kind of clearly of color using appropriately does it allows you. To not focusing focus in on the ways in which anti-black this manifest right and how that impacts and excludes like black people in the US. So let's tell us about anti black racism on campus and in college students day to day lives. Yeah so you know how how does manifest in manifest in what's called hostile ratio climates. What does that mean? Any way? experiencing racial microaggressions. You know From professors from other students right. And let's pause really quick to define microaggressions because that's a useful. I think for people to know what we're talking about so you think about When we think about racism I think a lot of folks. Think about these big kind of someone calling you the N. Word and You know white supremacists than Salon and the term microaggressions really allow us to think about the every the ways in which raises them as experienced an every day basis and kind of small experiences that kind of invalidate on and make us feel small rights for example and. This is not a student example. This is more kind of like a faculty example being in a hiring committee where we're talking about being you know applying diverse being diverse and inclusive in our hiring practices and having a colleague say well. I don't want to. I don't want to sacrifice. Excellence and quality for diversity like as if somehow bring in black and brown people into a space automatically means that. Is that sacrificing that like. That's laser micro aggression. I've had conversations with students in my classes this semester. One student talked about Having conversation with a white professor where she opened up and was vulnerable about why she was afraid to talk in class and that she experiences where you know she's experienced racism from our professor is going to undermine kind of minimizing her experiences with racism. And this professor said to her. I don't see race. The classic everyone out there who feels like Sega and so here. We have the student who is opening up to a professor to say. This is why I see in your class. This is why I don't talk. I don't want you know because of the negative experiences that have had kind of targeted in the past That's why I feel not safe enough to talk your class. And she's opening up right onto this person. Dispersants basically invalidating that experience. I don't see like race. I don't see that's like I don't see you You know where you know. That could very well have endured some. You know insensitive statements from that very professor so that means that. You're not even willing to acknowledge that. Think about the ways in which you own accents might be detrimental to the students. You're not even open to saying I've never thought about that before these things it's also had students talk to me about you know coming into a classroom and no one sitting next to them right like all. The White Students Guide finding space with other folks but not sitting next to them. And I have to say that I have faculty of also said that about being in faculty faculty meetings and sitting down and the White Faculty like you know. Forty them like the plague but this is about students in any case. So there's there's there's not students licensed in particular maybe not wanting to work with them on projects or you can stay work with them on projects they see them outside of class. Act like they. You know they're invisible

Professor United States Associate Professor Of Sociolo White Faculty Getty Erlich Richmond Virginia University Of Richmond Delia Richards Dr Richards American Society Sega Bill Bashar Salon
"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

Haunted Places

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> now converted <Speech_Male> to a combination <Speech_Music_Male> bed and breakfast <Speech_Male> and museum. <Speech_Male> The former board <Speech_Male> and home is a popular <Speech_Male> destination for Ghost. <Speech_Male> Hunters and <Speech_Male> true crime enthusiasts. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The tour guides have <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a campy but <Speech_Male> informative take <Speech_Male> the information. <Speech_Male> They allow <Speech_Male> guests to pose with <Speech_Male> a rubber hatchet <Speech_Music_Male> on a couch <Speech_Male> in the parlor. That <Speech_Male> is a near perfect <Speech_Male> lookalike for the <Speech_Male> crime scene photo. <Speech_Male> Andrew Gordon <Speech_Male> on the anniversary <Speech_Male> of the murders <Speech_Male> the BNB <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> hosts live <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> re-enactors. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Playing the police <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or an agitated. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Bridget <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trying to avoid reporters. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The staff go <Speech_Music_Male> home after their <Speech_Music_Male> two hour night tour <Speech_Music_Male> leaving the <Speech_Male> guests to linger <Speech_Male> socialize <Speech_Male> and ghost <Speech_Music_Male> hunt to their hearts <Speech_Music_Male> content. <Speech_Male> They can even use <Speech_Male> the houses we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> board which <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> has an enigmatic <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> history of its <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> own. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's rumored to have <Speech_Male> been returned after <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> being stolen a few <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> years ago with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a note reading. <Speech_Music_Male> Please <Speech_Music_Male> make it stop <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> while the national <Speech_Male> press may have been <Speech_Male> lizzy side. <Speech_Male> The tide turned almost <Speech_Male> immediately in <Speech_Male> fall. River <Speech_Male> people refuse <Speech_Male> to attend church with <Speech_Male> her and children <Speech_Male> frequently rang. <Speech_Male> Her Doorbell will lead <Speech_Male> to run away. Giggling <Speech_Male> and terror <Speech_Male> at having completed <Speech_Male> their friends days <Speech_Male> she <Speech_Male> was frequently overcharged <Speech_Male> by store. <Speech_Male> Owners and <Speech_Male> local newspapers <Speech_Male> wrote mocking articles <Speech_Male> on the anniversary <Speech_Male> of her father and <Speech_Male> step up his deaths <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> one point suggesting <Speech_Male> that Lucy's name <Speech_Male> was officially cleared. <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Male> the cause of death <Speech_Male> was really <Speech_Male> heatstroke. <Speech_Male> Lizzy <Speech_Male> seems to have taken <Speech_Male> it all in stride. <Speech_Male> Renaming <Speech_Male> herself Lisbeth <Speech_Male> and living in fall <Speech_Male> river for the remainder <Speech_Male> of her life <Speech_Male> spending <Speech_Male> as lavishly as she'd <Speech_Male> hoped to <Speech_Music_Male> what her father was alive. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> She left her Sunday <Speech_Male> school days. Behind <Speech_Male> and befriended <Speech_Male> or perhaps <Speech_Male> dated <Speech_Male> famous actress <Speech_Male> Nance O.`Neil <Speech_Male> she hosted <Speech_Male> Raucous Parties <Speech_Male> Finances Theater <Speech_Male> Company at her and <Speech_Male> her sisters Garish <Speech_Male> new home <Speech_Music_Male> which they called. <Speech_Music_Male> Maple CROFT <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> EMMA. Board <Speech_Male> let the home abruptly <Speech_Male> in nineteen o five <Speech_Male> after remarking <Speech_Male> that she found the <Speech_Male> newly Bohemian <Speech_Male> atmosphere in the <Speech_Music_Male> house unbearable. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The borden <Speech_Music_Male> sisters never spoke <Speech_Male> again <Speech_Male> and Emma passed away. <Speech_Male> Nine days <Speech_Male> after Lizzie did <Speech_Music_Male> on June. First <Speech_Music_Male> Nineteen ninety-seven <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> lizzy sustained <Speech_Music_Male> would have been worth over <Speech_Music_Male> three point. Five <Speech_Music_Male> million dollars today. <Speech_Male> Her <Speech_Male> will include <Speech_Male> a donation to the <Speech_Male> city of Fall River. <Speech_Male> In order <Speech_Male> to provide for Andrew <Speech_Male> Gordon's grave <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as well as over <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thirty thousand <Speech_Male> dollars to the Animal <Speech_Male> Rescue League <Speech_Male> in her will <Speech_Male> lizzy wrote. <Speech_Male> I've been <Speech_Male> fond of animals <Speech_Male> and their need is crate <Speech_Male> and there are <Speech_Male> so few who <Speech_Music_Male> care for them <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in her book. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The trial of let's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> see borden cover. <Speech_Male> Robertson quotes <Speech_Male> Nathaniel. Hawthorne's <Speech_Male> The scarlet <Speech_Male> letter to address. <Speech_Male> The question <Speech_Male> of wine lizzy <Speech_Male> would stay in the town <Speech_Male> that it made her a pariah. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's a fatality <Speech_Male> of feeling <Speech_Male> so irresistible <Speech_Male> and inevitable <Speech_Male> that it has the force <Speech_Male> of doom which <Speech_Male> almost invariably <Speech_Male> compels human <Speech_Male> beings to linger <Speech_Male> around and haunt <Speech_Male> ghost like <Speech_Male> the spot <Speech_Male> where some great and <Speech_Male> marked event <Speech_Male> has given color to <Speech_Male> your lifetime <Speech_Male> and still <Speech_Male> the more irresistibly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the darker <Speech_Male> tinge <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Music_Male> sadness it <Music> <Music>

