35 Burst results for "Little Pinter"

Three neat venture rounds, and Alibaba’s latest

Equity

04:45 min | 1 d ago

Three neat venture rounds, and Alibaba’s latest

"All right. So talking about the weekend well, here's what's up as the American election looms and the holidays beckon things kind of slowed down this weekend. Now, it's a little bit soon to say that this is the new normal, but certainly, it felt more like a traditional late October weekend if that makes sense. So posts covering new rounds where little bit light there wasn't a lot of news. There wasn't a big acquisition that drove the Monday morning chat cycle so here. Are Some things that did happen that really do matter but I think we can all exhale just a little bit as we head into the second half of October. So according to TECH WRENCH DOT com, you may have heard of it. alibaba group is going to spend about three point six dollars to take a controlling stake in Sun art. One of China's largest big box supermarket chains after transaction is complete, alibaba will own about seventy two percent of art this calm i. Because the Amazon wholefoods I, mean this seems to be relatively similar. What's interesting is Alibaba actually invest in son are back in two, thousand, seventeen million just under three billion for just over a third of the company. Now, this matters because that's part of Alibaba's quote new retail strategy new retail kind of blurs the lines between online and offline commerce. This should sound pretty familiar to all of us have seen Amazon, to this inside of its now big buck stores and other people are trying to do curbside pickup even small businesses it appears. That like this e commerce world that we all think everything's going to become we'll still have a larger physical footprint than we probably anticipated. So Fun to see what China is doing. Think about, what happens our marcus down the road Alibaba out a lot of money even during relatively bad economic times worth catching up on and it kind of good news this morning space x fired another sixty satellites into the sky as part of its starlink project to speak at all really moved the boonies when Musk and company done bring internet? Everywhere. So turn to funding around this morning, our bread and butter I found a few really really cool ones despite the talk of a slowing new cycle anyways in no particular. Here are three start ups that are funny runs out that are worth checking into if you have the time. We're GONNA START WITH API, which is a I F I. M printers pronounced eight five new they have announced a fourteen point five million dollar round this morning the company is calling this a pre series b according to crunch base news, which sounds like a series a. plus maybe a series B. minus or really just called a series B.. It's fourteen point five, million dollars any investors in the round include qualcomm ventures, serve ventures, translink capital, and a new investor clinic quench base news called Plum. I never heard of plum alley or serve adventures just goes to show how many theses firms there are out there right now, all that. Aside, what does if I do? Well, they build checkout free experiences for consumers. Essentially, they allow other folks to build and operate autonomous stores. So my read is like this Amazon go but for everybody crunch news post up on this, according to that article, fourteen stores from a fire in the market lots more coming off of capital here. Exciting to see the Sir Technology Spread more broadly I'm not entirely sold on it yet. But of course, always hard to know what's going to be the future and a lot of people are betting that this is that next up, we have law Maddox, a San, Diego based startup that is building software for lawyers kind of marketing crm. Suffer Lawyers. It has raised two point, five million dollars in seed funding always nice seen actually seed funding sized seed round very rare in twenty twenty. Why do we care about this? Well, we've known that for a couple of years vertical sats, which is software aimed at one particular slice of the market one particular. Law or like gardening has been pretty hot for a while. So why not this lawyers have money target them take some of that money gee-gee funding round was led by any act ventures forefront venture partners, and then of course, rebel ventures and bridge venture partners took part I know about half of those firms again. So many VC firms out there kind of crazy according to TC. A big part of what law maddox wants to do was help automate marketing tasks for law firms to big part of their business of nurture clients to the backslapping handshaking. Stuff really does matter even in the digital realm and like you said, alerts have money. So this round probably GonNa work out pretty well law maddox. And for a third run, we're GONNA leave the US and talk about cheaper which raised twelve million dollars. Now I try to proud correctly on the show because it's respectful. In this case, it's H. I. E. R., which is not chipper nor is it Go cheaper best shot. anyways. This is an ECOMMERCE platform for merchants in Latin America it series a was raised from wind ventures and two groups called Montes and Kosic ventures. The startup claims his built quote, the largest brand never of digitized corner stores in Latin

Alibaba Group Maddox Amazon China Qualcomm Ventures Kosic Ventures United States Sun Art Latin America Latin Translink Capital Musk Montes Diego
Absentee-Ballot Expansion Promotes Early Voting This Year

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 5 d ago

Absentee-Ballot Expansion Promotes Early Voting This Year

"Early than ever before, way more at 2.5 weeks before Election Day, Some states are already up to a third of their total turnouts from 2016. That's being driven by absentee ballot expansion all over the country because of the pandemic and a surge of in person early voting, But not everything has gone smoothly. We've seen long lines in Georgia and Texas and tens of thousands of mistakes with mail ballots. Joining us now to talk about all of this is NPR's Miles parks who covers voting. Hey, miles high there. So just how big has the early voting this year? It's been huge, more than 17. Million people have voted already, according to this database compiled by University of Florida professor Michael McDonald, and it's hard to really overstate how unprecedented that is. You know, it's about five times as many people who had voted at the same time in the 2016 cycle. Target smart. This data firm that works with Democrats has done some analysis on the initial numbers has been significantly more Democrats than Republicans, which isn't that surprising when you consider you know the sort of rhetoric President Trump specifically is used about vote by mail, But there are also some other interesting trends. You know, we're seeing more than seven times as many African American voters at this point now, as opposed to 2016 Which seems to be driven by this increase in early voting access in states with higher black populations like North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia. That's interesting. Well, we have been seeing pictures of these long lines at many of these early polling places. Can you talk about how smoothly the vote has been going so far? Yeah, There's clearly been some hiccups with in person and with vote by mail options, it seems like computer problems have contributed to a lot of the in person delays that people have seen photos off in Georgia. The database used to check people in was slowed down because of all of this traffic on the website. There were similar stories in Texas Houston Public Media's Elizabeth Tro Vel spoke to a voter named Renee, who spent nearly four hours in line going to three different precincts. I cry. I frankly think it's a form of voter suppression. There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I gotta one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then they said the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point I'm reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company

Georgia NPR Allegheny County Ron Stroman Renee Texas Michael Mcdonald Elizabeth Tro Vel Gwinnett County Texas Houston University Of Florida President Trump North Carolina Professor Pennsylvania Virginia
The Importance of the Print

This Week in Photo

06:28 min | 5 d ago

The Importance of the Print

"Able to little something different for you today here with an old friend of mine as in I've known him for a long time not that he's. Data's. Data start is here. He's from Epson a little company that that makes printers that you may have heard about printers and a bunch of other things but we're GONNA WANNA. Have Dental on to talk about printing. From the standpoint of the importance of it in how people that that may be afraid of printing today or somehow said, you know I don't print stuff on facebook and instagram whatever what's a print? I WanNa talk about that and get to the crux of why people should be printing especially if you're an advanced amateur beginner or or or professional photographer. So denno Steinar welcome to the program and how you doing great veer. It's great to see you and you're a game of thrones. Very symmetrical background their employees. Against Green. Screen. Good Yeah. Thank you. This is this is a brand new setup. People have been watching this show no, that normally that's not my background. Normally, my desk is actually slipped in the room is the background. So some different you guys got mix it up every now and So let's let's talk about this. So you're at you're at Epson let's talk about like the your role at Epson what what does Danone do at the company? Well, title is marketing manager my primary responsibilities are. Working with the creative professional markets in the marketing things that go along with that primarily photography certainly work with anybody that's creative professional. A fine artist and illustrator in other markets. I also do video production and amd because of some of the crazy background ahead in the early days of printing I've been I sometimes a pulled into some color science things related to projection because of all the pain we went through early in printing. I consider these long boring international color science meetings and understand what's going on. The. Yeah Yeah Yeah I definitely want to talk about that because. You know we were. We were talking before I clicked the record button about. Just sort of back in the day you know we won't have to go back. You have to put a time stamp on it, but back in the day. The printing experience was, hey, I got this brand new printer gamma. I got my box of paper and you run your first print through it and he came out. Magenta. Okay let me what did I do wrong. Okay and now gotta understand all this stuff. You run another printer it comes out yellow. This was you know. So let's talk about that a little bit. or excellence. Let's let's do that a little bit deeper I want to talk about the history. Of Printing itself you. Touched on that a little bit. Back in the day was enlargers. Remember those you know we had enlargers. Black and white, and then we went to color enlargers, which was a little more involved than a little less tolerance of temperature and all that, and then today you know it's it's file print. So talk to talk about sort of the evolution of where things were in the digital printing world and where they are today. How much time do we have? We have have about three days. So make a quick. To say you know. If you were to take the entire history of photography from nips if I'm pronouncing that correctly, when took that eight hour exposure the French street scene. and to kind of the the beginning of the digital age, you know that is like ninety five percent of photography and digital that term is just this. Let little. Little Flash. Little. Wink of the eye and just in perspective how quickly and things evolved. But as I've been with Epson and a little over twenty years, I was recruited from the Eastman Kodak Company. And this was when Kodak was Kodak. Amazing Kodak Moment. But it was so. Before, that I was a commercial photographer, I used to use a biton view cameras. Shooting. Food for magazines. Cargo, but if you look just a quick thing in the past. The. Printing was always about black and white printing. And it was not an uncommon thing that post World War Two for hobbyists to have dark rooms and advanced amateurs do dark rooms, and if you define yourself as a professional photographer, you always had a black white darker. Color Printing as we know it, we call now the analog world then it was called color print. That slowly came in the kind of mainstream. Sixties seventies, but that was purely big labs big photofinishing houses. It was difficult. You need a big processors he needed temperature control you needed. People Staff and. The Lap And? And it'd be fair to say that traditional see printing. I've never met anyone that said, Gosh I just love the way my seat prints used to. There were revered print processes back there like dye transfer some people remember CPA chrome off of things. But they're just kind of there in the past. It's kind of interesting history lesson in I. I lived at and that's where all this hair went in those darker. Darker. But the first kind of digital printing. started. Really A in the early nineties and I was then a Kodak technical sales representative which was a revered job back in the analog days in my territory to zip codes in Manhattan. New. York City district.

