17 Burst results for "Little"

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"You clearly go above and beyond in bribing physical attributes of unattractiveness hair. And i wanted to talk about why i mean clearly. This is a deliberate fair criticism. Vecchio the burr holding my feet to the fire for this. Because i agree. I think maria extraordinarily vain in her vanity is part of her character. And she's she's vain and she's wounded by the way that she thinks other people see her and so she's constantly thinking back to her her own physical attributes and feeling not good enough and and this inspires her to do some quite lovely and wonderful things in the book but it also inspires her to do perhaps compensates in other areas. I would like to believe that her. It is this constant reference back to her mud. Lateness comes from her and comes from her her feelings of being an outsider and being a bastard as than being Not good enough in trying very hard with all of her diligence in power to overcome what she says her profound preliminary flaws illicitly. Atoms are nailed. Any damn it to you lauren growth. And we're talking about her latest mobile matrix and lowering a good the second the hulk talking about the life of a non the daily routines and to begin their i spend you know a good twenty billion googling various different sites trying to work out what the difference was between an abyss and a prior and seem to be divided. So i would ask you the same question. Well i think that in larger abbey's they were different. Orders of obedience areas which are the people who support that the head of the house. I think in the larger places that abbasi's ruled But perhaps i'm incorrect in you can tell me what your research told you. But at their sometimes they were only paris's and sometimes they're only addresses in sometimes. There were both in the same place. Get pretty much. What i read it. It was confusing sometimes the progress the bisi judge right exactly and they're all you know you said various different layers. There were nuns. That's the analog overseas. The sisters are in charge of the various different areas have various different jobs and tasks and stuff and then there is an novice as and then there was another group of people code ablaze and hair in their story. They're often children. And i wanted to about who they were so in this particular. Stir that's a little bit different in general and oblate with someone who is given the adding A child of late was seven. Who is given to the abbey as a child by their parents. And so for instance. Hildegard von benjamin. Who's my favorite medieval. Missed it. because she's a genius on multiple levels. She was given a child late. She would grow up within this abby Learning the things that the other nuns taught her learning numbers learning literacy learning languages learning how to run a vast estate in a fiefdom and becoming powerful that way and in this book. It's obviously. I tried very very hard. Not to put anything into the book that i hadn't found an instance of in my research which was extensive and exhausting. But i think that it's i stretched a little bit at the borders of what is in historical record by making my child. Blades a be people from the impoverished classes and like strong people from of the the villainous says the the peasants working on the field. Because marie sees that a different qualities are necessary for the running of a place like this abby lake..

Vecchio maria abbasi lauren Hildegard von benjamin abbey paris Blades marie abby lake
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms. A radio show about ideas and coach with me nailed any this week. Lauren growth returns a little ad. Talk about latest novel. Matrix is a new york times. Bestselling author three levels the monsters of templeton acadia and faints bureaus and the celebrated short story collections delicate edible birds and florida which we talked on their labs. A couple of years ago has been featured in the new yorker harpers the atlantic and simple best american short story anthologies. And today we're going to be talking about loans. Latest novel matrix lauren. Welcome back little atoms. Thank you so much for having menia first of all. Tell us how you would describe this novel. I just kind of this novel. As a contemporary retelling of the life of the phones who has the first female poet in french who became an abyss. But we don't actually know much about her so it's all imagined she becomes a mistake in my book and this book deals with ideas of female power and autonomy and a little bit of climate change and all sorts of other things the purpose of religion in the life of a person who is resistant to it. Well hey when you describe it. In those times i was gonna say this is ostensibly on the surface that departure for you compared to your previous word but actually there are many contemporary residences in the story. Oh absolutely actually meant for this book to be sort of the past and the present speaking to each other over the abyss. There's this incredible. Elliott smith quotes. That i was thinking about as i was writing. That goes a work of art in unfixed time. The shaft opens the past and present exist in the same moment and we know as being that. We are connected in that sort of the idea that i was trying to go with. I also played around with some of the historical fiction written by say penelope fitzgerald. Who does this sort of extraordinarily lights vision of the past written with a great deal of sort of contemporary wit's end ideas that have slithering in and out so that was my model for this book. What i was going to ask you about right at the edge. But let's do it now. Then so well support for joe terms of writing hysterical historical fiction.