"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

Haunted Places

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

"The heat soaked into Abbey Skin and she felt her body was going to burst. Summers and fall. River weren't meant to be this hot but she did her best under the circumstances. She always did her best. Her Stepchildren refused to speak to her most of the time but she got by. Lizzie had recently moved from referring to abby with a strange cold an informal reading of mother to refer to a slightly less disturbing but still distant MRS borden. It did not even matter that both step children were allowed to make decisions usually reserved for the Lady of the House Abbey had been built to endure hardship. She could withstand this. She had a decent allowance and she truly believed that she had Andrews affection even if he refused to wear wedding band instead he wore a small gold. Bring that Lizzie. Had given him as she did not comment. It wasn't her place still abby resolved to endure the stifling summer heat and the icy stare of Lucy's gaze as she went about her chores setting the household to rights. She may not have in charge of this family but she was still a part of it. Abby asked Lizzy if she was willing to set the table looking much more like a child but a thirty two year old should couldn't Maggie do it. She asked referring to the families. Irish made abby politely explained that bridget was working outside. She never understood. Why lizzie and Emma so insisted on calling bridget. By their previous mate's name but it made her extremely uncomfortable. Lizzy nodded her head. Curtly her smile was sickly as she went to the cupboard and got the plates and cutlery while lizzie worked in the dining room abby tended to their dinner. Swordfish wasn't the most desirable meal in this heat but it was what they had. Andrew was frugal with the accounts and he would appreciate them using leftovers rather than heading to the butcher. She sprinkled some dried herbs on top. Before letting it warm over on an open fire. A clatter came from the other room. Abby left the comfort of the kitchen to ask your stepdaughter what happened. She rounded the corner and came face to face with lizzie holding a knife upraised pile of shattered China on the floor. Abby took a deep breath she calmly asked Lizzy to explain what had happened. Lizzy said she had seen someone peeking through the windows. She meant only to scare them off at knocked over the plates and the process abby. Step closer to Lizzie. Removing the knife from the other woman's hands reassuring her that it was all right even though she felt something other than fear radiating from her step daughter's body Epi used her apron as a makeshift basket. Picking up the pieces of broken ceramic off the floor when abby had collected each and every piece. She tried to address lizzy again but her stepdaughter was gone. Abby put the jagged pieces into the Dust Bin and went back to the kitchen. Lizzy was prodding. The swordfish abby asked her to leave well enough alone and continue to set the table. Lizzy stared at her for a long moment. Her Eyes inscrutable.

Abby Lizzie Lizzy MRS borden River Lucy Abbey Skin Andrew House Abbey Summers bridget Dust Bin Maggie China Irish Emma
"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

Haunted Places

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Haunted Places

"On August fourth eighteen ninety two sixty nine year old Andrew Gordon and his wife abby or found dead in their home in Fall River Massachusetts. They've both been hacked to death with a hatchet to the point that their faces were unrecognisable. He was killed in the parlor in the middle of a mid morning nap while his wife appeared to have been attacked in the second floor. Guest bedroom Andrew's youngest daughter. Thirty two year old Sunday schoolteacher Lizzie. Borden was tried for the crime but found not guilty. What are the trials of the century? Lizzy story has inspired everything from nursery rhymes to a lifetime television series the site of the board murders. A three floor house at what was then ninety. Two second street is now a bed and breakfast. You can take a two hour night tour of the home and sleep. In the bedroom where abby borden was murdered fall river was in its Golden Age in eighteen ninety two known as the spindle city for its many textile mills. Andrew Jackson borden invested in several of these mills and was the head executive of one of the town's largest banks a carpenter and coffeemaker turn self-made business owner. At the time of his death his estate was valued at three hundred thousand dollars or over eight point three million dollars in two thousand nineteen despite his wealth. Andrew Gordon was a famously tight fisted mad. He refused to pay for the house to be renovated for electricity and indoor plumbing and was rumored to a cut the feed off of corpses to save money on wood for his coffins Andrews. I twice Sarah gave him two daughters. Who SURVIVED INFANCY EMMA? Leonora and Lizzie. Andrew Borden Sarah passed away when Emma was twelve due to uterine congestion. Andrew quickly remarried in the interest of providing a mother for his two daughters but Emma had promised her mother that she would take care of Lizzie. Both girls viewed their new stepmother thirty seven year old abby gray as an interloper and verbally abused her when they weren't giving her the silent treatment is it any wonder why many of the citizens of Fall River suspected the emotional violence became physical.