Epson Eastman Kodak Company Facebook Instagram Marketing Manager People Staff AMD Danone York City Sales Representative Manhattan
Interview with Chris Ford

Hallway Chats

06:28 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Chris Ford

"Welcome to hallway Jets. I'm Liam Dempsey. I'm Cara Clay's today. We're joined by Chris Ford Chris spent the first twenty years of her career working as an agency and freelance designer five years ago. She took a hard left and to project management team is a hybrid project manager and designer at reactive a WordPress VIP partner. Hi Chris. I'm so glad to hear welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm really glad to be here. Mm. I have missed interactions with the WordPress Community. I think tank fair to say that we all have Chris Chris. What a pleasure to meet you. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself off? My name's Chris Borg. I started working on the web in Nineteen Ninety Six when I graduated from design school. I was supposed to be a T-shirt designer at a skateboard company and then their web guy quit and suddenly I was the new one person on staff fortunately. There were like five tags so there wasn't a whole lot to learn at the moment. We were very excited when animated gifs and background images came out for a little bit of context. I did that with the agencies in every industry from like skateboarding described booking at agencies and as a freelance writer and then five years ago, like I said, I took a really hard left into project management because I was interested in more kind of the business end of things. Like, how do you run a profitable project? How he managed timelines, how do you manage budgets which is something I always struggled with as a freelancer. And now I have just recently within the last couple of months started dipping my toe back into the design Pond relearning everything because it's been five years, which means nothing is the same Everything Has Changed. I started in WordPress. I don't even know how long it go but it was before Studio press was Studio project. I had been working as a professional scrapbooker which he says an actual job and the industry. It's the craft industry is like the tech industry. There are bubbles in different crafts and then those bubbles burst. And so when the scrapbooking Bubble Burst, I knew a bunch of people with photography. Skills he needed websites. So I got me a copy of the Kubrick theme and added flash headers with navigation to him and stole my WordPress Journey. Wow. I am so many things I want to ask you about I do too. I totally do. Can we start on scrapbooking, please, please please. Yes, I did a little scrap booking not professionally and now, you know with digital photos, whoever I mean what may have do people still do it? I mean I assume people still do but it seems like a a something that Is not a thing anymore because nobody prints out there photos. I actually I got into it because I started as a print designer and I'd love to paper and I am working it is miserable job where every day I wouldn't go in and recreate Rain Bird sprinkler timers and Flash like my whole job was to show you how like the dial spins phone numbers flashed and then you push this button and it was miserable and horrible and there was a scrap booking store down the street. So I would go and buy papers and things change and usually I just hoard crafting supplies cuz they're pretty but I actually used fees and digital scrapbooking was just taking off and that's kind of how I got notified because I do a lot of like retouching and like Photoshop was my thing. And so I got to know enough people who knew that about me that Wednesday, Digital scrapbooking started getting more popular. I got more people calling me saying hey leading someone to write an article. I was the art director for digital scrapbooking magazine and wait a second cuz I think scrapbooking and I think paper. So what is digital scrapbooking? It was basically you would go in and it off when skeuomorphic design was really big so I could like make things look realistic. So you would go in and you know make something that looked like a rib shack and put it on a page or design your own pattern backgrounds that look like paper I would do a lot where I would design my own stuff and then print it out on a printer and make kind of hybrid page. Just whip it so the Andrews to still pay and yeah. Oh, that's a really yeah. Well, no wonder you did it professionally that sounds amazing for a print em out and log. Yeah, it was super fun. Like I had a Michaels in my closet people would just send me stuff because you would get published in magazines. Like it was a really really good fun mystery years until the money ran out where I basically just kind of got paid to paint things and I don't know if anyone knows who clotting home but she's this really amazing collage artist who does like acrylic image transfers and packing tape transfers and it was you basically got page to make crafts which was kind of the coolest thing in the world, but I had a you know, I had bills to pay so I couldn't like walk it was a really competitive thing. Right and a lot of the people who were involved in it. It was their second job their husband was working. They weren't really in it for the money and I'm like dude. This is my full-time job. Like I need to get paid and I need to get paid on

Chris Chris Digital Scrapbooking Digital Scrapbooking Magazine Chris Ford Chris Borg Wordpress Liam Dempsey Project Manager Cara Clay Design Pond Rain Bird Partner Studio Press Writer Photoshop Andrews Director
Becoming the Director of Your Life - with Fritz Brumder & Jerry Colonna

The Reboot Podcast

05:21 min | Last week

Becoming the Director of Your Life - with Fritz Brumder & Jerry Colonna

"A. Fritz. Each. You could mean, she was jerry thanks for coming on the show before we get started. Wanted you just take a minute him introduce yourself. Sure my name is I her I am the CO founder and CEO of a company called brand lives. We are based in Portland Oregon and I've recently exited the business in now I've moved my family to bend, Oregon and things are going really well right now. But. Wasn't necessarily always that way. So we'll get into kind of Janta Printer Journey of brainless. Was the. CEO. Wasn't the. Would it be helpful to talk a little bit about the was the CEO Journey? Yeah I think what's most helpful for me I. A now out of the company that I started it was. Over a seven year process, but we are really in a hard for seven years. had one co founder in the company, but he was just really on board more. Of the initial co-founder Story a little bit more but. I am in a period where I'm still kind of decompressing from that process. It ended well on a minute. Really good spot right now. Have some breathing room and have time to think and be creative and and working onto passion projects and hopefully launched my next company. But as a result of some of the like. The turmoil I experienced as a result of starting in next thing, my company. There's a little bit of fear in that process of. One in my ready to. Jump. Back on the hamster wheel knowing that the energy and effort that it takes to start a company from Ground Zero just to give you a little bit of an idea of scale, we raised around five million in capital. Peaked at about fifty employees and contractors and. Had Global operations throughout the world live video delivery tool. So basically create communication and collaboration for product companies or customers were. People like Nike Levis go crow. So it was Super Fun ride for the vast majority of it, but also pain along the way. So. Maybe before we SORTA die being. Where you are now. And some that fear, and maybe we can spend a little bit of time sort of plotting out a little bit of a path forward. I think for context it won't be helpful to talk a little bit about. The transition out and what the last few months were like. Yeah. So my first question is, why did you leave? Well it's it goes back to about a year ago. So the company. was doing really well, we navigate a number of things that mentioned have one co founder and we we were a spin out company so. You know from the early company creation process, we navigated some pretty tough decisions very very well, and then we grew in that process was insanely rewarding fantastic management team culture, the company momentum of becoming the May. Top four hundred of Inc. five hundred list of I two to three years in business that we were growing well over one hundred percent those first couple years. On, and then just as the numbers got better know even though we're adding over a million in a are. The percentage growth rate was telfer and I started to notice some issues with my own in particular. I was just we weren't seeing eye-to-eye in. Too. Many situations. And started to become a problem out as we are trying to make sense of. Why is the company not growing over one hundred percent anymore Even, though we were making solid progress, it was. Challenging to make sense of that. I had one one venture capitalist one angel investor, my co-founder, an independent on board. So I was I mentioned been to rebuild circles and I was looking back at my journal entries from a lot of those sessions. There were times where I realized. I don't think I have the right border I'm not really managing my board the right way. and. I tried a number of different things to sort of realign redirect. But, ultimately, it led to me trying to make some changes on board. And then I walked into a board meeting. Only, two board members were there. Now, that kind of meeting goes and that was February two, thousand eighteen. And so they said, now's the time to hire a new CEO identify contest job for but. We want to his company next level we feel like it should be growing over one

CEO Co Founder Co-Founder Oregon A. Fritz Portland Jerry Of Inc. Ground Zero
Early voting starts with long lines but few other issues in Atlanta's Fulton county

The Rashad Richey Morning Show

00:42 sec | Last week

Early voting starts with long lines but few other issues in Atlanta's Fulton county

"A lot of people show up on the first days of Apple releases a new phone. You're going to the first day you're gonna stand in line for a minute. That's an election officials speaking with channel too, aboutthe long lines voters experienced on Monday, which was the first day of early voting. Secretary of State's office reported more than 125,000 people cast ballots and in Fulton County, There were some technical glitches. However. Unlike in June, Fulton County chairmen Robb Pitts told Channel to the glitches were minimal. The only one where there was a glitch with technique. The holy passes right here. The other printer that malfunction there was a scanner that malfunctioned one Those problems are corrected quickly Early voting last until October, 30th

Fulton County Channel Robb Pitts Apple
Nintendo delves into ‘Pikmin 3’ and ‘Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity’

Nintendo Voice Chat

06:54 min | Last week

Nintendo delves into ‘Pikmin 3’ and ‘Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity’

