19 Burst results for "Liz Truss"

UK abandons hope of US trade deal by end of year

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:21 sec | 2 weeks ago

UK abandons hope of US trade deal by end of year

"Has abandoned hopes of clinching a US free trade deal ahead of the presidential election, with officials blaming the Corona virus outbreak for slow progress. Trade Minister Liz Truss said last month, Britain had no deadline to strike a trade deal with the U. S. And she criticized the US administration for talking quote a good game on free trade while restricting import access.

Trade Minister Liz Truss United States Britain
"liz truss" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:35 min | Last month

"liz truss" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Kingdom are calling on the U. K. to stop selling tear gas to police departments in the United States to learn more about this issue we're joined live on the KCBS ring central news line by Sky News reporter enda Brady and I didn't realize just how much of this material but besides the tear gas I understand also rubber bullets is coming from the UK to the United States yeah this is a big big industry obviously defense here Britain sells wooden weapons and defenseman systems all over the world and many all of your police forces rubber bullets tear gas CS gas and they're all sourced out of the United Kingdom it is a multibillion dollar industry and yes the UK exports a lot the United States but the question is for how much longer because all the protests and the targeting of protesters and in particular the targeting of the media you know this is played out prominently on the news bulletins here for many days in a row and what's happened now there is two really interesting situations about the politicians a hundred and sixty six of them in parliament from various different parties have signed this letter calling for a cessation in not trade and then a private citizen is looking at taking a court case against the government to force their hand also what in the letter which was sent to the British trade secretary Liz truss it says the among other things and this is a quote from the letter the brutality now aimed toward protesters and reporters across the country is unacceptable have we ever seen a review like this before aimed at the United States from the U. K. no never and it's really interesting what's happening here because obviously break this has happened and by the end of the year Britain will be you know going its own way and no trade deal with the European Union you know the negotiations are pretty much come to a standstill there Britain needs every trading partner it can get its hands on right now and for a sizeable chunk of our elected representatives to have written this letter and put their name to it and sent it to the government minister in charge of developing overseas trade and industry and it is quite something it really it really is but you know make no mistake the protests that we've seen in so many of your cities how will people have been treated the fact that this is a British sourced gas and rubber bullets being used on U. S. citizens and media you know it has not gone down very well here and one point has been made that you know would June last year the U. K. stop selling at weapons and rubber bullets and tear gas to Hong Kong because of the way protesters were treated there and a lot of people are saying well hang on if we don't want to sell this stuff the Hong Kong anymore because it's being used for you know when the ferries purposes and it doesn't look good why should we still be selling it to the United States and the only about thirty seconds left but how much worry is there that this could have a broader impact on US UK trade yet there is that worry on obviously your president you know he is a very strong minded man strong willed he has his own opinions and the big concern is that you know if this were were to go ahead and there were there were to be stopped that people would suffer as a result here because Mr trump may well decide to give me an open secret tradition elsewhere economically it it it's a fascinating dynamic it really is thank you for your time this afternoon that's a Sky News reporter enda Brady as more than one hundred members of parliament in the UK are calling on their country to stop selling tear gas and rubber bullets to police departments.

"liz truss" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"liz truss" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"They put every truck painter on the committee the same old stuff they frankly want our situation to be unsuccessful which means death and our situation is going to be very successful but the doctor about you will be testifying in front of the Senate and he looks forward to doing that don't devote cheerleading member of the corona virus task force has sometimes appeared to contradict remarks by president trump the Indian government has announced plans to bring home hundreds of thousands of citizens who've been stranded overseas since the start of a national looked on six weeks ago on Tuesday India announced nearly four thousand more cases of coronavirus the highest jump in a single day here's our South Asia editor Jill McCabe firing in late March India banned international flights as part of its tough national lockdown hundreds of thousands of Indians found themselves stranded overseas many of based in the Middle East as unskilled or semi skilled migrant workers now with lockdown finally easing the plan's been announced to bring them home most by playing on special government flights others aboard three Indian navy ships passengers will be screened before they're allowed to board and face quarantine on return that also have to pay their own fast the French president Emmanuel macron has defended his policy of re opening schools on a voluntary basis next week in a television interview he said no one would be forced to return but he said staying at home for two months have been traumatic for some he said the aim was to help children who were falling behind or whose parents could not help them study world news from the BBC the British airline virgin Atlantic says it plans to cut around a third of its work force because of the pandemic more than three thousand jobs are expected to be lost the firm will also close its operation at Gatwick airport outside London the United States and Britain have begun months of talks on a post brexit trade agreement opening the video conference the UK's international trade secretary Liz truss said that an increase in trans Atlantic trade would help both economies bounced back from the economic challenge posed by the coronavirus the first round is expected to last two weeks the biggest broadcaster in the Philippines a B. S. C. B. N. has gone off air off to the media regulator ordered it to halt operations the station was waiting for Congress to renew its license how Johnson reports from Manila as stuff left the B. S. C. B. N. studios tonight they later rose candles income is a rations the last time the country's biggest broke Costa was shot down was on the former Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the nineteen seventies today's action comes after the government's top lawyer threatened regulators with corruption charges if they allow the company to continue broadcasting approval of a B. S. C. B. N.'s franchise is currently being reviewed by Congress Philippine president Rodrigo deterrence he has repeatedly threatened to end the franchise accusing the company of failing to act campaign advertisements in twenty sixteen and bias against his government officials in Liberia say they fear that's at least twenty five people have died after being trapped underground following an accident it's an informal mine there are reports that they were searching for diamonds at a site in Masaka tone when the US walls of the mine collapsed a relief worker told a local radio station this at least three bodies have been recovered and that the search for survivors is continuing BBC news I'm a medical frequency radio my ripping the communication of to.

UK, US kick off post-Brexit free trade talks amid outbreak

Morning Edition

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

UK, US kick off post-Brexit free trade talks amid outbreak

"The United states in the United Kingdom begin talks today on a free trade agreement and beers Frank Langfitt reports American trade representative Robert Lighthizer will speak on a video call with Britain's international trade secretary Liz truss as officials on both sides listen in the US is expected to push the U. K. to permit the import of chicken disinfected with chlorine which the U. bands and most Britons oppose while the U. K. wants the US to lower trade barriers to bridge products including cars and cheddar cheese the UK government estimates a deal could boost the economy here from point oh seven two point sixteen percent over the next five years which analysts say wouldn't come close to covering the economic losses of leaving the European Union the first round of talks is scheduled for two weeks trade deals tend to take

United States United Kingdom Frank Langfitt Robert Lighthizer Britain Liz Truss European Union Representative Secretary
"liz truss" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

