26 Burst results for "Little Bighorn"

"little bighorn" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:23 min | 2 months ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Native America calling from the Allegheny territory of the Seneca nation. I'm Brett navy. The crow language consortium is developing textbooks, dictionaries and posters all in an effort to preserve the crow language. Absolute for future generations, money from the federal government in the form of COVID relief aid is helping boost that effort. Right now the consortium is collecting recordings of fluent speakers among other projects. And the red Lake nation is breaking ground on a new building the house through ojibway language emerging school. That's also thanks in part to federal relief money. These are just two of the dozens of language and culture programs getting some added strength from the influx of emergency funds. We're going to hear about them coming up this hour and of course we want to hear from our listening audience as well. What language programs are working in your tribe, give us a call, the numbers one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's one 800 9 9 native. Joining us from billings Montana is jeanine peas. She is in the valley of the chief's district of the crow Indian reservation in Montana, also known as the large grass area. She is founding president and faculty member at little bighorn college and she is the board chair of the crow language conservancy. She is a crow tribal member. Welcome back to Native American calling gene. Show the tick alone. It's good to be here. Thanks for having me. I'm excited about our conversation today as I was telling you before we kicked things off today. Well, language revitalization language immersion is something that I'm extremely passionate about and I'm guessing, well, this has been a passion of yours for a long time. You've been working on crow revitalization for several years. What are some of the developments that you're working on right now? Well, probably the most that we're emphasizing right now is materials development for our dual language and our language immersion classrooms. And we work together with public and private Catholic schools, as well as our little bit corn college are tribal college. So we have a big partnership, but we're really been able to take a step forward with these ARP funds through the national endowment of the humanities and through the administration for native administration. We have we're going to take some steps forward with a series that our children can learn about our crow history, a timeline over from time immemorial right up to the present as well as a crow heroes series to learn about our people throughout all the ears. And then also, we're planning to publish a student dictionary that will come from our multiyear work on a dictionary and the savory dictionary. We're very, very excited to be able to bring these things to the classrooms through the art funding. How long have you been working on language revitalization, Jenny? You know, we put our language consortium together in 2011. We began to meet about the how it would be an advantage for us to exchange our language materials, many of the schools had started dual language and language immersion classrooms, especially at the early childhood level. And so in 2014, we started our nonprofit, and from that time forward, we have been able to realize mutual progress right now we have 24 classrooms where the language is being taught 14 of those are at least half a day in the absolute language. And they start from pre-K all the way through third grade. And then we have curl language being taught as a modern language at the middle school and high school levels. And probably the most suspicious project, of course, is our language immersion classrooms. And we're very, very thrilled about that. We've developed materials in that approach language teaching in a contextual format. And our students are learning anywhere from a thousand to 1500 vocabulary words in context every year at three different major levels. And then the next major development was our dictionary project. We called our language speakers in our elders together in the summer of 2018 and had a rapid word collection project. Whereby groups of elders and speakers, maybe four or 5 of them were given. Word that would be like a word association, let's say like hand and all the words and the obsolete language relating to hand. Or injury or a particular like mother, okay? And we collected our goal was to collect over two weeks 10,000 words. And in two weeks, was about 65 elders and language speakers. We collected just short of 15,000 words for a dictionary. And we recorded the speakers. We wrote down our the words and all the people in these groups had to agree with that. How they were written, as well as how they were pronounced. So from that time, up to today, we now have an online dictionary that records and puts all of that out to our solid public in anyone, because it's a free app. And bob roux is on program today. He's really the expert in the technology of how that has been placed online. So we're really happy to have that dictionary as a matter of our offering it to all of our classrooms our students and really our speaker public and the crow in our crony. It certainly sounds like you have pretty much all of the bases covered. You have the little little ones all the way up through the college agent. Of course you're working closely with the elders and the community as well. Coming from as most indigenous nations pretty much 99% of indigenous nations were all oral has there been an easy process getting things written down as well phonetically and things of that matter? Well, we were fortunate to have a number of cadre of young folks scholars go to Massachusetts institute for technology, MIT in the mid 70s. And they originated in orthography using the international syllabary. And really, our language has been written,.

Brett navy COVID jeanine peas little bighorn college crow language conservancy Montana Native America administration for native admi red Lake Allegheny Seneca billings middle school and high school federal government Jenny bob roux Massachusetts institute for te
Kabul Wasn't a Withdrawal, It Was a Retreat

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Kabul Wasn't a Withdrawal, It Was a Retreat

"I've been waiting all week for this. He is the vice president of the heritage foundation heritage dot. Org he is the man we go to for all matters national security and foreign policy. Jim califano welcome back to america. First you're on am. I know not live on national radio. America you have to actually here. So let's i think there's two big issues one is what they're gonna do next which is going to make things even worse in the white house and and the other is what we how we stop it okay so before we get to that for two days. Now i've been quoting. You'll tweet here on america. First very powerful super powerful visual tweet where you said. The compost wasn't a withdrawal. It was the result of contact with the enemy. Which means it's a retreat. Jim what write that what. So here's what happened. And i'm not nancy drew but i think and i even think on your show. People have unpack this understand. What's going on biden. Convinced himself that afghanistan was going to collapse. He so he had and so he grabbed gani. And he said you're going to cut a deal with the taliban and you're gonna turn the country over to the taliban and what you guys are going to do is let me leave first. And then the country's gonna collapse and it won't happen on my watch and it won't be fall and what happened is of course. The taliban were like well dude. If you just tell us you're leaving we're not gonna cut any deal and of course ghani got cold feet grabbed his suitcases and headed for the door. And then what biden did was just executed is planning precipitated. The collapse and then he put himself in a situation where where there was no escape. It's literally like dustin hoffman walks up to customer and says dude there's a million indians on the little bighorn don't go there and then custard charges anyway and and get surrounded by the by the indians and then he then he turns to the guy next. How could this possibly happen.

Jim Califano America Heritage Foundation Taliban Gani Biden Nancy Drew White House JIM Afghanistan Ghani Dustin Hoffman Indians
U.S. Ramps up Wild Horse Roundups in Drought-Stricken West

Environment: NPR

02:20 min | 5 months ago

U.S. Ramps up Wild Horse Roundups in Drought-Stricken West

"Throughout this hour we've been following how the rain and wind from hurricane ida is punishing the southeast. But we can't forget that all this is happening. While the west is experiencing severe drought and that drought is not just affecting humans. Wild horses are dying. Due to a lack of water the federal government is trying to save them by rounding them up and adopting them out across the country but as nevada. Public radio's nate heggie reports. It might not be the solution. It appears to be black helicopter. Swoops past a group of wild horses running across western. Utah's high desert. It's mid morning already on. The helicopter is trying to herd them into a corral. Lisa read is watching the action while sitting on a blanket under an umbrella. The helicopter works like a sheepdog. It works the horses from side to side guiding them to the direction that he wants them to go read is with bureau of land management. Right now. her agency is in the middle of a huge emergency campaign to get roughly six thousand. Wild horses like these out of the desert and into private stables or pastures across the country. That's because the drought in the west is so severe this summer. That it's killing horses. People wanna say let mother nature take. Its course but boy. That's the stuff. Nightmares are made of reed remembers reading reports about a small group of wild horses who died from dehydration during the west last severe drought two decades ago. There was one full. That was still alive and It was nursing off of a dead mom. That's heartbreaking wild horses rounded up. Today are faring better not by much at a nearby row. Some of the mayor's look got you can see their ribs and their hipbones and that is definitely a direct impact from the drought unlike other desert critters such as bighorn sheep or mule. Deer the federal government. Can't just let wild horses die off. They're protected under a fifty year old. Federal law it mandates. A set number of healthy horses living on healthy range lands. But lately the beale has argued that there are too many wild horses on those range lands. That's creating unhealthy conditions and the drought is just making things worse so the rounding them up and adopting them

Hurricane Ida Nate Heggie High Desert Federal Government Bureau Of Land Management Nevada Utah Lisa Reed Beale
Brian Regan on the Difference Between Doctors and Veterinarians

Netflix is A Daily Joke

01:20 min | 9 months ago

Brian Regan on the Difference Between Doctors and Veterinarians

"My doctor looked at me and said brian. You are way too sedentary back. So i vowed in that moment to get a dictionary but i haven't gotten around the house lying around the house. Doctor specialized right last month. I went to an ear nose and throat doctor last week and into an arch of the foot small of the back nape of the neck dr fallen arches my small too big and i have a trick. Nape it's weird in the human world. There's a doctor for everybody part. But in the animal world a veterinarian takes care of all animals and all parts. it's going to be the hardest job in a world where the bighorn sheep need doctors wildebeest gastroenterologist giraffe throat throat in throat doctors.

Brian
"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Did he that put in your way now. It's time for congress so wait plan get it. Compliment to eagle jig style. Shoot yet god. Gpa indira mandal copy done frederick banting kentucky on inter pinto beans as in doing that. He says those interest companyas his stick on not bionic esther their alice last prosecutors india's economy this the dollar us did he at letter. Say like alumina stayed llamas. New medusa highly start for porto skin. Those death umbrellas. She said he. Al category frontal maintain control in the middle..

congress frederick india eagle medusa
"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

05:23 min | 11 months ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"In influence. Your told me cassoulet eunice. Davos he congonhas. Doing gunther literally paso but gwen. Twenties egos for super tvos sanity. Don asked us who come in tokyo rear little become territory. We gather montana. You can recall. We're bufallo get. Allow us to me on a diva.