"And welcome to NBC ends Nintendo podcast this week, we will be talking about Pittman Three Deluxe Higher Warriors, age of Calamity Monster Hunter of course, and the lack of Nintendo voice chat on it Nintendo switch. Would we have talked about before but you know this time we got Europeans. So look forward to that I'm your host cases in this week, I am joined by Pear strider. Day. Marks Oh and Zach Ryan top of the morning to each and every one of you. S. We are now recording on Thursdays so we never have to scramble to cover a Thursday morning announcement ever again. Even move everything to Friday it only two two plus years of intendo absolutely us. Before we decided we'd better move this stuff so. It's time this time we put our foot down. So, Great. But yeah, let's get started I guess the the biggest news is that we got to see a forty five minute long presentation on Picton Three Deluxe and a think twenty, five long minute presentation pyro Warriors Age calamity, and they were both treehouse presentations. So it was basically gameplay play with people talking about said game play Let's talk about Pittman three because that demo is available now and also Tom and pair have been plane. So did we learn anything in his treehouse presentation that you didn't already know? From play. we learned about the ultra spicy limit, the ultra spicy difficulty mode, and how it's going to limit Sixty like you can only have sixty pittman in the field at a time, which is kind of interesting like I don't know if that's the type of difficulty increase I would want because I lake having lots of Pitman following me, but it's it's an interesting thing to to hear about but yeah. Tra- spicy, not only great difficulty mode, but a wonderful flavor as well. I completely disagree with that but. Their own. But we did get to see person photo mode showing off, and we also got to see that whenever you encounter a new creature. It gets entering the PICCOLA Pedia, which is new at least for pick three, and there are new levels with Louis, which we saw the split screen. This was announced with the announcement victory deluxe, and now we just got to see it in action like I said the demos out now but I didn't mention that save from demo transfer over to the full game, and also completing also gives immediate access to the ultra spicy difficulty mode in the full game which Tom just mentioned. I'd stuff. And I'm actually going to be on the review for this one. So I've been playing I've been playing in a little bit more than what the Demo has well. And Man I still just love. This game holds up. So well, the the graphics aren't really any better here beyond like there's not lag when the juice goes into the bottles anymore like there was on we you but it was already such a good-looking game that you know it holds up in a lot of different ways are talk one of little little quality of life things that are just so so nice that aren't going to be on like the box or the store page, but are just like if you played the original, you're gonNA feel how much easier it is to control this one in little ways. Juice lag removal obviously is the top selling point. I've Hewlett back of the box to i. saw got very excited. Okay. I played it last night with my daughter. I played the demo not the full version yet but. We immediately jumped into op to see how that would work and I thought it was going to it in the demo of the final game. I. Thought it was going to lock you out until you had other characters on walked right in the picnic games picnic three everybody's scattered, and then you find each other and then you can switch back and forth. But the game actually lets you do you know laid at the same character twice from the from the very so you get this vertical split-screen arden the noise I. Think my wife is printing something on this year printer. Way Yeah, you get a vertical split screen and it is is completely de couple. So it's not a it's not keeping you together. One person can go into a cave and the other person can be outside. You can toss pigment to the one player and the other new obviously split the maximum amount of a between the two, but it worked really while it ran well, and it was just kind of fun to be doing these tax separately. Now I don't know how that impacts. The game because. Can Get way more done. I was battling a Boston. My daughter was like bringing strawberries back so We'll see how that impacts the game, but a works like a cinch and then. Play with a pro control in has two different Gyro moats. So has warned that is more like a pointer away you move around your target on the screen and the other one is more directional with like slight till to adjust. But I felt like the regular controls with the lock on feature worked just fine so. That's how a play on the we you as it was into great man. That's my biggest love that game. That's my biggest question is what the deal with the touchscreen integration was the handled that pretty well with Super Mario Galaxy with the pointer. So I figured it would be sort of a similar situation. Can. You can do joy concept shortly inside ways all of that, and the pretty smart in how the describe it, and it has reversible camera mode. So. Everybody was upset about the Mario Collection. It sounds like Nintendo is adding adding some of that feature stuff. Nice. Yeah the the funny thing about pigment to me is that. Pittman has now been on four consoles right with this. It's it's stretched across four different Nintendo systems five view count the three D. S., but we don't we don't. and. The funny thing about it is that it has never really been quite at home control. Wise on any of them. Right like the we you like the we moat is like not a much. It's a good way to play it but like it's it's got sacrifices in other ways the game pat I really liked but also then you have to like hold the game pad with one hand and right. With the other in our sometimes using buttons like like this, really as always had little control issues. So that's still sorta here but the the options they give you a lot of options and the options that they give you feel really good and the lock on feels really good and some of the the the quality of life things I was mentioning that just make things easier and quicker to control are like. Really little things like I'm getting into the nitty gritty here. But like when you disband when you do the whistle to dismiss the people or dismissed the pigment and let him out of your

Pittman Nintendo TOM Zach Ryan Piccola Pedia Boston I Lake NBC TRA Mario Collection Pitman Louis D. S.
Interview with Brandi Davis

Revision Path

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Brandi Davis

"All right. So tell us who you are and what you do? Hi, my name is Brandy Davis. I am a graphic and web designer by trade. I am recently entering into the apparel industry we're going websites for my Niche is small businesses. I love helping small businesses and entrepreneurs create their branding and get their sites off and running and able to be profitable for their businesses. Nice. Now before we kind of get more into what you do and your background and everything. I've been doing this check in with everyone this year back of the pandemic. So, how are you kind of holding up during this time? I I'm starting to balance out. Thanks for asking. I'm starting to balance out when it first started that first month was very tough wage literally work came to a stop and understandably. So everyone was scrambling trying to figure out how to shift their business models from events and different song. Things I think stuff started to sort of shift a little bit better for me. Probably around May or June right now. We're starting to wear like on an upswing. So we're starting to get more clients that are looking to now they have a better grasp of what they're doing virtually. And so now they want to execute so things are starting to pick up a little bit more but that first month was like whoa, like it was silent. I had to struggle myself to sort of figure out like, how do I shift to support people in a life that that this ideal for us virtually for it to be a graphic and web designer. This is ideal. But how do I shift my model and Mark it to my existing clients and helps them in a virtual world. So I have a shift a little bit as well as a little scary at first, but it's starting to balance out and feel a little bit more like normal. Nice. What are your work dog? Kind of looking like right now just in general. So I try to balance things out between the graphic and apparel side because I do in-house printing for that piece. So I have sort of like a split day where maybe like the first four to five hours. I'm at this desk designing probably the last and then I do like some mean time in between and then late in the evenings. I'm printing for about another 3 to 4 hours. Wow, and you're doing the the printing in-house. Yes, I would say about 93.3% I know that's a weird number, but about 93% of the printing is done in-house. I used to use an online resource, but now just to kind of keep quality and that's basically to keep quality in shape. I was like, you know, what is an investment, but I need to bring this in house to make sure that I'm giving the customer what they expect. Wow. So you must have a dog I mean, well, I don't know tell me like what does that space look like it is so I'm home base. I am fingers crossed looking to move into the studio space of bigger workspace wage, but it's literally basement Workshop setup. I have a printer that he presses everything all the equipment that I need to treat the garments. I have any other like vinyl cutting different things that I do depending on a designs. It has been self-taught to for certain extent. I was not familiar with any of this at first I had other people that I would work with so long. It's yeah, it's it's not a massive work space but it gets the job done. You know, it's enough to kind of get the job done. I utilize about a fourth of the basement. Okay, I'm curious about that because you mentioned you know that you were doing it online and I know that there's a lot of these sort of print to order type of places where you can just like upload like an EPS birth. Something upload the design and then they'll do the printing but I feel you on the quality. We try to do merge at revision path. Oh God, like two years ago. Yeah and the quad he was definitely very sketchy. Like some people would get the shirts and the image is all glitchy and stretched out and I'm like, oh I didn't expect wage is definitely a trial-and-error with different printers. Yeah, because yet you could have a good run with one printer and then all of a sudden you'll get an image a t-shirt back in your life. This is not how we should look so it is it was so hit or miss and what I didn't like was I would have customers or people it was it luckily. It was people that knew me and so they were reach out and say hey just FYI. This is how a shirt look in case other people call and say something and so that's how I would know because lung Three people who were supporting me in the beginning were friends and colleagues. So they would reach out and say hey this is what I receive. And so then it was like, okay. I have to think about other option and I did do some local printers here in Chicago for a bit, but I still needed to they all had different print processes. So one person might get one shirt printed with screen print and then one person may get a vinyl shirt. And so it was so all over the place that I was like you need to streamline this because at this point it's starting to look more like a hobby business. And so I had to make the investment my family was super supportive everyone around me, you know were super supportive and helping me get support page that Financial place because I was literally diving into something that was way out of my budget, but, you know, we managed to, you know, they were able to support and manage the page. Get everything in place. But yes, it is very sketchy with online printing. Yeah,

Web Designer Brandy Davis Chicago
Mobile Voting's Future

WSJ The Future of Everything

03:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Mobile Voting's Future

"Many of us can get to the polls on election day if we prioritize and make a plan and everything goes smoothly. But for some people getting to a polling location isn't even an option whether they are in rural locations or in another country. Really out there the ends of the Earth it's it's ugly Afghanstan. It's middle Afghanistan. That's where West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner found himself in twenty twelve after more than a decade serving in the military he was working in. Afghanistan is a military contractor, the roads there were under frequent attack. The mountains were treacherous and the weather could be nasty, and so there were literally months. Wouldn't get mail. Just part is the acceptance of that type song. I'm that meant Warner couldn't vote in the twenty twelve primary. Fast forward to two thousand. Seventeen. Warner's back in the US and becomes West Virginia Secretary of State. So now he's in charge of his State selection and wants to help military personnel to vote more easily. Assistance is just kind of an afterthought or any cases. So what I WANNA, do I wanNA give soldiers and opportunity to vote and I think the Electric means is the most logical place to go. Warner. Started thinking about a guy he met back in twenty fourteen budding Entrepreneur Nimitz. Hani. So my brother and I viewers go. Up and to be at a hacksaw at South by southwest in Austin. Texas. At south by southwest side was just a guy trying to break into the tech world. He wasn't thinking about voting what really intrigued US besides the in the free food. Tons was the prize money and the team of the on was hacked to the future. Was One thing you would do in the future and how you're doing. So as he thought about the future and what he would do. So honey actress past growing up in India as a member of the Sikh minority A separatist movement was ascending in northern India led by seeks that was swiftly brought down by then prime minister Indira. Gandhi in Nineteen eighty-four she was assassinated by her Sikh bodyguards. There was a lot of political and religious turmoil and election soon after for the new communist and there were some very unfortunate incidents which happened under time and one of them was as a little kid see people being coerced ward at gunpoint. Coercion to vote at gun point that can stick with a person and in Austin under pressure to create an innovative APP. Sahana. Used that memory and pitched mogul voting after that used a digital ledger called the blockchain that was invented to help, buy and sell crypto currency. And when we pissed onstage, it was printer of silence in. Maybe. The completely bombed when they announced the first by it was a shock. So honey. Took that prize money found investors and developed the mobile phone voting APP called votes. That's V O. His first client was Mac Warner, the former Afghanistan contractor who's now West Virginia's secretary of state in two, thousand eighteen. The state became the first in the country to try it out in a federal election when Warner launched small mobile voting pilot program for his states military personnel serving overseas. But there were issues and there were critics

Mac Warner Afghanistan West Virginia United States Austin Nimitz India Hani Texas Prime Minister Gandhi Ward
Justin Bieber Has New Music Video For 'Holy' Directed By Cardi B Wap Director

Ace and TJ

01:06 min | Last month

Justin Bieber Has New Music Video For 'Holy' Directed By Cardi B Wap Director

"Justin Bieber as a new song out at midnight it's called Holy. Now. Here's the interesting part about it comes with a music video and the guy directing the music videos name's Colin Tilley he just directed Cardi B. and Meghan the stallions hit single lap. So Justin Bieber Song holy a lot of people thinking it's a Christian song maybe it's a new era for him. The guy that directs the video just directed Hey, the guy makes videos. Yeah. That's guy people that print books. They print the Bible there prince a bad stuff. Do they. Probably not that's probably wrong. Same people the print, the Bible friend. Hustler. They can't. Printers. Leon when I'm in Barnes and noble they they sell they sell Christian books. Some not. So Christian. Also do they do they? Yeah. Right. Yeah. I. Mean I'm just just an interesting little part that'd be out at midnight. We'll have it tomorrow morning for you.

