5 Burst results for "Liz Brunner"

"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

22:22 min | 1 year ago

"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"There's going to be partisan diligent land right around a trillion or a little bit more than a trillion and so on one level the republican the last republican offer. That's really only about two hundred fifty billion dollars in new money. You could say that looks like an insult or that. It looks like a ridiculous response. It's nowhere in the ballpark. It's offering one hundred thousand dollars for houses listed at seven hundred thousand dollars. But i'm not sure it's actually like that. I as i look at you know i try to think about. What could you do in a reconciliation. Bill that you'd lineup all fifty democratic votes for how big that bill be. What could it really encompass. I think that might be so far off. From biden's opening bid that ends up being worth doing a deal with republicans that looks drastically different from what he proposed originally and of course the the good thing about being an eight year infrastructure package is. You can always come back and do more in the future if it's appropriate in the future to spend more money. The negotiations look at first glance like they should be sort of dead because the sides are so far apart but i. I think that there might be more reason for biden to take a much smaller loaf than you'd expect these negotiations. But i think that's gonna be a rude awakening for a lot of liberals if they end up doing an infrastructure package share. That's really only three or four hundred billion dollars of new money and it's all in very traditional infrastructure a areas such as roads and bridges. And then maybe some power grid stuff. I'm i think that I think that's likely to be disappointing. To liberals who saw the last round of relief get done and biden get substantially everything that he had asked for in the beginning except the minimum wage increase. I think that you can expect every future negotiation is going to end up looking like that one. I'll just add that. The republicans advantage here is that if you pass nothing you get nothing. So biden. Wants something cutting a deal somehow. Getting to fifty votes the negotiating advantages in the hands of the guys who say well if you want something. We're giving you something. Smaller is better than nothing. I'll be back with tim. Carney of the washington examiner and liz brunner of the atlantic talk about the return of cruises. You're listening to left right and center. You're hearing from our left right and center and we want to hear from. Ut tweet us at eller kcrw and download the free kcrw app to listen to left right and center on demand back again with left right and center. I'm josh barrow on the right. Is tim. carney. Senior political columnist at the washington examiner on the left is elizabeth brunette staff writer at the atlantic this weekend. The first big ship caribbean cruise since the cova driven cruising shutdown setting sale the celebrity millennium can hold over two thousand passengers. And it starts. Its first post co voyage this saturday but not from the united states. It's going to sail from saint martin us-based cruising is supposed to begin later this month. But there's a political snag florida's by far the largest us cruise embarkation point and cdc says. The cruise lines must ensure that at least ninety five percent of passengers and ninety five percent of crew vaccinated in order to sail from the us but florida governor rhonda. Santa's signed a state. Law that prohibits private companies from requiring proof of vaccination from their customers to santa suing the. Cdc and he's warning cruise lines. They'll be fine if they follow the cdc rules and that has florida's cruise industry in limbo. The ceo of norwegian cruise lines even said they can just sell from caribbean ports. If florida proved to be a problem. Tim what to send us is doing here. Seems like part of a major shift in how conservatives think about freedom. it's not just about freedom from the government he's saying private companies may not set rules that impact individuals in ways. That i don't like you can see it. In the fight over social media moderation which we talked about on the show last week and you can see it here with this rule of no vaccine passports. Which isn't just about when the federal government's trying to require the vaccine passports. It's also a prohibition on purely private enterprise decisions require proof of vaccination. So what's the deal with this concept of liberty. When should the government interfering to stop private entities from imposing requirements on private person. There has been a real shift. And i i've said on this show before that republicans conservatives have have changed the sort of feel like lost the debate for years we just said look a private business should get to do what it wants. And then you know the if you were talking about not catering a gay wedding if you talking about whatever and then immediately the argument would go back to black people being denied the counter and every time you said well if a private business wants to set a different set of rules it should be able to. That didn't catch on with the elite media and frankly most of the public wasn't totally on board. You see today with masks. The one of the biggest arguments. I hear about masking now. Is it's too unclear and inconsistent. I don't know. Why am i allowed to not wear a mask and giant but i have to wear a mask and safeway or whatever people kind of want consistent rules and so the idea. The argument let private businesses. Do what they want. And if you don't like it you can go to another one a lot of conservatives feel well we win on that so we're going to stop playing by that rule if the other side isn't going to play by that rule so that's how i see rhonda scientists action. The left has always said if we we know what's right and we're gonna make private businesses play by those rules and the right used to say. Well what i would say josh is. I don't think these cruise lines should have a vaccine mandate but it's up to them that seen as sort of of washing out because we know the other side wouldn't play by those rules anymore. There their relevant liberty interest. Here that that you see should should the government be making rules about when private entities can require proof of vaccination. Yeah of course. I mean take particular side. I'm a leftist. There's no left party in the united states. Look the idea of corentin itself was developed around boats which were just floating disease bombs because they put creatures human and animal in close proximity with no escape. They have always been vectors of virulent plague. Horrible horrible institutes. I don't know what would possess anyone to go on a cruise. But anyway if you're going to do that The institute of quarantine arose from i believe venetian authorities during the black death Forcing boats to wait in dock for forty days to see if people on them were going to die and huge numbers and it could have been a completely different pestilence than the black death it could have well been cholera Many many types of plague wash ashore on these horrible vessels all over the world historically And the current a virus is just yet another human history that we you know risk exporting all over the world as we try to stamp it out so i think it makes perfect sense from a public health point of view to say if we're all going to crowd onto boats and go to other countries which may have this virus under control or at a manageable level. Let's make sure that. We're not exporting. A bio weapon and we can do that by making sure that people who get aboard are vaccinated. This is a public health issue. Public health only works. If everybody has to participate it does not work if individuals op de not how public health works. But but so. I guess you make what i think is a is a strong argument. That cruises are are an environment where it is especially sensible to impose vaccine requirements. Because it's so easy to spread diseases in close quarters on a cruise ship. I'd also note. It's it's an environment where it's relatively easy to enforce a vaccine requirement. The same people are on the cruise for week. They already have to provide all sorts of other documents including a literal passport in order to get on the cruise and so the it's administrable to that requirement. Are there other places because the santa's has been trying to do this all over the economy. Are there other places where you're sympathetic at all