Twenties Don tokyo
"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

06:03 min | 11 months ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Unless you're seeing less than the actual murder economic the there bechtel who came and on dictum thing in place.

Keith Morrison reads Dr. Seuss How The Grinch Stole Christmas

The Mysterious Mr. Epstein

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Keith Morrison reads Dr. Seuss How The Grinch Stole Christmas

"How the grinch stole christmas by dr seuss. Every who down in whoville light. Christmas a lot but the grinch live just north of veal did not the grinch hated christmas whole christmas season. Please don't ask why no one quite knows. The reason it could be as head wasn't screwed on just right it could be. Perhaps his shoes are too tight. But i think that the most likely reason of all may have been that. His heart was two sizes too small. Whatever the reason is hard or shoes. He stood there on christmas eve. Hating the who's staring down from his cave with a sour grinchey frown. The warm lighted windows below on the town for he knew every who down in whoville beneath was busy now hanging mistletoe wreath and they're hanging stockings. E snarled with a sneer. Tomorrow is christmas it practically here. Then he growled with his grinch figures nervously drumming. I must find some way to stop christmas from a main for tomorrow. He knew all the who girls and boys would wake brighton early. They'd rush for their toys and then whole the noise show the noise. Doi's noise noise. That's one thing. He hated the noise. Noise noise noise. Then the who's young and old would sit down to a feast. And they feast on they feast and they feast. Feast feast feast. They would feast on who pudding and rare who rose beast which was something that grinch couldn't stand in the least and then they do something he liked. Leashed all every who down in whoville. The tall and this mall would stand close together with christmas bells ringing. They'd stand hand in hand and who's would start singing. They'd sing sing sing. sing sing. Sang and the more the grinch thought of the who christmas saying the more the grinch thought. I must stop this whole thing. Why for fifty three years. I've put up with it now. I'm must stop christmas from coming. But how then he got an idea. An awful idea the grinch gonna wonderful off idea. I know just what to do. The grinch laughed in his throat and he made a quick santa claus hat and a coat and he chuckled and clucked. What a great grinchey trick with this code in this hat. I'll look just like saint. Nick all i need a reindeer. The grinch looked around but since reindeer are scarce there were none to be found. Did that stop the old grinch. No the grinch simply said if. I can't find a reindeer make quan instead. So he called his dog max then. He took some red thread and he tied bighorn on the top of his head. Then he loaded some bags and symbols empty sacks on a ramshackle sleigh and he hitched up old. Max then the grinch said got up and the slaves started down toward the homes. Where the who's they snooze in their town all their windows were dark quiet. Snow filled the air. And the who's were all dreaming sweet dreams without care when it came to the little house on the square. This is stop number one. The old grinchey clause est any climbed to the roof. Empty bags his fist then. He slid down the chimney around tight pinch but if santa could do it then socal the grinch he got stuck only once for a moment or two then. He stuck his head out of the fireplace flu where the little who stockings all hung in a row. These stockings grin are the first things to go. Then he slithered and slunk with a smile most unpleasant around the whole route and he took every president. Pop guns bicycles roller-skates drums checkerboards tricycles popcorn plums. And he stuffed them in day than the grinch buried nibley stuff dole the bags one by one then. He slumped to the ice box. He took the who feast. He took a who pudding. He took the roast beast. He cleaned out the icebox. Quick flash way the grinch even took the last can of who hash

Dr Seuss DOI Brighton Grinch Nick MAX Santa FLU
Mysterious monolith appears in Newnan

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Mysterious monolith appears in Newnan

"Move on finely chelsea at the manila. Just tell us out. The art world has reacted to the appearance of this enormous metal block in the utah test at first. The world responded in a sort of excited and generous way. So i think this thing appeared. It was spotted by a helicopter. That was being some environmentalists. These guys were counting bighorn. Sheep in the utah desert and spotted this. I think it's about twelve foot. High shiny metal monolith there amongst the red rocks and for a while. It was exciting. Because i think there was. There was some intimation that might be a an unknown work. By the great scope to joan mccracken. He created his planks in his columns. These great shiny minimalist objects. Which have this have a mystical power to stand in front of them. They sort of reflect you but you kind of lose yourself in them and so everybody was very excited about that quite quickly. he's gallery said we're actually no. It's not by him. He's got rivets on he'd never vs rivets and things like this and then they sort of all these sorts of other events these other molesters appearing in the art will very bored very quickly. And i think that's where we are right now. They keep appearing not. I did a quick google search and this another monolith has appeared somewhere else and it was olive white. Various the world romania months left right and center. But everybody's going to be with you think whoever's doing it to stop

Utah Desert Joan Mccracken Manila Utah Google Romania
"little bighorn" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"I'm John Bachelor, Peter Cousins. The Earth is weeping, the epic story of the Indian wars for the American West. We come to the moment that is burned into the 25th and 21st century memory of the Indian wars. That's Custer's last stand so called by Hollywood Peter 31 officer's 5th 578 enlisted men 45 Scouts. A total of 660 all told, as cussed arise off in late June. This June 22nd June 23rd June 24th. What were his orders in his mind at this point, What was he to do when and if he found the suit? His orders from General Alfred Terry is immediate Commander were to find the Sioux Village, find those a large village of sitting bull combined village of sitting bull and and crazy horse in the Cheyenne and Essentially to use his discretion. Once he found the village, which, of course, as Terry well, you and you're talking about custard. That meant most likely that he would attack it, and that was That was fine by Terry essentially was to find the village and then use your discretion as to whether or not to attack there would be another count of smaller count coming down the line of the Bighorn and Little Bighorn River. From the North and West. But there was no expectation on Terry's part that Custer's column and this other column could really coordinate the movements or In any way, shape or form. Engage the the Indian village the same time. This is that was not known to be impossibility, given the nature of Indians to move every day or two and the vagaries of the situation so Customers. Orders were discretionary so and then passed to me and then then use your judgment in Custer's mind. This was going to be washed each other the the attack that he'd made many years before that had been a great success. He was going to find the village and then advance. And that was a great success for and then it will be. Now let's come to the June 24th. He rides 2028 miles that day. They're they're exhausted that their signs of Indians somewhere somewhere around them. They're scouts of bringing in information. Now it's the 25th Indians are on the trail. Custer believes that he's lost the element of surprise. How does he react? Peter? He way act with the decision when he learns it's ironic that the information in his scouts have been telling him As pro scouts throughout the course of the day that he should attack at once that they have been spotted. He's not entirely convinced he really wants to rest his men. He wants to rest him for the record for the rest of June 25th and then attack fresh on June 26. He's not entirely convinced of his Indian scouts, reports and data that we've been seen. Until his brother rides up and says, You know what? One of the pack mules on the back trail drop some rations and we went back to look for it found some Indians scrounging through the rations and had to drive them off. And Custer assume that these Indians would then ride around his command and alert the village. And that is what when his brother told him that he instantly decided We've got to attack now because we will most definitely have lost ailment Surprise and the Indian village will do it in need of villages always had done in the past, which was to pick up and scatter as quickly as possible. Ironically, those Indians that were scrounging through the rations on the back trail had no desire to get get ahead of customer or get involved in a kind of fighting whatsoever, and they, in fact, trailed along behind and waited till after the battle to join the village. But sadly culture, of course, could not know that. And he made the instant decision to attack when he learned that Custer divides his command. Fantine and one other commander stays with the pack train. He sends Reno to the left. Peter provides maps of this. He's going over the battleground very carefully. Reno because he has in mind that he's going to attack like washy to come from different directions around the village. Though he doesn't know how big the Indian encampment is, and he will be surprised to learn that its vast he's going ahead with 221. Men riding straight into the Indian village. Reno makes contact First. Reno's conduct is puzzling. You've been there, Peter. Did Reno take advantage of the landscape? Did he respond responsibly to get news to Custer? I think Reno at first. It's very hard to say Reno had a fairly small command he had 170. Some men think I would of which about 40 were Indian scouts whose job was not to participate in the tack but to gather up what they could of the Indian pony herd, so he had If you have fewer than 150 men, and he's riding into the valley, and it's spectacular, see this Broad Valley today that he was charging over. On instead of coming upon a smaller village that is about to run he comes face to face with the tail end of a village is vaster than anything he could possibly have imagined. Or any one of you ever seen. And there's a critical moment. He has his eye whether to ride head first into the village and try to disrupt the Indians, who are not expecting him or two. To pause and take up a defensive position, and he makes the decision to stop form of men Open skirmish line on opening round and start firing into the village. And that is, um, the first of a faithful syriza decisions he does at the Indians have time to gather themselves. They begin to ride around his flank. He pulls his men back into a stand of timber next to Little Bighorn. And he's not sure what to do. And then Custer had given him his favorite scout. Um, who Was talking to Reno and suddenly a bullet. Discuss names. Bloody knife. Suddenly a bullet blows apart bloody knife, head and scared spatters his brains all over Reno's jacket. At that point, we know completely loses it drinking. They fall back in disorder. We could say that he had been drinking. He was He was He was in shock, and he essentially said, every man for themselves and hey, rode off toward the nearest high ground across the river, which actually turned out to be a decent enough position. But it was not something that he'd planned. Right. That becomes Reno's ridge now custard around 3 P.m.. Spots the vast encampment of the Sioux and the Cheyenne. Its vast It's not is bigger than anything he's had. He sends word to bend team to come quick. He sends him a noted 3 P.m.. 3:30 p.m., he writes. I'm following your reporting. That's the last we know of Custer. That's it, and Peter's put together a very good and convincing case for what Custer does after he sends for venting to come up. He does not know that Reno's not Falling back. He's by himself on the high ground overlooking what we called the little Bighorn and the Indians called the greasy grass River. He intends to attack by himself. Peter, is that what we think he was going to do to get down through the coolies to attack the village? Exactly to, uh, draw some of the pressure off Reno, perhaps so that Reno could presses attack Because.