Justin Bieber Colin Tilley Cardi B. Meghan Leon Barnes
Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar  Remote Work  John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

A New Direction

05:46 min | Last month

Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar Remote Work John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

"Doing Zoom and working remotely because that's the world that we're currently living in today, and it's probably going to be the world that we're going to be living in for not just. A short period of time but because we're starting to understand that you know what we can get a lot of work done remotely in very a lot of industries we need to grasp, hold its concept being able to do as zoo meeting and do it right all right, and so we're we're GonNa talk about some of these little pieces here as we finish up here in this hour so. Let's talk about a couple of really we you talked about the green screen, but I think one of the things that two things that we need to talk about is audio and video. And bring up to really fabulous points and I am right on it and Let's. Let's talk about the video portion I, what should we know about video because we can make some mistakes there Why I think the the first mistake that we make is that is that when we get into the whole realm of video. We immediately go. Hey High def right I want high. DEF. and. All that sounds good because of course, we're watching I definitely and television and by the way watching something happened. Is Infinitely more. Is Easier and simpler than you actually making it happen. So you want to look at your resolution and see if you can actually tone down your resolution because. They're probably not gonNA WANNA see four K or whatever. And by the way very few people have the bandwidth to do four K. Right now. So video is important and and you WanNa make sure that you understand how your video works, how how it's going to be put together and you can. You could start out inexpensively and you can go very expensively You can actually get a really decent zoom call out of a iphone or android with with a face with a front facing camera. But what you WanNa do you WanNa get a stand and have this stand hold it instead of you because let's face it. If if you're holding your camera, you know if you're holding like this way you know and you've got this little jitter will cause your hand will get tired and you're doing this stuff You're not going to be not going to be very effective. So just make sure that you understand that and and you know. Test see what is like also, you can make videos on your on your PC, your Mac you know on your laptop makes videos and see what the camera it looks like. Big Mistake that people make is they got nostril cam going that's great. You know which one I'm talking about right. Looks like it looks like Sherwood forest up there but you know you got these guys who they don't even they're clueless by the way if you want to know how to make your laptop, go up up up, I will give you the cheap way to do it. You could go get some paper that would go into your printer and just keep stacking up keep stacking up. Reams of paper until have the right line of sight. So people aren't looking up there and going. I wonder. Don't want them to wonder, hey, how's how's that? For a really inexpensive way to do that and you're right you know you can take books or whatever to raise your laptop if you don't have a separate camera, I think probably you and I, I have a camera on a tripod that's a USB camera attached here so I'm looking right at it, but you don't have to have. That you don't have to spend that money to do that type of thing. So you most as you point out in the book, most of your laptops have a camera in there. Let's get rid of knows. Kim Let's. Let's get some books and let's get that. Let's get that raised there. So we can see you right. Let's talk about audio. Let's talk about audio because I think we we think that because Ron video that audio is not important, but it really is critical. Isn't it? Audio's very important. Now, I I happen to prefer just because of my personal style and what I do is I wear I, wear a gaming headset so you can go buy a gaming headset for seventy. Bucks. Plug into a USB and it does a good job. It it. You know it sounds good by the way it kills lots of surrounding noise and that makes me the MIC stand. You know. So matter how much moving my head and it's funny because I, what I'm. Looking at buying headsets I was talking to. Somebody. Who is really a good audio engineering and we're talking about my problem, which is I had a really nice microphones like Jay has in fact, I have several but the problem is I would come off center. So my volume would keep getting funky and changed and he said, well, tell me how much you move your head and I said, well, it's got like halfway between Ray Charles and Stevie. Wonder. and. Said Okay here's the solution. The solution is you have to be the Mike Stand. So I bought actually have multiple headsets but for for seventy bucks at a best buy, you can buy cheaper but you know you now have this and it's great isolation people are I watch a lot of people who take the little headset that comes with their phone and they have that they're holding the microphone up to them and let's face it a microphone. That's the size of a pinhole. That's that's what your voice is being replicated through. Right so you spend a few bucks you'll get a, it'll be a lot better. Some people don't like to wear these because it makes them look I. Don't know whatever. But you know you gotta think in terms of a good microphone and you can get pretty decent microphones for less than one hundred bucks.

Kim Let Mike Stand Sherwood Forest Def. RON JAY Ray Charles Stevie
Add Lepow's 15.6-inch USB-C monitor to your home office

TechtalkRadio

01:52 min | Last month

Add Lepow's 15.6-inch USB-C monitor to your home office

"And I came up with this one. This is from a company called Lapel. Now Lapel it's a fifteen point six inch type C. Portable display. Oh Wow. So what it is is basically a high quality. Display like top but without it's just basically just an extension of a monitor, but it has the USB which means with USB device like a Amanda you've got the note common. Justin you have a pixel. Can Plug it into this and extend your smartphone onto the screen. But with HD, I can actually connect Miichi my from my laptop and connected to this and use it as an extended monitor. And half. At best buy right now, this is a case. So the AFC, which is a USB, it's not type see the AFC one which I looked at is ninety nine dollars. So if you need an extended monitor, you can do that with. It's not nineteen, twenty, ten eighty that one from the. League is a little less on the resolution for it. this one from the POW was. One, hundred, eight, hundred, Eighty, eight bucks. It comes with a real flimsy stand which is magnetic as you guys can see. I might invest in an actual stand for it, but I can just pull it up. Put it in my laptop bag at has power record. You could plug the power cord in has HDMI has. Again the C connector and I'm really looking forward to putting some use to this, and if I can do the drag drop easily off my laptop with it's sitting right there on could really heaven absolutely. Somebody. With a three D. Printer, they

Lapel AFC Justin Amanda D. Printer Miichi
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
Music that Imitates Inanimate Objects

Classics for Kids

05:17 min | 2 months ago

Music that Imitates Inanimate Objects

"Hello. I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. It's pretty obvious that at the beginning of the second movement of Beethoven's Eighth Symphony The Orchestra is imitating something mechanical. That's not a clock ticking. It's a metronome, the machine that was invented to show exactly how fast or slow a piece of music should be played before the metronome. The only way to show the tempo of a piece was by writing fast slow, very fast or very slow usually in Italian on the music. But a composer had no way of telling you exactly how fast very fast was. That's where the. Comes in. In, the early eighteen hundreds Dutch inventor named Dietrich Nichols Vinko perfected a machine that could be adjusted to take at set speeds, but Vinko wasn't a good salesman. So he didn't get credit for it. A friend of Beethoven's Johann. NEPOMUK melt. Seoul was the one who took out the patent on the metronome and marketed it. So he gets the credit. When you see 'em m equals sixty on a piece of music. The M M's stands for metals. metronome equals sixty a metronome marking of sixty is one tic per second, which is about the speed if your pulse. battleplan was the only composer to write music imitating an inanimate object something that's not alive. He wasn't even the only one to write music takes composers love to put clocks into their music. That's the symphony number one, hundred, one by Franz Joseph Haydn, which is nicknamed the clock for pretty obvious reasons. Hungarian composers ultime Kodi put a musical clock into his opera Janos. There's also a famous fairy tale character for Houma clock striking midnight was very important and very scary Sergei. prokofiev wrote a ballet Cinderella including the clock. One last. A tick that slightly off balance, there's a piece by American composer. Leroy Anderson called the syncopated clock. In this piece, the clock goes tick Tock Tick Tock and then suddenly. It does something different syncopation in music is when you shift the accent from where you expect it. To, someplace you don't. Leroy Anderson loved inanimate objects. He wrote another piece imitating one that's just about disappeared these days before there were computers with printers, there was the typewriter. In music, it's not just instruments that imitate inanimate objects sometimes singers due to. That's from the first act of Jacques Offenbach, opera the tales of Hoffmann in which the hero Hoffman falls in love with a woman named Olympia or whether he thinks Olympia is a woman but she's really a mechanical doll in the middle of singing her mechanical music she runs out of steam and someone has to wind her back up. Played. Some wonderful jokes with their mechanical music

Leroy Anderson Beethoven Olympia Dietrich Nichols Vinko Naomi Lewin Seoul Franz Joseph Haydn Ultime Kodi Jacques Offenbach M M Salesman Houma Sergei. Prokofiev Hoffmann Hoffman
Dinner Reservations That Require DNA Samples