08:59 min | 6 months ago

"liz truss" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"I'm not saying either of these models is better than the other. It depends on the quality of the advice to New Blair sort of Napoleonic very strong number ten model David Cameron because of coalition had a very devolved model to resume had to sort of system of terror to advisers victim of the few and a hill would order everybody else around and savage. Avidan particular rebelled against that. He hated it and he reproved raise me for after the election. Saying I never want to be treated that way again. He is not what sort of person that likes to be given instruction or direction by somebody who isn't elected. Some people get more sensitive about that. Been others but as far as as your Javed's concerned what Boris was suggesting wasn't just in front of him. It wasn't in front of the British system of government. James pays the counter is number. Ten helped him praised where she soon neck. They've found him easier to whatever at times in such Javid say if they now have someone they trust more. Does that mean. It's going to be a more even relationship I think if you can. Cameroon is a very interesting model. Because Cameron was undoubtedly you the lead on that one on because you know when. Cameroon disagreed in private cameron. One out but I mean anyone looking back on camera. Government wouldn't think that didn't have any influence you see huge mountain softwares dumb by him and so I think this is the question which is if you have two teams the trust each other. Danzon actually involve more complex one of the things that one of the things that the numbers around G. H. S. T. briefing or. They didn't like this idea of things. Being talked offers a win for this personal win for that person. They they they they they can took issue with that but I think the proof of the pudding will be in the eating right so what happens in the budget. More happens in the spending review. And you know what happens with Brexit? The trade deal. Where's the treasury's tunnel on all that stuff? But I think I think in a way as of about the French student protests both sides of the French Revolution. It's too early to tell whether this will work or not but it is interesting in that one of the other things that means is. The departments have traditionally tried to play number ten in the Treasury against each other. They were able to do that now. So there's this massive centralization of power because you've now basically got the treasury and the cabin office the two most powerful departments and government yoked together now. This news has overtaken all other cabinet. Reshuffle needs the have been other comings and goings at in the shape of this morning. Boris Johnson sacked five his cabinet ministers and that included unions Smith phrase. It wasn't so long ago he will. He won minister the year at spectator parliamentarian. The year was clearly isn't a curse but it does touch on the fact that this is to some surprising because Gene Smith's work breaking the deadlock stole months. Yes and which is Northern Ireland was incredible. Hugh Hughes praised by the Prime Minister for that all went reasonably well. The there's something else that you've seen as he almost resigns. When it came to the brexit talks he was regarded basically as being a bit of a warbler. He didn't quite mobile bits. He was seriously thinking about it. He thought ballots for long enough to put some doubts about his loyalty. In the mind of the Prime Minister he knew that he knew he was going to walk the plank and part of the reason that we gave Minister of the Year award was because people did think. His Car Ricard was marked. There aren't that many ministers who achieved much less twelve months. I think his achievement to get dilution backup running in Northern Ireland was probably the single greatest ministerial achievements of the last twelve. Months is not saying much. He deserved the award. But I do also see why Boris Johnson thoughts that he wanted people who completely rely on. Because let's not forget we might be looking at a Nudie brexit. At the end of this year we might be looking at Michel Barnier and born Jones not coming to terms and in that case lasting boras once somebody likely to resign from his cabinet. So that's a mistake which was made by an with amber route. And as a mistake he doesn't want to repeat James if we look at the various cabinet ministers were forced to. I know sacked. You Have Geoffrey Cox Andrea. Lets Him Estimate? Vais trees videos. And as we just mentioned. Janine Smith what do they all have in common? And what do they reveal that about? The thinking behind this reshuffle morning was this is the morning of a long memories because nearly everyone is only as far as Julian. Smith was all clearly on the verge of resigning as things. Go Very Harry in the autumn. I think Boris Yeltsin has long stunning worry about Geoffrey cocks dealer any pundits. There's going to be entirely comfortable of an attorney general who named his chambers after Thomas. More of the man who famously when the block rather than Rather than follow the King's lead Andrew. Let's go over the fact that she got eleven votes in the leadership contest and then basically wanted a great office of state from him as a condition for supporting him. I think he was gonNA incredulous about. That Theresa Villiers didn't Bat Boys Johnson's Brexit. When he first came back until morning Saturday sitting which we all remember tonneins were false. But you know van want number. Ten One is loyalty discipline and confidence and competence. I mean those are you got to take all freer voice boxes in this reshuffle. And if you look at the people who are promoting for example Ameri Trevelyan you know in dominant cummings is various blogs about the vote leave campaign. He wasn't polite about many. Mp's but I'm reach. Rebellion was one of them and then when Boris Johnson was running in the palm interesting contest. I'm really one of his wits. He was very effective at getting people to sign up his campaign. And if he what you see. There is a competent. Loyal soldier can reward. And I think this is. This is a reshuffle which is about. Basically saying you've got to be on the same page as time we're not gonNA have little bastions of of a rival powerbases across oil loyalty. Was IT Loyalty Discipline Competence? Ldc right the greatest of these is loyalty. Loyalty trumps all. I suspect this may be a two podcast kind of day. So we'll be back because we have old new appointments to discuss Fraser just before we ended this one. There was quite two-leg head of the reshuffle that Liz Truss could be in trouble. As Summons Tommy that one of the phrased bees in Whitehall. The speed take out the trust but entry. She stayed in position and she hasn't actually be mutual. Hello she is longest seven cabinet ministers. James Points Iras definitely GonNa say that she is international trade secretary so it's a victory of trust will to survive is victory like dunkirk really and this is more than the chancellor has managed to do and we're also told that we might not be reshuffled. Says she might be even longer serving international business secretary that also department was supposed to be ruled up into something else and so. I'm a big Fan of hers. I think she makes them more interesting. She's very good articulating. Why people should vote conservative. Which I have to say is being done brilliantly at the moment so long may she continued her glorious instagram cabinet career. I think one of the things this is. She was the first cabinet level. Minister Back Boris Johnson. And I think I think he has not forgotten. Now I think some some others around there might have done but I keep personally has also still in place. And he was the first. Mp Tobacco again coming back to loyalty being the greatest awarded trait and then I think other thing. I'm saying about Israel switches. I've been there is going to be thing which is number ten. Don't lie as you yourself are not gay team anytime. You don't like media showboating but there's also another thing which is if you mean social traits. Actually point your job is to go and promote the UK and so there is a kind of. There's a fine line and I always thought that she was slightly more slack on some of that. Stop ENOUGH OF PEOPLE. Because some of the kind of cheesy photo ops in various places around the world you might have been a bit cringe-worthy but they will say were effective at getting various the newspaper coverage in those countries fund. She's fun cabinet member and if you went to him move from that fun cabinet member we have not one but two episodes of wills Liz Trust. How much goes she might be. Thad at this right just. Www Dot spectator dakota forward slash bulls? Thank you raise them. Thank you James..

Boris Johnson James Minister Back Boris Johnson cabinet treasury David Cameron Northern Ireland Geoffrey Cox Andrea cabinet member Cameroon Prime Minister Boris Yeltsin Janine Smith Javid Avidan New Blair Javed Hugh Hughes Theresa Villiers Liz Truss
"liz truss" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