Custer Reno Peter Cousins Sioux Village General Alfred Terry Little Bighorn Little Bighorn River Commander American West John Bachelor officer Um Sioux Fantine Broad Valley grass River washy
"little bighorn" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"John Baxter. This is the John Basso. So Peter cousins, his book is the Earth is weeping the epic story of the Indian wars for the American West. We're at the moment. Where General Terry General Crook, Colonel Custer. All of them are now following a course laid out by the Grant administration provoke war with the Sioux Sitting Bull. And crazy horse and all of the attendant tribes, The Cheyenne Everything is going to collapse right now into what we know is the battle of the Big Little Bighorn. And then after that the retribution The blame shifting and 140 years of what happened. And why. Peter General Teri's in charge of the overall general cooks along he has 1000 men. They also have a battle plan laid out to provoke to find the tribes and bring them to battle. Is that why they're out there in the this is the Yellowstone River all the way up to the big horn. They seeking a set battle pieces that it Peter Well, there were three different expositions, extraditions moving simultaneously. There's the one under general Terry, uh, which Custer's principal subordinate as commander of the seventh Cavalry that are moving From east to West along roughly along the line, the Yellowstone there's extradition under Colonel John given that is moving east from Montana territory along the Yellowstone and then an expedition under General George Crook that's moving north. From North Central Wyoming. And the idea is it's pretty rough plan Man, as by necessity to had to be because no one quite sure where they knew where the Indians weren't any given moment, and they need a village and moved every three or four days. The idea being that at least one of these expeditions would make contact with the Indians, and the notion was it Any of the three were large enough to tackle the Indians on their own. Given the army's intelligence on India strength, which happened to be having a grossly underestimate the Indian strength, or that if by some quirk of fate some stroke of luck to or even all three of them were able to converge and and And crush the Indians between the three. So that was kind of the rough plan that one would strike them on. And with luck, perhaps both for all three There's a smaller battle battle of the Rose bed, and there are not many casualties there often aren't the Indians break off. But general crooked this point you right loses stomach for the fight was Was he appalled by what they were doing? Is that it? I think for your quick Rosebud is in terms of the number of troops and the number of Indian warriors engage was actually the largest battle to occur in the Indian wars of the West, the crook between soldiers and his shirt Shoni and Crow Indian auxiliaries. And and civilians and Teamsters he had on a T least 1500 men. Um I can't recall the precise number but at least 1500 It was not close to 1718 100 men and the number of Indian warriors, of course, is never certain, but it was at least 1000. So this was it was a It was fought over this rolling, you know, open Prairie back and forth through ravines and up ridges. And just, you know, just swirling affair almost all day long. But the casual Rollo because as a zoo, you say in party the Indians didn't do not close with the enemy. They were not looking too. Sustained or inflict heavy casualties, but rather to to teach the soldiers a lesson that is to leave them alone and Tonto. They hoped for some to withdraw and neither side could could hit the broadside of a barn. Really. So it's really remarkable having walked around and it's the thing that this action involving almost 4000 men went on the better part of a day. In the casualty. Total casualties were less than 100, but it was a major blow. In that it did not cook out of the part of the campaign and the crook. Not so much. He was not. Defeated militarily, but he was defeated. Psychologically, he crook had had great success against the Apaches, but he had never. It never encountered more than you know, relative and full of Indians at a time and basically guerilla warfare. He never in his long career had never faced. Set piece battle with hundreds of Indians and galloping down on him through ravines and over over ridges. I don't think he I think, frankly think he had executed out of him. Tunis there was psychologically defeated. June. 22nd Custer heads up the Rose Bud will follow customer just a moment here just right this moment. Sitting bull has a dream or a vision. What is it, Peter? What does he see in his in his in his spirits. He has a vision during the Sundance which was the most important ritual religious ritual Other of the Plains Indians, particularly the Lakota and in the Sundance Here, he undergoes, um self inflicted. Torture to help provoke a vision a dream and he sees Um Innumerable numbers of soldiers falling from the sky upside down, and a far smaller number of Indians falling upside down from the sky. He interprets this You mean that walk on Tonka. The great Spirit is telling him that the that his Lakota Cheyenne alliance will score a great victory against the Army with small losses, and he further interpreted to mean that they will score this victory, but they will only On Lee Reap the fruits of this victory if they do not mutilate or plunder the enemy dead, and that is that is his vision. And that vision is it conveyed to the other tribes? Everybody gathered absolutely can. It's conveyed to everyone attendant at the Sundance and that included not only the Lakota but also he's shy and ally. So word of that vision it spread like wildfire throughout the throughout the tribes. So it elected, electrified, electrified the the the Warriors and the Chiefs, and it was one of the reasons why they fight. I think they fought with the band and they did at the rose, but because they had such confidence. That they were that sitting bull head had a divine vision and they were going to achieve a, um, a great victory. However, the Rose Bud was not dead victory of sitting Bull was quick to remind that because in his vision, I should add that the soldiers were flying upside down into the Indian camp. They were flowing into an Indian village. And of course, that the Rose Bud, there was no Indian village near there s O. Sitting Bull's vision was not Fulfilled by the battle the roads, but it was yet to be fulfilled. There will be a smaller Indian village at the Little Bighorn when we come back the battle of the little bighorn seen by sitting bull before it happened, Peter Cousins is the book The Earth is weeping. The epic story of the Indian wars for the American West. I'm John Bachelor..

General Terry General Crook Rose Bud Sundance Peter Cousins Sioux Sitting Bull Colonel Custer American West army Big Little Bighorn Bull Little Bighorn Peter General Teri George Crook Yellowstone Yellowstone River John Basso John Baxter crook Peter Well John Bachelor
"little bighorn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Thank you, John. Bastard. This is John Bastard. So Peter cousins, his book is the Earth is weeping. The epic story of the Indian wars for the American West. We're at the moment where General Terry General Crook. Colonel Custer. All of them are now following a course laid out by the Grant administration provoke war with the Sioux Sitting Bull. And crazy horse and all of the attendant tribes, The Cheyenne Everything is going to collapse right now into what we know is the battle of the Big Little Bighorn. And then after that the retribution The blame shifting and 140 years of what happened, and why. Peter General Teri's in charge of the overall general cooks along he has 1000 men. They also have a battle plan laid out to provoke to find the tribes. And bring them to battle. Is that why they're out there in the this is the Yellowstone River all the way up to the big horn. They seeking a set battle pieces that it, Peter Well, there were three different exposition extraditions moving simultaneously. There's the one under General Terry. Uh, which Custer's principal subordinate as commander of the seventh Cavalry that are moving from east to West along roughly along the line, the Yellowstone those extradition under Colonel John given that is moving east. From Montana territory along the Yellowstone and then an expedition under General George Crook that's moving north from north central Wyoming. And the idea is it's pretty rough Plan, Man. As by necessity, they had to be because no one quite sure where they knew where the Indians weren't any given moment, and they need a village moved every three or four days. The idea being that at least one of these expeditions would make contact with the Indians, and the notion was it Any of the three were large enough to tackle the Indians on their own, given the armies Intelligence on India strength, which happened to be having a grossly underestimate the Indian strength or that if by some quirk of fate some you know, stroke of luck. Two or even all three of them were able to converge and crush the The Indians were between the three. So there was I was kind of the rough plan that one would strike them on. And with luck, perhaps both for all three There's a smaller battle battle of the Rose bed, and there are not many casualties there often aren't the Indians break off. But general crooked this point you right loses stomach for the fight was Was he appalled by what they were doing? Is that it? I think for your quick Rosebud is in terms of the number of troops and the number of Indian warriors and gauge was actually the largest battle to occur in the Indian wars of the West. The crook between soldiers and his shirt, Shoni and Crow, Indian auxiliaries and and civilians and Teamsters. He had A to least 1500 men. I can't recall the precise number but at least 1500 it was not close to 1718 100 men and the number of Indian warriors, of course, is it's never certain, but it was at least 1000. So this was it was a It was fought over this rolling. No. Open prairie back and forth through ravines and up ridges. And just, you know, into swirling affair almost all day long, But the casualties were low, because as you said, you say, in party, the Indians Didn't do not close with the enemy. They were not looking to sustain or inflict heavy casualties, but rather to teach the soldiers of less and that is to leave them alone and Tonto. They hope for some to withdraw. And neither side could could hit the broadside of a barn. Really, So it's really remarkable, having walked background And did you think that this action involving almost 4000 men went on the better part of the day in the casualty? Total casualties were less than 100, but it was a major blow. In that it did not cook out of the part of the campaign and the crook. Not so much. He was not defeated militarily, but he was defeated. Psychologically, he crypt Had had great success against the Apaches, but he had never. It never encountered more than you know, relative and full of Indians at a time and basically guerilla warfare. He never is. A long career had never faced. Set piece battle with hundreds of Indians and galloping down on him through ravines and over over ridges. I don't think he I think, frankly think he had executed out of him. Judas that was psychologically defeated. June. 22nd Custer heads up the Rose Bud will follow customer just a moment here just right this moment. Sitting bull has a dream or a vision. What is it, Peter? What does he see in his in his in his spirits. He has a vision during the Sundance which was the most important ritual religious ritual other of the Plains Indians, particularly the Lakota and in this Sundance here, he undergoes, um self inflicted. Torture. To help provoke a vision a dream and he sees Um Innumerable numbers of soldiers falling from the sky upside down, and a far smaller number of Indians falling upside down from the sky. He interprets this To mean that walk on Tonka. The great Spirit is telling him that the that is Lakota Cheyenne Alliance will score a great victory against the Army with small losses any further interpreted to mean that they will score this victory, but they will only On Lee Reap the fruits of this victory if they do not mutilate or plunder the enemy dead, and that is that is his vision. And that vision is it conveyed to the other tribes? Everybody gather. Absolutely can. It's conveyed to everyone attendant at the Sundance and that included not only the Lakota but also he's shy and ally. So word of that vision. It spread like wildfire throughout the throughout the tribes. So it elected, electrified, electrified the the the Warriors and the Chiefs. And it was one of the reasons why If fighting they fought with the band, and they did it The rose but because they had such confidence that they were that sitting bull head had a divine vision that they were going to achieve a Um, a great victory. However, the Rose Bud was not dead victory as sitting Bull was quick to remind that because in his vision, I should add that the soldiers were flying upside down into the Indian camp. They were flowing into an Indian village. And of course, that the Rose Bud, there was no Indian village near they s O. Sitting Bull's vision was not Fulfilled by the battle the roads, but it was yet to be fulfilled. There will be a smaller Indian village at the Little Bighorn when we come back the battle of the little bighorn seen by sitting bull before it happened, Peter Cousins is the book The Earth is weeping. The epic story of the Indian wars for the American West. I'm John Basher. Way. Bc traffic in transit in Accident on Belt Parkway Good evening. I'm Steve Reggie. Talk Radio 77 W A. B. C. Have a lot of heavy traffic. Both directions on the Bill Parkway is you go between Queens and Brooklyn between crossed Bay Boulevard and Erskine Street because of an accident..