to his his saying. Basically you know this other place where you might go. The contact is so incidental or it's so important that children be able to access at before they can be vaccinated of that sort of thing. Is he right to be to be trying to impose restrictions in in at least certain parts of the economy on the the the ability to say. Show me your vaccine card. Yeah i mean. If i can't find you like it here just running around in a field or something then fine but you know if you're going to school we already asked that you be vaccinated for instance now. Children are are a different story in this case right because they seem to be relatively low risk of vector. But if your teachers and you're going back to teach at a school you should be vaccinated if you're going into a movie theater again. Any place that human beings are gonna pack together like sardines probably need to be vaccinated. That makes sense to me And you know someone else. Some other risk actuary Can measure out the harms versus the benefits of particular venues. But i think that math can probably be the. The math has to include the fact that corona virus right now in the united states is not an epidemic really. I mean the the case numbers are falling. They're falling dramatically. We have a vast majority of adults have gotten a shot. In lots of parts of the country you're up to seventy percent are fully vaccinated or or have Have at least one shot and that among children it has not proved to be very deadly. Very dangerous thing schools. Were very safe this year. And so it's different than measles. I wouldn't send my kids who a school that allowed large numbers to be unvaccinated against The measles but and i'm glad the teachers at my kid's schools got vaccinated against corona virus of for their protection. That children are not particularly at risk from this that the virus is largely disappearing will flare up again in the fall is another question but also the other thing is that the coronavirus vaccines were approved on an emergency basis. There was an emergency that emergency has passed. We haven't gone full. Fda approval to say we're gonna have an expedited process for approving. This vaccine was great but there should be a time between when we say you can get this vaccine and you have to get this vaccine. That's that's where we are now. I'm not saying it would never be appropriate to require these for all sorts of settings but right now it seems with very low prevalence and with the drugs. Still being new. It seems that humility would have a say. We want everybody to get it but we're not going to make people get it but that is what i'm saying and it seems like my my sense. Is that the the crisis The pressure has come off of the pandemic because the vaccines have been skiing for large part and so it seems like you know we keep our foot on the gas moderately. I'm not an alarmist about this. I mean i got corona virus. My whole family did. And that's because we you know largely weren't shut ins during the pandemic You have to take some reasonable risks and we did and we got it and that was unfortunate and we quarantined and so forth and now we've been vaccinated as well but You know. I think trying to limit exposure to risk at the tail end of this thing while we manage it on. Its way out. You know within reason. I thank you know i i understand. Why the cdc's aiming at the movie theaters have almost no spread. I mean i think. I agree on the general premise again. We go case by case. You could probably persuade me on. Cruise ships certainly on hospitals. But certainly not a grocery stores and i would say probably not movie theaters again. Because there's just not great evidence of spread in those where the spread happened was big family sunday dinner. And so there's just not that many public settings where i think it would make That much sense to require it precisely because this isn't the measles it's not going to kill off a ton of kids. It's it's something that's sort of under control right now. What about places of employment. Because i think that's the other big area where we are having an are going to be having fights about whether vaccines can be required I in the long run. I think it's impractical to have to to try to scan people as they enter retail stores and movie theaters. That's a huge burden on the employees of these places and on those businesses they don't want to be in that business but workers go to the same place every day. It's again like on a cruise ship. It's relatively administrable to say you have to prove to me that you have been vaccinated in order to work here and we're seeing lawsuits at hospitals and other medical places of work where workers are saying. We don't want to be subject to a vaccine requirement to work here and we've had at least one of these outbreaks in a in a in a nursing home where you had an unvaccinated employees Who who got corona virus and ultimately we ended up in large number of patients some of them vaccinated and because of course the vaccines. They work very well but they don't work perfectly so it seems like one of the places where the strongest argument for being able to say you must be vaccinated in order. Show up here as a hospital or a nursing home but we're seeing resistance and lawsuits even over that and that feels to me like the one of the the number one places where we we should be recording it because Tim you're you're right for kids. Kovic really is basically just like the flu which is not to say that it's nothing but risk to children is relatively low. I'm concerned about the risk to too ill frail and elderly people even when they've been vaccinated in these in these concentrates settings and that's where i really think we do need to be requiring Yes we have to ask who is a third party. You're protecting if you're imposing something on somebody to tell somebody you have to do. This usually not always. I mean we require a motorcycle but typically were saying. There's some third party that we're protecting. You're not just taking the risk on yourself by going unvaccinated. And i agree especially if you're talking about the elderly among the breakthrough cases of vaccinated people catching corona virus. Almost without fail are minor cases. There's approximately zero deaths in the united sates vaccinated people now where they're happening is with the elderly. So if you're going to my uncle's in a nursing home if you're going to be serving him to require you to be vaccinated. I think is legitimate if you're going to show up at The the new york times office or the washington. Examiner or kcrw with a vaccine. You'd have to make a specific argument for how that is really endangering somebody else and to me. The vaccines are not one. Hundred percent effective is not in itself adequate argument unless you can say. Here's immuno-compromised colleague. Or here's how we're all crowded together in a tight booth for hours at a time all singing or shouting or whatever you have to make a specific argument that there's a third party you're endangering by showing up to work unvaccinated liz. I thought you said interesting. Combination of things. Because you talked about you know. Public health is something that we all have to together when you have a communicable disease. The policies don't work if you don't get you know if if you don't get widespread enforcement and get everybody to participate but you also you talked about the the very real personal sphere of of risk taking and choices that people make even in the context of an infectious disease pandemic. The government doesn't regulate every individual aspect of people's behaviors. People are going to make different choices about what they feel about risks and that's okay within a certain bound even though there are externalities and even though cova did not create an absolute moral requirement to take every possible precaution to reduce your risk of getting covert zero. That would have been impractical. So i guess how do you balance those things. Where do you determine where that sphere of personal choice ends. Even when those choices have some effect on other people. How do you decide where the line is where that effect is too large and the government needs to come in and say no. You're not allowed to make that choice. Yeah i mean. It's it's very complicated. The the list of moral decisions that are simply black and white rules-based moral decisions that are independent of context. Those are very short. That's very shortlist of moral decisions. That are completely contextual and are going to depend quite a bit on the people involved