09:05 min | 6 months ago

"liz truss" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Uh when the United Kingdom joined the European Union Cinder Dune was minus seven years old. Richard Nixon was the US president. Little Jimmy Osmond was top of the UK charts over the past three and a half years. It's been political turmoil. As Britain tries to reverse that union T nucle-. It happened on January. Thirty really I bet it ain't over till it's over and it sure ain't over year so what happens now. Laura clock spells it out as much as she can do anyway so so the the UK left the EU on the weekends And then so now we're in the next stage of of what we do in terms of the UK's relationship with the e u but also the UK's position on global trade and on the world as an independent nation. So so it's it's quite a significant moment but what we have right now is we're in what's called. A transition phase said from the first of February to the end of this year which means a lot of continuity so not much really really changing right now says continuity for businesses for individuals and during that time within negotiating the future UK. AH relationship a trade agreement how we cooperate on security issues and then there's the opportunity for us to negotiate free trade agreements with partners like New Zealand what to New Zealand in the UK have to work out. What do we have to work out? Well we've done a lot of the groundwork already so as you know the referendum referendum happened in June twenty sixteen later in two thousand sixteen we set up a trade policy dialogue between the UK and New Zealand looking at all the areas that we would want. It's a cover so we've been having lots of conversations David Parker has met with Liz Truss. Our trade secretary several times most recently in London just a couple of weeks ago But it's really about what do we want to get out of a free trade agreement And as you know New Zealand is one of those top countries for Post Brexit Free Trade Agreement and I generally talk about that. FDA that free trade agreement in three broad areas one is what can we do in trade in in goods so obviously agricultural exports but also buses so for example. The electric buses are on the streets of Wellington OP tear electric buses. This is manufactured in the UK. They pay a ten percent tariff. So looking at things like that Looking wine whisky Coffee Hawk pods all that sort of thing so really looking at liberalizing tariffs there. So that's the first area. The second is what we can do in services And you know that. Really the forward-looking ambitious standard-setting type of work you know looking at. What can we do in the era of Fintech? What can we do with the digital economy? Where very interested in New Zealand's Digital Economy Partnership Agreement with Chile and Singapore And really you know setting of setting the tone on that sort of issue and Fintech New Zealand made a good trip to the UK last year and we soon doing a report setting out its recommendations is in Fintech area and then the third areas really about values. You know how you're not just looking at the bottom line but how you're looking for trade it to benefit everyone and New Zealand has what it calls. Its trade for all agenda and you know there are lots of areas where we think we can work together closely so The UK is very committed to taking a leading role on tackling climate change. We're hosting COP THE UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow later this year. So we're looking at how we can work together with New Zealand's on those sorts of sustainability issues. So there's a lot to work through. There's a lot of detail to work through but I hope that it's an opportunity to Build the prosperity of both our countries but also to enhance cooperation in other areas. As well tell me about your your role as High Commissioner ends and what is your involvement exactly In terms of these discussions. Are you involved at the coalface so we have negotiating teams with lead negotiators in each country. And that's not me so we have a london-based Team and then. The new Zealan team is headed up by museums embassador to Ireland Buzz so we have a capital based teams if you like but my job is really here in New Zealand building. Those relationships building our understanding of what New Zealand wants to get out of this. You know explaining what our goals are and so it's really about those relationships as the understanding and of course influencing and that's what my counterpart in the UK will be doing as well so. I have an expanding team of trade policy experts Who are building relationships have really really good relationships in the agricultural sector in the In the tech sex All sorts of areas in terms of the relationship between New Zealand and the UK. What are the key issues on the table in terms of how that might change as a result of Brexit? What we've seen since the referendum was has been some people saying Oh brexit means the UK's turning in on itself it's becoming less global and actually there's been a lot of say this that's not the case in fact the opposite is true and we're walking the talk particularly in the Pacific where we're opening up three new you high commission say three new diplomatic posts? They were doubling our diplomatic presence in the Pacific and a public. Talk on Tuesday in Auckland. Laura Clarke acknowledged the UK standing in the Pacific had waned in recent years. She says the country has had a long standing presence in the region but scaled us down in the two thousands. It's now under. Its newly named Pacific uplift strategy. Miss clocks is the. UK is stepping up alongside partners. Australia and New Zealand in April. Last last year the British government said it would open new diplomatic posts and Vanuaaku Psalm one and Tonga the missions which in Tonga and Vanuatu we'll piggyback on on New Zealand's High Commissions there are a doubling of the UK's diplomatic presence in the Pacific that's really important for you K. and New Zealand Because we've got got a lot of shared interests in this region working with Pacific partners tackling climate change protecting our oceans And so I think that's kind of one manifestation of the UK UK taking on this very glow even more global role one of the biggest areas of uncertainty for New Zealanders seniors around immigration in vases there for more than two hundred thousand Kiwis living permanently in the UK and many thousands more visit each year. So will Britain become lease open is the classic Kiwi. We are way under threes. As with anything it's up for discussion but more o'clock cs daren't lose too much sleep over it. Of course there will be. Changes is to our immigration policy settings because at the moment we have freedom of movement with the e U of course once we fully left left the end of this transition period. There will no longer be free movement in the same way and we will move most likely to what I call a country agnostic immigration shen system. which is based on skills kind of skills based immigration system and I see that only bringing benefits New Zealanders? Actually how how do you make. So you've already got your existing routes like say that New Zealand's got one of the best deals in terms of immigration. So if you look at where we are currently New Zealanders islanders can go and travel in the UK for up to six months with movies or tool and then those do apply for a visa. We have really high successor again. It's ninety seven percent of people who apply apply for visas. Get them and you're different. Routes of the visa the Youth Mobility Scheme the ancestry visa and then the route that most us which is the tier to skilled worker visas. So there's lots of different routes for Kiwi is to go and live work travel in the UK and then looking forward. I think appoint spaced skills based immigration system that is not focused on geography will be of benefit because key bring enormous skills And so curious you want to go and work in the legal sector and the financial sector as teachers as Doctors they will be huge scope there. I think but I say all of this with a bit of a health warning that we don't yet know exactly what the what the detail will be but I The economic reality is the UK is always economy is going to need people coming in And it's going to need the brightest and the best and in New Zealanders stand to benefit there. I think you mentioned the youth. Mobility entry visas the mobility. These are being if the a two year work visa for people under the age of thirty. The reviews are being. You can apply.

New Zealand United Kingdom UK New Zealanders Pacific Fintech New Zealand New Zealand building Britain Laura Clarke Jimmy Osmond Richard Nixon European Union Cinder Dune Kiwi US EU FDA Youth Mobility Scheme
"liz truss" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

