17 Burst results for "Little"

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:24 min | 3 months ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms radio show about ideas and coacher with me nailed any. This week, the surprising science building shape, our behavior, health and happiness with emily. And her new book, the Great Indoors. Emily this is an award-winning science, journalist and author. Her work has appeared in the New York Times New Yorker the Atlantic wired nature slate. Bloomberg Businessweek Scientific American The Washington Post the Boston Globe and other publications. Have previous book Frankenstein's cats which you may remember..

emily New York Times Boston Globe Bloomberg Frankenstein Washington
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:10 min | 7 months ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little.

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

12:16 min | 7 months ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"You're listening to atoms. I'm no denny too damn took it to Ben Hose and we took it about his debut novel the Quarry and then. Yeah let's move onto what influence some of the stories where these people come from? I think a spend the age of eighteen to twenty four as you said the android like worked him a couple of pubs. I worked in a couple of offices doing nothing I worked in a couple of off-licences and especially around that time is around storing. That was like the last big recession. Which is how it never run. I think in one to two and a half year gap was made redundant full times. It was a tough time. The characters Assu of inspired by that those rough socio economic times and I think the way she'll stories a quite good telling is you could take snapshots La la the characters. You can boil down to you. Know a a feeling on something. I saw something I saw in someone. I knew something I saw them going through. And you can kind of immediately focus in on the conflict on the rubbings of extract then then build a character around it which is good vehicle to explain this one thing and then from that I could. Kinda try and build the stories out of life. Rinse the bouncer in little ones. The second story the very very loosely person is based on the person is based off. The thing is base of China's some moment of work to a hub an like they were prey tough scary person but they were like so emotionally intelligent and life. You quit money's enlighten the way. The conversation plays that we press go in that story. He knew what to say and he had figured out but he wouldn't speak up and you never even and he wouldn't talk about how he'd what happened in his life to get him to that point so I built this character around him which you see play out in the stories. The tragedy for me of that character is probably the most intelligent emotionally intelligent one of the love. But he won't talk to anyone associate and it's also great. I mean obviously the base of a real person but what he also plays this role as the bouncer. Somebody who's quiet on the outside and he's also able to comment on the other stories. Abc's characters for the for the other stories is able to gave us sort of like especially considered that story comes directly after after. How my we've we've seen poll the right to have ham. You get into a fire into the in the pub and then immediately it in the next door we take a step back and are able to observe From the outside. Yeah I mean it works one. I like to stories openings. I think it does give Rita. The idea of how this book is GonNa work. How these are connected. You can immediately see the kickoff incident from one story another but yeah I like that. Outside view and another characters are the same. I just want to talk about some of the some of the issues that the the the the characters Facing in this book as we're GonNa talk about some of the books of influence this one later on. I don't think there's a lot of writing around now about these sorts of characters but the has of course being over the years. Lots of great writing about you know working class men and the and the struggles they might face but now there are things that are unique. Like obviously we've been lucky said living through recessions and years of austerity. Suddenly this is a world of zero hours contracts precarity in terms of employment but at the same time. There is all these. There's always been the pub but now that might have you know high stakes gambling machines in it. Yeah I think the in the story modernization which is a lot of people like it which is nice is the one. I was a bit unsure of Polish going back to the quarry lane route and he grew up there and it wasn't sure and I think on that because it's something Grand grandees to say about the areas that like when they went back. They'd see it change like that. I think for me. It's like it happens. It's a lot of stories. It's gone back to the Falcon and I think a lot of these. How the world has changed. Things can be you know sewn up in that pub and I think back too late you know the pups off known and stuff as well with this is as you say. How old is rather than having lot cheeky? One POUND QUIZ MACHINE. That might be a five hundred pound fruit machine or hundred pound fruit machine in the an how rather than it being an actual local pub. It's only by a chain and you can get two for five of every day an drinks promotions and it just it just like chips away at community a little bit. You know rather never meet raffling a Sunday. You go boiling a bag. Roast dinners and I think that little bit decay hurts people and it kind of rarely Hammas home. The these people these characters have ambitions of getting out and getting somewhere and it just feels like the net of like central London. Light where prosperity is is closing or even that stuck in the Gulf because you've got