their specific situations And whatever is going on in the world in the world at the moment. That's a very long list of moral decision so In the case of corona virus there were a lot of things that made it a very unique situation. It wasn't ebola. It didn't have an extremely highly thallady rate across the board Where a young family. I'm thirty my husband's thirty two. We have a two year old and a five year old So we weren't high risk group to begin with we didn't have any exposure to elderly family members So in our immediate sphere. We thought about that not really exposed to people who are very vulnerable to this disease at the same time. You don't know who the people around you are being exposed to on a daily basis so we didn't want to pick it up at the same time there were certain things we weren't very willing to sacrifice In order to avoid picking up so for instance you could pay for a grocery delivery service like postmates or instacart. But that's just paying someone else a poor person to be exposed on your behalf We would rather be exposed. Been ask that person to be exposed considering that our risk was relatively low and we don't know that person's risk so it's complicated. It's difficult at something. You just sort of sit down and game out and in my case pray about and ask for guidance and reconsider every day But in the case of where the government comes in the government is looking at it from the view of know ten thousand feet from three hundred million people and managing it on the macro level and that has always been the government's role In terms of public health. From the government's point of view maximal vaccine uptake and maximal management of the pandemic until it is totally negligible in the population Are going to be the goals. And i understand. That is a problem for commerce. But it seems like we are getting to the point where those two lines are about to cross the commerce. Getting back on its feet. Pandemic is coming to an end. It's just a matter of not getting out over skis. Before those two things intersect before we break. I i want to switch gears and talk about one other topic. Which is michael. Flynn at a of cuban on type conference last weekend in dallas Someone in the audience has to basically. Will you know there was this military coup in myanmar. Why can't why can't we do that here. And flynn was like well that that should happen here. and then we've had reporting including maggie haberman and from charles cook at national review. Saying that the former president seems to actually believe that he's going to be reinstated into office by august. This is what the mypillow guy. Mike lindell has been saying also says two republican senators who lost in the last election. They're going to get seats back after these. They examined ballots in in phoenix and find the bamboo threads and the watermarks. And all the things that prove how the stole the election was stolen from donald trump. And all that stuff. That's actually that's actually going to work. He's actually going to be president again. Which is nuts again. It's as cook emphasize that seems the president's not saying this to troll people he's not saying to raise money saying it in private to people in a way that suggests he actually believes it and i i don't like to do segments where we just sit around and say god isn't that thing trump said not because i don't think that's very productive but when i look at this tim you know at some point. Republicans need to turn around and start running election campaign for two thousand twenty two. This presumably in large part about joe biden and joe biden's agenda and republicans should run the government. And that sort of thing. It seems like the president who was about to go back out onto the so-called campaign trail and speeches again the former president. he seems intent on keeping the republicans trapped in the psycho drama of his whatever. The effects are on the republic. It doesn't seem very useful for turning out republican voters and electing republican officials in elections in the future. Yeah it seems that nominating and rallying behind a narcissists without good ability to grasp reality might have been a mistake for the republican party. And it's a mistake that they're continuing to pay the price for donald. Trump is is what we raise our children not to be he. and that a lot of republicans tried to convince themselves that his total lack of character and sort of mental acuity with something that could be gotten over if he had the right advisers and he gave us a right judges and passer i tax cuts and he did give us the right judges and pass pretty good tax cuts but it still is a huge cost and maybe in the long run. Not worth it to put this man where he is because what he's done is. He has fostered so much of a loyalty from a significant portion of the republican base. Which is a minority of of the electorate. But it's important enough that so many other republicans feel that they have to be one hundred percent loyal to this man and not what he believed in but to the man and the man was a very worst part of the four years of the trump administration. And so i mean. It's a gift that will keep on giving to the democrats. But i don't think democrats should be happy about it because it's legitimately bad for our country to have The conspiracy theories floating around and the cult of personality for one of the worst personalities out of the three hundred and thirty million personalities in america list. Does this worry. You liked him describes. What an idiot cycle i mean. It's kind of amusing It's a little bit worrisome. I hope that no violence. No more violence comes out of it. It's also just really funny. The pillow for really adds to humor to it. My pillow guys running the country. Well not yet. We still have joe running the country. i think. I think we can leave that. There i've been talking with tim. Carney washington examiner and liz brunette of the atlantic. We will be back with patrick. Sharkey of princeton university talk about the rise.

Mike lindell donald trump Trump trump seven hundred thousand dollars joe biden patrick one hundred thousand dollars forty days august Flynn liz brunner ninety five percent two thousand thirty michael eight year Republicans maggie haberman flynn
"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"You have two sides and there's some distance between them on what they wanna do on an issue that a compromise should be expected to land somewhere approximately in the middle of their positions. But of course it can't always work exactly like that because that was how it worked. Then you could just utter ask however high was necessary. Such at the midpoint between your ask and the other side's is is what you were actually looking for to begin with and so it's just because biden proposed two trillion dollars. That doesn't necessarily mean that you know if there's going to be partisan diligent land right around a trillion or a little bit more than a trillion and so on one level the republican the last republican offer. That's really only about two hundred fifty billion dollars in new money. You could say that looks like an insult or that. It looks like a ridiculous response. It's nowhere in the ballpark. It's offering one hundred thousand dollars for houses listed at seven hundred thousand dollars. But i'm not sure it's actually like that. I as i look at you know i try to think about. What could you do in a reconciliation. Bill that you'd lineup all fifty democratic votes for how big that bill be. What could it really encompass. I think that might be so far off. From biden's opening bid that ends up being worth doing a deal with republicans that looks drastically different from what he proposed originally and of course the the good thing about being an eight year infrastructure package is. You can always come back and do more in the future if it's appropriate in the future to spend more money. The negotiations look at first glance like they should be sort of dead because the sides are so far apart but i. I think that there might be more reason for biden to take a much smaller loaf than you'd expect these negotiations. But i think that's gonna be a rude awakening for a lot of liberals if they end up doing an infrastructure package share. That's really only three or four hundred billion dollars of new money and it's all in very traditional infrastructure a areas such as roads and bridges. And then maybe some power grid stuff. I'm i think that I think that's likely to be disappointing. To liberals who saw the last round of relief get done and