abby borden Andrew Borden Sarah Andrew Gordon Andrew Lizzie Emma Fall River Massachusetts abby gray Fall River abby Lizzy Leonora business owner executive
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 1 year ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
Former 'Jeopardy!' contestants share their experiences on the show

Slate's The Gist

05:27 min | 1 year ago

Former 'Jeopardy!' contestants share their experiences on the show

"For the last couple of nights on prime time television and extending who knows how long jeopardy has jeopardy. It's a game show answer in the form of question staged the greatest of all time tournament and I think this is a case where the contestants really do live up up to that title. Brad Rutter the all time winningest contestant in jeopardy history Ken Jennings who blazed a trail of glory when they changed the rules to allow people to win for as long as they win and James Holes. How're all face off in an interestingly formatted and much harder version one of your favorite answer and question show joining me? Now are returning champions or a returning champion. Justin Peters who writes for slate he was well. I'll read you the headline of one of my favorite articles. He's ever written. I got a second chance on who wants to be a millionaire. Last year I became one of the biggest losers in gameshow history going back with terrifying. Justin knows gameshows. Hello Justin. It's me and Lizzie leary. Who is the host of of slates? podcast what next. TB An old friend of mine and a jeopardy contestant. Hello Lizzy Hello Mike. I'm jeopardy contestant into jeopardy real jeopardy honest to God civilian jeopardy tell me about your jeopardy nece I was on Washington power player jeopardy in two thousand twelve thing. I don't know if it's still living but it was a thing. It's like celebrity jeopardy but for politics and media people a- Ah so if Washington is like Hollywood for ugly people what's power play jeopardy jeopardy refer. I know you were on it. You're better looking than almost everyone else else. On jeopardy isn't on television aired on television. Yeah Yeah in twenty you play your opponents. I played against Chris. Matthews and Robert Gibbs now Chris Matthews doesn't like anyone else to get a word in edgewise. Did that affect gameplay. I mean I think it affected the banter with Alex and getting and Gibbs. He's a former White House. Press Secretary Presser because he's pretty smart smart smart guy. And how did your go. I want to be clear that going into final jeopardy. I was winning by a lot too. So I'm they're on the the measurements that matter. Yeah I was. I may not have the best bedding strategy. Fine did you get final jeopardy right we we all got it wrong. Oh Oh I had like a slightly more aggressive than Robert who liked bet very little dinky amount that might have been the best bedding strategy because you had to cover all in right and you just have to Eke past you. So in that case actually the person in second place will almost always have the advantage. I had to cover like what if he goes all in and gets to this point. Okay and just for like one real. I don't know horrible footnote. The answer her the question the question was who is Bill Cosby we all whiffed. Oh Wow yeah. What was the question? The you mean the answer. I don't know what this celebrity won an emmy. The Mark Twain Prize and the Spin Garn metal right updated today serving garden given by the end. Tapie we all look like a bunch of really clueless white people which we were well and if you updated for today and is now serving ten to thirty in Philadelphia Correctional Institution almost unfair. And just do you watch jeopardy all the time Yeah as much as I can that I'm a man who has not but yeah a little bit. Yeah you guys excited for this show so exciting. What about it is just such a good idea? I mean jeopardy occupies Very unique place in sort of Pantheon of game shows and it's champions more so than any other game show are sort of known. People know them James Wholesaler throughout the first pitch at Wrigley Field. Glass Year So it is just a cool idea to take the three quantifiably most most successful players in the show's history. Pit Him against each other. Yeah and also they do tournaments of champions at tournaments of all time champions and you could say it's like the rock band who keeps claiming claiming that there never touring again and then does but with Alex tra- back having pancreatic cancer. This is going to come to an end and sadly it's going to come to an end fairly early soon so when they say this is the greatest of all time champion. This is the greatest of all time. It is like they were all wearing purple. Ribbons is that for him. Yeah let's talk a little bit about Alex Trebek's I understand that he. I have critiqued him over the years. I think that especially in the QA in a sections. I mean let's unite. QNA's I mean he's a game show. Host is not an interviewer and he it comes across the he doesn't care with his to go to sentiments. which are good for you and I'm not going? There says that one a lot so yeah I understand like what he does is a skill skill and he's obviously good at it but the fact that he is battled cancer and came back from it. And there's this this whole outpouring of Love I. I think it's deserved. I can't I can't find fault in that jeopardy fans are loving and miss already missing al now not at all. I think it's okay. I'm good with

Justin Peters Alex Trebek Robert Gibbs Pancreatic Cancer Chris Matthews Brad Rutter James Holes Ken Jennings White House Washington Bill Cosby Secretary Presser Lizzy Mark Twain Prize Philadelphia Correctional Inst James Wholesaler Alex Tra Lizzie Leary Wrigley Field
Rookie NFL player pays off layaway debts for 60 people

AP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Rookie NFL player pays off layaway debts for 60 people

"Rookie NFL players paid the layaway debts for five dozen people at a store in Florida you Lizzie's Gilbert a linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers paid off thousands of dollars that sixty people owed on lay away at a Burlington coat factory at the shady oaks shopping center in Ocala Florida Gilbert graduated from a local high school and said he got the idea when he saw other professional athletes paying off layaway debts on social media mark Shipman the store's manager said Gilbert actions were special shipment told the caller star banner that Gilbert was doing it for the right reasons out of the kindness of his heart

Florida Gilbert NFL Pittsburgh Steelers Burlington Mark Shipman
Harry and Meghan Share Never-Before-Seen Wedding Photo for Their Engagement Anniversary

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Harry and Meghan Share Never-Before-Seen Wedding Photo for Their Engagement Anniversary

"Joined by I. Ice voyles producer. Lizzie Robinson this week. Going to be helping me navigate. What has been quite chaotic busy week week? It has been of course as we record this. The Sussex is far away. They are on their on their break right up until Christmas Christmas and send that they celebrated Thanksgiving privately with a close family which is lovely and amazing to think. This year was the celebration Asian of their two years then outside engagement I know I saw post Harry and Meghan shed new photo from an an outtake from one of their wedding photos taken by Lexie. Leave a Mirsky on their instagram account this week and it just reminded me how long is being since that day. The I remember driving at a very fast but legal fees from Oxford because I was out of London at the time and we got the confirmation that they're engaged in about ten o'clock in that and then they had that you take cool a couple of hours later in the sunken garden at Kensington Palace. Bitterly Italy cold But Yeah Lot's happened since then