Jobs and money in central London. And then when you take you know the forty five minute hour commuter trains out to the countryside. Why think was maybe on? The outskirts of London is now. There is like people retreat looking for a bit more space and greener grass and different schools. And whatever and I think these people left in that Gulf and the on aid things failing at You know big companies who specialize in offering cut rate products cut rate services It drags the whole thing down doesn't feel friendly anymore and that's something. I'll try to go because I've seen this happen in low places and it just it just stops feeling friendly affects you and you're in it. And what are the writers? My opinion influence on this book as a set I like. I like love traditional masculine right. And that's just what I'm calling other else to describe it And I like short stories. Incredibly incredibly incredibly lucky enough to be able to study in America for a bit where and so might influence it'll putting together all Americans Story RIGHT AS YEAH. I think people I Raymond cover were big influences especially stuff. When he's added to stop going when he broke up with his editor was a big influence over romanticized. I tried to escape. Some of like the is hemingway just Spanish weights. As chatting stories. I tried to make little bit. Structurally little ones like a the way it runs a bit of a copy of a clean well lighted place. Which of that worked in my head. It made sense but then even just wanting to imprison voice onto exa- superintendents me. They didn't owe sound the same and I love legislature with the strong voice. Whether it's something like go by Jamaican cade will transport him a moving cola. stuff I read A crime book a picked up on hold onto things called Saturday's child. I cannot remember who went spy. They had two characters one or in the Queen's English one Britain in local slang for the two main characters and that was super effective This when you're in a car and someone gives you the Caitlyn's his players so many forget every some little bit written Nothing is important to me to get proper voice in an give these unique voice for how it came over but then yeah structurally like I. Classic American shows stories and in terms of voice making sure it sounded like people sound not written in in high Oxford comber English. That's my final answer to that. Can I get you to be a little bit of the Corey you? Can I tell you what I'm going to read? It's not apo- normally worried jokes. Doug chat a bit about wanting to give these characters this over piffle. Talk out loud going. Look a by Raymond Carver to show stories the earth in a small good thing. It's more good things. Will he originally wrote before Gordon Leash edited the hell out of an and KI keeps those? Pink is a better story for should've said the wool inspired you answer. And so I. I've always taken to heart. You should show these kind of moments and I'm GonNa do the moment like that from still recoup. Fix fix up spiring gambling addict and he you know loses his county. Poland's is falling and loses. That and so if you're reading along like when I was reading the copy it's it was kinda going. Well this is ridiculous would do this. And oh he's not as repeating as you said this but smoldering I was like no. This is kind of the way of gambling addicts. Brian Works on the office. I worked at a book is next to a little ways. Come in watch the rings it. You can kind of see someone on a bad day. This is the moment of him trying to kind of explain to the reader of the how. He's just lost all his money. Fuck sake a week's worth the money. Now phone the fuck. I'M GONNA TELL EMMA. She doesn't get it. Naughty gets it things that when he can watch your cash disappear from behind you be appropriate. Keep pisses away in those fucking machines. Don't lie that though. It's like an hour on the PISS. You have a few drinks a few laughs. And you get to the point where you know you're gonNA feel dead the next morning but you say to hell with it this time in my fucking life. This thirst comes over here. You keep drinking because you think if you still sit around your sober up the funnels stop. And you'RE BACK TO REAL LIFE UTAH deepening into bullshitting took about the ways. You want to make your life and you think of ways to get out there and do it like this fire inside here. Maybe in the night is obvious. Staggered BACK UP. One of those home measured drinks which is basically just a glass of whisky or vodka. Laying around with a splash. According to make you look like you're at least trying to ease off. He's sitting in front doorstep and drink and chain smoke cigarettes and think of all the ways which your life is going to be. Now you've got to figure it out you broken the back of the base. Thanks the Monkey on yours and the future is only going to get better. You might poor another. And then one more than the sky starts to stain purpose the sun comes up streetlights blended into it as it gets lighter and light me. Think now. Maybe it won't even go to bed. I feel fucking alive and I know what I want to do. But it's five in the morning and the won't be up until about eight or nine hundred thing all right. I'm not that pissed. I'll get a few hours. Kidman set lower than up and fucking atom. Then you wake up a few hours later a gloss a`spirit by Abedin AB- food. You don't remember even cooking spilled out on the sheets and the rest of the day is spend sweat and chuckling up bile. The high horse has gone now. You Hung over. Us has got to deal with the fact that it is all an illusion. You might wanted to fucking change a life. Change everything about insane and out but really it's been chasing the out just fucked you up beyond belief you swear off it and try and get yourself at the beginning of next week chasing the dream and the pine glossies again..