Rose Bud Colonel Custer Sundance Peter Cousins Sioux Sitting Bull General Terry General Crook Colonel John American West Little Bighorn Bull Peter General Teri John Bastard Big Little Bighorn Yellowstone River George Crook Peter Well India Lakota Cheyenne Alliance John Basher Brooklyn
Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

The Art Newspaper Weekly

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Mysterious monolith discovered in Utah desert

"A mysterious object resembling the free standing plank sculptures of the late minimalist artist. Joan mccracken or the alien monoliths in stanley kubrick's sci-fi classic. Two thousand one space odyssey has been discovered in a remote area of the utah desert prompting theories ranging from extraterrestrial visitation to avocado installation biologists from the utah. Division of wildlife spotted. The monolith from a helicopter welcomed up during a routine count of bighorn sheep in the area. The location of melissa has not been disclosed but the footage shiny object in store within a red rock canyon suggested that live somewhere in southern utah which has distinct ecological landscape

Joan Mccracken Utah Desert Stanley Kubrick Division Of Wildlife Utah Melissa
An Unexplained Monolith in the Utah Desert

Kottke Ride Home

01:57 min | 1 year ago

An Unexplained Monolith in the Utah Desert

"A helicopter crew from. Utah's department of public safety. Were on a routine assignment coming bighorn sheep in the southeastern part of the state when they spotted a mysterious silver monolith in the middle of the red rock standing about ten to twelve feet tall. Perfect shiny triangular prism the crew. Says it definitely looks like it was planted there on purpose not dropped from above on accident. Short of some nasa experiment pilot brit. Hutchings thinks it was probably put there by an artist maybe fan of two thousand one. A space odyssey. It does bear a striking resemblance to the black monolith that appears in that film but the department of public safety reminded people in a statement that installations on public land require permits quote. No matter what planet. You're from end quotes. They've also said they won't disclose exactly where they found it. Because it's in a location that could be dangerous to navigate for amateur hikers. And they don't want to cause curious visitors to injure themselves or become stranded. But they did post a bunch of photos and videos taken by the crew with the monolith including one where one of the guys standing on top of another one's shoulders to get a measurement of the monolith against lincoln. The show notes. So you can see for yourself with this mysterious structure. Looks like i'm kind of curious how long it's been there you know. How often do people fly over this part of red rock country looking for sheep or otherwise paying close enough attention to have noticed it. The guardian pointed out that some people have noticed. The monolith bears striking resemblance to the works of artists. John mccracken who did live in nearby new mexico but died. Eight years ago he's galleries. David's werner did not return request for comment from the guardian. Is it possible. The monolith has been there for over eight years just waiting to be discovered or was it planted by someone else or some thing else. I guess we'll just have to wait and see.

Department Of Public Safety Hutchings Utah Nasa John Mccracken Lincoln The Guardian New Mexico Werner David
"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"He's terrified man. Must know there as good as dad. This is it. This is where they'll make their last stand. Bulletin arrows continue to fly. Forty cavalryman decide to make a run for it and plead for the little bighorn. But there's no shortage of warriors to greet them as they did cut off. They run into a gold called deep ravine whether by bullet or club all of them are dead within minutes and it's not long afterward the sound and spoke of firing guns. On the grassy knoll dissipate. A warrior cries out. All of the white men are dead. I can't tell you exactly how. George custer met his end amid his brass casings. He lays on top of others at the null. The corpse has a bullet hole in the chest and left temple. He probably thought wounded for some period of time as the chest. Wound was mortal but not immediate. It may have been inflicted by the cheyenne hero of the battle of rosebud. Buffalo calf road woman the northern cheyenne will keep this under wraps for over a century but in the early twenty first century the publicly share their tradition buffalo calf road woman was the one knock george custer from his horse yet that contradicts accounts that credit spotted antelope or brave bear. So we'll never really know as for the shot through his head. Something it was. A mercy shot fired by his younger brother. Captain thomas custer after all. Tom's body lays here to only fifteen feet away from george. He may have wanted to spare his superior officer and brother from a more gruesome like the when he personally met. Tom's head has been crushed to a thickness of about one inch. He never would have been identified if not for his tattoos as the youngest custer. Brother and nephew late teens boston. Custer and henry read their among the forty who ran down the deep ravine their bodies lay in there with all. The others. Fled the null. There are no survivors. Among george custer's five companies. Of course that isn't the end of the battle or the seventh cavalry. Italian-born giovanni martini. Got the message to frederick benton. Earlier that afternoon as its battalion was coming up though it ran into what was left. Marcus reno's frederick told him about the note. But marcus said he wasn't going anywhere without more ammo which was with the still on route. Pattering unaware of how screwed the lieutenant. Colonel really was by this point. Frederick reinforced the still drinking whisky major. This catches us up to about the time. George custer's five companies are getting wiped out and now the lakota and cheyenne warriors. Come at frederick reno's position for miles. Farther south there to battalion suffered casualties but hold their positions along with the later arriving pantry soldiers until the native americans who see a large army approaching break off the attack the following evening. June twenty sixth that armies. George custer's commander general electric terry. He and his forces arrived the next day. June twenty sabbath. Their arrival may very well have saved the rest in. Us seventh cavalry so the battle of the little bighorn or the greasy grass is over but its impact on the united states and far more so on the lakota. Cheyenne and arapaho. Peoples is only just beginning. Let's unpack all of that. I the united states alfred. -tarian is men are stunned to find george custer and his five companies wiped out. Marcus reno and frederick. Benton are equally stunned when they're generals get to their position and break the news. The days soldiers start to count bodies. Us army has lost two hundred. Fifty eight men including three civilians like boston custer and has another sixty wounded compare that to just over thirty lakota and cheyenne warrior deaths in ten innocent women and children. This was an incredible american indian. Victory in us cavalry defeat yet lost in early death immortalized. George armstrong custer. He becomes a legend. American society already held him as a revered civil war hero in indian fighter a courageous man for whom things always worked out in luck never abandoned until that day georgia's men are romanticized newspapers in school. Primers which bill the fallen lieutenant colonel as a hero and a quote unquote true man within weeks of the battle in montana territory at least five dime novels hit the shelves telling me highly fictionalized glorified story of georgia's death georgia's devoted widow. Libby takes her pen and writes a three volume memoir of her soldier husband buffalo. Bill cody's wild west show. Which will tour the united states in europe at the turn of the century will reenacting glorify custer staff or rather custer's last stand but what of the lakota cheyenne and arapaho. Their decisive victory in a battle. They didn't start and fought protect. Their homelands cost them dearly. Colonel john gibbon who are mind you lead. The montana column had sympathy for the sioux native americans in general just before receiving orders to do his part in the pincer movement. He wrote this in the army and navy journal quote. What would i do if treated as the indian has been in is. I have seen one who hates an indian as he does snake and thinks there is no good indian but a dead one on having the proposition put to him. In this way grind his teeth in rage and exclaim. I would cut the heart out of everyone. I lay my hands on close quote. I think the civil war hero gotta right. It makes sense of the lakota and cheyenne not taking prisoners and frankly being brutal as iron hawk will later say while explaining how he pummeled a cavalry. Man's head with a bo. I was very mad because the women and children had run away. Scared and i was thinking about this when i did this. Killing in other words aren't hawk wasn't to use a term of the era a quote unquote savage. Who enjoyed brutality. He was a man furiously protecting his family in that. Same fury the lakota and cheyenne utah and rob. The dead cavalry now sitting bull's dream for told a great victory which people had but it also contained a warning. A voice had said the fallen soldiers were not to be touched. That's not what happens. Though as revenge is taken by many including widowed women morning their husbands in goods are stolen sitting bull sees this as a failure his nephew one bowl later. Great medicine man been proclaimed. This failure would curse his people to quote covet white people's belongings and starve at the white man's door. Close quote while. I respectfully doubt stolen guns and coffee impacted. Anything it's bit irie to see how on point symbols prophecies continued to be the outcome of the little bighorn galvanizes. Us soldiers politicians back east to crush indians and their leaders specially sitting bull and crazy horse on august fifteenth president ulysses s grant signs the su- appropriation bill though it contains increases in food payments which we should note are less kindness and more necessity. The bill also withholds payment from any indian tribes fighting the us army it further promises to withhold any food or cash payments to the lakota until they give up the unseeded territory and their reservations black hills as the over hunted for sport. Buffalo can no longer sustain them. The likud are basically left choosing between partying with moorland including their sacred black hills or starving to death. That's not much of a choice. But that's not the end of it deeply embarrassed. That indians could beat a cavalry unit so badly. Us pursues the non treaty village many of them including sitting bull flee canada for at least the next few years some stay longer. Those don't make ultimately find themselves pushed reservations. This includes crazy horse who out of options rides with nearly one thousand followers into fort robinson on may six eighteen seventy seven. He says he wants peace but knowing his skill the army actually wants to fight for them against other tribes. It's hard to know what exactly happens. But his words get translated in a meeting. Crazy horse flees but is convinced by friends and other native leaders to return to fort robinson in nebraska. Crazy horse doesn't understand. Though that england back they'll be placed in prison when this finally dons on him. Back at the fort he breaks free from the escorts harms. A fellow lakota. Little big man. He captain kennington and runs for freedom or tries. Little big man manages to grab his wrist.