Lizzie Robinson Kensington Palace I. Ice Producer Sussex Instagram Oxford Meghan London Italy Harry Two Years
The Hazards of Making Movies About Real People

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:19 min | 1 year ago

The Hazards of Making Movies About Real People

"The I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as many of the Hollywood reporter and Matt has come up. Many times in Hollywood does what it loves to do which is to make make movies and particularly awards season movies based on real people that controversy follows and we're seeing more or less at the same moment to different controversies sees. One of them involves Clint Eastwood's new movie Richard Jewel. which according to the Hollywood reporter's awards reporter Scott Feinberg up ends the Academy Me Awards race? It's it's GonNa be very very popular. He thinks with hatemi members in numerous categories. I'm assuming that probably includes picture but in this movie Richard Jewel. Joel this is about the security guard who tried to warn about the Olympic Park bombing back in Nineteen ninety-six a real event. He is portrayed in this movie. Of course he. He was excused of having been involved with the bombing. He was completely innocent and his life was M- very damaged by this. But I'll tell you what life is being damaged now day day in this movie have character a woman reporter who Allegedly in the movie sleeps with a source with an FBI source to get a story about about this and this person this real life person whose name is used. Kathy scruggs is dead and cannot speak up. I mean this is an outrageous thing to accuse as a reporter of that is a firing offense as you know if you were to get wind of one of your people at the Hollywood reporter sleeping with the source to get stuff and I will tell you in my life there. There have been occasional offers. But that's not something that real reporters do and the editor of the Atlanta Journal Constitution where this person worked is objecting to this and I will just now. This is a Clint Eastwood movie. Clint Eastwood is clearly very conservative. Possibly part of the trump you know the reporters play reporters are fake news world and I honestly Kinda Hope. This becomes the controversy. Because I think it's outrageous. Well it's also part and parcel of the film this. This is an indictment according to the reviews that have come out of both the FBI and the media and how they handled this situation with Richard Jewel. And I don't I don't think anyone is saying that this was the finest moment for either of those institution absolutely not but it does cross the line there to suggest that a reporter did something like this and it's also a trope like you've seen this in other things with sally field. I'll never forget it. I was like well. Paul Newman hard to resist about. We don't do this right and even more recently. If you look at the character in house of cards played by Kate Mara her relationship with Kevin Spacey. Right if you look even Amy Schumer in trainwreck. I mean that was. She was sleeping with the subject of her story. So this is like a trope that comes back and and I am not what a female journalist but I see how deeply offensive this is And also not necessary like you. Don't need it's Lizzie. And let me just turn quickly to this apple premier. You know apple is trying to plunge into this world. It's been a bumpy ride. We've talked about. They have this movie. The banker they were going to have a premier they cancelled it. Why did they cancel it because the son of the subject and the stories about a black man who this is a real story again of who recruited a white man to front for his financial business sixty years ago before the Civil Rights Act? This is a real story. But they have been using this guy. Son is the sky named Bernard Garrett Junior to promote the movie and IT Turns Out Bernard Garrett has a couple of half sisters who say that this guy had sexually molested them for years ears and this has now blown up. It's a different kind of hazard. Apple acquired this film. But when you don't vet things carefully this hazard that can happen. Yeah that's an interesting question because apple bought this movie after it was already made and neither apple nor the filmmakers knew about this controversy until about a week peak before the premiere and obviously the allegations are very specifically time. But now they've got to figure out what to do with this movie. That has this. Explosive allegation dropped their wives. Yeah I mean I just saved. Proceed with caution when you're doing true real life stories and I think it's a cheap out to Take on someone who's dead and can't speak up. Thank you thank

Reporter Apple Clint Eastwood Hollywood Richard Jewel FBI Amy Schumer Scott Feinberg Kim Masters Olympic Park Kathy Scruggs Atlanta Journal Bernard Garrett Junior Kate Mara Matt Joel Richard Jewel. Bernard Garrett Paul Newman
"lizzie" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Murder Minute

"This is dan done the host of what we're drinking with dan done on the latest episode we can get deep dive into america's native spirit bourbon with my very special guest tiffany thesis that's right got the throwback whiskey we kelly hausky and it turned out to be everything. Young me could have possibly dreamed of and more. Did you see see some of my alcohol is actually getting a little low and you do have some bottles that are saying let down into my dressing room. I don't let a lot of men in my dressing. This is where i do all my podcasts dressing all completely innocent. I swear also in the latest episode details on how to win a pair of passes to the bourbon beyond mm festival in kentucky next month featuring foo fighters robert plant hall notes joan jett john fogerty and lots of other old people plus. I'll be there with tiffany tiffany thiessen for real. Come drink with us so check out what we're drinking. I'm dan dan reminding you. That drinking can cause memory loss or even worse memory loss. Welcome to murder minute today. The story of lizzie bordon continues what i your true crime headlines a self-described white nationalist nationalist is behind bars facing charges of aggravated menacing and telephone communication harassment after a video he posted on instagram caught the the attention of police twenty year old james patrick reardon of youngstown ohio uploaded a video to his instagram account on july eleventh. The video shows reardon shooting a gun into the darkness with the sounds of screams and sirens wailing in the background. The video was captioned optioned. Police identified the youngstown jewish family community shooter as local white nationalist shameless overburden and the geo location for the video was set to the jewish community center of youngstown ohio. The attack depicted in the video never happened but police took the threat seriously and arrested reared in last week the day before his arrest authorities searched the home of reardon parents where they seized weapons bulletproof armor and communication reared participated in the twenty seventeen unite the right rally in charlottesville he was interviewed at the rally as part of a national national geographic documentary that was being filmed in the documentary a then eighteen year old reardon speaks about his desire for a homeland homeland for white people he describes himself in the documentary as a white nationalist and a member of the alright reardon has pled not not guilty to the charges against him and is being held on two hundred fifty thousand dollars bail a texas man was arrested after he allowed his twelve year old daughter to drive an s._u._v. around an apartment parking lot and she crashed the vehicle striking and killing a man dan who was out walking his dogs police say that forty two year old thomas makiya toll allowed his twelve year old daughter to drive the black ford explorer around around the apartment complex. She was pulling out of a parking space when she pressed the accelerator and struck forty six year old and rica vasquez who was walking his dogs the car struck vasquez and one of his dogs and pinned the man to a tree he and the dog both died of their injuries initially mahia told police that he had been behind the wheel at the time of the accident but authorities later found out that his daughter daughter had been the one driving mahia was charged with child endangerment and criminal negligent homicide. Those are your true crime headlines up next part two of lizzie borden but first a quick break birthdays.