London Gulf La la denny China Ben Hose Raymond Carver Abc Abedin AB editor America Kidman Gordon Leash Corey UTAH Doug Oxford comber English Poland Brian Works
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

10:50 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms radio show about ideas and coach with me Nail Denny Sweet Casey on murder fraud and the last trial happily in her Baillie Gifford Prize shortlisted book fury nastiest Rhode scholar she's a staff writer for the New Yorker and has written for the Paris Review and the New York Times among others and today we're GonNa be talking about her debbie book furious hours Ed fraud and the last trial of Hopley Casey welcome to little atoms right thanks so much for having me tell me first of all where you I came across this story I think like a lot of people even in the U. K.. I Read Harper Lee when I was quite young and I knew about mocking bird and I had even read a biography of her life but really read past this kind of sp tackler episode in the years after kill mockingbird when she found the true crime story and I learned about it a couple of years ago I was doing some reporting for the New Yorker and supposed to be writing about go set a watchman the surprising second novel that was announced the year before Harper Lee died and you know they're all these questions about the provenance of that manuscript in her ability to consent to its publication and so I went down to Alabama to the town where she was born and raised and where she was living and was trying to find out as much as I could al You know her new attorney and about the folks who have brought watchmen to the world and while I was down there I found out about this other book Harper Lee had tried to write this is true crime book about very strange series of murders in the nineteen seventies and the more that I learned about it the more interesting it was and the fact is because she was interested no one else really written about the case every she squatting on this great story everyone thought Harper Lee is version of events was going to come out any day now so why would they bother to try and write about it so I found out about it in in two thousand fifteen and wrote a short piece for the New Yorker right away about the Maxwell case about these murders and then just realized there was even more to say so it grew out of some reporting just a few years ago Hopley for various reasons that we will probably go into towards the end of the of the interview bright this story didn't get the story out now you have and brilliantly are my ad but the must have been a point at the beginning of where you thought hop in league could yeah it's true I mean right you talk about big shoes to fill yes I was of course exceedingly aware that a very talented writer had found out about this case and spent many years trying to write a book about it and write the question was was there were problem with her or was there a problem with the story three and there are certainly in some great stories that feel cinematic or they feel important and yet they're very resistant to narrative and the truth of the matter is this crime story is complicated and a lot of the facts remain elusive and some of the early investigations which were quite thorough were still indeterminate and there's a lot of our cannonball you know the the motive was life insurance until you end up having to learn a lot about the history of life insurance and there are all these things about it that make it seem like maybe it wouldn't be great book and so yes early on I thought well Gosh maybe she didn't finish it for a reason of or it's just so difficult and I won't be able to either and you know Yes the thought hadn't occurred to me over and over again I'd be interviewing you know octogenarians and Alabama who'd be like really I've never heard of you you're going to write the book Harper Lee couldn't so yeah they were pretty quick to to caution me about it and I did certainly worry especially towards the end when trying to sort out the ending and some things like that you know would would it workout and so the way you have done is the book is structured as section to begin with it talks about the Reverend William Maxwell supposed serial killer and also married a victim eventually then section about his lawyer which will continue later on then at the end of the story of happily in her writing in writing the book and so first of all talk about well I guess Willie Maxwell up to the point when he becomes he starts calling himself reverend what was his background yeah it's he's a he's a very strange character and it's quite obvious what Harper Lee would have been drawn to him and for much of his life he was just a very respected renowned clergyman and he had a very thorough knowledge of scripture and a very charismatic style of preaching and utterly distinctive way of dressing for this part of the world yeah these ornate three piece suits bespoke suits at a at a time and a place where most African American men were inconspicuous clothing than cure he wasn't his suits whether or not he was preaching a wore them even when he worked in the timber industry and when he worked at a rock quarry WHO's always sort of turning up places looking like the reverend even when he wasn't preaching and so for many years he was just renowned as as a pastor and what happened was in nineteen seventy s first wife was found murdered and he was the prime suspect acton her murder and right away people started to change the kinds of stories they told about him and and all of that respectability just evaporated and the police in addition to being