George custer Captain thomas custer united states Marcus reno frederick benton boston Cheyenne Tom fort robinson custer arapaho cheyenne warriors Bill cody frederick reno Colonel john gibbon giovanni martini Frederick
"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Strategically the. Us military's plan is simple led by seasoned civil war vets. Three armies will move against the various bands of non treaty indians in a pincer movement that converges on them in unseated territory. General george crook's column will march north from wyoming. Territory's fort fetterman coming from montana territory. Colonel john gibbons column will depart from four ellis marching east and crucially general alfred. Terry's calm will march west from dakota territory's fort abraham lincoln with him as the us seventh. Cavalry its commander as you know is the already famous civil war hero lieutenant colonel george armstrong custer but simple. Plans do not equate execution starting march. First general george crook's nearly seven hundred men move up the bozeman trail little over. Two weeks later cavalry. Donald j j reynolds spot horse tracks near the powder river that lead them to a cheyenne village. On the frigid subzero morning of march seventeenth is men attack. Cheyenne fighter tells us that quote women's screened sheldon cried for their mother's old people tottered away to get out of reach of the bullets singing among the lodges quote with leaders urging them to fight like men two hundred fifty or so warriors attained high grounded. Hold back the almost four hundred cavalryman for hours. As the village escapes the battle of black powder river claims few lives about four cavalryman four american indian warriors it also helps push the non treaty indians together with their camp destroyed. This shyam ban trudges through the freezing temperatures to crazy. Horse's oglala lakota village seeing the his village is too small to take care of so many crazy horse breaks camp and leads both groups to a far larger village of honk. Papa and many kanju lakota. Its leaders sitting bull. Meanwhile more reservation dwelling native americans are deciding to throw in with their non treaty. Brethren remember that combined lakota cheyenne-arapaho village. I told you about in this episode's opening well it's starting to form. Meanwhile general george crook has little choice but to retreat back to fort fetterman in other words all his quickly court martialed colonel manage to do is fill the lakota and their allies with resolved fight. It will be a few months before the next battle says the three columns move and the non treaty indian village swells. Let me officially introduce you to our two. Most famous lakota leaders sitting bull crazy horse born in or around eighteen. Thirty one sitting bull is a. Honk papa lakota. He acquired his name or rather this name as a teenager by counting coup in a battle against the crow in other words he exposed himself to great danger by getting in close quarters touching an enemy warrior than writing off. It's a deadly gamble. But american indians of the great plains value the move as a display of bravery and skill. So that's how he earned the name sitting bull and by the eighteen sixties. This handsome strong george. Straight mouth lakota. Quite the name for himself among his people sitting bull deeply values liberty and freedom to quote him all agency. Indians i have seen are worthless now. We are poor but we are free close quote and now by eighteen seventy six thousands of lakota cheyenne and other allies. Look to the non treaty. Resistor sitting bull for their spiritual political leadership. There are many other important leaders. Working with sitting bull like fellow. Hung pop lakota. Chief gal oglala lakota. Hey dog or the cheyenne leaders. Lame white man and two moons but the most famous figure working with sitting bull at this point is crazy. Horse the details of crazy horse's childhood or than clear. He was born somewhere around eighteen. Forty two parents from two different lakota bands and lived among at least a third nonetheless associated with his. Father's band the oglala lakota. There are a few different accounts of how he acquired his name. But when i find the most convincing is that as a teenager he returned from a battle with another tribal with two scalps overcome with pride at the skill and bravery this displayed his father. Who has already named crazy. Horse gave his own name to his young son. His skill and shrewd battle tactics are proven again and again in battle against enemy tribes and the united states. For instance. remember. When i told you that. Ten warriors lert william fetterman and eighty other. Us troops to their deaths during red cloud's war. Well crazy horse was one of those ten choices off. The battlefield aren't so great a few years ago he ran off with a married woman. Her husband been shot crazy horse in the face. Miraculously he survived. The whole event was scandalous in crazy horse lost status with his people but he's still a leader of sorts. I mean the young looking warrior with a curiously light complexion in hair down to his hips is simply unmatched on the battlefield. No one can overlook that in these perilous times and so in eighteen. seventy six. as winter gives way to spring sitting bull's non treaty village continues to grow as lakota cheyenne and arapaho flock to it soon enough. It consists thousands of people including some two thousand or so warriors and in june. The good spiritual sign with the village camping by the rosebud. Victory over the begins the two day to night ritual sundance on june sixth. This is an annual ritual of purification and common among many of the people in the great plains. But it's especially important this year given the conflict ahead sitting bull purifies in a sweat lodge. He carries out the pipe ceremony. One hundred small pieces of flesh are cut from his arms as he praised to the walkin tonka or as white americans understand it the great spirit. He faints while dancing has a vision of down earless soldiers and their horses falling into the midst of liquidity bees when he comes to sitting bull sacrifices of buffalo and interprets his dream. The village will enjoy great victory but the missing ears mean they're warriors must have stained from taking any prizes off the debt villages elated in victory soon cons after a few smaller skirmishes crazy horse leads some one thousand or so warriors out to meet general george crook. Yes after getting lick retreating this past winter. he's already heading northward into the unseeded territory crazy. Horse's army rides fifty miles through the night of june sixteenth to carry out a sneak attack and it works on the morning of the seventeenth. The lakota cheyenne army descends upon us troops and their crow and shoshoni allies for three hours the approximately equal in size armies ballot out mid the fighting cheyenne man loses his war pony. Right in front of us forces the perilous position is fellow warriors. Assume he's a goner. Well all the his sister that is ready to risk all for her siblings buffalo calf road woman rights straight into enemy fire rabs and pulls him onto her steve gallops off to safety for that act of bravery and display of great plains indian. Horsemanship the lakota. Cheyenne army names. The engagement after her calling it the battle where the young girl saved her brother the. Us will name it. after nearby. the battle of the rosebud the non treaty indian army since general. George crook's column on the retreat. Is this the victory sitting bull for saw. Something so others aren't so sure. Casualties were low on both sides. Shouldn't the victory be a bit more definitive well. There are two things american indian forces. Don't know i just deflected one of three armies ruining the planned three-way pincer movement second a far larger engagement with a different. Us army is only week away..