james patrick reardon dan dan youngstown rica vasquez lizzie bordon lizzie borden joan jett kelly hausky america ohio instagram kentucky murder ford charlottesville negligent homicide endangerment harassment texas twelve year
"lizzie" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Murder Minute

"But within two days of the murder papers all over the country began reporting evidence that lizzie bordon. You might have had something to do with her. Parents murders on saturday august sixth services were held for mr and mrs bordin who were buried at oak growth cemetery after the funeral the mayor informed lizzie that she was a suspect the next morning lucy's friend alice who had been by her friend side since the murders song busy in in the kitchen burning her blue corduroy dress in the stove lizzie claimed but the dress was covered in paint and that she had been meaning to dispose of it the following week lizzie borden was summoned to an inquest during her four hours examination. Lindsay's behavior under questioning was erotic often contradicting herself providing conflicting accounts of her whereabouts the morning of the murders she claimed to have been in the kitchen reading magazine when her father arrived home then and she claimed that she was in the dining room ironing handkerchiefs then that she was outside in the barn looking for lead sinkers for fishing trip then that she had spent twenty minutes outside eating pears she also claimed to have removed her father's thurs boots and put slippers on him. Despite police photographs clearly showing that andrew borden was wearing his boots at the time of his death. Lizzy even refused to answer some questions even though the answer was actually helpful to her case uh this confused testimony may have been the result of lizzie bordon having been prescribed regular doses uses of morphine to calm her nerves. Even dr bowen later agreed that his morphine prescription was likely to blame blame for lizzie bizarre account during the inquest but lucy's testimony was not the only evidence against her during the inquest. A druggist testified that the day before the murders lizzie had come into his pharmacy attempting to purchase <unk> a poison. She requested prussic acid. She claimed to clean a seal skin cape deep. They did not sell lizzy. The poison news.

lizzie bordon lizzie Lizzy morphine lucy murder Lindsay oak growth cemetery mrs bordin dr bowen twenty minutes four hours two days
"lizzie" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on 600 WREC

"But certainly not someone like Lizzie Bordon who ticks all the boxes of respectable feminine era Sunday school teacher at the local congregational church. Woman without a hint of scandal really up until that point to borrow, you know, to use the term, a spinster somebody who is considered almost non member of society, non player, and and yet, obviously for some people that there was he I mean, we can look at it and say, well, that's just that's so sexist that they could think that a woman couldn't do that that only a guy could do it. And that's part of what I think is still interest people is to think that she'd had enough, you know, that if she did do it, and we'll get into more that when we talk more about the the trial of Lizzie Borden is that if she did do it it represented a woman taking a stand a woman just brazenly doing something, which people thought women weren't many people in society thought women were not capable of. And that also ties back by the way into the growth of true crime in the nineteen twenties and thirties because true crime in America. This is part of what I was researching. It was really the first time that magazines of this sort featured female criminality, and they have hold the there were popular magazines called women in crime. And they were so shocking. People are so titillated by the idea that women could do these crimes, and it sort of reflected the dark side of where women were where we're women's independence led them to take a new position in society at nobody thought that that they're elevated role in society is independent people would also come along with the darker side of human nature, but the writers of true crime the editors of magazines, they got it right away. And they so they that's why they would often feature women on the cover holding guns because they were they were really into the story, even before sociologists were even covering women as criminals, which didn't really happen really until the forties and fifties. Yeah, that's fascinating. Because Lizzie Borden definitely benefits from the from the idea as you say that that woman like her just wouldn't have been capable of something like that, you know, poisoning was a different matter. But when it right picking up a hatchet or an act, and he can implement that would have required. The both the proximity in the force not to mention the gore that would have ensued that just seemed beyond a woman's capacity. So that so that she is the beneficiary of that in the course of the trial in a way that you know. I'm not sure that that if for example, her house housemaid. Also in the house at the time and could have been suspected of the crime, but for an alibi. Then I'm not sure that she would have benefited from quite that same assumption. A lack of capacity presumption of innocence based on gender or status. Yeah. That's interesting which also comes brings us back to another aspect of the case. And then coming up on coast to coast. We'll we'll tell the story the way in when we get into longer segment here next. Sort of the beginning. And then we'll get to the middle part. The the notion that there was this sort of psycho sexual aspect of the case, which in some cases were sort of unspoken, but has become a central theme that there could have been some sort of relationship some sort of. It's sort of a literary trope. It's kind of a obviously it's kind of a biased perception that somehow they must have been conspiring as lesbians to do this killing. And that that that's a way that some people could get around to thinking of Lizzie Borden as guilty is if she was involved in a a relationship with Bridget Sullivan, the made and that's become an ongoing thread in a discussion of Lizzie Bordon ever since. Yes. I think that that's that's it's partly it makes it a little more titillating. And it's also that there's a sense that the story just would be better. If there was a romance in it interesting.

Lizzie Bordon Lizzie Borden America school teacher gore Bridget Sullivan
"lizzie" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"State taxation. There's no question. All this one says is the federal level, and how about we'll also tax your diamonds in your yachts collection. Otherwise, accumulate wealth because there's a for me the fundamental fairness question here. Okay. Lizzy from now on she shall be known as Lizzy Lizzy. Here's my question. Lizzie Borden took an ax gave the wealthy forty whacks. When she saw what she had done gave more wealthy forty-one. That's what she wants. She wants to blow the wealthy. So Lizzie here's my question for you. I know you're smart went to Harvard. Lizzie apple in the first quarter is sitting on two hundred and forty five billion dollars in cash. Why don't you go to TIMMY, cook and say TIMMY were taken the two forty five. We're taking two hundred and forty five billion dollars in cash that you're sitting on right now apple is valued at nine hundred billion. Plus they could by tomorrow with cash warmer, WalMart, they could buy with cash, I think Berkshire Hathaway they can do amazing things. So you wanna go after rich people? I get it. And I understand that. But why do you wanna do it Lizzie because you grew up hardscrabble in Oklahoma, and you were denied opportunity and the only pathway forward was what junior college, and then college, and then you went to Princeton, and then you went to law school. And now, you're a professor at Harvard and somehow magically. Along the way, you have you ever you have a a a net worth of north of ten million dollars. How'd you do that from the hardscrabble life in Oklahoma Lizzy? And how would you like if somebody a little poorer than you came in and said, we're take it from you. Lizzie. Lizzy loser. Breadwinner will show him seven sixty talking. Breaking news Jim Sharpe out with Hitler. The small plane has gone down on the outskirts of oceanside closing highway seventy six in the area for several hours today. We'll have an update next AM seven sixty KFI MB, the eighty nine dollars special at Zerorez ends on Sunday. So if you've waited as me, I am a procrastinator. I'd say,.