biden get substantially everything that he had asked for in the beginning except the minimum wage increase. I think that you can expect every future negotiation is going to end up looking like that one. I'll just add that. The republicans advantage here is that if you pass nothing you get nothing. So biden. Wants something cutting a deal somehow. Getting to fifty votes the negotiating advantages in the hands of the guys who say well if you want something. We're giving you something. Smaller is better than nothing. I'll be back with tim. Carney of the washington examiner and liz brunner of the atlantic talk about the return of cruises. You're listening to left right and center. You're hearing from our left right and center and we want to hear from. Ut tweet us at eller kcrw and download the free kcrw app to listen to left right and center on demand back again with left right and center. I'm josh barrow on the right. Is tim. carney. Senior political columnist at the washington examiner on the left is elizabeth brunette staff writer at the atlantic this weekend. The first big ship caribbean cruise since the cova driven cruising shutdown setting sale the celebrity millennium can hold over two thousand passengers. And it starts. Its first post co voyage this saturday but not from the united states. It's going to sail from saint martin us-based cruising is supposed to begin later this month. But there's a political snag florida's by far the largest us cruise embarkation point and cdc says. The cruise lines must ensure that at least ninety five percent of passengers and ninety five percent of crew vaccinated in order to sail from the us but florida governor rhonda. Santa's signed a state. Law that prohibits private companies from requiring proof of vaccination from their customers to santa suing the. Cdc and he's warning cruise lines. They'll be fine if they follow the cdc rules and that has florida's cruise industry in limbo. The ceo of norwegian cruise lines even said they can just sell from caribbean ports. If florida proved to be a problem. Tim what to send us is doing here. Seems like part of a major shift in how conservatives think about freedom. it's not just about freedom from the government he's saying private companies may not set rules that impact individuals in ways. That i don't like you can see it. In the fight over social media moderation which we talked about on the show last week and you can see it here with this rule of no vaccine passports. Which isn't just about when the federal government's trying to require the vaccine passports. It's also a prohibition on purely private enterprise decisions require proof of vaccination. So what's the deal with this concept of liberty. When should the government interfering to stop private entities from imposing requirements on private person. There has been a real shift. And i i've said on this show before that republicans conservatives have have changed the sort of feel like lost the debate for years we just said look a private business should get to do what it wants. And then you know the if you were talking about not catering a gay wedding if you talking about whatever and then immediately the argument would go back to black people being denied the counter and every time you said well if a private business wants to set a different set of rules it should be able to. That didn't catch on with the elite media and frankly most of the public wasn't totally on board. You see today with masks. The one of the biggest arguments. I hear about masking now. Is it's too unclear and inconsistent. I don't know. Why am i allowed to not wear a mask and giant but i have to wear a mask and safeway or whatever people kind of want consistent rules and so the idea. The argument let private businesses. Do what they want. And if you don't like it you can go to another one a lot of conservatives feel well we win on that so we're going to stop playing by that rule if the other side isn't going to play by that rule so that's how i see rhonda scientists action. The left has always said if we we know what's right and we're gonna make private businesses play by those rules and the right used to say. Well what i would say josh is. I don't think these cruise lines should have a vaccine mandate but it's up to them that seen as sort of of washing out because we know the other side wouldn't play by those rules anymore. There their relevant liberty interest. Here that that you see should should the government be making rules about when private entities can require proof of vaccination. Yeah of course. I mean take particular side. I'm a leftist. There's no left party in the united states. Look the idea of corentin itself was developed around boats which were just floating disease bombs because they put creatures human and animal in close proximity with no escape. They have always been vectors of virulent plague. Horrible horrible institutes. I don't know what would possess anyone to go on a cruise. But anyway if you're going to do that The institute of quarantine arose from i believe venetian authorities during the black death Forcing boats to wait in dock for forty days to see if people on them were going to die and huge numbers and it could have been a completely different pestilence than the black death it could have well been cholera Many many types of plague wash ashore on these horrible vessels all over the world historically And the current a virus is just yet another human history that we you know risk exporting all over the world as we try to stamp it out so i think it makes perfect sense from a public health point of view to say if we're all going to crowd onto boats and go to other countries which may have this virus under control or at a manageable level. Let's make sure that. We're not exporting. A bio weapon and we can do that by making sure that people who get aboard are vaccinated. This is a public health issue. Public health only works. If everybody has to participate it does not work if individuals.

seven hundred thousand dollars forty days one hundred thousand dollars two trillion dollars liz brunner ninety five percent last week Tim cdc today josh two sides saint martin three caribbean eight year josh barrow four hundred billion dollars republicans florida
"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Endangering by showing up to work unvaccinated liz. I thought you said an interesting combination of things because you talked about you know. Public health is something that we all have to do together when you have a communicable disease. The policies don't work if you don't get you know if if you don't get widespread enforcement and get everybody to participate but you also you talked about the the very real personal sphere of of risk-taking and choices that people make even in the context of an infectious disease pandemic. The government doesn't regulate every individual aspect of people's behaviors. People are going to make different choices about what they feel about risks and that's okay within a certain bound even though there are extra analyses and even though cova did not create an absolute moral requirement to take every possible precaution to reduce your risk of getting covert zero that would have been impractical. So i guess how do you balance those things. Where do you determine where that sphere of personal choice ends. Even when those choices have some effect on other people. How do you decide where the line is where that affect is too large and the government needs to come in and say no. You're not allowed to make that choice. Yeah i mean. It's very complicated. The the list of moral decisions that are simply black and white rules-based moral decisions that are independent of context. Those are very short. that's very shortlist. The number of moral decisions that are completely contextual and are going to depend quite a bit on the people involved their specific situations And and whatever is going on at the world in the world at the moment. That's a very long list of moral decision so In the case of corona virus there were a lot of things that made it a very unique situation. It wasn't ebola. It didn't have an extremely highly thallady rate across the board Where a young family. I'm thirty my husband's thirty two. We have a two year old and a five year old So we weren't risk group to begin with we didn't have any exposure to elderly family members So in our immediate sphere. We thought about that not really exposed to people who are very vulnerable to this disease at the same time. You don't know who the people around you are being exposed to on a daily