General george crook lakota cheyenne Us papa lakota lakota cheyenne-arapaho villag lakota cheyenne army oglala lakota fort fetterman colonel george armstrong custe cheyenne village Colonel john gibbons Cheyenne army Cheyenne cheyenne fort abraham lincoln indian army william fetterman wyoming bozeman
"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Their opponents and guns approximately one hundred fifty men one hundred thirty or so cavalry by to crow and twenty plus or recruit scouts charged north and downriver toward the lakota cheyenne village. Indigenous scouts are in the league and begin to gather lakota and cheyenne horses to prevent their use in battle at the same time battalion. Commander major marcus. A reno his blue clad troops to stop all prepare to fight on foot. This mount he hollers with every fourth man holding horses the cavalry skirmish line a quarter mile or so short villages southern end. It's a wise choice. They're grossly outnumbered but in truth. The major in his men don't know that yet. So why the caution well some like sergeant charles white will later. Report that marks and other officers have been hit in the flask. Pretty hard so. The decision is more likely born of whiskey than wisdom but whatever the cause the major fears. He's charging into a trap. They'll approach on foot. Multiple things now happened at once to rookie cavalryman who couldn't dismount or control. They're scared galloping. Horses fly into the village. They're pulled down and killed. Meanwhile the cavalry's indigenous scouts find a group of women and children in a wooded area near the river. They killed ten of them. Unaware of this unsure what to make of the cavalry sudden dismount. Lakota spiritual leader sitting bull rides out to see if he can parlay piece bullets ripped through both good bear boys legs and symbols beloved grey horse the bereaved spiritual leader calls to his man. My best horses shot. It is likely they have shot me attack them. The two sides exchanged fire guns crack. More village defenders gathered soon as many as five hundred lakota and cheyenne warriors are engaged in cavalry. They still from the open. Prairie into the trees near the river's western hatch as a three forty five pm fighting's drawn to a stalemate but that's about to change with his body covered in yellow warpaint and dots of light. A lakota leader charges out. He's armed with a stone. Headed war club and winchester carbine. Think short barreled rifle excited. Cry goes through the village crazy. Horse's coming legend in his own right on the battlefield crazy horse rise before his fellow lakota. An allied cheyenne urging them to save their shop. He wants to let the cavalry fire until their guns overheat in jam up with this new strategy they wait as the cavalry continued fire after several minutes crazy horse's satisfied it's time to attack yells out to those with him. Here are some of the soldiers after us do your best and let us kill them all off today that they need trouble us. No more already charge cook ahead. Hundreds of lakota and cheyenne galp forward. Despite having suffered hardly any casualties cavalry still on the prairie. Start to buckle. This includes battalion commander. Marcus reno whom fred gerard watches back while still throwing it back to quote fred. I saw him put a bottle of whiskey to his mouth and drink the whole contents crazy horse. Other leaders and fellow fighters follow the cavalry into the trees. It's a full on malay. According to flying hawk the dust was thick and we could hardly see we got right. Among the soldiers killed a lot with our bows and arrows. Tomahawks crazy horse was ahead of all and he killed a lot of them with his war club amid the fierce fighting the shot rips through the head of an rigorous scout blooding exiting his skull. The bullet showers major marcus reno and the dead scouts blood bone fragments and brains. Any of you men who wish to make your escape. Follow me the shot. Rain and blood splattered inebriated. Beatrix desperately calls out. Those are here mount their horses and follow while others on but crazy. Horse's pushing for decisive. Come on die with me. It's a good day to die. Cowards to the rear he exclaims with renewed effort and is man pursued. The fleeing cavalry firing bullets and arrows alike. The lakota cheyenne pickoff. Cavalry men with ease splash into the little big horn river. After their commander one warrior will lay. Recall and i quote it was like chasing buffalo upon reaching the little bighorn eastern bank. The blue clad soldiers horses slipped and scramble as they send steep clay covered slope. Finally they reached the relative safety of hilltop exhausted. Cavalryman immediately dig rifle pits and fire a few shots some cries. They look down on their dead in the river and woods below. They've lost thirty two troupes three officers. Three civilians and to recruit scouts still more missing and thirteen of the roughly one hundred cavalry men on this hill or wounded. Yeah this didn't go as planned the lakota and cheyenne have their own dead to mourn. Ten women and children and eleven fighting than nine lakota to tucson but at least they have successfully defended their village and families. You've missed the fight. Short bowl says the crazy horse teasing for missing the first twenty minutes of the battle. Sorry to miss the fight crazy horse answers with a laugh then somber tone overtakes pointing north continues. There's a good fight. Come over the hill. Data with a big fight is going to be will not miss that one crazy horse's planning to a large group of caverns miles on the distance. It's led by a call long hair. But you might know the lieutenant colonel by his giving me george armstrong custer.

lakota cheyenne village commander lakota cheyenne pickoff marcus reno Prairie cheyenne battalion fred gerard horn river george armstrong custer charles white tucson Beatrix
78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

"It's the afternoon of june twenty fifth. Eighteen seventy six as many as a thousand lakota. Cheyenne and arapaho village sprawl across the prairie. It's six to eight thousand. Inhabitants are enjoying a relaxing day. You're currently at war with the united states. But no one is expecting an attack presently. Us troops should be at least a day's travel out. Women are preparing food and chatting. Young men are watering their ponies. Playing hoop and pole gain still others are sleeping in after a late night of salvatori dancing as the hot afternoon. Sun beats down. Kids are swimming in the river at the villages edge these tribes and many other indigenous peoples of the great plains. Call it the greasy grass. You might know by another name though the little big horn river but the mood of leisure comes to an end around three pm. They're charging the charges are coming. A messenger yells

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Lakota Cheyenne Village Commander Lakota Cheyenne Pickoff Marcus Reno Prairie Cheyenne Battalion Fred Gerard Horn River George Armstrong Custer Charles White Tucson Beatrix Arapaho Salvatori Great Plains SUN
"little bighorn" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"That's a mistake, and it was an anomaly. What I found in the records in the National Archives were several accounts several firsthand accounts of rage, all in that neighborhood, 400. Stock were stolen the day before the Hyundai massacre and Andi. I speculated Nathan shot an Indian in the retaliation, motive to kill his family. Because there was no there was no death. The really war started in Nebraska, which is my chapters two and three on the little blue on August statins and Plum Creek on our estates on the accounts talk about the next day After this afternoon attack on Sunday, August 7th a stage was coming into Denver. And stages in or completely full. Nine people. Sometimes people sitting up on top. There was no soldiers going with him. There was no war going on, and they had to go around massacred Victims, a 15 year old girl who was staked out the prairie. The stage had to go around her and I witnesses said she was scalped in the private parts of mutilated. Another one said a steak for us, too. Just threw her female person and these people came into Denver, right when Governor Evans got his proclamation. Ah, not. Ah! Is second proclamation. We got his permission. To enlist the third Colorado volunteer cavalry, So it was that that inflame them, but in answer to the original question. Yes, there there was. There was anger and I start on that question to about what makes war and what motivated in It seems to be that when the scale of hatred reaches a certain level, it happens and there was hatred on both sides The Indians had just cause is to be very upset with what was happening. Andi. I covered that in the presence of my book. Ah, many, many factors, but basically, they saw that they were losing their land. And it was inevitable and white man wasn't leaving. Earlier, the white man brought him Guns and weapons and and whisky and all kinds of trade goods for buffalo robes on that went on for a good 40 years. But then the white man came with the discovery of gold and they're not leave it And those we didn't get the railroad in Denver till 18 70. So everything that came into Denver had to be afraid of. In the fall of 18 67 got traded from Cheyenne, Wyoming, but it still took three more years to get that Sperling down to Denver. So it was with us with the freight wagons going to and following the water courses, ranches air are popping up. Ah state stops to prop it up on the people aren't leaving And there goes the natural resource is they saw the handwriting on the wall is early is 18 62? You are. You actually visited the site of the Little Bighorn battle Custer's demise and and found artifacts to the state. Yeah, not not. Ah, ah, not a little bighorn, where I got our artifacts because that's Ah Ah, That's the National Park Service Land and the land around that is mostly owned by the crow or the Custom Preservation society. And so it's very difficult for someone to get Permission to metal detect up there today, so I I am no artifacts from there, but I have lots of artifacts from customs in his 18 67 campaign, especially when it came to Colorado. Ah, and camped at Riverside Station near islands and Oh, yeah, I found. Ah, Okay. Oh, maybe 150 Eagle, but various places from the riverside station and shell casings. Showcasing. Yeah, Unfired probably got about 200 unfired locations from Riverside Station from Custer's seventh Cavalry. I have 72. I don't wait. I think you're in trouble. I think you're not allowed to have more than 12 now. Under a gun control laws. You might be right. Let's take a break here when we come back. I want you to tell us about dog soldiers who they were and why they were called dog soldiers and also tell us about the major Ned wine coop. We know of that know about the wine Coop Brewery here makes sense from Colorado history in this When we come back, Cathy Walker was happening in the news..

Denver Colorado National Park Service Land Nathan Hyundai Custer Riverside Station National Archives wine Coop Brewery Little Bighorn Nebraska Governor Evans Cheyenne Plum Creek Wyoming Cathy Walker Unfired Custom Preservation society Oh Sperling
"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

"Custer went out west in Oklahoma and Kansas. He based on Leavenworth. And he fought a number of skirmishes brutal. Absolutely brood on customers part I mean, he was a war criminal might be a little hard because both sides were doing it. But, boy, I mean, you know, he was as tough as anybody and crazy horse and Custer had this long distance loathing. Okay, but After the Little Bighorn and everybody was killed by a crazy horse's force is the only body not mutilated on the battlefield was custom. I left them intact because crazy always had a code. All right, and Custer was a commander and he was killed. He was not mutilated. Another surprise in the book bills that Custer wasn't alone. He had family members with him. Yeah, his brother, his brother in law. Ah, and he and another cousin and two journalists. And, of course nobody got out of there alive. Um, you know, I I kid my friends of the New York Times, CIA. You guys should have been along for them, but it was North Dakota paper. You know, Custer felt that he was going to get all kinds of accolades here. Gonna be a hero, Hey, was going to decimate crazy horse and the Sioux and then come back to Washington and been promoted Whatever. And of course, it didn't work out. No, no, indeed. It did not. Bill O'Reilly killing crazy horse. The book is out now, And I'm going to talk to a bill a little bit more about the parallels about what he has in his book and what's going on here? As part of the later with Leigh Matthews podcast. Find that at Katie okay dot com and the I Heart radio app. A big fire in northeast Oklahoma City. Good morning. I'm Beth Myers in the Katie..