LBC Election 2019

12:43 min | 6 months ago

"liz truss" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

"Ships in this podcast racial three three folks but I should be so lucky. Anyway I know sorry. I'm sorry I've let everybody tailgate. Most of all I've let myself down family and she can't exactly I'm going to quiet now now. No I'm not the I think he let's. Let's stick with that theme three weeks to come because I think he is developing a bit of a tendency to brief things the not deliver on them anyway. Come I think. I think you're right all of that stuff about big machinery of government. Changes has seems to have gone away. I'm not quite sure what the reshuffle is going to bring. I not quite clear. WHO's in and WHO's out? I do note suit for Julian. Smith has done something else quite good this week in his role as Northern Ireland Secretary but he appeared to be one of those people who were sort of not in favor and marked to go you and he. He's actually the other thing I read was that he is bracing himself. This Boris Johnson to shift a load of women now if the cabinet And then to promote women at lower level so that he can sort of cover the fact that he will have fewer women in the cabinet of has been the case for a very long time which also I don't think he's a good look at some of those he's proposing to shift our? I don't think of done any worse. And in most cases got a better job than quite a few of the blocks appear you to be going to stay. There ought to be promoted. I think the big thing here is he's got to decide. Is he going to reduce the size of the cabinet nor because at the moment it's ridiculous I think this is it thirty thirty three people around that table. Of course Steve Barkley and his junior ministers. They've now gone members of the government anymore. So I don't know whether Steve Boat is still going to attend cabinet but not be paid or what. Now I would like to see the cabinet cut down to twenty two again as it always used to be an stop having. He's ministers attending cabinet because in a hung parliament tool with a small majority. You can see why you have to keep some people on board and you can handle it little bubbles. He doesn't need to do that anymore. So let's cut it back to twenty two now that that does mean some fairly big casualties. Actually I if he did that and I know he was quite relentless when he became prime minister he was going to be in and he was going to be out but his personality is temperamentally against confrontation. I think can I don't think he'll he would find easy to sack. Liz Trust for example. He was in his first cabinet supporter. Leadership Campaign Ben Wallace. Who is tipped by many to be for the chop? The defense secretary again one of his leading supporters autres but apparently rumor has it right. Boris isn't very impressed with his performance. So far he's made it clear that anybody who hasn't performed will be ditched so it could be a bit of a Valentine's Day massacre Valentine's massacre but then again you've got to have the people to replace them and that is where I think he's got. He has got an issue in the. I don't see this Whole raft of new talent ready to come into the capita and normally they would come from the ranks of ministers of state? And if you look down the list there's a few that but On the women problem. He's a big problem because If he gets really Liz Truss Andrew leads seminars. Two or three others For the chops coffee we see. How can you get rid of Therese Kofi? When you any appointed during August? She done wrong. Don't it also me. I wouldn't get rid of her. She's one of the names in the frames she well. I think that would be very odd. Because she's very popular actually to east coffee in within the parliamentary dementia poverty. I don't think she's done anything wrong. Has she done anything particularly right. She's kept department out of the headlines for quite a long time which is an achievement in itself and there aren't many female ministers of state. And what are the other ministers. Just haven't been in jobs very long and you think well that's quite a step up for anybody whether they're Mojo female to come in from Outside the second ranked so I think he's going to be really interesting reshuffle because the the toys do have more women now although they they I think is a proportion. Listen they were reduced in the two thousand nineteen general election but quite a few of the most talented women came in two thousand seventeen and two and a half years is a relatively short period of time to end up in the cabinet. You can certainly you know. I was minister after two years. But that's a very quick time to go in the cabinet unless you've been around government and you know who the sorts of things that are going on so You right but that should be reasonably thinks about what his cabinet looks like also agree with you that there is a disadvantage vantage in There is a time and Gordon Brown. Of course this when you start giving lots of people the right to attend cabinet and then cabinet gets very crowded it and you know I can remember in good Brown's cabinet thinking you know all the My personal space is being slightly squashed up here by all the people uh-huh around the cabinet table even more so than on Good Morning Britain on Friday. When I'm like a little I was like a little sliver between you? David Davis Somebody said to me about you about David does or you slightly invading. Your.

government cabinet Boris Johnson Gordon Brown David Davis Steve Barkley Liz Truss Andrew Liz Trust prime minister Steve Boat Julian Therese Kofi Ireland Valentine Secretary Ben Wallace Smith Britain
"liz truss" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"liz truss" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Idea of voting, Dan, the steel and today we've seen this approach you've had amber road in this day for Graham full by Liz truss on five. Live both putting forward this idea that if you don't vote for this deal, if you vote it down, you really risk the being no Brexit now when I at this morning, there are some who's saying she is gone off piste, and we have probably gonna get repeat from number ten on this because it seemed to suggest that there isn't such a thing as no deal. I think the truth of the situation is number ten trying to prompt approach so one hand they want to send a message to Brexit is saying vote this Dan, get ready for a second referendum all is things. You're not going to like on the other hand, they want say there to the remain minded NP's, including labor ones that if you vote down this deal is very uncertain for it will be chaotic you can't rule out cliff edge Brexit, the problem of having two different messages is cutting fan is is not to contradict each of us lightly. And is not just one orients. Here's hearing them. So I think is a risky strategy of user, sorta PM kids when estimate visa. Tourism all we definitely leave on the twenty ninth of March twenty nineteen and trees may seem say yes move, it would imply Jin's. Yes. If we have a deal, and so this is this is the problem is it's not like. Tori, MP's one a second referendum. Listen to five live until we run vs. Brexit is this today. Programme everyone listens to the same stuff. And that is the fundamental challenge for the strategy. Let's just move on t- prime minister's questions. More generally, Jamesy mentioned near parish Nesta McVay asking questions about Brexit. But they were by no means the only MP's he raised the topic. Katie Jeremy Corbyn focused, his six questions entirely on Brexit. How do you think it went? In a way. It was an open goal often open gopher Jeremy Corbyn. I didn't think he was particularly effective even though he asked the right questions. I think it was quick moving of the liveliest to pick up something that was set that morning. So he in reference to these comments in people, amber rot. He asked about the prospect of a no deal Brexit, but I think he let himself down because when he was giving us questions you'd go up at muddled with what exactly is in the agreement say he confused a customs border in the Irish shaver regulatory bordering iris average person on the street and thing that is the biggest mistake to make it did mean that trees making that we know you haven't read this agreement you told us out on Sunday and interview and lay they said, oh, you don't need to read it in all his detail. It does weaken your Coors, if you're going to say that you have a firm grip on it. And James, it wasn't just conservative and MP's or indeed Jeremy Corbyn who raised Brexit, probably the most dramatic question came from Nigel Dodds. And he was summing up ready. What's been going on with the DP over the past few days, even more dramatic than his question was the very ostentatious wave at night was Nadia long. As Jeremy Corbyn of all people was criticizing the northern provisions in the agreement. I've overt was designed the and other db MP's northing, Jeremy Corbyn, man, it is safe to say that they do not have much in common with much respectful. It was all Oviously designed send a message for treasury bench, which is think we could never team without guy. If that's what it takes to stop this. The question is essentially, the December joint report seems to suggest that the devolved institutions in Northern Ireland would be able to basically disowned what to do. So they'll be a democratic lock on the process nodules at what why not deleted, the strongest bitter trees homes in response was well, that's ideal..

Katie Jeremy Corbyn Brexit cliff edge Brexit Liz truss Dan Nigel Dodds prime minister Northern Ireland Jin Graham Tori Oviously Coors Nadia long Nesta McVay Jamesy James one hand
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"And when he was quite right to focus on it, the great achievement of David Cameron Georgia's bone is to have effectively brought that deficit down to nothing. We didn't really have a current deficit anymore without completely butchering. The public services would disagree with that we wrong because there's. Literally precisely nose to SCO evidence. Footrace of course, has been restrained, and there's been austerity and have been some job losses, but we still have a universal healthcare system that is with the best in the world. We still have universal education system. We still have good defense and decent roads. We're a civilized society still having brought down spending as a shout of GDP from forty five percent in just before we came into office to now around thirty eight thirty nine. So that was an over when we talk. And what it meant is that we didn't tackle other tasks and where are most critical of myself and my colleagues and the conservative party in general is that we have completely failed to get to grips with the housing crisis assertively is we should have done, and we spend much too long tiptoeing around Nimby point of view. And I think it's fantastic that Liz trusses now being very forthright on this issue, but she will know because frustrated her, I. Lungs, it's frustrated me. Many conservatives have been more concerned to defend the interests of those who already have a property and not focused enough on the interest of those who don't yet have a property and who have every the ambition to one we're leaving a bit late frankly, to be doing much more now we are doing much more now and I'm not sure we're doing quite enough, and we all leaving very, very late. And if we lose the next election, whenever it comes the two biggest reasons for it in my view will be one that we will have basically screwed up Brexit. And the second will be that we failed on housing. I think those will be the two hammer blows that will push into opposition if that's what happens to us. And then finding to end where we began with a lovely Brexit question. Again, you've essentially landed quite in the middle of this. You're remain supporter during the twenty sixteen referendum, like many of people from the Cameroon gang. But since. Then you've been relatively climatic. You votes trigger article fifty. You've supported boldly the promise position or things as hopes issues developed from the Harvard lines, the Lancaster House, the softer red lines of check has, where do you think Brexit's going to end up? And how'd you know again, we have according to what is a lot of chatter about a no deal Brexit potentially in the EU without deal. How do you feel about where do you think it's going to end? Well, the first thing I think is very important thing for people to understand is there's going to be a new deal Brexit. I don't care how many of my colleagues dream of this in the midnight hour. There are not the parliamentary numbers to support no deal Brexit, and I will vote as a conservative MP in whatever ways, necessary on whatever motion will achieve the result of stopping. No deal Brexit is a lot of support for that. Do you think amongst you'll colleague was a lot of support amongst my colleagues? I am bound. Happy to be burned by manifesto commitments to secure right Brexit deal, which preserves economy and which gives us greater control over the key measures. The key things that were the motives for the referendum campaign great control over our borders over our laws over our money. Nowhere did I say, and did the manifesto say that I was bound to support Brexit at any cost, any price without any deals to replace it. And I will not support a no deal Brexit. And I can't think of forty conservative MP's at least who will not support no deal Brexit. So not your Brexit isn't going to happen. What is going to happen is only either a good deal or a band ill and what I'm those, though. Well, there are many measures, of course, as the economic measure, which is, does it support the interest of British business of all kinds of sizes services and. Manufacturing, there's the measure of, does it deliver on the legitimate goals of those who voted to leave? I mean, they won and I've considered it right from that morning..