basis so we didn't want to pick it up at the same time. There were certain things. We weren't very willing to sacrifice in order to avoid picking it up. So for instance you could pay for a grocery delivery service like postmates or instacart but that's just paying someone else poor person to be exposed on your we would rather be exposed than ask that person to be exposed considering that our risk was relatively low and we don't know that person's risk so it's just complicated. It's difficult at something new. Just sort of sit down and game out and in my case pray about and ask for guidance in and reconsider every day But in the case of where the government comes in the government is looking at it from the view of you know ten thousand feet from three hundred million people and managing it on the macro level and that has always been the government's role In terms of public health. From the government's point of view maximal vaccine uptake and maximal management of the pandemic until it is totally negligible in the population are going to be the goals and i understand. That is a problem for commerce. But it seems like we are getting to the point where those two lines are about to cross. The commerce is getting back on its feet. The pandemic is coming to an end. It's just a matter of Not getting out over skis before those. Two things do intersect before we break. I want to switch gears and talk about one other topic. Which is michael. Flynn at a a sort of q. On type conference last weekend in dallas Someone in the audience asked him basically. Well you know there was this military coup in myanmar. Why can't why can't we do that here. And flynn was like well that that should happen here. and then we've had reporting including from maggie haberman from charles cook at national review. Saying that the former president seems to actually believe that he's going to be reinstated into office by august. This is what the mypillow guy. Mike lindell has been saying also says two republican senators who lost in the last election. They're going to get their seats back after these you know. They examined the ballots in in phoenix and find the bamboo threads and the watermarks. And all the things to prove how the stole the election was stolen from donald trump. At all that stuff that it's actually there's actually a work. He's actually going to be president again. Which is nuts and again. It's as cook emphasize that it seems the president's not saying this to troll people he's not saying it to raise money saying in private people in a way that suggests he actually believes it and i don't like to do segments where we just sit around and say god isn't that thing trump said nuts. Because i don't think that's very productive. But when i look at this tim at some point republicans to turn around and start running an election campaign for twenty. Twenty two presumably enlarge part about joe biden. Biden's agenda and why republican should run the government. And that sort of thing. It seems like the president who is about to go back out onto the so-called campaign trail and be giving speeches again the former president. He seems intent on keeping the republicans trapped in this psycho drama of his whatever. The effects are on the republic. It doesn't seem very useful for turning out republican voters and electing republican officials elections in the future i mean it seems that nominating and rallying behind a narcissists without good ability to grasp reality might have been a mistake for the republican party. And it's a mistake that they're continuing to pay the price for. I mean donald trump is is what we our children not to be he And that is a lot of republicans tried to convince themselves at his total lack of Character and sort of mental acuity with something that could be gotten over if he had the right advisers and he gave us a right judges and pass right tax cuts any did give us the right judges and pass pretty good tax cuts but it still is a huge cost and maybe in the long run not worth it to put this man where he is because what he's done is. He has fostered so much of a loyalty from a significant portion of the republican base. Which is a minority of the electorate. But it's important enough that so many other republicans feel that they have to be one hundred percent loyal to this man and not what he believed in but to the man and the man was the very worst part of the four years of the trump administration. And so i mean it's a gift that will keep on giving the democrats. But i don't think democrats should be happy about it because it's legitimately bad for our country to have The conspiracy theories floating around and the cult of personality for one of the worst personalities out of the three hundred and thirty million personalities in america. Liz does this worry you liked him. Describes what an idiot psycho i mean. It's kind of amusing. It's a little bit worrisome. I hope that no violence. No more violence comes out of it. Also just really funny. The pillow part really adds to humor to my pillow. Guys running the country. Well not yet. We still have. Joe biden running the country. I think. I think we can leave that there. I've been talking with tim carney. The washington examiner. Liz brunner of the atlantic. We will be back with patrick sharkey of princeton university to talk about the rise in.

Mike lindell donald trump Joe biden patrick sharkey joe biden tim carney trump america Liz brunner Biden Liz thirty august two republicans twenty michael Flynn flynn three hundred and thirty milli
"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:36 min | 1 year ago

"liz brunner" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"By showing up to work unvaccinated liz. I thought you said an interesting combination of things because you talked about the public. Health is something that we all have to do together when you have a communicable disease. The policies don't work if you don't get you know if you don't get widespread enforcement and everybody to participate but you also talked about the very real personal sphere of of risk taking and choices that people make even in the context of an infectious disease pandemic. The government doesn't regulate every individual aspect of people's behaviors. People are going to make different choices about what they feel about risk and that's okay within a certain bound even though there are extra analyses and even though cova did not create an absolute moral requirement to take every precaution to reduce your risk of getting covert two zero that would have been impractical. So i guess how do you balance those things. Where do you determine where that sphere of personal choice ends. Even when those choices have some effect on other people. How do you decide where the line is where that affect is too large and the government needs to come in and say no. You're not allowed to make that choice. Yeah i mean. It's it's very complicated. The the list of moral decisions that are simply black and white rules-based moral decisions that are independent of context. Those are very short. That's a very short list. The number moral decisions that are completely contextual and are going to depend quite a bit on the people involved their specific situations And and whatever is going on at the world in the world at the moment. That's a very long list of moral decision so In the case of corona virus there were a lot of things that made it a very unique situation. It wasn't ebola. It didn't have an extremely highly thallady rate across the board Where a young family. I'm thirty my husband's thirty two. We have a two year old and a five year old So we weren't high risk group to begin with we didn't have any exposure to elderly family members So in our immediate sphere. We thought about that not really exposed to people who are very vulnerable to this disease at the same time. You don't know who the people around you are being exposed to on a daily basis so we didn't want to pick it up at the same time. There were certain things. We weren't very willing to sacrifice in order to avoid picking it up. So for instance you could pay for a grocery delivery service like postmates or instacart but that's just paying someone else poor person to be exposed on your behalf. We would rather be exposed. Been ask that person to be exposed considering that our risk was relatively low and we don't know that person's risk so it's complicated. It's difficult at something. You just sort of sit down and game out. And in my case pray about nasc for guidance in reconsider every day But in the case of where the government