Custer Little Bighorn Bill O'Reilly Oklahoma Katie Leigh Matthews Leavenworth Oklahoma City Beth Myers New York Times North Dakota Kansas commander CIA Sioux Washington
"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

"Podcasts, all in one shell here his morning update coming up in just a few minutes, But he's joining us. Now it's Bill O'Reilly and he's done it again written a book called Killing Crazy Horse and Bill Once again, I think readers are going to be taken on a journey where they learn things. They have not learned before. Particularly if you live in Oklahoma. Lee. Yes. Yes. I wanted to get into that in a minute. Yeah, we spend a lot of time on Ah. How the Indians were Posed in your state by the Washington government and how the Sooners came to be on most intensely how the command she nation Influenced Oklahoma and to this day because I've been Tokyo home many times. If you go into the high schools and around of the county's you see Indian, a native American march everywhere, Williams of teams and it on and on. So I think that any Oklahoma and reading killing crazy voice will learn an enormous amount not only about their state, but the country and how, um we forge the sea deciding Shining sea. Program that James Monroe put into a action. So anyway, I write these books is that ninth of the killing Siri's The most successful nonfiction book series of all Time, 17 Million copies in print. And this one Open, Strong sold 100,000 copies on the first day, and I think anybody reading it will learn a lot and have a lot of fun in the process. You mentioned the icons that we see all around our state, including and up into the swastikas on the four corners of our Capitol building. But they're not the Nazi swastika style. No, no. Look, the tribal, um Civilization. I think that's the right word in Oklahoma was very sophisticated. It wasn't the way the press because they had fake news back then they didn't press is not reporting. The Indian wars accurately. We started 18 13 with the creaks in Florida and Alabama and Andrew Jackson going down and that big conflict and we take it all the way up to 18 90 with chief Joseph. But in the interim The press was anti native American, and they didn't report why the tribes were angry Why the conflicts happened. They just said, Look, look what they do, and in the command cheese that was the most fearsome Indian nation and they were brutal. There's no not about it. On, but I write these books so people will know the truth about their country. Killing crazy horse. The merciless Indian wars in America. Bill O'Reilly's with us The book is out now on NewsRadio 1080. Okay, Bill there. You deal a lot in this book with Ah, Armed custard. And am I correct in that Custer kind of had a little dress rehearsal at the Battle of Wichita, a river here in Oklahoma? Yes. Look, the buy put Crazy horse and Custer on the cover. Of killing crazy horse because that wass the most intense rivalry of all the Indian conflicts, so crazy horse was a the minister of war. Most Americans don't know this. I didn't know this. He was not a chief of the Sioux. Sitting bull was the chief. He was the boss. But sitting will never fought in a battle like Dwight Eyes. Now, if you read killing patent, Dwight Eisenhower, that commander in chief during World War two never fought about Sitting bull never fought about crazy horse was the brilliant military tactician. Custer was a war hero in the Civil War at Gettysburg, and Grant and Sheridan, the Army chief of staff, ordered him to get Crazy horse. Alright, So Custer went out west in Oklahoma and Kansas. He based on Leavenworth, and he bought a number of skirmishes brutal. Absolutely brood on customers part I mean, he was a war criminal might be a little hard because both sides were doing it. But, boy, I mean, you know, he was as tough as anybody and crazy horse and Custer had this long distance loathing. Okay, but After the Little Bighorn and everybody was killed by a crazy horse's force is the only body not mutilated on the battlefield was custom. I left them intact because crazy always had a code. All right, and Custer was a commander and he was killed. He was not mutilated. Another surprise in the book builds that Custer wasn't alone. He had family members with him. Yeah, his brother, his brother in law. Ah, and he and another cousin and two journalists. And, of course nobody got out of there alive. Um, you know, I I kid my friends of the New York Times CNN. You guys should have been along for them, but it was north. The code of paper. You know, Custer felt that he was going to get all kinds of accolades here. Gonna be a hero, Hey, was going to decimate crazy horse and the Sioux and then come back to Washington and been promoted Whatever. And of course, it didn't work out that way. No, no. And I wanted to ask you more about that and featured on the later with Leigh Matthews podcast, which you'll be able to find it. Katie okay dot com and on the I Heart radio app. Bill O'Reilly's update coming up in just another few minutes on NewsRadio 1000. Katie, Okay. Ah, A motorcyclist has been killed in a crash.

Custer Oklahoma Bill O'Reilly Sioux NewsRadio chief Joseph Lee Leigh Matthews Dwight Eisenhower Katie Little Bighorn Siri James Monroe Dwight Eyes New York Times Army chief of staff Williams America Andrew Jackson
"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KTOK

"He's joining us again. Because Bill, You've done it again. Your new book killing crazy Horse. Once again. I think you're going to take people on a journey where they're going to learn things they've never learned before about American history, particularly if you live in Oklahoma. Lee Yes. Yes. I wanted to get into that in a minute. Yeah, We've spent a lot of time on Ah, how the Indians were Posed in your state by the Washington government and how the Sooners came to be on most. Intensely how the command she nation influenced Oklahoma and to this day because I've been Tokyo home many times if you go into the high schools and around of the counties You see Indian, a native American marks everywhere. So teams of teams and on and on, so I think that any Oklahoman reading killing crazy horse will learn an enormous amount not only about their state, but the country. And how, um we forge the sea designing Shining sea program that James Monroe put into action. So anyway, I write these books is the ninth of the killing Siri's Most successful nonfiction book series of All Time 17 Million copies in print, and this one Open, Strong sold 100,000 copies on the first day. And I think anybody reading it will learn a lot and have a lot of fun in the process. You mentioned the icons that we see all around our state, including and up into the swastikas on the four corners of our Capitol building, But they're not the Nazi swastika style. No, no, I looked the tribal Civilization. I think that's the right word. In Oklahoma was very sophisticated. It wasn't the way the press because they had fake news back then they didn't press is not reporting. The Indian wars accurately. We started 18 13 with the creaks in Florida and Alabama and Andrew Jackson going down and that big conflict and we take it all the way up to 18 90 with chief Joseph. But in the interim The press was anti native American, and they didn't report why the tribes were angry Why the conflicts happened. They just said, Look, look what they do. And in the command cheese That was the most fearsome Indian nation on They were brutal. No, not about it. On, but I write these books so people will know the truth about their country. Killing crazy horse. The merciless Indian wars in America. Bill O'Reilly's with us The book is out now on NewsRadio 1000. Katie. Okay, Bill there. You deal a lot in this book with Ah, Armed custard. And am I correct in that Custer kind of had a little dress rehearsal at the battle of Wichita River here in Oklahoma? Yes. Look, the buy put Crazy horse and Custer on the cover. Of killing crazy horse because that wass the most intense rivalry of all the Indian conflicts, so crazy horse was a the minister of war. Most Americans don't know this. I didn't know this. He was not a chief of the Sioux. Sitting bull was the chief. He was the boss. But sitting will never fought in a battle like Dwight Eyes. Now, if you read killing patent, Dwight Eisenhower, that commander in chief during World War two never fought about Sitting bull never fought about crazy horse was the brilliant military tactician. Custer was a war hero in the Civil War at Gettysburg, and Grant and Sheridan, the Army chief of staff, ordered him to get Crazy horse. Alright, So Custer went out west in Oklahoma and Kansas. He based on Leavenworth, and he bought a number of skirmishes brutal. Absolutely brood on customers part I mean, he was a war criminal might be a little hard because both sides were doing it. But, boy, I mean, you know, he was as tough as anybody and crazy horse and Custer had this long distance loathing. Okay, but After the Little Bighorn and everybody was killed by a crazy horse's force is the only body not mutilated on the battlefield was custom. I left them intact because crazy always had a code. All right, and Custer was a commander and he was killed. He was not mutilated. Another surprise in the book bills that Custer wasn't alone. He had family members with him. Yeah, his brother, his brother in law. Ah, and he had another cousin and two journalists. And, of course nobody got out of there alive. Um, you know, I kid my friends of the New York Times, CIA. You guys should have been along for them, but it was North Dakota Baber. You know, Custer felt that he was going to get all kinds of accolades here is gonna be a hero, Hey, was going to decimate crazy horse and the Sioux and then come back to Washington and been promoted Whatever. And of course, it didn't work out that way. No, no indeed. And I wanted to ask you more about that. Plus the parallels that could be drawn by this story about how the United States handled native Americans and some of the things that are happening now, if you'll hang on, we'll do that. After the news block Mohr with Bill O'Reilly Killing Crazy Horse is the name of the book, and it's out now available everywhere. News Radio 1000 Katie,.