Brexit David Cameron Georgia Cameroon Harvard Lancaster House EU forty five percent Liz
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"Bad deal, say we will get Dale account guarantee the month of the Dale. So I'm gonna be. Right now. I'm just say, I believe the will be Dale, but I'm not sure about the precise dates about deal. Would you accept a no deal Brexit? We have to be prepared to do that, and that's why we're planning for no deal in your heart of hearts. Would you like to see a really hard Brexit and turn Britain into Singapore of Europe? Breakfast process is gonna take time to get to where we exactly won't to be where we've got to allies very good progress, and I'm convinced we'll get a Dale and we will continue to reform our country. Would you like to be the first female chancellor? Well, who say to that? Would you like to be fine minister? I'm not sure about that one. Would you support any of your other free enterprise groups MP's efforts to become prime minister? Look, we've got a prime minister in place. She's doing a brilliant job. She's a very, very resilient person, and she's the person we need leading through these Brexit negotiations. We're scientists. We got lots of fun tastic. Colleagues. I'm delighted that dome rob is now Brexit secretary, but we're not talking about the leadership pay. We're talking about the future of our country will trees maybe plan minister this time next year? Yes. And finally, if you to one area of public spending, where would it be? Well, I'm not going to reveal the spending review to you now. Sebastian can look forward to that after not getting that scoop. Thank you very much for joining us for this special episode of f. t. politics back next week with another guest FT politics with presented by Sebastian pain. I'm produced by Unidad until next time. Thanks for listening..

Dale prime minister Sebastian pain f. t. politics Unidad chancellor Europe secretary Singapore Britain
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"She dealt with the challenges time, unions, privatizing, nationalized industries, all big challenges, all areas like housing a up the economy utilities. What does the future look like in a fully digital broadband world for regulation? Those are the areas we're fixing. She mentioned housing that which is key tenants of why the result was as it was in the twenty seventeen general election. Would you be happy to starve paving over green and pleasant land? Well, I have said that idea think we need to open up more land for building, and I think people much more a lot more. There were lots of nimbies in person who Lord the conservative part. Thirty, the raw, but I think it's dwindling number. I think people recognize the choices building or more greenfield sites a making shoulder enough Hames for the next generation or losing the election and ending up with Jeremy copen his policy of his to be appropriating property. So they which one I choose an, it's having more Hames available on the open market for people will ever generation to afford an also. I think we need to make it easier to build up in cities are quite like the Japanese system where essentially you can build up on top of your house without having to get extra planning permission. I think we need to be more liberal about these policies. I'm sure that's a lot of toys. Having a colony, the thought of all those things. Let's talk about your core job for moment. So you're sent you the facts figures that data person at the treasury which is super important stuff, but it's not particularly sexy to try and Sout people. How do you make what the treasury doesn't. Game sexy people. The app t do. I'm sure to politics do, but not everybody does. Well, one thing I think we need to do do break it down to what are we spending per.

Hames treasury Jeremy copen Sout
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"And of course the most infamous one of this was the daily most front page enemies. The people with hindsight, do you wish you spoken out against that sooner I think is completely wrong. Full ministers to dictate to newspapers what they put on that front page, but it's values and conservatives light yourself should respect British institutions and those institutions day relief. I think institutions are stronger when properly scrutinized when they're subject criticism. I think a lot of the problem was criticism. The enemies of the people, then it's not words I would use. But I think try and say to the press, I condemn you for writing. This is completely wrong. I think one of the most important institutions in Britain is the free press. And I've been slacked frontier times in the press and you learn to live with it. But I think that is better. Were public figures are under scrutiny than assistant like Russia were journalists, get arrested. I think the difference between simply saying, I disagree with this and arresting journalists. When you were government minister, you're in a position of power, and if you say which had been called for the time, you shouldn't be printing this I condemn this, which is, will certain people asked me to do. I think that is an attack on the free press and the job of low chancers to defend the independence of the judiciary is not to be a shop steward for the judiciary. And I think there's a two, very, very different things. Let's look to the future. Now, do you ever feel you're the last member of the conservative party fighting for free market values that you're out there talking about tax rates talking about spending and simply saying, we can't to splash the cash around, was everybody else in the cabinet loves to seem to splash the cash around. I think there are lots of people in the conservative party who believe that an I think in the cabinet in the cabinet as well. I think some people in the party of lost confidence in some days valleys because they wrongly believe that they're unpopular under. That's true. If you look at young people in particular young people Molay to believe in light taxes and having more control over their lives, the no degeneration. And if we ought to be attractive party to the people coming through the political system, I think these are strong messages that we can put out in a positive way. So what I am happy to do is be the person out there speaking out in favor of this finding new ways of communicating it, gaining support for it. And I know a lot of my colleagues believe in it a multiple that too. And that's why the Freya, which has been set up by t 2017 colleagues of mine, Lee Rowley elite Graham because they believe in those values as well. So I think there is a growing movement within the conservative party, and I believe that more broadly in the country, people do more control of their lives. Date necessary won't be paying over huge sums of money in taxation. What I would say. I think people in the country won't change what they've got now, because. The big challenge. You've got people on a shakeup you'll write about because you've got to try and sow capitalism and flea markets to under- forty fives, particularly my millennial generation who are the ones who have lost faith in this. And then we have little faith in it. I think voting Kuban then I think what Jeremy Kuban. My gold, he's goal kinds of Foltz has made a successful point is that we do need a shakeup and I think people want to see that. So they want to see things change. But what that shouldn't be is moving back to the pulse. It's got to be a future country where we have more enterprise people feel more able to sell their businesses. They feel more able to get on the housing ladder, say his the greater degree of control of your own life. Not less. I mean, Joe McDonnell is talking about spending five hundred billion pounds of government money on centralized planning run by the government. I mean, can you imagine what that would be like you cues late saying that they're looking backwards. To the past, but essentially the sorts of your Tokiwa is going back to call Thatcherite arguments. It's not. I mean, Mrs Thatcher did a great job at the time. She released same liberty laidback sation, but the areas we need to look at now areas like housing and planning. We're not areas that Mrs Thatcher dealt with..