the prime suspect they were quite sure they were going to get a conviction and it was only because the state star witness changed her testimony that that he was acquitted in that first murder in which is very brutal murder and there were no other suspects and he didn't have an alibi and right away the police realized that he had benefited quite extensively from these license insurance policies some of which he had only recently taken out on his wife's life so this this was all confusing to the police because they thought they had such a great case but of course it turns out you know the State Star witness who they they couldn't figure out why she changed her testimony a few months later she became the second Mrs Maxwell and it was a meeting partly clear to them why and when she turned up dead you know at that point it was just pure rumor mill And nobody you know he's still called Reverend Reverend Maxwell all or the preacher Maxwell but certainly that was you know out of a sense of irony not no longer out of respect let's talk about before we carry on with about the other who he met at but what was Alabama light at this time for your typical African American family yeah that's a great question the says you know even before he settled into those careers the reverend was drafted into World War Two and he was drafted into a completely segregated army and to get around to his lawyer but what happened to a lot of Caucasian men when they were drafted you know they became officers they got legal careers they got skilled engineering jobs but the reverend was just commissioned and he had a very minor role in the service and when he came back Alabama was still just as segregated as the army had been so there were sharecroppers jobs and there were menial jobs and there were hard labor jobs with little pay and life I think the way we would talk about it now is life under Jim Crow was was not much different from life if you know pre-civil war you know you were technically free but you were you were still caught up in an incredibly predatory system of employment and in in particular in this of Alabama is one of the most rural counties there's a lot of poverty and a lot of poverty even even in working class white families too because the displacement from the sharecroppers the system was slow and gradual and so even if you worked very hard and worked very hard at many jobs you're still basically marginal let's talk about let's say something about first of all there was was his second wife 's husband Yes so I'm what we didn't say when we were talking about the second Mrs Maxwell as you know the reverend could take a new wife because his first wife had been found murdered and the woman he ended up marrying was only available for marriage because her husband had also died under suspicious circumstances and that's an example of you know there's so much lure and rumor about this case over and over again people would tell me that the Reverend Maxwell murdered his neighbor Mr Anders one of his his wife's name was Dirk Anderson and she had been married to a man named Abram Anderson Abram Anderson was also a World War Two veteran but he had developed ls and you know I would say to people will he had ale and he died in the Veterans Hospital Tuskegee it doesn't seem like the reverend was involved and they would insist that he was and they would say well no he poisoned him and it was a slow poisoning and took a long time but he was doing very well and he was fine and then he just died suddenly and you cannot convince them there was is an autopsy the the autopsy found died of pneumonia and again he was in the hospital for ninety days so it's not as if he was particularly vulnerable to predation of the Reverend but there's just the sense that somehow the reverend was involved because it was too good to be true you know at the very moment he needed this man to die he went and died and you know aside from the kind of coupons Gordon of that were I'm sure going to get into this but there began to be these rumors that the reverend even though he was ordained in the Baptist Church even though he was a Christian minister that he was of practice Fisher of Voodoo and so that's really where the rumor mill caught traction and so when you talk about someone like Abram Anderson who was you know a relatively healthy man all those dying slowly of a degenerative disease the fact that he died suddenly and conveniently is why people said well it must have been a potion or a charm or the reverend reason dim and you know if he didn't do it with foo he did it with antifreeze and people just have this real certainty avid same thing you know so the reverend was accused of killing his first life and then his second wife died two and people knew that had been done with Voodoo and then a brother of his diet and a nephew of his died and a stepdaughter of his diet and in every one of those cases the community he was convinced that that he'd been able to commit the crimes because of new and the police hadn't been able to convict him because of Voodoo and that might have just seemed truly doc unfair innuendo or the kind of unfounded conclusions of fearful community but of course the police were just as upset with the reverend and the police had just as much certainty that it was Voodoo but that it was murder because all of those incidents has the reverend had life insurance on these individuals so these truly appeared to the police says pattern IBM again you really feel for the law enforcement officers or the criminologists who work these cases because right he didn't even he didn't even bother to kind of change the circumstances so.