comes in the government is looking at it of from the view of ten thousand feet from three hundred million people and managing it on the macro level and that has always been the government's role In terms of public health. From the government's point of view maximal vaccine uptake and maximal management of the pandemic until it is totally negligible in the population are going to be the goals and i understand. That is a problem for commerce but it seems like we are getting to the point where those two lines are about to cross. Commerce is getting back on its feet. Pandemic is coming to an end. It's just a matter of not getting out over skis. Before those two things intersect before we break. I want to switch gears and talk about one other topic which is Michael flynn at a sort of cuban on type conference last weekend in in dallas Someone in the audience asked him basically. Well you know there was this military coup in myanmar. Why can't why can't we do that here. And flynn was like well that that should happen here. and then we've had reporting including from maggie haberman and from charles cook at national review. Saying that the president seems to actually believe that he's going to be reinstated into office by august. This is what the my pillow guy. Mike lindell has been saying also since two republican senators lost in the last election. They're gonna get their seats back after these you know they. They examined the ballots in in phoenix and find the bamboo threads and the watermarks. And all the things to prove how the stole the election was stolen from donald trump. And all that stuff that it's actually that's actually going to work. He's actually going to be president again. Which is nuts in again. It's you know as cook emphasized that it seems. The president is not saying this to troll. People he's not saying it to raise money saying it in private people in a way that suggests he actually believes it. and i i don't like to do segments where we just sit around and say god isn't that thing trump said not because i don't think that's very productive but when i look at this tim you know at some point. Republicans need to turn around and start running an election campaign for twenty twenty two. That's presumably in large part about joe biden and joe biden's agenda and y republicans should the government and that sort of thing. It seems like the president who is about to go back out onto the so-called campaign trail and be giving speeches again the former president. He seems intent on keeping the republicans trapped in this psychodrama of his and whatever. The effects are on the republic. It doesn't seem very useful for turning out republican voters and electing elections in the future. I mean it seems that nominating and rallying behind Narcissists without good ability to grasp reality might have been a mistake for the republican party. And it's a mistake that They're continuing to pay the price for. I mean donald trump is is what we raise her children not to be he and that a lot of republicans tried to convince themselves that is total lack of character and sort of Mental acuity with something. That could be gotten over if he had the right advisers and he gave us a right judges and pass tax cuts and he did give us the right judges and pass pretty good tax cuts but it still is a huge cost and maybe in the long run not worth it to put this man where he is because what he's done is. He has fostered so much of a a loyalty from a significant portion of the republican base. Which is a a minority of the electorate. But it's important enough that so many other republicans feel that they have to be one hundred percent loyal to this man and not to what he believed in but to the man and the man was very worst part of the four years of the trump administration. And so i mean it's a gift that will keep on giving the democrats. But i don't think democrats should be happy about it because it's legitimately bad for our country to have The conspiracy theories floating around and the the cult of personality for the worst personalities out of the three hundred and thirty million personalities in america. Liz does this worry you liked him describes what an idiot i mean. It's kind of amusing It's a little bit worrisome. I hope that no violence. No more violence comes out of it. A toss which is really funny. The pillow for really adds to humor to my pillow. Guys running the country. Well not yet. We still have. Joe biden running the country. I think. I think we can leave that there. I've been with tim carney. The washington examiner and liz brunner of the atlantic.

donald trump Joe biden Mike lindell joe biden Michael flynn trump america Liz maggie haberman august thirty flynn republicans dallas Republicans tim carney ten thousand feet democrats two lines three hundred million people
"liz brunner" Discussed on Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

21:38 min | 1 year ago

"liz brunner" Discussed on Voices of Hope’s Cardinal Cafe

"To put a spotlight on. Here's we wanna show the people that are in the arts these people doing good things through the arts and also people that are in the arts. That are doing good on there. There's so many of these folks out there. Yeah it's it's amazing how we all kind of interact with one another in mix and match and how we work together to keep the arts going. This is going to be a lot of conversation about how we are all trying to stay afloat during cogan even if we get the vaccine june july august. There's going to be a lot of non theater having and twenty twenty one lot of the theater. Groups live show to show and we wanna talk about how they're doing how people can help support them same with us. How we get support love to bring in and talk to some of our sponsors as to why they support us because they have a lot of their own stories as well. Then as i said a lot of our members have very personal stories mass. You either with voices of hope so we got a lot of fun things planned. We might throw a little sports ball for some of our friends at our avid fans and voices of hope. Sings at all the The red sox celtics patriots We do a lot of national anthems for a lot of local colleges as well. So when you're with us you gotta have. You gotta have a little sports ball knowledge but since this is our first one in some of the people who will be listening to this. Actually they're gonna be listening all over the world because we're on international platforms all of the ones that you can get a podcast on. We were out there kind of want to talk a little bit about the origins of voices of hope. How edna i met. I think ed wood was our first show together and colonial chorus working. Or were you in. It was yeah. I was in working. That was the show that we the lights went out during the opening number. That's that's what. That's what ed and i met just just like i two years ago. Maybe wish working before once on this island yes because after that i produced once on the right. And that's when you said you would never produce another show f for kids and here we are using. And i've known for a long time. We've done many many shows but the show that we were doing and the origins of voices of hope in two thousand nine was aida at arlington friends of the drama. A beautiful show one. That i didn't almost do. And when we have our directed dana siegel on. She can talk about that. Fun story teller. How almost didn't happen. So yeah edna. Were doing that show when my mom passed away from pancreatic cancer. She actually passed. I think it was opening night while i know you went home. Thirteen week. She was failing during tech week. So i went back home to indiana. Wake up to be there with her at the end because she went into hospice back at the house they had to drop out of aida. The show was opening and she passed just before the show went. Open coming back a couple of weeks later. I think we did three weekends. I think is three weekends. Two weeks later. I came home after the funeral and doing some other stuff to help set up back home. The cast invited me back in. I was like no. I some lance arnold. Actually a friend of a lot of people here took my spot filled in for two weeks when i came back. No no come back and do the last last weekend with us you. You need this and i did and they. Ed was the one who went with me the week and helped me remember the Harvey right i. One of the choreography was with those giant sticks. In know what i was doing. I'd kill somebody on. So that was your dance captain. Yes my dance captain and for all of you know that no you can appreciate that. They opened their arms