Lizzy Lizzy Lizzie Borden Lizzie Lizzie apple Harvard Oklahoma TIMMY Berkshire Hathaway WalMart Jim Sharpe oceanside professor Hitler Princeton forty five billion dollars eighty nine dollars ten million dollars
"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Literally zero evidence to support that one that there seems to be based on the following to be based on Lizzie, giving her father a ring as a teenager, and it was the only article of jewelry he wore. He was buried with it that that's like the main evidence for this. Are you? What are you kidding me? He wore a ring. His daughter gave him so he must have been molesting her ridiculous out here. Lizzie bedroom, joined your parents bedroom, her bed was angled as to obstruct the doorway between them like she was trying to prevent them from getting in that or she just fucking that was the best place to put the bed. Lizzy kept her bedroom door locked at all times. Yeah, but so did Mr. MRs Borden someone call bullshit on that. It's possible in the way that we don't know what was going on behind closed doors there, like we don't know what was going on behind closed doors of any family, but no evidence there is another common theory that it was a murder suicide. Now, something to Andrew killed his wife with the hatchet for unknown reasons, and then unable to live with the guilt. You know, he then laid down while he's in shock on the couch and then hatchet it himself to death. Miraculously surviving the first self inflicted hatchet wounds whose own face is crazy to sounds not unprecedented a thirty seven year old man named Harold Baines killed himself with the hatchet in Erie, Pennsylvania in eighteen eighty eight after being suspected for stealing half a dozen rabbits from a neighbor. The previous day, the corner determined that herald survived the I seventeen blows to his own head before killing himself. He severed off both his ears, knocked his teeth out obliterated, both eyeballs, and then the next blow killed him. Now, I think that's true. I did read about it in a book written by artists foul or at least allegedly written by him as he claims on YouTube. So you know, it's got a true, it's got to be true. Now, get out of here. It's fucking crazy talk. Let's move along now to top five takeaways time. Time by away. Number one seventy year old, Andrew, and sixty four year old Abby Borden murder with the hatchet on the morning of August. Fourth, eighteen ninety two in their Fall River, Massachusetts home abbey was struck eighteen times in around the back of her head. Andrew was truck ten or possibly eleven times in the face. Number two, Andrew's thirty two year old daughter Lizzie was charged with the murders of her father and stepmother. She and live in maid Bridget were the only people known to be home at the time of the murders. Lizzie tried to buy cyanide the day before burn the dress. She was most likely wearing when the murders were reported gave a ton of conflicting testimony about where she was and what she was doing the morning of the murders. But she was acquitted number three. Despite what lunatic? Artemis, fowl asserts there was no axe or hatchet wielding serial killer on the loose and Fall River in eighteen ninety two for sure. There was another murder committed months later by someone who had never been to America when Andrew Abby were killed. Number four, maybe Lizzy didn't do it. Truly she was tried and found innocent and all the evidence that she did do it as her defense attorney pointed out at trial is circumstantial. However, there is a lot of circumstantial evidence, but you know, she wasn't found covered in blood known ones killings that we know of. So maybe innocent, but how come on and number five new info did Lizzie Borden stripped naked to commit the murders, then put address on that. Explain why there was two brutal murders of murders committed, but she wasn't found covering blood. Now this theory admittedly comes from Hollywood, the nineteen seventy-five movie legend of Lizzie Borden starring super sexy, bewitched actress. Elizabeth Montgomery forty-one at the time of filming showed Elizabeth getting naked to commit the murders. Well, it showed her getting naked as much as a made for TV nineteen seventy-five. ABC American movie could now why? Well, probably honestly, because. It was a great excuse to show as much of a Elizabeth Montgomery. Sexy skin is possible. Love Seventy-six humbled by the way the hair, the natural look. Fantastic. But could this have happened? I mean, sure. Why not? It would be much easier to wash blood off of your body then to get it off your clothes, maybe what Lizzy you know when she when she explained because you explained it's one point that there was a gravy stain on.