Custer Oklahoma Bill O'Reilly Katie Sioux chief Joseph Lee Dwight Eisenhower North Dakota Baber United States James Monroe Dwight Eyes New York Times Army chief of staff Little Bighorn America Andrew Jackson Washington government
"little bighorn" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Welcome to hidden history. I'm your host get chrome today. General custer and the battle of the little bighorn would've referred to as custer's last stand who's the plains Indians called at. The Battle of the greasy grass was a battle in southeastern Montana that took place in eighteen eighteen seventy six and lasted for about three days. The Indians were a combined force of Lakota. Sioux Northern Cheyenne. These two great nations hadn't happened along the little Bighorn River Seven-thousand-strong County Women and children ten thousand perhaps the largest ever gathering of the plains plains Indians the cap covered several miles data pony herd fifteen thousand. The American Indians had been relocated numerous times government treaties treaties. Were broken land. Grants rush of miners drove the end ins from their ancestral homes where they had thrived for generations to near barren ground and by the summer of eighteen seventy six two great nations of Sioux Cheyenne had had enough. It was during a Sun dance around June fifth of that same year ear. That sitting bull the spiritual leader had a vision. The set the great gathering motion the Seventh Cavalry had been created just out the civil war under George Armstrong custer represented seven hundred men who made up twelve companies in the end around the time of the battle custard a divided the seven hundred men in his command into four units of the seven hundred men. A hundred and thirty nine had little training and no frontier experience dance on the morning of June twenty fifth custard divided his twelve companies into the three battalions anticipation of the forthcoming engagement with an Indian village. Three companies were placed under the command. Major Marcus Reno. Three were placed under the command of captain. Frederic Ben Teen five companies remained under CUSTER's immediate command. The Twelfth Company be under captain. Thomas McDougal have been assigned escort the slower pack train carrying hiring provision in additional ammunition unknown. The custer the Group of Native Americans seen on his trail as reported by scouts was actually leaving leaving the encampment and did not alert. The rest of the village. CUSTER's scouts warned him about the size of the village with one scout reportedly saying general. I have done with these Indians for thirty years. And this is the largest village I have ever heard of. CUSTER's overriding concern. Was that the native American group group would break up and scatter the command began. Its approach to the village at noon during civil war round eighteen sixty three George Armstrong custer master at the age of twenty three was promoted to the rank of brigadier general and he cemented his reputation. As a boy general days later at the battle of Gettysburg when he repelled a pivotal confederate assault led by Jeb Stuart by the end of the civil war custer had risen to the rank of major general. He was known for his dramatic charges directly into the heart of confederate encampments. Shock and surprise would send troops running. It was to be his tactic. The little bighorn five of the Seventh Cavalry's twelve companies were annihilated custer was killed as were two of his brothers and nephew and brother in law get get cades. After the battle of the little bighorn native American survivors of the battle claimed to have witnessed custer's soldiers shooting themselves much later in Nineteen Nineteen Eighty S. Some of the soldiers skull showed wounds caused by a single shot that would have been consistent with being self inflicted. CUSTER's body body was found with the wound to the chest and to the temple again raising speculation. That suicide may have been the cause of death but after Her husband's column was wiped out at the battle of the little bighorn. That was June eighteen. Seventy six many in the press army and government criticized custer for blonder and into a massacre President Ulysses s grant publicly blamed custer for the disaster fearing that. Her husband was to be made a scapegoat. By history. Mystery Libbie custer launched a one woman campaign to rehabilitate her husband's image persistence to the author of the first custer biography Greg Eric. Whitaker helped in able the rapid production of the popular book which praise customers career and set the tone for future biographers and the decades ahead. Let me begin. Writing articles making speaking engagements praising the glory of what she presented as her martyred husband her three books. Boots and saddles came out in eighteen. Eighty five tenting on the planes came out in eighteen eighty seven and the follow Gideon eighteen ninety aimed at glorifying her dead husband's memory though generally considered to be largely factual and accurate. They were clearly slanted. In custer's favor ever libby remained utterly devoted to her husband and never remarried despite having spent her life travelling extensively through the United States including winters in Florida and around the world. Elizabeth custer never visited the Valley of the little bighorn. She was said to treasurer letter from President Theodore Roosevelt who stated that her husband was one of his heroes and a shining light to all the youth of America. It wasn't until over half a century later. Historians reexamined CUSTER's actions leading up to and during the battle and found much to criticize after an initial period of distress address dealing with her late husband's debts custer spent over half a century of widowhood financial comfort attained as a result of her literary career in Lecture Tours. At our passing. She left in a state of over one hundred thousand dollars. She died in New York City four days before her ninety the first birthday on April fourth nineteen thirty three almost fifty years after the battle and was buried next to her husband West Point a few years before her death she told a writer that our greatest disappointment was that she never had a son to bear her husband's honored name the battle of the.

George Armstrong custer CUSTER Elizabeth custer custer little Bighorn River Seventh Cavalry Montana Sioux Cheyenne Marcus Reno Sioux President Theodore Roosevelt Thomas McDougal New York City Cheyenne Gideon Frederic Ben Gettysburg Jeb Stuart Twelfth Company
"little bighorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"little bighorn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No. Yeah. But I feel like we have to get this total arrogance of like people, you know, people were total bar Burien when they weren't as his we are about transgender identities and racial, politics and stuff, and I was like, you're not inherently more awesome than people were thirty years ago. You're lucky because somebody woke up. Plot that part out in the radio version. And you know, these I had this amazing experience a couple of weeks ago. I saw Gerard Baker whose Amanda dot SU guy who started at the park service's a janitor ended up as a superintendent who's the guy who's like the top guy at a national park or national monument, the two that he became the superintendent were. Little Bighorn national monument, which had only recently stopped being Custer battlefield national monument. And God, what's what's the Melton? They carved all are horrible presidents faces in. Raffia? Yeah. And. And and he radically transformed who felt welcomed their how native people were visible, their new change the histories and stuff. And I just thought like all of us who think were woke we have to think the human alarm clocks kind of woke us up and to see the way he transformed the visibility representation in presence of native people changed. You know, changed our national history in these intensely public places was so amazing. And I was just so excited. I maybe the single biggest formative experience of for my hopefulness, my activism intellectual history was seeing native American sees hold of the Quinson tenue the five hundred anniversary of Columbus. Arrival and say, we're not gonna let it be told his discovery or triumph for celebration were taking creating this space where wedging ourselves to create a space talk about five hundred years of genocide. About the fact that it wasn't a discovery about the fact that we were not conquered. We did not disappear in this history is not over and we are still year, and it was so transformative so much so funny talking to Julian noise kit fray is this amazing climate activist and writer, fellow writer of mine at the guardian and I realized afterwards like like, Jillian what I was trying to tell you is it's hard for a young person. Like, you to know how little we knew thirty years ago, we white people about native people and how much change in terms of what's taught in the schools. What the sign inches how people are represented in movies and things like that. And to see a profound change that begins with writing with scholarship with activism with voices that are supposed to be marginal in relatively powerless. But that will change the are very understandings of history, culture nature, this continent, who has who has rights here is so amazing to see that. But I also feel like we always have to sue. The last alarm clock has not gone off. We are not the most woke human beings can ever be. There's gonna be you know, like, I'm old now I've seen people think we are. So damn woke, you know, in the nineteen eighties in the nineteen nineties cetera is like, hey, there's more to come. And it's sort of it's kind of fun knowing it's a little bit like being a little kid with your birthday, or so I don't know what else is gonna come over going to become more aware Lake Erie just required just acquired person like sort of legal standing, I think person that. Yeah. Well because you about trees having. Yeah. He no standing, but the people of Akron, Ohio voted to give lake area legal stint legal.

Burien Little Bighorn national monume Custer battlefield national mo Lake Erie superintendent Quinson tenue Gerard Baker Ohio writer Columbus Jillian Akron Amanda dot thirty years five hundred years
Kelsey Snell, Brett Kavanagh and Senator Corey Booker discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:06 min | 3 years ago

Kelsey Snell, Brett Kavanagh and Senator Corey Booker discussed on All Things Considered

"Some birds and insects have an innate drive to migrate. Not. So for big hoofed mammals, like sheep or moose NPR's. Nell greenfieldboyce reports on a surprising new study that shows these animals have to learn to migrate. And they are not exactly quick studies. Brett Jasmer isn't a colleges at the university of Wyoming. He says there have long been hints that large mammals aren't born knowing how to migrate but learn from their parents so biologists might be in the field, observing moose, and they see that the moose calf followed its mother on its spring and fall migration moving from place to place to follow new green grass to see if knowledge about migration really was passed down from generation to generation he and his colleagues studied, moose and Bighorn sheep in the western US some populations had lived on the same land for a long time. We know they were there at the time of the Louis from Kark, expedition and probably for. Hundreds or even thousands of years prior others had moved in over the last sixty years as conservationists brought animals to areas where the original populations had disappeared due to hunting or disease. What the researchers found using GPS tracking and satellite imagery is that animals put into vacant unfamiliar land. Didn't migrate Matt Kaufmann is a wildlife researcher at the US Geological Survey that was sort of a little bit of an aha moment for me of like, wow, they really have to learn where things green up and where they need to move next in the journal science. The researchers say it took Bighorn sheep nearly forty years to develop a robust migration. It took moose nearly ninety years. The study impressed. Jackie freyre. She's a wildlife ecologist at the state university of New York in Syracuse dimension that they're bringing to migration ecology is memory and cultural transmission of information. She says this shows we need to protect animals existing migration routes now because there's no easy fix. If a migration culture is

Kelsey Snell Brett Kavanagh Senator Corey Booker Senator Booker President Trump Senator John Cornyn Senator NPR United States Brett Cavanaugh Senate New Jersey Nell Greenfieldboyce Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Nobel Prize Glenn Close Judiciary Committee