Hopley Casey Harper Lee fraud Rhode Baillie Gifford Prize murder staff writer Paris Review New York Times Ed mill ninety days
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms radio. Show about ideas and coach with me nailed any sweet. It's the six hundred edition of little atoms and i'm joined by lower coming to talk about her. New book on chapel sans my mother another another missing person coming has been the chief art critic of the observer since nine hundred ninety one thousand nine her book. The vanishing man in pursuit of velasquez was book the week. I'm ready for the wall street journal book of the year and the new york times bestseller and also won the twenty seventeen james tait black biography prize and was published to critical acclaim. You may also have heard us talk about it on a previous little atoms her first book a face to the world on self portrait was described by nick home be of brilliance fizzing. We've ideas not just about a human nature and by julian bones as that rare item an art book where the text sixty seventh rolling that the pitch is almost seem like an interruption and long as latest book which we're gonna talk about today is on chapel sans my mother and other missing persons laura welcome back. It's wonderful to be back. Thank you very much new for inviting me so this book a little way into it. There is a photograph which i wanna talk about first of a young girl on a beach with a man whose rather nattily-dressed tell us about that photograph into those people the photographs of tiny thing about the size of is credit card black and white it shows my grandfather george alston sitting on a beach very say nattily-dressed very sunday best so he's wearing doc silk suit and as a panama hat and this is interesting to me because he was a traveling salesman so this is definitely him got up to really really look as good as he can look and he's sitting on the sandy beach chapel sounds the time with book and he's got a child with him him and the child is about to and she is being held firmly still for the camera olden times nineteen twenties the long exposure exposure times and she is just slightly moving and if it was possible to save a two year old child that she'd depressed. She looks depressed. She wants to be away from the shot and this virtual was tucked in the back on its own almost as if hidden in my mother's family album classics with took black primera snapshots and go across one corner of the cover and the album has always been a mystery to me had until so now perhaps being a mystery to me because of the fact that it's a very small modest album <unk> twenty two pages black black pages kind of thing you had those little transparent corners for putting the picture in for of each picture and even though it's a very small book and not many pages hof because empty empty and there are no photographs of my mother before the age of three and none of her off the age of thirty and the crucial thing to know about this growth cross that you're asking about neal is that she's not three in the pictures younger than that so. Where does she fit in the secrets along the back of the picture. It says what's the name. It says her name except that it's not her name in the course of the family album. She is cool betty and she was betty all her life until she met my or not. She changed her name to elizabeth because she could stop the name betty betty gray davis. She didn't like a name so and she didn't like the connotations herald of her paws does the child but on the back of the photograph is written george and grace george and grace and yet this is indeed her so this is partly where my search begins how come she's cool grace and if she didn't come to live with my grandfather and grandmother until she was three how come he knows her. Why does she have this different name and whose handwriting is it on the back of the photograph. Grace race to become better was adopted by george and his wife data when she was three and they were quite old they were. They were forty nine years old and for child of threes. This is not obvious reno nine hundred twenty nine. This was this adoption and i don't think i think my mother would have noticed and she didn't really notice that they were considerably older than the parents probably in front of the decade but yes they were not only were they quite old for they've stays but they had been married for just over twenty years with no children and so the fact that they've doctored her toll of twenty years. I was found quite strange and inserted cheese and there's another mystery now. This book is extensively about when she's three me. Your mother is kidnapped among could pick up the bokan think it was going to be the story of you know a kidnapping in this sort of lindbergh baby style but in some respects if i may say the the kidnapping is almost a macguffin. The story is about behind the kidnapping. In who was that did it that was rather than the actual story that could not be. Let's talk about what actually happened on that day when she was taken. It was an alternate oaten day after day weekday in ninety two thousand nine. It was bumper snotty unfeasible warm. I know that because the police report of that day makes it clear that she had no shoes on she had no koto cardigan. It was rather warm day. She was only speech chuckles atlanta's which is about seven miles from lincolnshire coast and crucial think about this beach. It is absolutely flat. It runs with twenty miles without a curve or a rock or any place you could hide way to child but yet this little girl my mother was on the beach with her adoptive mother vida feeder and they're playing in the sands dance and they've been