Lauren new york times lauren florida Elliott smith penelope fitzgerald joe
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"It just felt like this is a decision that makes sense because you know like this is sort of how the character is feeling her house. She thinks of herself right. Looks like with the second person dot creates kind of like a convenience distance. Like you're sort of watching yourself from afar you're disoriented so that sort of was a suitable way of like how you might feel when you suddenly like arrived in this in your home country where you haven't been for twenty years and then you know she's the person who season really sure who she is like she sorted feels very uncertain. She houses identity of like. Yes i'm the new volunteer. An yeah so. I think kinda writing outweigh of like referring. Turn those different ways. It was just a decision that just makes sense to me. I just i sort of just trusted my gut. Trust my instinct and using. It turned something about mattias. Well then yeah. And so he is. You know sort of a simple way. Describe human lena's like childhood friend. But i mean calling him like her brother would also be accurate because they they lived together. They grew up together. They were very close. And you know the kind of like revelation of the back story of sort of like how that dynamic came about about how he came to live with. Her family is kind of a key moment in the book. So so we're not going to give that up now. You'll have to read a tantalizing revelation. But yeah and i mean i think it's interesting because sometimes i feel like when people read the book like people think lena's the character who sort of the stand for me. I can understand that because you know like me like she studied literature though. Technically you know. I studied creative writing. But you also we will have an academic background. You know we're both like the same gender but like really like mattias. The character who. I feel like he resembles me more because i think sort of his struggles of just kind of like his his kinda like desire for like privacy in sort of like also the way he he really wants to help people right unlike. That's an instinct. I recognize myself to just sort of like. Oh yeah like..

mattias lena
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"The tia's is also someone who who plays like a really important are unlikely to hear his voice kind of closer to the end of the book. And i suppose sort of like the main story. Their main conflict of the book is them kind of like butting heads for. She really wants to know what he's been up to like how he spent like the past twenty years and he's very kind of private person very reserved person who just wants to move on like he just wants like a fresh start like he doesn't want to unpick the past kind of pick the scabs and i suppose he kind of parallels the situation of columbia the time like post like peace agreements were. It's kind of you know. Obviously it's not like a direct parallel but this idea of sort of like well. How do you sort of move on from the past like it's kind of talking about it constantly like is that actually a healthy thing to do but at the same time obviously like burying things not having things come out into the open either that has consequences as well and cheese usually comes from a relatively wealthy background that you'd obviously grow up a pro so there's various reasons why she might like a privileged outside to the locals but also as the book goes on both about this but also obviously About you know the gradual revelations about about matthew. We're not gonna give him which way about the story. But just i guess. Summarize it's a little bit and that we start to realize that she's she's a lot more trouble than i said's. Yeah unlike in is her background. Like that was definitely something. I thought about a lot because my first book which was a collection of short stories the lucky ones like that also kind of dealt with know a group of like. I guess what you would call it. The colombian opera class kind of like you know people with with drivers go to to private schools where you know like you speak english or french and so forth so yeah and i mean like that was..

tia columbia matthew
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Kinds of writing. Say i missed. Read fifty novels so the auto fiction novels are all very short and they're very modest you know in a minimalist in in their platz and their ambition is almost doubles. Nothing i mean. The ambition is is not like proust's you could say remembrance of things past some sort of auto fiction but that has sent it's adequate because preuss was also a beautiful stylists and he was revolutionizing the whole concept of a fiction so i'm reading a variety variety of novels and unaccompanied these little fin auto fiction and it just seemed to me so well all kinds of writing is fine. You know i don't. I don't really care that much about being judgmental. What compared to a really ambitious nab all. Let's say something by toni. Morrison or java wideman or colson whitehead or many other people. The auto fiction just seems to be very anemic. So i didn't really mean to get into that at great detail and my novel is not all objection is really not. It's more about the kind of surreal number that one experiences in a hospital in after the death of a loved one i wanted to explore kind of estrangement that we feel from the world. The encroachment of the environment a kind of trance personal experience that is their experiences in our lives at certain points. That really are not dependent upon being particular people but just being human beings in the most obvious one would be birth were born and this is a trans person are universal experience which we don't do voluntarily and we don't we don't remember and i suppose death is like that also it's analogous. These are experiences that don't belong to us. As individuals at mcculloch has experiences throughout the novel. That don't necessarily belong to only her but belong to anyone who's not going the sort of experience that she is on. I think it's a phenomenon that when you lose somebody close to you at such a trauma to your sense of the ad to logical status of human beings that you can't really grasp that this person isn't somewhere in elect. The person could be in another city or in australia you can't really quite fully grasp. That was nowhere that you can find that person anymore. I think intellectually we know that but emotionally. I think it's very difficult. And i think children probably can't grasp that that helps to explain why ghosts are believed by many people because they they're so haunted that they give a kind of visual form to the haunting nece michaela she hallucinate She sees gerald everywhere is ever present in the in the second of the bulk after he is dying and she becomes undone. She said she eight. She stops eating Mysteriously starts to south home. It would seem and she failed without becoming pharaoh becoming animal. And there's this particular horrific like elements of horror. Come into the book in this sequence repeated. where she she fails that she's given. She imagines that she is basically given bone. Marrow had an operation to give gerald bone marrow in an attempt to save him and this is somehow then been stolen from her and use. That will tell us about this sequence. There are a number of quasi hallucinatory episodes in the novel..