murder Andrew Abby Lizzy Lizzie Mr. MRs Borden Elizabeth Montgomery Abby Borden Fall River YouTube Harold Baines Pennsylvania Erie Massachusetts home abbey Bridget Andrew Hollywood America attorney thirty seven year one seventy year
"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Basically, unless you're wearing a lab coat or you work in a mine no reason to buy this poison unless you are trying to poison someone, another neighbor, Alice Russell testify that Lizzie was talking about poison. Now the night before the murders, you know, that was claimed Lizzy told her social visits issues, afraid or families being poisoned. Lot of poison talk feels like she's trying to plant seeds like, hey, you know, my fucking family dies just know that you know a lot of enemies. A lot of people wanna poison them diabolical. She really did that way. Alison said to Lizzie or said that Lizzie told me of a man that came to see her father said she heard him say. Say that she didn't see him, but her father say, I don't care to let my property his business. You know, we talked about that earlier. Told me of seen a man running around the house. One night when she went home, said she'd for said, and, and you know the bar and has been broken into twice. And this is interesting based on, we know about least one of the break ins that the burglar was very likely Lizzie herself. We don't know that a hundred percent, but it seems like it probably was her. So if true interesting for her to attribute this to some other possible murderer hanging around Alice said she told Lizzie, oh, well, you know, well, or excuse me, you know, well, that that was somebody after pigeons. There is nothing in there for them to go after. But pigeons while she says that they have broken into the house in broad daylight with Emma and Maggie in me there. And then she says, I have never heard of that before. She says, father forbade are telling it right father forbade telling it, I just I, I don't believe this and I don't believe that she would like not say Saudi because her father forbade it. I mean, she was a known shoplifter around town. I'm guessing you're also forbade her from stealing shit, but she still did that. Oh, but she's gonna keep this weird secret about a crime. That she actually in all likelihood probably committed. Alice was asked further questions by the prosecution they said, is there anything else you recall anything about burning in the house? She said, I feel as if I wanted to sleep with my eyes, half opened with one eye, open half the time for fear, they will burn the house down over us. What else? Anything else that occurs to you in the conversation? Oshii said, I'm afraid someone will do something, I don't know, but somebody will do something. I think that was the beginning. So she just talking a lot Lizzie is telling everybody she can, you know, who listened to her about someone might burn the house down or someone might poison them all this crazy constant, talk worried about her father's life. You know, reeks of someone premeditated murder, you know, especially she's Yoshi so worried about someone killing her father, but she has no idea who that person would be. How can mean it's very convenient to deplete have no to question about these mysterious people want to, you know, from the kill her dad because you know, she can't name them and she's probably I, I would think not naming them because you know she did name them, then they might have an alibi that would mess up. Story, and then Alice, you know, of course, also testify that Lizzie ripped up address days after the murder. Testified on that note, supposedly delivered a saying, MS Russell to go back again to the day, the homicide. Do you remember anything about a search for a note by anyone? Yes, sir..

Lizzie Alice Russell Lizzy murder Emma Oshii Alison Maggie hundred percent
"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"This is never revealed, which is incredibly suspicious. This had happened. Then Abby would have been at a friend's house writes that morning instead of the truth, which was she stayed home. Got murdered. So it seems like Lizzie lion's teeth when she talks about some mysterious messenger in a sick friend. That would never be revealed. Also, you know, Abby claim to spend a lot of time in the morning, the murders in the or I'm sorry, Lizzy compl- claim to spend a lot of time the morning of the murders in the barn behind the house where the pigeons used to be doing what like, who just hangs out in an abandoned pigeon coop investigators would examine the barn loft that hot August day in say that the heat was stifling that no one in the right mind. She a quote, no one in the right mind would spend any time there that morning. Also Lizzy would tell investigators that she had gone up into the barn to look for lead to make sinkers for an upcoming fishing trip that no one, but Lizzie knew about also investigators reported. There were no footprints in the law. Just a bunch of dust and cobwebs and look like anyone have been up during awhile that looks really bad. The more you learn about Levy and the testimony from both her and others about her behavior. And whereabouts I mean, the guilt she looks. Now to be fair Lizzie was not the only person home at the time of the murders. There was also twenty six old Irish made Bridget Sullivan and Lizzy told Bridget that there was a department store sale and gave her permission to go to it that morning, but bridge didn't feel well. So she chose to take a nap in her bedroom instead and her room was directly above Andrew Jackson's room and Andrew. Jackson portent bridge also is Maggie to Lizzie and Emma claims. She was in her third floor bedroom. Resting went about eleven ten AM. She heard Lizzie call out from downstairs Maggie come quick father's dead. Someone came and killed him. Andrew was lying prone on the couch and the downstairs parlor where he'd been struck, you know, ten or eleven times with a hatchet like weapon. One of his eyeballs had been split cleanly in two which seems to indicate along with his body position that he was probably asleep when he was attacked, says, if you're awake, you'd most likely, you know, turn your face when the ax is coming for it. When Lizzie and Bridget arrive. He still bleeding out. So it's safe to stay say he was killed somewhere close to eleven AM. Considering a he hadn't gotten home until ten thirty ten forty five AM needed time to settle in and fall asleep for him to end up with his eyeball, cut cleanly into an abbey had been killed a little before ten thirty AM at the very latest right at the corner place her time of death. You know somewhere between nine AM and ten thirty am considering. No one had seen her since sometime shortly before nine AM. You know, it wasn't like her to spend all morning quietly. Upstairs common sense dictates you probably die closer to nine AM than to ten thirty AM which means that the killer savagely and literally bashed her brains and with an axe. And then if it's not Lizzy or or I guess Bridget just hides in the house for at least you know, I don't know half an hour, but probably closer to two hours and then pops out and bashes in her father's head and then vanishes leaving nobody footprints, nobody murder weapon. You know, no one saw some bloody person walking down the streets, Fall River that day. So you know, easy to see why Lizzie getting arrested. Now, here's Andrews autopsy report. This is his. Actually the the doctor described him body that of a man will nourish, or I guess the corner did body that of a man will nourish here. We go with their strange corner, speaking man, interesting that they went with well, nourished instead of the very well nourished they used with Abby. So you know, I guess not chubby but not skinny. I hope some corner makes note that my corpse appears well, nourished someday that seems to be about the best you could hope for actually fit and muscular fit in just nourished enough..