Kottke Ride Home

03:27 min | 2 months ago

Dinner Reservations That Require DNA Samples

"A restaurant in Tokyo is planning to three D print sushi. But that is not all the three D. printed. Sushi is going to be biometric tailored to your nutritional needs. The restaurant is called Sushi singularity and it's run by a company called open meals who are really into strange techy food endeavors more on that in a minute. The way that this particular one works is that when you make a reservation at Sushi singularity, you'll be given a health kit through which to submit biological samples on the website describes these as DNA urine and intestinal tests but I don't think they're actually making you do all of that for say, one visit to the restaurant. The website is laying this out as a model for the future of food in which all people were already have established health ID's consisting of that information. The mockup of the health kit looks more like it's probably just a saliva test quoting my modern mets biometric DNA data gathered from these custom kits will inform. Nutrition infusion the encoded sushi customized to each guest's nutrient needs artfully produced by three D. Printers and laser technology and quotes. Said Open meals is aiming high wanting this to eventually be something fairly standard quoting again, the Food Fabrication Machines Food Operation System and health identification employed by the cutting edge restaurant. We'll eventually these smaller available to general consumers. This culinary digitisation will require immense collaborative technological efforts according to open meals. Food must first be encoded with complex algorithms that account for texture taste, heat, smell, etc. then these encoded dishes must be made available online through a platform called food base leslie anyone wishing to create a downloadable dish must have the correct ingredients in Three D. printing formats and quotes. And the Three D. printed sushi itself is really artfully designed I mean that alone would bring a bunch of people to a restaurant let alone the gimmick of being customized for your unique nutritional needs. Though as weird as it does sound in this moment like I don't know that I'd be super. Mad. If this were in some way, the direction we go for food, you know they're a ton of advances being made in three d bio printing right now I've talked on previous episodes about some of the initiatives to Three D. bio print meat alternatives to lessen the meat industry's impact on the environment. Than just as someone with some annoying dietary restrictions, I would be pretty excited about going into a restaurant and knowing that whatever on being served is guaranteed not to make me sick in any way that would rock. But like I said, open meals has some other weird projects. One is called Sabre Ouaga she and it uses weather data so that you can taste the weather. Watch out skittles. And a few years ago at South by southwest debuted a prototype of their Sushi teleportation device, which basically had a chef in. Tokyo making Sushi that was been scanned in remade. By a robot arm in Austin and both of these projects use their custom three d bio printer and their method of digitizing and categorizing elements of food. So keep an eye out on the company opened meals they're trying to start what they call a fifth food revolution. And you know parts of it just might play out.

Tokyo Food Fabrication Machines Austin D. Printers
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Parallels Desktop 16 revamped to run Windows faster on macOS Big Sur

Techmeme Ride Home

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Parallels Desktop 16 revamped to run Windows faster on macOS Big Sur

"In addition to supporting big Sur for both host machines and virtual machines parallels. Desktop sixteen has a slightly different look to fifty different appearance apple has gone with in big Sur. While support is the flagship feature here there's a laundry list of small improvements in this release, for example. Parallels desktop sixteen three and metal applications when running a Mac. Os Big Sur virtual machine on a Mac Os big Sur hosts. Also, printers can be shared between host and virtual machines across operating systems and support has been added for zoom and rotate gestures on multi touch track pads for windows APPs that have zoom rotation functionality. We asked about any plans for supporting windows on apple silicon in big Sur but parallels reps declined to talk about that saying they would discuss it at a later date and quote.

Big Sur Apple
Garmin breach has major ramifications

Clark Howard Show

02:45 min | 3 months ago

Garmin breach has major ramifications

"There's a big data breach that going on right now. It's actually worse than that. It's a full ransomware attack on an American company that most of US know only for fitness trackers and that's Garmon, but Garmon is really much more important company to Defense Aviation and marine life than any of us know, because most of us would not. Be Aware of all the things that garments involved in so odds are the huge attack on garments computer systems. was really from likely a foreign power trying to disrupt the United States so a lot of airplanes that rely on garments. Systems can't fly right now. it may affect shipping. Don't know on that yet, and for those of us like me. I've worn a garment fitness tracker for nine years. All our data's lost in space, and it's unclear whether it will ever be seen again now. This is something that's going to affect this corporation in some activities A. A lot fitness obsessed people are you should see him on message boards? They're going crazy, but this to me is a clear warning to you. Why I've said things like Make sure you go back to paper statements for any bank account and brokerage account anything like that. As the foreign state actors get more and more sophisticated it being able to find vulnerabilities in key computer systems, and with companies imagined the disruption. They could cause with your. Retirement accounts investment accounts, your bank accounts anything like that by being able to invade the systems and try to actively wipe out records so I. Know Everybody in the financial services. Industry is trying to get you. To go to paperless. The problem with paperless is unless you print out records. Use Your Printer. You're INC to do that. You may find yourself at a time where they get hit. And in turn. You get hit because you have no documentation of you have what you had so. When I see how upset people are just about their fitness records, not being available to them and I wasn't happy about not having my nine years of records at least for now. It is nothing compared to how you'd feel? If suddenly you didn't have access to your money,

United States Garmon Defense Aviation
"little printer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

07:27 min | 6 months ago

"little printer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"It's going to depend most of the time you need at least like a raspberry Pi or something like that to Volker taxi. Do the connection for it by. Have you seen the Rip Lots of tears about this. But did you ever see the bug? Little cloud little printer. I forget where it so it did come out in the like kind of win away is that I mean how do I set up some really hot? Because they they. They cuss a lot of money and Feedback cycles very slow. So you have to keep that money and your runway going for a lot longer than suffer sat up so That one unfortunately went down. I did have one in what it would do. Is You would subscribe to feeds such as you know. I want to do daily poem today or I want the weather and then it would print you out a little report every morning and it was the cutest thing ever and you could send each other pitches to and it would just print the pitch out and it was the best thing And he had a little modem plugged into your route and that was basically the little computer that would securely talk to the print very similar setup to that. If that makes sense it does so it. Somebody could have bought this thing. Who doesn't have a computer at all and still make it work. May maybe it was the most adorable thing ever and they ended up open sourcing back end cloud server so people have gone and re implemented it and hosted it and they little prentiss a living on which is adorable. That said that it's a cool. You are L. Too LITTLE PRINTER DOT COM and it just spins and spins thought. He just didn't even renew the domain name. Sad it's a door -able frigging. Dorothy could descend daily puzzle as the best and then it would stop it. Would prints like the paper would go behind this face? Silhouette cut out in every time it stopped printing it would print the face and then feed it through so that the face was showing again on the printout. And that was it's like it's just the details in a was so beautiful that yes it did actually make me excited about them apprentice. That's why I went out and bought up playing with them for years. Ever since man I wonder yeah I just I want this I want I. I would love to live analog side of things you know. Just that's that 'cause like I feel like specifically with like macy's or whatever maybe this is a good figure Stream too but like you know it's like when it's all digital. You're just like dude. I don't know which issue is that. What was that. I have no idea but I don't know we'll thing little. Qr Code to the issues on now. This is the kind of not that I absolutely love. It's like little tiny augmentation that I prefer those kinds of things I would also recommend ate. A fruit has like a clone. They have like a diesel version. Didn't obviously reference Kit with Plastic and you put assembled printed in to make it look prettier Yeah if you go eight of fruit. Ada Are you it They have like a couple of kits in they have to toil. That walks you through it. And if it's just python Swap that out for Java script if you want but they have a Lotta Python libraries that they do for that kind of stuff. That's cool onto a Try TO YEAH HERE. We go all right. I'm just going to get the old critic so no no. No no paid saving blacks. Yeah they should be able to have diop. I thought that'd be cool to have pay with striped button where it was like your stripe account not like a credit card. Thanks Stripe bucks is like a jerk. We have internally bucks then So we just have a little time left to be interesting to you. Are you know it.

Dorothy Volker macy prentiss diop
"little printer" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