preuss java wideman colson whitehead proust toni Morrison mcculloch nece michaela australia gerald gerald bone Marrow
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Gerald who he is which is actually inspired by my late husband. Charlie who was acquitted distinguished neuroscientist. So jared is not at principalities. At harvard he is his really not identical with my my husband and mikhail is not identical with me as i said i was using using them parameters of memoir and really re imagining the same material and save emotions but reimagining them with different people slightly different setting and more of a complicated platt and so it both is and both is an is not based on real people. So jared was is a professor at harvard. And he's interested in going to the west of the united states which is very different from the east. Most obvious signet happens when you go west and go to a place like santa chiara which is inspired by santa fe. Most obvious thing that happens immediately is that you can't pre you're very short of breath because accident is not being utilized by your brain. Your grades not getting enough axa jen and so your heart goes a little faster and you may have a feelings of slight panic. Or maybe just hyper excitement. You enter a different state of consciousness if you're coming from sea level which is where i come from when i go west. So he goes out west and he wants to. He gets very interested in endangered languages. Studying the languages of a number of native american tribes and peoples who are we might call aboriginal native americans whose ancestors very much predate any any white white settlers from england. So we're in a in a landscape that both isn't isn't america or united states. The united states is relatively new nation but north america has been there for you know millions of years and so when americans come to parts of north america or south america they were they moving into regions that predate their own Civilization so jared gets very interested in endangered languages and mcculloch learns that you're the after his death when she's looking at us. Manuscript and mcculloch comes into Some sort of really awkward and.

jared harvard mikhail Gerald santa chiara united states Charlie santa fe north america england south america mcculloch
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Stephen walker was born in london. Here's a ba in history from oxford and an ma in the history of science from harvard is previous book shockwave. Countdown to hiroshima was in new york. Times bestseller is also an award winning documentary director. His films have won an emmy ab- after and the rose door europe's most prestigious documentary award. Today we're going to be talking about stephen's latest book which is beyond the astonishing story of the first human to leave our planet and journey into space stephen little atoms. Thanks for having me. The first thing we took about is why now for this book obviously books like a lot well to actually write wii the book out right now. I mean the obvious. The obvious truth is is out because we've just hit the sixty s. This is the big year the sixtieth anniversary of the first human or humans. In space yuri. Garin the first human to go into space when that in april nine sixty one which is just over sixty years ago and then substantive app americans who joust essentially lost the race with the russians the soviets for the first human in space got their astronaut. Alan shepard into space in may nineteen sixty one. So he'll talking about an anniversary and publishers. Love 'cause they can do things that investors which is great and so. That's what parts of it but i think it's more than that for me because i'm a none of us. Rates is one thing this is a hook but it's not enough for me to do a book like this and to put a book like this out at this time. The key is that we are living in very exciting times. As far as space is concerned is just tremendous kind of impetus adventure. We can maybe talk about Really exciting's happening happening among. Obviously there's talk about going back to the moon again as you space telescope going up based on the big entrepreneurs for like eat a mosque. Jeff bezos will satisfy switch. Brunson ruled taking Up into space and themselves. I think going up into space to get taste of what that's actually like so women a very interesting time with as little energy and excitement and there's a lot of drama and a sense of real adventure that we haven't really hunt for a very very long time and i think you could get back to the sixties to recapture that sense of adventure and excitement so in a way at a time when we on taking later steps you know we've beginning to move out into the soda system beyond anything we've done before. It's incredibly apposite. Time to back six decades to the moment essentially will begun when the very first step was taken by the very first human being into what i've called the beyond cycle title of my book just briefly remind of the context in which all of this story takes place. Why are the usa and the is are engaged in this race to space. We're in the middle of the cold war. I mean the epicenter of the cold war. You have the tastic..