Jeremy Kuban Mrs Thatcher cabinet Foltz Tokiwa Molay Britain Russia Joe McDonnell Lee Rowley Graham five hundred billion pounds
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"I think she by Fraser Nelson phase spectator, but I think he'd heard of him civil servants you sent. She went into child communists if I'm right, and that was when you working under Michael Govan. At that point, education was a truly reformist apartments. A lot of new policies coming in the flip side of that as well. That some said it was a quite aggressive environment to work in, and there was all sorts of stuff about press briefings more. Have you? How do you remember that experience? It was great. It was a bit like big on a pirate ship, say it was a different styles. Michael, go captain hook, kind of, but in a good way. He was great reforming minister that department and it needed it because the education establishment in Britain had resisted a lot of changes in policy, the so called blob, yeah, the so called blob. And what this was about was putting fresh impetus disruptors essentially in the education system in the shape of free schools and academies, and also raising all stunned needs to be the best in the world. Why is it the kids in Japan or China will performing better in subjects like Massen's aunts and Britain is a reason for the auto drain on any less able. And it was challenging the sort of excuses culture that we'd seen for generations and education. And I went to school in Leeds in the nineteen nineteen eighties. And I remember that attitude which is that some kids just don't let goods, and we really need to push them not hard, and that is what Michael challenged and you can now see the effects which is would prefer. Looming amongst the best in Europe in terms of reading for nine year olds, we were some of the worst ten twenty years ago, and I think it does take a strong minister to achieve that kind of change from time to ban the department. I think a lot of conservatives of looked back on that period may be with Voest into glosses, but they certainly see that was it west stuff was happening. But when Mr. go was moved on from education because he was seen as a bit electorally toxic towards the conservatives. The impetus for reform was really loss. And I don't think it's been regained certain education since then anything. That's fair. I think a lot of change took place which is now being a budget, you need to have a revolution, but you'll say, need to have continuous improvement as well say, we shook up the system and is now the case that these reforms are being built on. And if you walk in a school now, I think in my constituency we have seen big improvements. And of course, the real always. Issues and things need to be worked out. But there was a school in my constituency where lesson twenty percent of students were getting five eight to seize GCC. It's now up around the fifty percent Mark. These are real improvements to real children's lives, which means they gonna get better jobs. They get have much better opportunities. So yes, you need that sort of counterculture revolution and you will say, need to keep working at it as well. I think that's how you all a successful reformer, your previous to cabinet jobs and environment. Our injustice, I think probably when you environment sexually became very infamous for a viable social media, cliff, do you think you'll ever forget that from Tory comb? France? I don't think so. No. It was about importing swilling pigs. Even if I believe that is factually incorrect, Sebastian, though is a bit on cheese and how we obviously need to export more of our excellent products bid on pork as well. It was the poll. And cheese the team people remember. And then of course you went to just think one of the first political memes at my place. If that's what you go down the history books for his Paul Bley worse things. And then you had a brief spell Justice, which I think was particularly striking because it was doing it time when MRs may became prime minister. We had the EU after end and there was some notable attacks on the judiciary, this Moines..

Michael Govan Britain Fraser Nelson Paul Bley Voest prime minister EU Europe Leeds France MRs Massen Sebastian Japan cliff China ten twenty years twenty percent fifty percent
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"When did you make the decision pitfall that I worked for shell and cable and wireless say, I did work in the telecoms industry, which is one of the reasons I say interested in it and also to new oil industry as well. What was the moment you decided you were going to run as an MP? Well, I actually ran in two thousand one, so I was in which seat in Hemsworth in Yorkshire against Jon Trickett. Yes, he is from Leeds as well. So you ran into, did you run again, two thousand? I'm a tryer we can say, and eventually you'll part that listeners remarkable when you look back that A-List, your one of the few examples of someone who's actually still, they're still at the top of cabinet. A lot of those people sort of didn't quite make people. He was only list. I was already interested in politics before that. Already stood twice before, say we won the Tatler tool released. I've never been in Totta is still a career aspiration. If toddlers listening, please get one to me. That's something to look forward to over the summer. When you went into pollen, how did you find that experience for the first time when you went thousand Kalman's? You said you'd followed and observed politics for many years, but then you actually inside the chamber to try and make your name how those initial couple of years. It was a brilliant time, and I think being in coalition with Liberal Democrats gave Tory backbenches freedom because any policies we didn't light. We could just say it was a Liberal Democrats idea. So it was kind of licensed to go on will his what real Tory government would do if we had total control. And if Nick Clegg Wilson caulking things up, that's why we were able to do things the French prize. We were able to write books like Britannia unchained because there was a freedom that probably wouldn't have had under a Tory majority government where we'd have had to admit it was David Cameron to tell you about the free enterprise Cuban, how. Came together. This was AUSSIE like-minded MP's. You'll south who love liberty and wanted to try and keep taxes low as possible and folks on business friendly policies. That was one of many groups. I remember that emerged at that time when the conservative were back in power. And what was the aim of it? Well, after the financial crash, there was a lot of people saying that capitalism is over the, we believe in free enterprise anymore. And the what we need is more government intervention, and we feel that was completely wrong. They invite to lots of problems in the financial crisis have been caused by poor regulation. Say, for example, the tripartite regulatory structure or by t, much government spending, which is what labor Dunlap increases is the state forty, five percent of GDP say we were that to put the case full pro-competition policies, not just pray business pro new entrance pro, having a free market where anybody could be able to set up a business could be success. Awful. This isn't about defending the big corporates and specific registry benefits they might have. It was all about making the case for and price. But that of the controversial time when Britannia unchained came out, which was the book of thirteen free enterprise group MP's and essentially said Britain's of very lazy people. That was what you put us, and that was the headline. And it didn't go down probably quite as you wanted it to. Dave who exactly it said he was with me, but the issue that we were talking about was Britain's productivity problem. The fact is that it still the casing, they people in Britain, what very hard we're producing less per hour than other countries. And that means we're working incredibly long hours a, not necessarily getting the results say, pretend you're unchained was all about how do we open up more opportunities? And we talked about things like education becoming more of a risk taking country. I think we're overly cautious and people could say was certainly become a vis taking. Country in the past two years is Paul of the mater Vatian behind Brexit for load of people voted for? It was saying she, we can go lead, we can be successful. Let's have a go at this. So after the free enterprise group you I went to government is junior education minister where I believe you accord miss dynamite by civil servants..