and their hearts and welcome back and it was During that time in the green room talking to others and having them tell me their stories of how cancer affected their lives. Voices of hope was sparked. I knew i wanted to do something. Theater was what i did for recreation. In for fun Back then i was working in the The stock market and banking and stuff like that for real job. I wanted to give back in some way so we created this one night show in october. Twenty two thousand nine but you ought to tell them the funny story about opening night with you guys in how mom affected opening night we think oh my god that was there was there was so funny. We yeah you're right it was. It was opening night. And we're about maybe forty five minutes before curtain. Everybody is in the green room. We're getting ready in yup. Like you said all of a sudden there was a power outage in the neighborhood in arlington. You know we were checking with national grid or an star. Whoever the power company was in we kept on getting. Oh yeah the power is going to be back on. We can do it in a half an hour or an hour. We had a lot of the people. It was almost a sold out house. People were out in the street. We couldn't be in the theater so dana. My wife said you guys you gotta go out. You gotta go. Just mingle with people. Don't try to keep as many people here as possible. If we get the power back we can still put the show on so sure enough. We went out in full costume on. I think we even did a couple of pieces from the show just to keep them entertained and sure enough about forty five minutes after curtain was supposed to go up. Power came back on in so we went in and we did the show. We got all the way to the end of the show. It was amazing. It was a fantastic show in just as we were doing our bows everybody. The entire cast comes out in. Of course the two leads aida in rod amaze are the last two to come out and take their bow in just before they came out. The lights went out again. The emergency lights in the theater came on. You know people had their cell phones out and they came out and they took their final bow under the emergency lights. It had that happened five minutes all the emotion that was building up with her. Just been killed. But but your mom made sure dana. Yeah i got a text that i think was from somebody when the lights went out and said tell your mom it's okay we can have the show without you very funny it was. It was just very ironic. It was also ironic that our first show together on the very first night at the very for show united together. The power went out and reading and colonial course but we we entire number. We finished the number. Everybody was in their final position in a lights. Came back on the opening number rather all because of a coffee maker of community theatre plug in the coffee maker. it's in the same circuit as the lights. The aida experience brought me back to Wanting to give back and the only way was to raise money with my theatrical friends and after hearing their stories. I asked if you guys to come and do a show one night show In october of two thousand nine and we ended up raising seventeen thousand dollars at the next theatre they are now winchester and then we're like oh that's great. We did a great thing. I was very happy somebody else said. Hey you wanna do that for us. We went for the next door theater to symphony hall. Like wow berretta sixty giant leap and from there. that was. that's where it was born and we've been together now going on eleven years we've donated after this year will donate over eight hundred thousand dollars to cancer research amazing. I can't believe that. I know right. Now we start with dana farber in but the last eight or nine years. We have been with the tamir center targeted therapies at the mass general cancer center. They're just amazing people and we'll talk more about that as the podcasts continue. We're gonna have some of the m. g. h. People come in and chat with us about what our funds do for them and how they use those funds. We've got a scholarship named after us now. Which is amazing. But we've got a lot of things to discuss. So that's just. Basically the origins we started out with twenty two twenty three people and we are now at any given show. We're have over one hundred people on stage but the membership is well over two hundred and fifty people. Yeah it's amazing and people just keep coming. It's really interesting because all of us that are involved in in theater you look for show union. Go to a group you see. They're putting on a show. You really connect with it. You wanna do it. Then when it's done you look for the next show Manifests with another theater group. Than that's where you go but that is just the pure joy of producing art in with us. It's quite different because we use art is our vehicle to raise money but it's the family that's created in when people come in join us for a show. They realized how different it is than just being involved in irregular community theater production to be able to have over one hundred people at any given time. Active within the organization is just amazing every year. I'm worried that. Oh my god when people this year in. I don't worry about that anymore. Because they they love coming back in. This cova has been really tough because try to keep people engaged. We can't do anything together. Live and it's just been tough. Keeping people artistically fulfilled we've redone some online things Some cabarets things like that. But when you're doing those in your living room it's still doesn't really fulfil you even though it's a few moments of just being able to sing out of the joy of singing but one of the things that i've learned this year is we really truly are a family. People love to get together. They loved his. We have zoom meetings. And i'm like. I can't even keep up with how many people are on screens. It's just it spits. Been an amazing eleven years. And like i said as we move through the podcast. We'll talk to the people who helped create this atmosphere. Create the love. The joy people who've been helped you have our own members who've gone through the whole cancer journey with us the start of their cancer journey through the treatment through the living with and now cured so we have a lot of wonderful stories. But it's not just going to be about us. It's like had said we have a lot of community theaters out there. That need their voice heard You know here. A lot on the news about the susan komen the pan mass challenge the millions and millions of the giant people who raise tons of money which is awesome but there's a lot of smaller groups like us to amazing work our friends to conquer cancer center who have the guard of hope in the massachusetts license plates as well good friends of ours and they wanna come on and talk about their story and we have a few of those so it's gonna be it's gonna be fun. I said this is the first one. So we'll learn as we go figure things out the one thing that's been tough for setting this up and never doing it as edna. I can't be together so if it sounds like we are. that's awesome. Great engineer engineering. The vote that does a lot of work with a lot of podcasts. In the world like jordan rich and liz brunner and candiotti some of our friends as well but edsa in his little studio down the basement of his house and same with me. I'm in my basement. That's right now turned out to be. My daughter's basically her whole apartment packed away because she had to move on because of it and so when we can be in studio together with our guess we'll have a lot of fun bantering back and forth but it's very different. I'm sure we're learning the hard way. Yeah definitely but actually one of the things that we have been able to do in while greg said. We can't get together as a large group into performances but we have been able to secure grants that allowed us to turn our rehearsal space into a kovin safe recording studio. We have been able to get seven to ten people together and time in their own. Little recording booth that sanitized. We have our microphones. Everybody brings their headphones. We haven't amazing. Sound engineer in darren mcguire. We've been able to do things like our arsenic and old lace radio show. That was awesome. I mean just to do all of the rehearsals zoom and then to come into the studio and then just to lay down the show itself all get mixed together with the equipment that we've been so fortunate to be able to be gifted to us. We've also been able to do some recordings for the national anthem. The aso anthem was really cool by the way. Oh my god it sounded