Stephen walker Garin hiroshima Alan shepard oxford harvard yuri stephen london europe new york Jeff bezos Brunson usa
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Besides jake knew as elliot had known as all artists often know that every story every single work of art from the cave paintings to whatever was playing at the park theatre in kabul skill to his own puny books with in conversation with every other work of art bouncing against its predecessors joined from its contemporaries harmonizing with the patterns all of it paintings choreography in poetry and photography and performance And the ever fluctuating novel was willing away. In an unstoppable spin art machine of its own and that was a beautiful thrilling thing. He would hardly be the first to take some tale from a play or a book in this case a book that had never been written and create something entirely new from it. Miss saigon from madam butterfly the hours from the dalloway. The lion can from hamlet. For goodness sake. It wasn't even taboo and obviously it wasn't theft you're gonna parker's managed existed at the time of his death. Jacob never see more than a couple of pages of the thing to remember little of what he had seen shouli what he himself might make from so little with belong to him and only to him. Be sen- were the circumstances in which jake found himself that january evening and his computer in his credit curbs full apartment in the leather stocking region of upstate. New york out of pride hope time and he could finally admit ideas of his own. He hadn't gone looking for this. He had upheld the honor of writers who listened to the ideas of other writers and then turned responsibly back to their own. He had absolutely not invited. The brilliant spark student had abandoned okay involuntarily abandoned to come to him with come it had and here it was this urgent shimmering thing already tap tapping in his head already hounding him the ideas characters. The problem so what was going to do about that. He rhetorical question. Obviously he knew exactly what he was going to do about that so i took it to jean communists. We've been talking about her latest novel. The plot which is at the uk from favor gene. Thank you so much for taking the time to share. It was great to talk to you again. This episode of little atoms whose produced and presented by me nail denny edited by sky redman and was first broadcast on resonance one. I four point four. Fm latham's is supported by eight to nine up in hosted by cast. If you enjoyed the show please do subscribe rates on itunes and even tell a friend. Thanks for listening..

park theatre jake shouli kabul elliot parker Jacob upstate New york sky redman Fm latham denny uk
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"That only they can tell on which is bullshit and bullshit so into his class. Walk all of his predictable people including one who was certainly there in the only creative writing class. I ever attempted to teach many years ago massachusetts. But i've since confirmed is present in every single creative writing class this guy. This incredibly arrogant guy who in this case is named evan parker. And it's with. Evan parker that the plot of the plot really begins when a date. I wouldn't do this. Actual guy is present at all of those classes. Because evan parker does it turn out. He's right about himself. He is and when he announces to the class that he kind of doesn't need them doesn't need his teacher doesn't need to be. There doesn't need anything because he's writing. You know the greatest plot never told before and all of the wonderful things that we all dream of happening to our novels are going to happen to his novel and he he's protective of the story and will not share it in class but later in a conference with jay his teacher He does let drop the story and jake. Here's the reader doesn't hear it. We don't get to hear it to later. We don't know what this miraculous blood is. But we know that jake to his own distress absolutely agrees with his student. This book is going to be successful. It is going to make evan extremely famous and wealthy and successful and that is just so unfair and yet there are rules about these things and there's nothing he can do about it so you know he he returns to his own downward slide as a writer and a couple of years later. He makes the discovery that evan has died. He and he's died without completing his book. Certainly without publishing this book perhaps even without writing his book at all so suddenly jake finds himself not just to kind of envious teacher of an undeserving student but a writer confronting a story that has been left behind and and it's just sort of sitting there waiting for somebody to come along and pick it up and do it justice and it doesn't take much self persuasion for jake to decide that that writer is himself before we carry on with whether boat goes from. There just meant to win. Jake finds out. The evan has died his own career as sung. If possible even lower and are brilliant sacred. So i would say he's basically left to create the creative writing calls and he was doing this completely online and he's he's still a bit of money from that but he ends up working basically what like a writer's retreat but they just had the balladry of a out for basically. I mean somebody. I set that sequence in the town where i am right now to town in upstate..

evan parker jake evan massachusetts jay Jake upstate
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They is little atoms a radio show about ideas and coach with me nailed denny this week gene on a new novel. The plot gene correlates was born and raised in new york city and educated at dartmouth college in college cambridge. She's the author of seven novels including the devil webster which respect about mc latins a couple of years ago you should known was adopted as the twenty twenty. Hbo series the undoing story. Nicole kidman hugh grant and admission was adopted as a twenty thirteen so with the same name. So tina say lily tomlin paul rudd's and wrote novels included the white raise the sabbath stay with an injury of pays and today. We're going to talk about jeans new book the plots gene. Welcome to little adams. Thank you for having me back. I guess i didn't disgrace my guilty badly. Leftback tennis how you would describe the plot..