Britannia Britain Jon Trickett Kalman Hemsworth telecoms Paul Nick Clegg Wilson Leeds David Cameron Dave Totta Yorkshire Brexit Dunlap five percent two years
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"The situation in parliament is not easy as we saw by the votes few weeks ago, but I think what checkers shows is a resolution is negotiable and does command parliamentary support. I think it was signature. But nevertheless, parliamentary support, and that is what we're talking about. The we are in a position where the conservative party doesn't have a majority. We do rely on the support of other parties, but nevertheless, those votes will won an overall parliament wants to see Brexit happened and they won't say it happen properly. So I take your point about it being very complex forty years of trading economic and legal relationships with the continent to sit there in the financial times and say, this is simple, but it isn't that it was sailing work of Grubman. Everyone thinks his glamorous, but there's a lot of grind to it and that as well is involved in such a complex negotiation. We had the election last year which reduced the conservative majority to next to nothing and the arithmetic forgetting breaks deal was cleared. So again, why did it take a year from the election to say, okay, this is where MP's are turnout to say, well, actually, here's a deal that we can possibly get through parliament. Well, if you remember. We ain't got onto the stage where we were talking about trade off future relationship, post, December, December, say that was important work that was undergone guessing through the first stage talking about the financial settlement, making sure that we had the implementation period in place. So that was an important stepping stone to getting to talking about the ultimate trading relationship and how that was going to work and it's involved what quickview opinion, union discussions that have taken place in parliament. None of these things as simple reason. But I think what's important is we have consistently made progress. The talks of moved to a new stage. We're now in a position where you'll self admitted. We've got an agreeable proposition on the table redo. So let's just talk about list trustful moment. How did you end up in politics and what did you do before you entered parliament? Say I've always been interested in politics, teenager even before. Well, I say interested. Kind of dragged along my parents. He were to see an Dima is and things like that in the nineteen eighties, and it was a fascinating time in politics. I was interested in what was going on the wiz, the Cowell with the safey union. I did get involved in politics as a teenager with the believe. It was actually the liberal Democrat. So there you go. I'm not quite that old. Was the Liberal Democrats at the time, and I'm essentially somebody who wants to control my life of believe, strongly impossible free to my believes that people who are capable adults should be able to determine if each ready believe in the government telling today, I thought the Liberal Democrats was the way of expressing that either. Then found out as I grew up as I met conservatives that actually that instinct in favor of freedom, self-determination, personal responsibility is strongest in the conservative party in this law about the Liberal Democrats is quite ninety. State, what was I got frustrated by what was the point? Can you remember when you flipped over form? The yellow bird to the blue Vos at it was at university is probably because I met Tories. He were nice people, and I, I could you met young toys. Stories, but who say the Europe debate was gang on at the time and the liberals time of Maastricht? Well, yeah, they came to join the euro which I thought was about idea. So that was one thing. And the other thing I remember is a big debate about putting a penny on income tax -education, and I feel that was the wrong policy that actually we shouldn't be raising taxes. We should be spending government money better, say. These things. I actually Liberal Democrats say they're liberal freedom, loving policy, but then already. So then after that, you will also directive reforming tank which focuses on reforming public services..

Liberal Democrats Vos Brexit Grubman MP Dima Europe Cowell Maastricht safey union forty years
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"And then this general sense, they haven't got enough teeth and not just doing that job poppy. And if you look at water twice which the FTC a lot of investigating and over the past couple of months, and it just looks like off what just not really doing their job that you think the regulators will fit for purpose lightly. We need to look at where we've come from, which is when those companies will first privatized in the eighties, thirty years ago, huge the performing and we need to remember what British way was like, which is the number of passengers would very low. The service was pulling the water industry wasn't being invested, and that has been turned around by do agree with you. We need to make sure the regulatory structures much the best in the world. And since the nineteen eighties, we've now got things like the. The internet which we didn't have, then we've got varsity new technologies. We've got new industries of pinned up, and I would like to see more cross-sector competition. So utility companies being able to compete with each other. And these are absolutely things we should look. We always aim to be the best in the world and Robin following the countries leading where you mentioned. The altar isn't to go backwards to the nineteen seventies nationalize them. The answer is to look at what the best countries in terms of broadband is countries like South Korea. You mentioned the best in the world, and there was a Flint as the Daily Telegraph this week is recording the set Britain's railways all the best in the world according to a spokesman with the road delivery. I think a lot of your constituents and commuters might not quite agree with that is definitely true and people are very annoyed about some of the problems of being with services. And in the modern world, we expect services are all the times when they say they'll be we're expect modern equipment, things like that. In so many cases and that is being fixed. I know that Chris Greyling is working very hard on that. Making sure that the timetable is delivered in the were problems at eight. Think anyone would deny that tool. So let's just do a quick review of the political USA. Be nice quite six months. Let's say every six months, I think it conga any crazier, and then it gets crazier what was a great time to politics from share interest point of view. I can tell you and fussing observed as well. What's been the craziest moment? What was the point where you just stood back and thought, oh, my word, this is just bonkers. I think of course, Brexit negotiations is the big thing we do. This is a forty year that we've been members of the European Union. We're working to leave the European Union, of course that dominates the political discourse. And that has created probably some of the maced seismic moments of this year was checkers and the aftermath, of course, but they're all kinds of other moments. I think the end of last year we had to resume getting on the plane at three in the morning. I think that was a important moment as well. How do you think check has landed? Because I think in terms of breaks that was probably the most decisive moment, not least because two cabinet ministers decided they couldn't stomach eight and walked out the government Boris Johnson, David Davis, but it was the first time. The u. k. really for what I would describe as a coherent economic strategy that was negotiable will find out in the autumn how much they you used to do to that. But why did it take so long to get to that point? Two years since we've oats leave the EU and all what was presenting check is should have been presented before we triggered article fifty. This stuff is an easy, Sebastian. I disagree with those people say we should have waited to trigger article fifty as far as the British public concern. They voted to leave the EU. They wanted to see action taken. We needed to get moving again stations in order to do that by the concentration we needed to trigger article fifty. It was the right thing to do. And of course, these things are difficult..

European Union FTC South Korea Daily Telegraph Chris Greyling Flint Robin Boris Johnson USA. Sebastian Britain David Davis six months thirty years forty year Two years
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"Happening in Westminster from the financial times. I'm Sebastian pain well into the summer, political retail. And so what trying something a little different over the next couple of weeks. I'll be sitting down with some interesting political figures you, I think he'll be shaping the political weather over the rest of the some of the might be familiar with others. Possibly not. Our, I guess I'm pretty sure you might have heard of Liz trust is the conservative MP for south west Norfolk and chief secretary to the treasury. She entered parliament in twenty ten as David cabins a list of candidates to freshen up the party state image. She first made her name as leader of the free enterprise group of MP's who wants to put a rocket up the British economy with some more business friendly policies. She rapidly took a political office. I as junior education, minister that into the cabinet in twenty fourteen as environment, secretary, then Justice, secretary and last June. She moved. Treasury and his reinvigorated her reputation. Thanks to a number of high profile speeches and ample use of hashtags. Liz. Thank you very much for comes the f. t. for summertimes his vast, although the accusations of accuser, it's not feeling very summary today, like most of the cabinet. I'm she or very relieved that it is now the summer break, the government hasn't collapsed tweets, amaze lent Downing Street. You're selling jobs, Evan complete, little easier until September. What does August mean for you? Well, August is a great time to get all the work done. You haven't been able to do jury rest of the year to make preparations for the autumn. We've got the budget coming up. We got the spending review coming up bowls. I'll be taking a bit of time off just to recharge the batteries and whereas time office at the constituency or board base such cell being Norfolk and Italy over the summer because the traditional idea in Westminster is the mpg disappear off the streets around us to be one tiny bad, but you're still minister. You've still got a department of Unser. How much time do you spend between the. Treasury and your constituency of some of technology can debase online. So be in the treasury very much over the summer. I'll be in my constituency spending time of my family. And yet of course, doing treasury work, but I can do online so stupid about your constituency Norfolk's very much very conservative area path from Clive Lewis, I think, and Norman lamb. It's blue all around there. And one of the main kind of things you have to deal with in your constituency apart from the dates casework most MP's get of the biggest issue in Norfolk is the poor infrastructure say it's the lack of serious infrastructure investment for years and years which were now putting right say one of my first chievements is nam p was getting the eleven jeweled which has made a massive difference, but it's getting the train lines upgraded. It's making sure that we've got broadband that is a massive issue constituents. I don't. If you saw a fascinating piece in the f. t. we ran. Those direct correlation between Bullard band speed and propensity to vote for Brexit, and it was the most Brexit voting areas. The ones that had the worst board bands, north Norfolk was awfully one of those places. Well, certainly my constituency, the broadband got better, but there is still a lot of people that don't have good enough broadband. I think in the molten, weld, whatever you wanna do, whether it's going Instagram, which I love doing all DEA homework. If your school or run a business, you need access to that infrastructure. That more can be done about that because a lot of focus on BT and BT open range, the two bodies that sort of a sponsor for this and people invite critic of open reach for not moving fast enough with. And what more would you like to be done? These areas we're looking at for the future and are no that December working on fiber Rolla how we do it, how we make sure it happens. But overall, they all utilities need to continue to be the best in the world. We need regulatory models that work. One of the things I've advocated is look at countries like South Korea who have led the world in this. You have a single utilities regulator. I think there's a lot more we can do was being a low of criticism of regulators across the board beat energy, be railway or bid on of calm full-bore band as well..