10:38 min | 8 months ago

"little printer" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"So you can use the APP control it. When you're in the House on the same network but that's it The circular bridge was introduced in two thousand twelve and replaced by the square. One in two thousand sixteen have two stories here. That kind of remind us that gadgets don't live forever. They do go away. And we've all got drawers. Probably filled with with some old gadgets and wires and things like that but Nicole. I loved that. You looked into the afterlife. Of these gadgets that have been discontinued by their companies and found some hopeful stories right and I think in almost all of the start all of the cases that I've researched. It's always sparked by a really beloved gadget that has like hundreds of thousands of fans and the passionate passionate really passionate community really and one of them is the pebble. That's one of the most successful kickstarter all time and just tens of thousands of fans that you bought the pebble years and years of just building up this community of people who just love their public and this is despite the fact that the Apple Watch came out like a few years later android where came out so he can survived this like influx of all these wearables. Accept it kind of did it. Because as we all know pebble Cadeau died away. Bought up by Fitbit into sixteen Any officially it officially was shut down. The service was shut down in twenty eighteen. So if you don't have servers and APPS you're kind of useless rate except eight communicate because as much as a developer community really cultivated on very beginning and they built up. This site called rebel. Rebel DOT I. O I believe is the U. R. L. With the rebels spelled R. E. BB L. Like Pebble. Yes that's right that's right so these people like when they first heard. Okay fitbit's buying this company out. That's pool our resources and they just like doubted everything the S. T. K. The documentation like everything. They could get their hands on. They downloaded everything in like two days in two days. They had this this whole new website and they said that hadn't had everything ready just yet but they were like we have everything now we can just reverse engineered from from here and it took a couple of years to do so but right now if you go to like if you've ever all pebble lying around your house somewhere and have connecting. Plumpton everything you can actually get it up and running again by going to rebel falling. Really simple instructions leaked linking and click a lot about the figures stuff they have. I was really impressed They have a customer service team discord chat channel. They could go help questions. It's a full organization run by volunteers and yeah. There is hope yet for all of you out there. That is one of the greatest stories of a gadget that no-one who loved it wanted to see go away and so they banded together and made sure that it didn't go away. I mean they're not making new pebbles but the pebble out there can still work. I was more surprised however because I know how much people who have. Pebbles love their pebble. I was surprised that the Chandi still works. That's the that was a surprise for me too. So the Chambi anyone remembers the Ciampi. It was like a small little. Like what like a personal internet device? I guess you call it. A small echo shows that was also a beanbag basically kind of squishy squishy small little alarm clock almost anywhere short you could. You could use it. Use It to show your facebook feed and they'll weather widgets like think of it as a a widget screen scruple of widgets essentially rather than traditional smartest way. The you know off today so it was no. It was again founded in two thousand six and the founder Bunny along. He made the hardware but he the whole idea behind the Chubby. Was that the champion. Hurdle was supposed to be the seller for the OS. They wanted to sell the operating system. Tv's and pieces and things like that but and they've been sold even sold off their their os to the Sony Dash. I don't know if anyone remembers the Sony Dash and that was kind of like a fancier more elegant Ciampi if you will and unfortunately that too because with the with the iphone all of these other guys coming along just didn't stand a chance really against the oncoming smartphone revolution but the CTO Chubby Duane Maxwell. He was like no. I will keep it running myself. So he essentially bought out Giambi from the shareholders like just with his own money and you know kept it running with his own time and by by himself. And if you like I think the exact site I think. He's the company's called a blue oxy. And there's a company that you can go to you to look at it and you if you have an trumpy lying around you can still go to this website and no plug it in everything. You will still work. I mean he said that. He told me that he had to like reengineer everything. Because the original framework use adobe flash. I'm just nobody uses nowadays so yet like rework everything like you use Java script. Html and all of that so but it's up like it's running and if you have all chummy lying around it will still work and they do have a customer service team again. Which is amazing to me that they have a customer service team and still store and if you're Ciampi sort of like brakes a little bit you get you send it in and try to fix it. So that's really interesting. This small little Fan Community. What you would be forgiven if you heard this and said wait a minute. The CTO bought the company and just kept running. How is that a story of life after death? That's not exactly what Nicole was describing. This was a company in bankruptcy. It was it was going out of business and what the CTO did was for cents on the dollar. He bought the IP here by the company. He just bought the parts that would let him maintain the servers and basically is doing this a labor of love. This is not a startup. That's doing rounds of series B funding. This is the CTO trying to make just enough money off of people who want to keep their GIAMBI's running so that he can keep the servers up and keep the jump. He's running right right. And that's the other thing was that of. Obviously it takes money to run this thing by yourself and he was like okay if you would just WANNA use Chambi as just a dumb alarm clock. You know that's free that's fine. But he's any of the wizards that will cost like three dollars a month and which is fine. I think it's very very reasonable. So yeah that's kind of how he is keeping it all going. Rabble website uses petri on for new supported before we wrap up. I know there's there's a few others out there including one that just got another life. There's a there's a crowdfunding campaign started this week for Nasdag round two or three. I guess depending on Friday. That's a little white by bunny. Wi Fi connected bunny in today. Yeah that's been fraught funded. The little printer uses the little receipt printer as being sort of there was resurrected last year. A little bit and all kinds of stuff. I'm sure that I haven't even looked into. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's nice to know that if if there's enough people who love the gadget that we have the resources for people to kind of rally around and keep it going so cool. Thanks for looking into this they call. I'm glad you did this story for joining the conversation in our discord. If you haven't already it's a rock and good time and you can join by linke to a patriotic at patriotair dot com slash. Dt Ns. Let's check out what's in the mail bag. Oh let's We got a response from Chris. Christianson are amateur travellers. Note about remote work yesterday. This person wanted to stay anonymous but said just wanted to respond as somebody who's been using those sites plus more without any success for over a year wouldn't want anybody to think that this is an easy carol plan on so many dozens of applications without any responses and even more before talking to anybody. Maybe I'm wrong but I'd like to let folks know that they may be ignored or rejected or dismissed regularly so going through such a process with a strong disposition because it can be extremely demoralizing. Chris was just trying to give us something to shine a little light in there But but yeah This is this is the norm when you're looking at applying places even if they are working on a beach and Chris himself wrote back after yesterday's show and said Thomas so right that this is not a great time to be a travel blogger. Travel podcast for that matter. Although it's a lot worse to be a travel company airline or cruise line. Fortunately Chris says I still make my living as a software engineer my company actually just went into limited. Beta at bodes well dot. Io in the personal finance space. So if you want to help Chris out you could check out the boats well and make sure you keep him employed can keep doing amateur travellers stuff. Also got an email from Marcus. Who says greetings from this week? It's spring in Golden Colorado. Sounds Nice Mark just thought? I'd mention that the first time I recall the concept of a phone screen that scrolls out to whatever sizes convenient was from the earth final conflict TV series from way back in one thousand nine hundred seven it featured heavy. Mci Product Placement but otherwise demonstrated the practicality of this concept other factors took the series on a very steep decline after the first season. But somebody in the props department was top notch. Thank you Barca's. What flashback forgot all about final conflict? That's cool. I don't even remember it to begin with But it sounds like they were onto something. Shout out to patrons at our master and grandmaster levels including at James Peak Allison One d Hernandez and Jonathan Pryce. Also thanks to Nicole Lee. Always nice to have you usually. It's on Fridays. It seems like how can people keep up with everything? You've been up to Well the easiest way to do with be twitter dot com slash Nicole but of course seeking always good to in gadget dot com to see my story X. Let folks. It's been three months since we started the counter on people getting a new sticker poster Mug or t shirt with the special six year anniversary. Dns Logo on it and the first batch is headed to the factory right now. In fact they're probably in the factory right now..

Nicole Lee CTO Chris pebble Cadeau Fitbit Sony Ciampi Apple facebook adobe twitter Giambi R. E. BB developer James Peak Allison Hurdle Barca
"little printer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"little printer" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Dot com slash Kim are a couple things we need to pass long before we get it back into your phone calls and are a D. I. Y. security to the first of which is that I thought this is kind of cool who could forget Polaroid cameras right for the longest time is the only way to get photos instantly but what if you're feeling nostalgic with your smartphone well they have something new is called the Polaroid land is the printer so you just take a pic a photo put your face down to the printer but the phone face down on the print rather does the rest you have to order the instant film packs a boring leapt out won't do much good either that and it's still just doesn't come cheap it's a hundred and thirty Bucks just for this little printer that looks like you'll have all the reference. all right next to you was a committed up come take a look at the homepage of the various sections and you think we've got you covered with a wide range of digital tips tricks and alerts but there's a specific article I know you're gonna love like let's say for example you're watching a you tube video one of our community I Y. videos on YouTube and forty three seconds into it there's a specific detail that you want to share with a family member or friend basically there's a trick we can share the video haven't exactly start were you designate rent I have do that I don't know how well Facebook takes your privacy maybe you're finally ready to shut it down but you want a copy of every single thing that you posted on Facebook well we're gonna tell you how you can do that too another trick you might know about is if you social media extensively for work that you have various accounts in different platforms well you can take a lot of time to pose the same information each social media account but actually there are ways that you can make one post is sent out simultaneously to all your social media accounts really a huge time saver for links to the is a step by step look no further than the official homepage of the camp commander show that's K. O. M. A. N. D. O. dot com want to there is a link that says show picks and you got it I just see in Houston Texas either Jesse. welcome Jessie. thank you very much what's going on. a little trouble with these. rebel called like yours for the Israeli falls or a local phone number to call you will business from who knows where it is just a sales call I have going on in the non blocked the calls probably twenty or thirty of them and still get a few through in a block..

Kim YouTube Texas Jesse. Jessie. official commander K. O. M. A. N. D. Houston forty three seconds
"little printer" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"little printer" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Now the second half kickoff on the patriots C. HSL football game of the week. your source for that our life can't the credit union scoreboard Cabrini in a tight one with her lady lakes at halftime fine arts of twelve seven Catholic central loop losing to to legal or not legal hurdles to legal central Catholic yes little printer Catholic twenty to six I thought Trevor city central for a second just like you didn't have time but I I we thought about that that's a legal so that's for the fourth quarter makes a little more sense now but yeah but it's a season one who's kind of struggling cece's facing one and two and it doesn't get easier for them they've challenge some folks credit them they be king but then dropped two other of big ones right after that. UT Jesuit gets the opening kickoff to begin the second half of plain leading himself out of town there is Jeffrey night that probably would've been a procedure called you let it go well Brady Henry with a perfectly coffin kickball and it hit right in his arms right at the sideline you're right if he lets it go cheer me it is a penalty but it's hard when you're a guy that you want to return that football so bad if it's close I'm taken and we're gonna run baby but yeah. the very strategic kick by brother rice to well executed so this market the five yard line to get a second look at Nate brown the young sophomore quarterback count they're trying to find some space for his squad right now first time we haven't seen them in a passing formation it's into the hands of Nick Johnson to try to find some species up to the ten yard line that's a solid Dino foreign first down just does just that. yeah Sir keygen brown comes up I mean these guys are tough we talked about the back end but Sir keys in the guy in the in the outside backer is probably their best defender in he hasn't. he made himself present at least in our eyes in the first half but he's ready get loose the second. to keep brown under center here. St night check that hit in motion to the far side it's Johnson again who has it on the ground he turns across the fifteen yard line to bring himself to the twenty and drank in the pile all the way to the twenty five yard line so you'd be looking for some kind of spark plug it maybe it's Johnson here to start the second half yeah they give in the name of Johnson and I got punch right off left guard in this goes for twenty yards here me and it's a good dragging saving touchdown effort what a nice twenty are chunking the best in high is gaining offered to play for the cubbies him again in motion to the far center gonna pretty much fake it to him it's Johnson again who has it for the third straight play strangling through potential tacklers as he stomps over the twenty five in the Alps is way up to the thirty one yard line after Mourad finally made the staff it's another dean of five on first down as hers I come down through cram Homer yeah it's not the guy you want down cram homers one of their leaders up front he's one of the reasons they've been able to have success in the second half on the ground. Aloysius is birth given name and he's down right now Jerry and I think we're going to step aside. still ten forty two love to play in this third quarter it's fourteen nothing in favor of the warriors here on the patriot FM one a one point five and EM fourteen hundred. the C. HSL game of the week is sponsored by cause pain and knee has recruiting..