Nicole kidman hugh grant denny dartmouth college webster new york city cambridge Hbo lily tomlin paul rudd tina adams tennis
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Erratically appropriations okay but then we have to look at how white the publishing industry is super super white the us so that means that the appropriation is more likely affecting people of color. We have to look at how masculine american literature has been. How many men chosen to write in women's wasted. I am this is amazing. Podcast called marlin j. re dead people and to the bowl. Yeah and they just had one episode recently where marlin james new amazing booker prize winning author. I can't leave anyone listening to podcasts into who he is. He said that in order for men to write women they need to read women and his editor jake said will then in order for women to write men they need to remand. Knee said they already do. Yeah i mean yes. I mean if you're sort of outside of that thing that keeps being identified as the default which is white male insists in straight. You've been absorbing all of the stuff about that default. All your life is a reader. so it's actually. It's really not hard to ready. Characteristic gerry anderson. I i know dozens of jerry or since white men might age involved in creative endeavors. Who are a little bit clueless about the damage that they've done. So yeah i mean but i go round it around on this if we look at the back simply in courts of the case of dream girl first of all. This is one place where we should believe jerry. Jerry made it. He made the whole thing in the reason. He doesn't wanna talent you on what the inspiration was is because then you know..

marlin j marlin james jake gerry anderson us jerry Jerry
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Had this great job. i love it. I'm so lucky that. How do you keep it fun in fresh and so that's why we're going about it. You know and dream girl in particular. I like her. i don't read it enough in. i have not read it widely. I do watch a lot of horror films. And i watched them by myself for the most part because the other people in my household do not let her so. It's interesting watch harm. I went south and with jim girl in particular. I had just missed the end of two thousand eighteen in. I just finished watching a quiet place. And i was thinking not for the first time about helmets. Har- loves to deal with the idea of isolation it's usually very literal is apply solution. People are out in the country telecommunications or down they can't get to anyone no one knows where they are. They're off the grid. But i had this hunch that you could achieve the same thing in a congested urban senate and i always wanted to try it and after watching a quiet place in thinking about. I was like yeah. I'm ready to write a novel. Where someone's inner city can see people all the telecommunications work yet this person is still some very trapped in isolated i had a hunch can is at the end of two thousand eighteen. That people were more isolated than they really knew that. We had a lot of buzz in clutter. That made her lives seem busy full. That stuff could easily follow away in find out how many true friends we actually had when push came to shop and then of course what you couldn't have noticed lockdowns. We're going to start happening. I am not rushing On the opposite. I mean i would look back through history in so you can make money betting against my instincts on almost anything. Let's talk about your protagonist. Gerry anderson that you raised the specter of philip. Roth jerry under said is clearly. Wanna be late middle aged. Why big beasts of american literature right. Yeah tell us something about him. Well okay so it's important to remember that. Jerry is not of ross generation that he thinks he should be jerry. Anderson is sixty something novelist One really big success in other successes but one book in particular has allowed him to live. The life of the mind live very well. He identifies with raw bellow updike that generation. He feels like he has that level of gravitas. He is someone who secretly keeps waiting for the phone to rain in the middle of the night to be told that he's won the nobel prize. Mean he really does have that level of confidence made even arrogance about his work in some things. Jerry is a very interesting actual alter ego for me because we he's horrible is terrible. Cnn did that out of the way right up front. But i agree with a lot of things about writing in creation. I like the fact. That jerry doesn't better is research does just enough. I like that. He belongs to what call team imagination where he thinks you should just get to make stuff up and his somewhat tired of questions about the are biographical aspects of his work. I had a lot of different writers on my mind when i was creating jerry but woman in my office note. Limping comical insanely space to me. I'm also not entirely. There's a lot of mehan. Jerry i just think i'm i think i'm her social being tapped. I'm so when you actually run out the pandemic pretty well because they did have friendships. That i could pursue the attacks in dm in facebook pages. I never felt lonely. Not really because he's a stay at home writer. I put years in making sure that. I had these communities to keep me company when i was home alone writing. Show yet jerry. Juries a snob. His hair much snob but he is wolraad. He is smart is good at what he does in Comes to women. He's an absolute hig. He doesn't have a clue. You really doesn't feel like jerry were sitting next to me. He gas mcgauchie. Say that about me. Because jerry is that most person of awe in that's the person who is very vested in believing that they're good which i think is one of the most dangerous concepts that anybody can have about themselves. You mentioned the idea of novelist. Spain you always asked about autobiographical elements in that were jerry's. His first book was based on his. Rather unpleasant. Oprah again yeah. He's had trouble times in his past and he loosely based on that and so of course. This is something everybody asked him. But he's got this book we really don't give much away about what happens in the story. Because people need to experiments out for themselves but dream girl is also the title of the book that may jerry a massive success and so one of the themes in the book is in this book. Go his book. Go is is is the idea of taking someone else's story to use novelist using other people's stories as thoughtful work and this smitten. I it's viewed the great chris power a few weeks ago about his brilliant book. A lovely man which has a similar theme and privately luckily just for this you now lower just a couple of weeks ago with the news the other thorough around the cat person story again about you. Know the fact that ted's out that spot possibly have been based on aspects of somebody's real lives at so. Let's talk about you use of this team in the book about the idea of taking somebody else's life as material your novel. This is something i really struggle with. Lady in the late was full up. Letta meditation on whether i can defend what i do when i take a real crime story and turn it into a novel and i'm not sure it's defensible. But i'm also not sure is indefensible. Ellison caesar beside the point. I understand what people value their own stories in believe that their stories belong to them on one of the reasons that that's a legitimate way to feel is because there are times when the motion picture business comes calling in will pay people for the rights to their real life story. You know michael lewis the writer american writer who written so many amazing books you know. He's made a lot of people. Famous in those people got to sell their stories. Make money too. So yeah. Your story has value. Maybe has to be pretty extraordinary. Value in the next part is but are you harmed by someone else deciding to tell your story again survived while yes it now. I think i have damaged in friendships because people have read my books instead what she stole my life and i don't think i've done that with a friend except like little teeny tiny stories. That are kind of funny like a story about a friend who on a road trip bought some desired snack at a roadside gas station. When it turned out not to be the delicious thing that she wanted she and her sister tried to flush out mujtaba toilet with disastrous results. Like y'all still stuff. Like i'm a little mad i i'll grab stuff like that but it is a really difficult argument because then we also have to get into. Okay well. i think that.