Norfolk treasury secretary Treasury Westminster Liz BT Justice South Korea Unser Evan Clive Lewis David Norman lamb Bullard Italy Brexit
"liz truss" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The labour shadow chancellor john mcdonnell said the business organization simply wanted and answers to some very basic questions about tariffs customs and regulations but above all else will the governor answer the question from the chamber will minister stop squabbling and provide some answers to these vital question a few minutes earlier the chief secretary to the treasury liz truss said labour wanted to overthrow capitalism now philip howard said it was fascinating to see mr mcdonnell posing as the champion of business when he's been attacking and undermining business ever since he got into his current position john mcdonnell had come prepared the charter doesn't have to worry about others underlining capitalism their agenda pretty good job but the chancellor recognize the concerns raised by the british chambers of commerce on friday the cabinet will meet to set out our way forward in negotiation with the european union we recognize that this is now urgent and that we need to make progress the shadow chancellor said it was time for philip hammond to show a great when the warring factions in the cabinet meet this weekend it is the role of treasury ministers to bring them into the real world and point out firmly to them the real cost of a no deal brexit on jobs the economy and all our living standards the chancellor said he wasn't going to give a running commentary but confirmed that he would spell out the cost of brexit i will be setting out for my colleagues in the privacy of our cabinet meeting on friday the treasury's indeed the cross whitehall economics groups assessment of the implications of different potentials roots for the meeting at chequers it certainly caught the imagination of opposition mp's the snb's john mcnally wanted to know what would happen if the uk left the customs union given so far failed to stop the heartbreaks what are we to expect from the chances are afraid to show the covenant dinovite or evasion and the labor former minister chris leslie sounded skeptical about downing street's new plan for a post brexit customs arrangement with the eu treasury chief secretary of finally allowed to have a look at this mythical third customers plan from number ten will they at least have the integrity and honesty to say that if it doesn't deliver the exact same benefits for scotland or for that matter for england wales northern ireland they'll come to this house and actually say so the chancellor smiled at that description of the new proposal but it was his deputy liz trust who answered the question we want to secure as friction this trade as possible with the you but also get those opportunities with the rest of the world the new customs plan appeared to take some senior ministers by surprise but cabinet ministers hate to be kept in the dark for long and of course they have their own sources as revealed by the defense secretary kevin williamson a short time later on the web series syrian democratic forces supported by what a very run business that is some of his colleagues argued amongst themselves about brexit mr williamson at managed to heckle himself courtesy of his mobile phone shown current reporting and they'll be more from yesterday in parliament just after half i state on long wave and on digital radio it's now twelve minutes to seven time for today's puzzle for today which has been set by hugh hunt reader and engineering dynamics and five brandon at trinity college cambridge in this full night of wimbledon and the world cup i've got my tennis balls all mixed up with my footballs this morning for instance there were four football's neatly stacked up as a triangular based pyramid i lifted off the top all and they're inside was hidden a tennis ball i was surprised because a tennis ball is about thirty percent the size of a football is it really possible to fit a tennis ball in the gap between four footballs and what about in the gap between eight football's stacked up to form a keep thorough part of the penalty shoot it's eleven minutes to.

john mcdonnell chancellor eleven minutes thirty percent twelve minutes
"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"liz truss" Discussed on FT Politics

"The business community could go and do and they're worried about the effect of brexit is probably the most serious in terms of damaging this conservative brand is being the party of business disastrous on not front and also having your foreign secretary really completely able and beyond any sort of disciplined by number ten it is a pretty bad situation i mean i think my favorite of the week is liz trusses bizarre outburst against michael novak and she sort of setup as being the kind of fiscally conservative conscience of the conservative party to try and remind other ministers not least gavin williamson that just because the nhs is getting lots more money the other why departments cont expect similar largesse or the conservative party will lose their other sort of key brian ingredient of being fiscally responsible but she was sort of slagging off a cabinet colleague more senior cabinet colleague in the most extrordinary terms and it's really become such a slightly comic if it weren't so serious georgia's been saying that is awful feeling of urgency the brexit decisions have to be made next week there has to be some sort of common position to termined by the end of next week all we really are in total kale's and that's before you even get the important business of trying to do the deal with brussels if possible before the tober summit i think it's really extrordinary position to be in just before the summer break the idea that mrs may had any authority over this crazy section of individuals seems to have disappeared entirely the only thing i think you can hope for is this kind of a lion's between the treasury and the more sensible members of the cabinet will prevail you know this idea of george is excellent piece at the beginning of the week said the idea that how many is trying to weaponize the weakness of the economy as an argument for doing a proper sensible compromise deal with brussels that i think the any sort of bright spot in any of this chaos the real question supposed georges that they all know to his make con sack these people because she's locking any authority at the moment and the balanced between the cabinet of mainers and leave as friends and enemies so delicate at the moment she doesn't really want to tip that over essentially they can all go out that say these things get a gentle slap on the wrist from the downing street press office and then essentially go on as before nice spoke to one prominent conservative mp this week say this dreadful in this 'em piece to me well yes it is dreadful but actually it doesn't matter because you concer that distracting for domestic policy because we don't have any and be honest any destruction from breaks is a good thing because it's all going so badly one take away from this week his the discussions in the conservative party about alleged contest of are more advanced and some people necessarily host what we've already seen this week as the auditory leech comes a may say no real authority left operates very off election year there's an expectation that's reason will probably be gone by the summer of next year some people think or even speculation minister he was wondering whether she could survive the next few weeks he tries to navigate these brexit discussions so people are putting themselves out i think the one thing i would say is they may position the parliamentary policy looks dimly from people who are looking to both these fables and the government being despoiled to the prime minister so i think if you look at yeah i'm taking some wins departments these coming doesn't go down well with either parliamentary paseo with people would choose the tory leader so i think despite about displays breaking down i think the possible more kindly on doing this kind of positioning more discreet way and i'm thinking here in particular someone like michael goes is doing a lot of what behind the scenes dinners with mp's actually getting with data come out with policies restraining quite popular of the environment department random people showing on the front page of the time ago i think that's absolutely right as to says you know you really need to keep an eye on michael gov not least because he seems to be lacking appetite to push mrs may off the tight road that she's been what walking for the.