Nick Johnson Nate brown Cabrini cece Alps Mourad Jeffrey Brady Henry football Aloysius cubbies rice Jerry twenty five yard thirty one yard fifteen yard twenty yards five yard ten yard
"little printer" Discussed on Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"little printer" Discussed on Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

"One on one basis little along word salad salad doing too much man every single <hes> project tried to have like nineteen different things going on that there we're gonna do this and this and this and this and this and this and this and this and this protects futures the example but i'll give credit digitize features although a scam eglise dude. I can't remember his name. Dude bro eglise least dude bro. Try to just like kind of do one thing right there was there was other things in there they wanted to build an exchange and on this exchange you do this and the token but i value because the token looking would enable you to do it would be held in equity on the exchange and blah blah blah blah blah. It's still too much so you're getting into the wrong with too much there. This is too much this far too much. This is a huge red flag and when i again all these people i think here's the thing you know this. We're we're in such early days of cryptocurrency man or in such early days of cryptocurrency and and and people are running around still trying to build the fundamentals of bitcoin. The fundamentals of bitcoin work really well. It's ten years old but we're still working on developing layer. Two who applications were working on fleshing out the lightning network which is revolutionary and <hes> you know in a theory. I'm is trying to get over turtles as well. You know <hes> those. There's some significant problems that we have right now that actually will improve the quality of life of human beings. Human persons improves their quality of life right and that's where the focus should be. That's where the focus should be and i think that's <hes> very similar to <hes> <hes> what's her name. You know the gal who raised billions and billions of dollars for her little printer thing that you prick your finger and you put the thing in the box and it tells you all your blood diseases of this huge like multibillion dollar scam <hes> she had investments from all the big investors you know she big bright blue is pretty girl <hes> and it was complete crap garbage scam project. You know the biggest thing in the news and you know you're doing too much man. You're doing too much focus on one thing and be good at one thing. That's what we try to do here right. We try to trade very very very well and then talk to you about trading and talk to you about what's going on in crypto. Try to do those two things. We try to do them very well and hopefully we do. I think that we do and and you know if we didn't do them. I wouldn't have all you guys showing up and giving us your thoughts and your opinions and i really appreciate them and you guys are absolutely fantastic. Thank you for spending time with me but this is garbage has been. I've said that for a while so it's good to be to the a little bit of <hes> indication regardless of whether you feel that this is right that the s._e._c. has the right to do this. That's completely different conversation. Here's the actual press release from the s._e._c. website so moving along. Let me know what you guys think about this in the chat amer gonna move onto the second story of the day closing parenthesis parenthesis. That was a weird one allender. Thanks so much for the follow on twitch and spark a talq spock talq alc- good. That's like talk that spock would use. It's like star trek..

spock s._e._c. ten years
"little printer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"little printer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"That sounds tasty. Dinner bell is ringing now. Do you what your printed steak, rare medium? Well, how do you want this gross? Now, see it's not actually meet either. Which is the good thing. This is gonna sound really tasty to you when I describe it. Okay. I'm listening, but just Sepe Scotty, the founder of Nova meet says, it's an innovative entree that goes from printer to pan. So you you don't get it. Meet him rare just comes out raw. And then you have to cook. It. So he came up with the idea two years ago since then he's been printing and preparing vegan stakes like this for people around the world. It's about new meat. I know want new new Matt. Yes worse. No. So we're creating the first three D printed plant based beefsteak the edible ink so far. It sounds delicious. Edible ink sign me up with ingredients such as rice peas and seaweed comes in a cartridge. Now. When my food comes in cartridge, I'm excited from the get-go like ink little printer cartridges shooting out seaweed and rice, and what the three D printer takes the role as sous-chef working meticulously to prepare the meat in under ten minutes. Then it's printed with the same texture and appearance as normal beefsteak. No. Then you says little bit of this guilt with a dash of oregano..

Sepe Scotty bell Matt founder Nova ten minutes two years
"little printer" Discussed on Material

Material

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"little printer" Discussed on Material

"Spot for if you wanna powerful Chromebook and seven hundred fifty bucks a really good price. Particularly when you compare it with an ipad pro, which is a wonderful wonderful device. But that's maybe your table stakes to get into the ipad pro before you even get. Before you, even get a keyboard Ford and couple of the things that you might want. If you're gonna use it that way, and I have to say that it's like, well, I really think that's a good deal, comma, especially if windows ten comes duel boot comes next year, and as certain as that's looking with all of these commits in the channel that use ice still can't say, yes, by omega seven hundred fifty dollars enough for you want, you spent twelve hundred dollars for the I seven because it's going to be a windows laptop to and, but at least the new updates to chrome OS now at least a Christine the Lennox layer, supports USB. So maybe now you can weaken at least start using it in a okay, I can actually plug things into this end and Lennox limits. See excessive I remember how excited I was getting back to the MAC ten. That again, they started off with a public beta as I can print Honey come over here. Again, the kids around look, the my MAC is printing things. Yeah. All the way to America. Now, your dream that you never came into see trimming true. We printing up what? Printing, your little boy, he's a printing, by the way, never figured out to go cloud print until I had to have it configured properly to printed my house, which is making me wonder does that mean that I can print stuff from here to my house at home. I should just preliminarily start printing all like all photos aches. Have I like waiting for me when I get back home to the pile of things that book. You know, be a little a little bit of fun for you for the when you come home like today just have it print. Just a piece of paper with simple system. Font saying I know what you did. And then you'll be jetlagged maybe another few days, you will totally forgotten about it. You just see this thing in the printer trae or maybe even better it will have like flopped out of the printer tray and slid across the floor. And now, it's just this thing like on the floor. It's too bad. When you're vulnerable with jetlag, actually. So I do have a wifi connected printer, everyone it's called a memo a memo bird, I call it a memo bird. I don't know why it's like the silly little printer you buy. They're like the cool new. They're not that cool or new. It's what's it called the Pete? The heat paper. You know, the rec- papers issued by the way got my English. Going to be adjustment. Yes. The thermal paper. And so I was just thinking what could I print to it? Sorry. I often to thinking zone. I'm sorry. I've been doing a lot lately. A dream that I went like that. I went on a thought hole, and I felt bad about it. So you might need to shake the little bit. Of deer show show, shall we? Collect ourselves with commercial. Yeah. Let's shake ourselves into commercial. He's upset of material is brought to you by our brilliant friends over pinged them paint them Branly because they help keep your sites and the.

Christine Ford Lennox America seven hundred fifty dollars twelve hundred dollars
"little printer" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Little printer. Still some kid. Prince kid, right? It's just so funny Brad that wind is Lola crazy over there, isn't it. Megan Markle didn't have to worry about that. But all the other the Queen has some sort of crazy glow on her. Got one. She's got one of those hats Allison wonderland who she always does. And she had beautiful feathers on she looked beautiful strong. She doesn't fall. Acquaint looked amazing to address the there's a million people there to catch her. I thought it was very cool though, what Patty said about the back of the dress. She wanted the back of the dress opened the Dover scars for surgery. Yes. When she was twelve years old, she had that surgery, and she has been ever since a really big supporter of charities in that area. So she wanted to show that that's a statement about eight twenty five on the big show of follow up on a story. We covered yesterday. It went viral. I can't I can't think of the last time we had that many people commenting on our Facebook page all the time. What are you talking about that it was the runner up? It was the runner up for the DA. And you guys wouldn't I would have voted for her. But I was outvoted. I had this the squirrel girl. She's a lady who was flying for more Landau to Cleveland on frontier airlines, and she said she had an emotional support animal, whether but it turned out to be an emotional support, squirrel a rodent as technically a rodent. So they actually took her off white. Yeah. Because that's not. But you didn't go peacefully now. No they hand up. They had to come and get her wheelchair. And now like silence of the lambs. She's. Now, she's. Fighting back. We either either you walk off the plane or I'm going to arrest you there will be trespassing warrants issued for you. And we will take that squirrel taking squirrel. Sorry. You are not I refused. He will not take my baby. From me. I politely informed them. I will own up big portion of this airline. I'm going. I'm going all the way I am contacting attorney and take it from there. She's going for. I gotta tell ya. Rambo wife, Kanye, west better, lookout, good. She'll swipe him. Sounds as crazy as he is. Wow. Listen this lady, I'm going for blood. I am going all the way. I am contacting attorney and take it from there. Contacted attorney. I imagine about ten minutes. Talking about attorney you'll hear a dial tone. There's always somebody that will take the case. And yeah, you're right. Who doesn't want to own portion of frontier airlines. Nick's case. Brad coming in from left field. Very good. You.

attorney Landau Megan Markle Patty Allison wonderland Brad Kanye Facebook Prince Dover Nick Cleveland twelve years ten minutes
"little printer" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Is there can you still get back film for this now or no gone isn't it they don't make it anymore and i been talking to frank about modifying some of these fuji in stacks cameras you know so that we can get some people are already doing it there's a couple of people that are charging charge a lot of money six hundred bucks for a for insects back but you know to shoot insects film on these old cameras yes okay right so you know we talk about that the time factor and franken do it it's just a matter of he has to get repairs done totally understand that the other thing that i'm looking into and eric with the one that brought the top of this this canon selfie printer a few use it with your sony alpha with a funky lens and you can walk around with this little printer then you can make you really nice images with the funky length so you're giving us something that's more interesting than just sort of a clinical digital picture is this printer battery operated it has yeah oh okay and it's by as well chip in you can take the chip area cam you can print it right there so that opens up right yeah yeah yeah yeah sort of a photo booth order new poll right and this lends here was something that was added yeah so that lends was added to the camera on the front of the standard through with two lar too long too big to go inside the bay of the cameras so i modified the front standard so that i could put that camera but that lens on that camera and then frank modified the polaroid back so that it would fit into the into the back of the camera and that that has been a workhorse another that camera you know and i just wanna point that you know in frank build something you know it it it'd built to last it is you know thought out he takes one of the most patient people up with me so he's one of the most people i've ever met and even the like it's funny like he's in the middle like they can multitask in the middle like strewing looking for tiny little screwing come up to him and in the most patient way like yeah you do this whatever they go back to what he's doing and.

franken alpha frank eric sony
"little printer" Discussed on Computer Talk with TAB

Computer Talk with TAB

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on Computer Talk with TAB

"After spending that much over and over again for as i'm concerned it's going to make in hartford mike yes sir how are you doing fine hurry great show man thanks great can you guys helped me out and you show me idaho cup thus uh wireless pro printer i got how far away printer going to be from your computer ten feet 20feet twenty seats you're going to us partly about fifteen feet i can get a close if he wa so the question is this the are you hooking up a wireless printer so everyone can use it in your family or just you might be a little bit of both luca because if you could always look it right to the computer if it's just you that'd be the easiest most effective way to make that sucker work what brando printer that uh i'm open up to a laptop i've gotta uh the hp chief 62 notebook laptop and i want to hook up with the eight hp officejet forty five hundred a wireless nice k now initially when you first started up your wireless does it have a little screen on it yeah little printer uh well it's not on now i can we walk over to it well yeah woman the woman the switch and we'll it's okay if it has a little screen on it it'll tell you you can go through those a wizard on the screen that's one way too got a faxed copy or ski and it's probably like uh two inches long through an inch thick little controlled let's guest does okay that's fight you can actually can figure it there which i don't recommend does the little buttons to me air goal out of a thing of all 'cause we can't hear you.