jerry jim girl Roth jerry Jerry bellow updike mehan Gerry anderson mcgauchie senate chris power philip ross Anderson Cnn Letta Ellison caesar Oprah facebook Spain ted
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Still the tom brady will. The instrumentation is kept feddie lewis until the nineteenth century. The romantics really cared about color. So the trajectories was ever greater specificity in music notation and the countess side of that is gradually making less and less space for interpretation so if you'll performing a medieval song probably about seventy five percent of the music is in the interpreter enormous freedom in how to perform e when you get to the nineteenth century to beethoven's time the former is just a performing monkey. I'm being a bit route. Here is mechanical to. I'm not an invest enormous authority in the genius. Composer is given us sort of god-like authority to dictate. Exactly what the is is not a good thing. I'm not sure it is certainly what happens to the west little atoms. I'm nailed any damn talking to michael spicer. We're talking about his book. The musical human history of life on earth and michael you talk about a identifiable history of music. Starting about forty thousand years ago the birth of what we would recognize as a modern human. Let's go a little bit further back than say a little bit further back. Will thousand years both to australopithecus. And i or the stabs a bipedal is which you talk about having an important connection to our identification. We've music. Yeah i into size what we call music. Nobody outside the west coast music. Music is is one word for sort of swiss army knife multiple things music does and when music quote unquote crystallizes. It assembles to gay at a a plethora of elements which evolved quite independently. So so rhythm miss. I found in insects on sixty five million years ago. We know that because we have fossils of prehistoric hated it so bush cricket some because fraud. Exactly what pitch kated chirp. And i was a thousand natural actually but the first knows in history is an e..