so good. And i guess the silver lining to not having fans in the arenas during the national anthem. You get to hear the last chord. that's something we never get here. Nobody gets to hear us tenors. You are beautiful. I don't know what it's called. Jonathan and grinding chris. They're gonna kill me. Because i don't know what the musical term is that when we changed the key at the end. Whatever we do we owe you modulate modulate thank you and you modulate and nobody ever gets to hear because the fans are all screaming and cheering them. Like nobody gets to hear the tenors. Do greatest two notes in the national anthem. And this time everybody got to hear it. That's right that's all ten is out there. For our holiday cabaret we're able to lay down the caroline tracks that we played along with the live. Caroline that we did over. Its wants a meadows so it's fairly been nice when we had those opportunities just to get together. Just to sort of reconnected person. But like you said everything else has been over in zoom to get forty to fifty people on a friday night for as zooming is pretty cool. Twenty twenty the word for me is adapt. We've been able to adapt at least try and do something now. We can go on and on about what we did all year. But my best memory of twenty twenty first voices of hope. We were asked to perform the song from german hanson. Oh my gosh again. Thinking it will be found. You will be found for mass general's annual fundraiser for the cancer center they wanted entertainment live and unfortunately they didn't have the dinner live so they asked if we would do a recording and they've professionally filmed us out up at Ramos day crane estates nips which in ipswich in created this amazing video. That we probably never would have done are being able to do you think about doing. They hadn't been for the way we were locked down. And that's kind of how the whole studio started. We needed to build a research. That was covid safe with the boos at talked about so going out and grabbing a grant and having that done we learned a lot. It's taught us how to look at theatre different way how to Participate in a different way and how to bring different people in for and people have given us Different skills that we didn't even know they had so with all the trials and tribulations of not performing live in being on stage and having the camaraderie on stage in the feedback from the audience. In all that it's really kind of helped us in a different way. Learn learn new skills and learn how to sing on a microphone. Which i didn't think would be that hard but it is. You know if you're in a group of one hundred people on stage and you forget the words are you forget the no mouth it. Nobody's no but if you're being miked and you have to sing that part out as nine. There's the ad so true though what you say about adapting and one of the things. I'm really excited about for this broadcast. Is that even. You know us. Little community theater folks that are adapting in trying to find ways of staying engaged. Same thing's happening in the professional world. And there's broadway performers that actually. I'm hoping that we're going to be able to get on to come and talk. So that's gonna be exciting yet is an. We were very lucky. the other thing i was gonna say about cove is it helped us in other ways of getting other people to come and talk to us in perform actually with us that we never would have because we're just trying to reach out to anybody who come in talk to our group in just say hello and we had some amazing people broadway. Tv movie stars rockstars popstars and pop into our Our cabin meetings and our cabarets just to say hello to our to our members because they know what we're going through and they've been there they started where we started and they just wanted to say hello and tell our members to keep going keep fighting. It was incredible. And i'm again if edmund for covid we probably never would have made those connections right. Hopefully they'll continue to work with promote and help us and brigandage the same. I know the first thing that we're all gonna do is. We're gonna get care to go see jagged little pill that casseus jon allen krill has been a great friend to us done a couple things for us in the cabaret and then actually let us use his christmas song on our fundraiser. It was incredible. I think for our first attempt here. I hope we have droned on until too many stories. But that's what podcast is right. We're not a serial podcast for next week. You find out how. Ed how many stitches. How how many. How many fingers healing we. We're talking to data. And she was like you know we should think about a throughput or something. I don't like jokes out of something to each week that we can do. We should talk about how each week a vh member comes on and talks about their covert injury. Because everybody. i've talked to his head hurt themselves in the kitchen one way or another because we're all learning how to re cooker got something but the one thing that we are going to do is a little theatrical or trivia. Got to be totally honest. I know a lot of music trivia. And i know a lot of tv trivia. Like i could name every character and gilligan's island in every episode but theater trivial tough. So we're going to start tonight. And i'm going to see if i can stump ed ready. Ed yeah you gotta make it hard one. It's a hard one all right so this adds this has to do with origins of voices of hope. Okay what is the connection between aida in very first song that we sang in october of two thousand nine which was five hundred and sixty thousand. Actually seasons of love is the name of the shower. So what is the. What is the connection between two in seasons of love. I in seasons of love. There's a connect. Yeah there is a connection. And i think i know s what that is a world. Oh stay tuned. Next they tell that would be the broadway production of eva starred adam. Pascal as roma's in seasons of love from brent also starred adam pascal. so there's the connection next week you're gonna you're gonna ask me in bay wolf That's right up on your theater trivia because next podcast is going to be a hard one. Our necks podcasts will have some guests we are hoping to bring in some of the theater groups some of the smaller groups around that do the same work we do. Some of our friends from voices of pope our board members our sponsors come in and tell their stories because everybody has a story in. It's really what we want to get out. There is very is their story and keep it going so ed. Thank you for the first podcast. We did it. Yeah thank you. Thanks for putting together. I think it's gonna be really fun. Hopefully folks will find us interesting. We'll finally the topics interesting and the folks that we get on to come. As our guest speakers will without generate interest in their communities will start getting a nice following. You did mention that direction hanson. You'll be found piece that we did a crane's estate Folks go to our website. Vh boston dot org. It's right on our landing page and it is pretty amazing. The video work that was done by this crew just straight on shots and also the drone shots and the other part of that production was the switch orchestra. The high school orchestra. That was also an incredible. That will is just absolutely. I was just so blown away by the talent of these kids. Just fantastic the other thing. I'd like to say is anywhere. There's a podcast that you listen to. we're there. It's called the cardinal cafe voices of hope and we are out there I could name them all but we are international stars two now but it will also be on our website. Starting next week the podcast will be on our our landing page. Vh boston dot org c. Can click there as well if you know anybody that would like to be a sponsor for this podcast. Just go to website and send me an email as well. I just want to thank dante. Bolt our engineer. Who put this together. Dare darren beset. Who allowed us uses song northern winds for the beautiful opening and closing all right. Well thank you until everybody keep listening and hope you come back actually if you want to go to our website and of some feedback on the podcast. We'd love to hear it really lush feedback in some some thoughts of what you'd like to hear in theater. People never give their opinions. When all i did have a good week and next week. All right looking forward to a gregg.

seventeen thousand dollars forty Pascal Jonathan candiotti october jordan rich darren mcguire two weeks next week two years ago tonight indiana dana farber Ed adam seven ed millions first song