luca hartford idaho hp fifteen feet two inches eight hp ten feet 20feet
"little printer" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Blog we'll prints out and it's well format so imphal well i'm o elisa in the wild dot com and and i'm again looking at the ignored cookies the we've talked about and there's a little printer icon right up there next the recipe so much easier to print that out and take that to expansion then it is to log laptop or how to copy at and i'd like to think that we're all stay needs you know we print them out we took them away let's be real we don't do that prove my recipe i take it to the kitchen i crumble it up throat with when i use it again later well what i do what i from the food network and others and yours too i i save it as a pdf on my computer hingis stick it into a file on when you're cooking you gotta make sure you don't getting spattered on that expense of apple computer but i k e keith you go right from the computer screen and works great and i've got that saved i've got a bunch of them saved a matter of fact is pds so i'm all out keeping it off what you know what i like about your recipes is speaking of simple as that they're very clear sometimes i think they they overdo the explanations and things and and uh it they're very very straightforward nine that's what i appreciate about it so again uh have a happy new year ravin you area we'll get back to talking about some january food about that i thank you for taking account or an empty room there you go thank you happy new year have you heard it here america's premiere outdoor radio show big wild today with it the emme you should waz f g three.

apple computer ravin america
"little printer" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"It's a writedown all right the cell how the the selfie of the the model i was looking at was to cp 1300 it's a compact little printer it prince postcardsized up the the photos it i think that you can even get postcard templates word that have the lines and everything on the vacuum guards it's so can't the are a couple of interesting things about i i use it on workshops like we have we have that printer out and people can print their stuff and it doesn't jews angola the weird thing juices oh what's called thermal transfer printing so you you get a really good quality out of it that is instantly it's like it's like a it's like a a the professional print it's it's glossy it feels good it doesn't look like it was on we are paying print well under thirty cents you've de la 26 27 sound better overall it's not bad at all and you you get the boxes of like hand over one hundred sheets of paper with the cartridge two with ink or the the the the system that it uses so you always have the right amount of inc the right amount of paper it it's not like you run out of yellow and then you have to buy a yellow and then you run of blue in it's it's all all the thing all the things it pretty much one package and its of i love it it's wireless uh so you can hook it up to your wi fi you can print if you're camera supports you can printed it from the camera it has a building card reader so it is just one of those things at sentinel brainer to have all i'm i'm going to make this a christmas present i like this okay a and the photographer give it to it showed us anything okay what else this is great spent at least this is the two hundred in ten roughly two hundred ten dollar item um you know the instincts the the fuji insects yes form at which is which is like polaroid it's an instant film.

angola wi christmas two hundred ten dollar
"little printer" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"I have working will be sort of got the drive working i got the drive working late at night last week it turns out windows eight point one is satan's operating system so we've been building telescopes on sundays i've been talking cosmic quest and programming things like that tuesday night's mats doing all sorts of different things on wednesdays and fridays during the day so go to twitch dot tv slash cosmo quest acts and you can find out all about when we're on and how you can get involved and your personal twitch channel is twitch tv slash star strieder on and expect the unexpected so i'm always talking science but i'm never sure where i'm going to go with it so saturday i'm actually going to use a painting technique that i i learned from our good friend surly amy artist amy davis roth and it allows you to paint gas giant's cool so i'm going to make a whole bunch of gas giants to hang up in this boring office and you can learn with me how to do it and hopefully not watch me make two big of a mess with paint but there's that gamble so join me on saturday and it won't quite be bob ross but there will be a lot of paint involved that's a great all right so our journey through interesting science fiction continues this time we talk about speculative fiction dealing with material science nanotechnology and three d printing it's a staple in star trek for what other stories deal with it now as i mentioned i've got a couple of interesting anecdote so the first thing is i as a you know really wonderful husband bought my wife a three d printer for her birthday earlier this year it's one of the mano price treaty printers it's a fairly small little printer relatively inexpensive and mono price isn't it model price now it has a singular price no with the name of the companies where he by cables and stuff from okay.

windows operating system amy davis roth bob ross
"little printer" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Are you ready okay the charge in case there comes with the air pods in double as an iphones fan i said it uh as the internet was all blowing up about this as a little wildly just which no i tried it myself you get a vibrating notification game over it's no longer there but it'll do in a pinch but as far as it being alive changer i'm not really sure are right what do you do when you take two old brands and you combine them together to old brands were talking about polaroid and motorol and then they're going to come together to create one great product what do you think it is is the polaroid instance share printer it's an instant camera that turns the bodos e a smartphone into a tiny photo printer this is actually an innovative idea this motives e it hasn't really taken off but the whole idea is that you can build the smartphone that she wide by adding all these different components to it but anyway this is to share printer eclipse onto the back of a phone dedicated shudder buttons who may have like a camera you print out the photos verdy taken it has an app that which ed text and filters to your picks before you print them and basically just have a little printer that you're going to test your smartphone and it's one hundred ninety nine dollars they also have some other mod's like a mole projector alexa enabled speaker the three hundred sixty degree camera and but this one is like two hundred dollars that's really really expensive all right let's talk a little bit about artificial intelligence because everybody's getting all excited about and it's being use we mentioned google using a i in their google search results apple of course than uh amazon with their alexa in order to predict behavior what we're doing lanyo facebook are all over a is that starts modifying your news feed then all the different things that you say so arms over at cnbc this past week online and i saw this story about buffalo wild wings lay in the text section of cnbc how are we talking about buffalo wings in the text section in the text fear well buffalo wild wings is hoping.

artificial intelligence google amazon facebook cnbc iphones polaroid one hundred ninety nine dollar three hundred sixty degree two hundred dollars
"little printer" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Are you ready okay the charging case that comes with the air pods and double as an icecream stand i said it uh as the internet was all blowing up about this as a little wildly just which no are tried it myself he get a vibrating notification game over it's no longer there but it'll do in a pinch but as far as it being alive changer i'm not really sure all right what do you do when you take two old brands and you combine them together to old brands of talking about polaroid and motorola and then they're going to come together to create one great product what do you think it is is the polaroid instance share printer it's an instinct camera that turns the modo's e a smartphone into a tiny photo printer this is actually an innovative idea this modo's e it hasn't really taken off but the whole idea is that you can build nationwide by adding all these different components to it but anyway this is to share printer eclipse onto of a phone dedicated shudder buttons who may have like a camera you print out the photos verdy take it it has an app that legit infiltrate to your picks before you print them and basically just have a little printer that you're going to test your smartphone and it's one hundred and ninety nine dollars they also have some other mod's like a mole projector lx enabled speaker the three hundred sixty degree camera and but this one is like two hundred dollars that's really really expensive all right let's talk a little bit about artificial intelligence because everybody's getting all excited about and it's being use we mentioned google using a i in their goals search results apple of course and uh amazon with their alexa in order to predict behavior what we're doing lanyo facebook there are all over a is that starts modifying your newsfeed all the different things that you say so arms over at cnbc this past week online and i saw this story about buffalo wild wings mike in the text section of cnbc how are we talking about buffalo wings in the text section in the text fear well buffalo wild west is hoping.

artificial intelligence google amazon facebook cnbc polaroid motorola three hundred sixty degree ninety nine dollars two hundred dollars
"little printer" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"In now john are you on the on the court system where you're getting all of your loads in your information on the phone as well yeah yeah yeah he was up you know i don't i hope our culture a toy stock on a red light and um if in fact i don't know writers waiting for a free car but most of your diet might the eu have that ari easy easy grabbing you know by the the area where grab it quickly yeah now listen on your work is coming through your phone so obviously people need their phones i know i know many people that drive for a living and if the work is coming in on the phone no longer you're not stopping off somewhere and printing it out anymore i mean you can but a lot of it comes through in little printer right in the truck it's just the way things are going so you know it's tough to do business without the phones because they do so much now at the same time she you'd be driving and doing business i don't think you'd whip out you know your your whole computer set up your your console and make it an office eight some of it is just ridiculously sense jim's and such would on wpro hi jim oh you're good how are you good desperate beard horrific thing and it would be your an unbelievable or coincidence but tragic going through the governor vr vr vr vr twenty seven year old young woman coming from northern rhode island was on 295 yesterday in the afternoon oh yeah off the road at a tree of dieter but my question would be wouldn't it be interesting if you're producer for check this out to see if they do check the though for a tragedy like that where this twenty seven year old girl that guide texting what she uh texting or under so for when she went off the road the ghost shadows things on the edge of the road so when you don't pay attention it brings you back to the middle of the road pseudocourt beer it hit a tree but but maybe it happens so quickly with her as interesting but could only either of your producer could find it all there are police reports in in in in many instances they come back a few days later a maybe a week later in.

eu jim rhode island producer twenty seven year
"little printer" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"little printer" Discussed on Tech News Today

"So the the printer and dots yeah is that for all of our our we all being tracked buyer printer dodds codified printer like my little printer at home or is this just nsa printers i know it's a pretty common to modern printers this particular printers is not an unusual printer the electric frontier foundation has running list of printers that they say don't have this feature on and having said that the the different deals that the national security agency reaches with different vendors are going to be and of beyond the clear scope of all of us for a little while so that list might be not entirely correct either if you are worried about this if you're worried about what sort of weird little bits of metal data your of leaking through uh by posting colored a pay printer pages online you can scan something in black and white or better yet just transfer the content manually by a leap creating actual characters and type sheet somewhere else and so it doesn't look like the original document but all the original content is there in can ask everybody hey you have to trust me here i'm not going to go ahead and and uh recreate this document even if i have scanned it black and white even if i have some a printed it on a black and white printer to don't color print anything because that's going to be uh that's if you're using a laser color printer then very well could have some sticking to graphic content and that you wouldn't be aware that you would never use its also pretty common in of money.

color printer dodds