michael spicer tom brady lewis beethoven michael west coast cricket bush
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"I went to the smithsonian method weather data and he looked back at four decades of weather data and he could see that that had been in fast food. Decades of the twentieth century could see a woman of a third degree celsius heat from that together with carbon dioxide levels went. I think we need to go back. And look at this Which then often will more more scientists did woops okay to finish. And i'm just gonna for it moment. Imagine that we're We're recording this into you. Not a little atoms but for the new news tunnel. Gb news and in and obviously has the potential shall. I probably don't believe in this stuff. And so an attempt to wound you. Alistair the ultimate. They spoke about the climate crisis. I might describe as a tree hugger and so to finish off. Would you tell us the story of who the original tree oguz were like. let's Let's celebrate the tree hug as as incredible radical brave people tree huggers women in northern india. Hey you came from a community which really traced like lots of communities where everybody trays because they give us shade. They help they make us Medicine the fruit Get us all sorts of that will really nice to look at ireland's traits and so this this community just like trace particularly important to them culturally like it true Around the world and one of the lake will rudas in the area decided they were gonna federal the trees they wanted to. I think those policy build something and they went in an older that. The army's go talk these trays and he's brave. Women went out and said ninety coffee trees on. They literally put that bodies between the axes and the trees by wrapping their arms around them which we might say hugging. But it's actually as bevere kind of literally cuddly way of paying. You know they were. They were putting their bodies between the axes in the trees and the the ax men. I think that surprisingly went fine art and chop them up and so these women became not they died for the trays and then became martyrs..

oguz Alistair india ireland army
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Worked in business <Speech_Male> and he'd <Speech_Male> never had a <Speech_Male> psychiatric <Speech_Male> illness nor <Speech_Male> had anybody <Speech_Male> in his family <Speech_Male> and yet two <Speech_Male> weeks after nine <Speech_Male> eleven. He <Speech_Male> flipped into <Speech_Male> a full blown <Speech_Male> unmistakable. <Speech_Male> Mania and <Speech_Music_Male> this is a state. It's <Speech_Male> it's a <Speech_Male> part of bipolar disorder. <Speech_Male> It's a <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> disruptive and <Speech_Male> mysterious and <Speech_Male> honestly quite interesting <Speech_Male> state where people <Speech_Male> become <Speech_Male> flipped into <Speech_Male> a state of high energy <Speech_Male> increased need <Speech_Male> for sleep. <Speech_Male> Increased rate <Speech_Male> of speech <Speech_Male> increased ideas <Speech_Male> increase motivation. <Speech_Male> What we <Speech_Male> call greatly increased <Speech_Music_Male> goal directed activity <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> elaborate plans. <Speech_Male> And this of <Speech_Male> course sounds <Speech_Male> good some <Speech_Male> extent but then it really <Speech_Male> becomes extreme <Speech_Male> strongly <Speech_Male> disruptive very <Speech_Male> risky behavior <Speech_Male> or disruptive actions <Speech_Male> and ultimately <Speech_Male> can lead to <Speech_Male> very severe <Speech_Male> problems need <Speech_Male> death <Speech_Male> and so this. <Speech_Male> This is mania <Speech_Male> and just <Speech_Male> to see this <Speech_Music_Male> happen in this person <Speech_Male> in this particular <Speech_Male> context. <Speech_Male> An thinking about <Speech_Male> what. We're all going through <Speech_Male> now around <Speech_Male> the world. I thought <Speech_Male> this was a this was <Speech_Male> an important story. And of <Speech_Male> course it's anonymous. <Speech_Male> In the greatest <Speech_Male> respect for <Speech_Male> the patients. I <Speech_Male> tell stories with <Speech_Male> the symptoms <Speech_Male> being accurately <Speech_Male> depicted <Speech_Male> symptoms. <Speech_Male> At the nation's are experiencing <Speech_Male> words. <Speech_Music_Male> That mattered <Speech_Music_Male> in that. We're used but <Speech_Music_Male> of course <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> this is protected <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the other thing i think <Speech_Male> is very <Speech_Male> movingly. Talk <Speech_Male> about the toll. <Speech_Male> The working <Speech_Male> at the sharp <Speech_Male> end of medical practice <Speech_Male> takes on its <Speech_Male> practitioners as <Speech_Male> well and it serves <Speech_Male> having you know having <Speech_Male> to deal with the loss <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Male> the extreme <Speech_Male> pain that <Speech_Male> you often experience <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> patients. <Speech_Male> Clay that something. <Speech_Male> That's obviously <Speech_Male> influenced <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> desire to study <Speech_Male> emotion <Speech_Male> career <Speech_Male> but yeah tell <Speech_Male> me something about this <Speech_Male> just about writing about <Speech_Male> the toll. The <Speech_Male> the medical <Silence> profession <SpeakerChange> takes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well it's this is something <Speech_Male> that nobody <Speech_Male> can quite prepare <Speech_Male> you for. They <Speech_Male> say it <Speech_Male> in words but until <Speech_Male> you have that experience <Speech_Male> it's like <Speech_Male> something you <Speech_Male> can hardly be prepared <Speech_Male> for in part <Speech_Male> not just because of the depths <Silence> of <Speech_Male> the emotional <Speech_Male> swings that <Speech_Male> happened but how <Speech_Male> it's every day <Speech_Male> you come in. <Speech_Male> There's a whole new set <Speech_Male> up disruptions <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> in agonies <Speech_Male> so i've <Speech_Male> been talking to cow <Speech_Male> dice raf. We've <Speech_Male> been talking about his book <Speech_Male> connections <Speech_Male> story of <Speech_Male> human feeling <Speech_Male> which is out now in <Speech_Male> the uk from penguin <Speech_Male> viking. <Speech_Male> Call thank you so much <Speech_Male> for taking <SpeakerChange> the time to <Speech_Male> share with me. <Speech_Male> It's my pleasure. It's been <Speech_Male> a wonderful conversation. <Speech_Male> Hope <Speech_Male> As a <Speech_Male> final thought is that <Speech_Male> i think the goal <Speech_Male> of the book has been <Speech_Male> to really show <Speech_Male> the unity in commonality <Speech_Male> of these <Speech_Male> these inner experiences. <Speech_Male> These connections that <Speech_Male> we have and and <Speech_Male> Both <Speech_Male> among all humanity. <Speech_Male> Whether it's at <Speech_Male> the extremes of of <Speech_Male> human suffering <Speech_Male> or in our <Speech_Male> day to day i think <Speech_Male> hopefully. The book helps <Speech_Music_Male> bring people together. <Speech_Male> Not <SpeakerChange> that's the. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> That's the ultimate coll- <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