Lizzie lion Bridget Sullivan Lizzy compl Abby Andrew Jackson Levy Maggie Jackson portent bridge Fall River murder Emma two hours
"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Some believe Lizzie killed Abby because she hated her then felt that she had no choice, but to also kill her father who would know the truth Lizzy older sister, Emma openly disliked Abby and both girls called her MRs Borden most of the time rather than mother and also rarely eight meals with their parents. There was there is definitely tension in the board and household. Now, since there isn't a lot of, you know, evidence about the day to day going on of Lizzie children or documentation. That's what I wanted us. Let's skip ahead. Eighteen ninety two. The year of the murders Lizzie is now thirty two years old. Her sister Emma is for. Forty one years old. Neither one of them seriously dating. Neither one has a job so weird. Not not not terribly encounter the time. But now if this is desirable, either you were looked down upon if you weren't married by your mid twenty s at at the very latest, you're an old maid. Now. Now we have two very old maids both living on daddy's money. If anyone is going to kill anyone else in his family, I would have thought Andrew, Jackson Borden. We'll have the most motive to hack some family members down with an axe. You know, just I am so fucking sick of pain for your lives. I pay and I pay and I pay and what do I get two daughters who sent me couldn't at least one of you accept any of the men. I talked to pun you up on. Yeah. Something like like that is fucking swinging the axe. I'm so sick of the pain and the pain in eighteen ninety two Andrew seventy years old, still working fulltime to support his wife and two daughters who both wish they lived up on the hill, especially Lizzy now that had been fun, but daddy, daddy, we, we never get anything we want. I wanna live on the hill with the real rich people. Daddy, I wanna use it. Golden forked, ate dinner with I not a silver fork does not fair daddy. Why do you only buy? I last year's fashions. I wanna wear what people are wearing in Paris. Now we're still cruel daddy. You ever spent any time around someone in their thirties or forties who never ever had to fend for themselves generally not a good look. I'm always amazed by the level of entitlement. Some of those people have and the anger they have towards the people who have just paid their way through life. Always gonna, say doing the research this week, Lizzie Borden reeks of that person to me chronically unhappy with daddy and step mommy, but never make an effort to, you know, I don't know, strike out on her own and yes, I can already hear some of you starting to write that Email the it was fucking different for ladies. It was hard as yes. I know. I know. I know the history. I know it was there were not many jobs for women. The the workforce was incredibly unfair towards women at that time. But there were some women working. I mean, Bridget, you know, the house maid. She worked for the families. She wasn't a member of the family, and there were female entrepreneurs that carved lives themselves shopkeepers and saloon keepers and many more type of jobs out west as we've learned in previous sucks at this time in earlier than this time. Like it wasn't impossible. I mean, yes, would have been substantially easier with ads system and funny, but not impossible, but Lizzie Borden just didn't seem remotely interested in that. Just. About it, but she just seemed like a brat. Perhaps she was lesbian, maybe that's why shouldn't get you. Wanna get married. That is a theory we'll discuss later..

Lizzie Borden Jackson Borden Daddy Abby Lizzy Emma Andrew Paris Bridget thirty two years Forty one years seventy years
"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Ageing Seventy-six city had one sixth of all, New England, cotton capacity and one half of all print cloth production going on the spindle city as it became known with second in the world only to Manchester England in terms of total output in this regard may make sweet spindle money, Andrew and Sarah married on Christmas day eighteen forty five which is that as weird to me. Why don't you get married on Christmas, whatever when he was twenty three and she was twenty two, but they wouldn't have child until five years after wedding day. Until then they would just fuck in for fun. Emma Borden born March. I eighteen fifty one in eighteen fifty. Six second daughter was born named Alice, Esther, but Alice died at age. Two of hydrocephalus water on the brain Lizzie was their third and last child. And when Lizzie was three years old in eighteen sixty three, her mother Sarah Borden died. Now she she was killed as fate would have it with with a tiny child's acts little Lizzie toy to be precise for death was ruled an accident. Even though young Lizzie, it seemed that she may have bludgeoned her mother somewhere between seventy and ninety times with this tiny little axe took that many wax to breakthrough Sarah skull due to Lizzie is weak little baby swings and and the wispy little baby. Hatchet investigators just couldn't figure out why she would just kind of, you know, lay there and take that. Obviously, that's not true. Obviously, a little Lizzie did not hack her mother down with a tiny ax. Her mother died of uterine congestion and a disease of the spine. Ammos twelve took care of. Lizzy. That's what the ruling was. She, that is something else, but people didn't know what things were as much back then m was twelve and took care of Lizzie despite the family living near the girl's grandfather step-grandmother and antler Rana from then on older sister, Emma would continue to be like a mother to Lizzie. The two girls were brought up in the central congregational church where Lizzie taught Sunday school children of immigrants is a young woman. She was a member of the organization of the Christian endeavor society where she served a secretary treasurer. She was also a member of the woman's Christian. Temperance union stop drinking. Fellas, get that evil devil whiskey on your hands as well as the ladies fruit and flower mission. So she just basically doesn't sound like a lot of fun. A real stick of the month. She she liked fruit didn't like drinking and yeah. Okay. And she briefly joined a local acts and through guild, she was put in charge of swing technique when she was young. That's of course that's not true either in sixteen and eighteen sixty five gives me just two years after her mother died when Lizzie was only five. Andrew board had remarried Abby Durfee gray Borden. She was thirty seven years old at the time considered to to be an old maid when they were married to spend starts only spend stirs this tale Abby. It actually put her vagina in a safety deposit box at the Bank few years earlier because she just didn't think she was going to need it established between again. What do you make me? Say, stuff like that. No Abby kept the Durfee name to link her with one of the first families of the area. She desired respect and social status was the daughter of a pushcart peddler came from very little money to marry. Someone of Andrew station was an unexpected blessing, especially age. Many times speculated Andrew had proposed Abby because he was looking. For a housekeeper and someone to raise his daughters. He wasn't exactly known romantic more more likely that the forty three year old businessman needed help raisins daughters. The true relationship between Abby and her stepdaughter Lizzy remained something of a mystery. There's there's no evidence of abuse or neglect, but several persons including prosecution witnesses in her murder trial reported that the relationship was less than loving and that things were tense between them..

Lizzie Abby Durfee gray Borden Sarah Borden Emma Borden Andrew Lizzy Ammos Andrew station Manchester New England Sarah Alice murder Sarah skull antler Rana Andrew board secretary treasurer Esther
"lizzie" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

And That's Why We Drink

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"lizzie" Discussed on And That's Why We Drink

"And the only reason this is kind of like supported in later years is that lizzie was later rumored to be lesbian although bridget later married a man doesn't necessarily mean in nineteen twenties but yeah bridget allegedly gave a deathbed confession to her sister stating that she had changed her testimony in order to protect lizzie on the stand that was like before she died that's what she said that she had changed her testimony i believe it also i'm going off of very vague reference but there is a lizzie board movie with christina ricci which oh yes by the way like she is exactly what i imagined support to be like and i think i could also be like putting in my own head but i think that movie like kinda hinted that there was a lesbian relationship where they never said anything allowed but the characters in the movie like looked each other a little too long and all that yeah apparently that movie real shit rating close a why it has really bad ratings but if you like the wazoo board stories still we're seeing at least watch watch it yeah but yeah so the only problem with that too is like okay so lizzie never married she and her sister never married she also later became very close friends with an actress named nance o'neil who was referred to by feminists as an overt lesbian and because of that her sister emma moved out of their house push was uncomfortable with her friendship with got this actress who was lesbian and actually after her sister moved out ninety five she never saw her again.

lizzie bridget christina ricci nance o'neil emma