bipolar disorder uk
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms radio show about ideas and coach with me naoto any this week a story of human feeling with up to genetics play call dice and his new book connections. Kodi is the professor of bioengineering. Psychiatry and behavioral sciences at stanford university is known for creating and developing opted genetics and hydrogel tissue chemistry advanced. Technology is studying the function of the brain in tax allowing complex emotions to be studied at the level of individual cells. A member of the national academy of medicine the national academy of sciences and the national academy of engineering dice. O-of has received numerous prizes discoveries including the kyoto prize. The breakthrough prize..

naoto Kodi stanford university national academy of medicine t national academy of engineerin
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"My memory call his story of caring aging and everyday acts of love. And it was a book that i really thought about hard about whether i wanted to write. I'm not a confessional writer. But i've seen on and off for the past twelve years a carer. I'm also so. Obviously i can be around my job. But lots of people can't do not give up their jobs to be a kyra but at the same time. It's a story that i felt was important to tell. There is a lot about me as a writer in the book. Resolute about me as rita in the book Because if you are often you don't really sleep through the night. You always got one open. And so i do a huge amount of retake in the small hours as it were but i really wanted to write this book which is a tribute to three extraordinary. People might my father and my mother both of whom now gone and my wonderful mother in law granny rosy for whom under fulltime kara up because actually there are thirty million of us unpaid carers in the uk. We all hidden everywhere in plain sight. And i very much wanted to tell my story. I'm only speaking for myself but also to try and help make carrying more visible. It's kara's week as we record this and they strap line. This year is making carry visible and valued because many many parents don't feel that they have any support. There are many people carrying on their own. They don't have the resources to be able to carry on working. And all of these things. So i wanted to raise my voice along with the other thirty million cares and say. Please stop paying attention to this. Social care needs to be sorted out and it was very different so of book for me to write. Obviously because mostly i've making stuff up in my fiction you know. City of tears came out in january. And i can't really believe an extra pair of hands has just come out. That's his second book in lockdown. And that's a missing meeting readers but the reaction to an extra pair of hands has been extraordinary and it's been a wonderful thing do to realize for many many carriers who are in the same position as me. How important books are and how important reading can be when you can't really get out as much and you're very much confined to a smaller space or looking to somebody and you can't really leave them books at the thing that gave many of us who are carrying the glimpse on the outside world so the next five has being you know it was something i wrote during lockdown and i'm really enjoying talking to people about at the moment you in doing women's prize and we have the women's prize shortlist but chill digital festival next week obviously discoveries. Today's i'm just juggling all these things. So i'll be talking to kate moss. We've been talking about. The women's prize trusts discoveries program. The winner of which emma van star was announced. Today oso again to say that the awarding of the women's prize will be on july the seventh and we're talking about an extra pair of hands cakes book which is out from the wellcome collection cake. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me. They love to see this episode of little atoms..

thirty million january next week second book uk Today both thirty million cares july the seventh kate moss This year rita emma van one three five City of past twelve years hands pair of hands