there for some time the tide had received a very long way app so she will clearly not in the water when she disappeared but it have mattered moment she vanished the planted footsteps to help determine what had happened and there were no witnesses to the incident purportedly renew witnesses to the the incident except those who talk about dress she was wearing what she'd apply them so and i have to do and it's very obvious says you rightly say from the beginning of the book. I knew that whoever had taken a must've known her and i think anyone reading this is very clear anyone reading this will realize that because there wasn't a sound she was playing and then she was gone and you know she would have screamed. If it had been someone she knew so clearly it was something to do with her family and naturally anyone reading it will know that she's going to turn out to be adopted. You don't know this the beginning and neither did she because i'm trying to follow the way she experienced to try to imagine what it was like for her. Yeah i mean you mother doesn't realize this has happened until she's six. She's sixty will come. Come back to that a little later on. Tell us something about georgian vida festival which as i say i'm watching it very much my mother's perspective because of the fact that my mother's childhood was fascinating to me when i was growing up and she wrote a memoir of her early life for me as my twenty first birthday present and she is the reason the book her ranking is wonderful. I would say that but i think everybody who's read. The book has commented very much. The memorials sex and memorize <unk> through and wonderful and she described in the memoir is going terrifically angry a bull bossy bronco pitic man george her father and her mother vita it was this very who i knew jewish died long before i was born but vita was very gentle and very add water and very gracious and very patient and so on and the relationship between them i i think gave my mother a strong feeling that men were. They ruled the half. They ruled the house and they shouldn't and quite a lot of formative. Moments from her child are in the book. <hes> he had a very bad temper and he was away during the week he would go out on monday morning and he come back friday suitcase would have samples of so and i see kyle was at the impression mother breezed out with he'd gone and perhaps feeder did too. I don't know but i certainly think it was very strange. Tall to this i go off in the book and photographs crucial to the whole story because in a way the book is a campaign to make me look harder at make all of us me particularly to look harder at these albums to try to work out. What's really going on in these pictures not to take them at face value. There's a beautiful photograph of jordan vida in the nine hundred ten and then you d words in bradford. They're living in this to to dan bradford and in the photograph their route in this country. It's very beautiful photograph it could have been taken by any of the great photographers of that era thing and you know he's very handsome and he's coming along with his cane on his beautifully dressed again and she's you know she's gonna feather in how lovely boss kitchen and at the same time i've heard very significant he's walking directly directly towards the camera with very military look to him and he fought in the boer war and she's looking down in a way very shy and you know we can we can enter black and white any particular black and white photographs that seemed to speak of the past and invent the characters in them and i could actually match the picture show with what i know of them. However is it right to see them that way. That's the point in a pictures of the tarot photographs of the turbo dependency to make us think we know the people to well when we don't so bet is kidnapped and as it turns out mentally quickly because i've been returned to georgia beta as it had this story is not really about that and subsequently her life at home which i think we're gonna see and towards the beginning of the buckets because she's been getting that and that would it be protective is very very cloistered. She doesn't go very far from the house she sometimes mac trends local.

grace george kidnapping betty betty gray davis wall street journal chief art critic new york times velasquez george alston sandy beach chapel jordan vida james tait julian bones georgian vida nick dan bradford neal reno elizabeth georgia
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms a radio show about ideas and coacher with me nailed any this week we could it live at the either festival Fenton House in Ramstad. Here's psychoanalyst Just Cohen on his book not working in the event in about forty five minutes. I'm just going to introduce Josh. A little more for May just co in is a psychoanalyst in private practice and a professor of modern contrary theory at Goldsmiths University of London and previously is the author of the private life why we remain in the dark and how to read Freud as well as other books and articles on psychoanalysis cultural theory modern richer and now obviously not working why we have to stop which is what we're here took on today and she's going to read the book to kick us off. Okay again. Thank you Tom. It's very nice to have such generous introduction from none other than Tom Hodgkinson slightly unsubtle but at kind of being given the official cost of legitimacy in talking about the subject I feel so much more spiritual affinity with Obama. WHO's ready that adult agenda.

Tom Hodgkinson Just Cohen Fenton House Freud Goldsmiths University of Londo private practice Obama Josh Ramstad professor official forty five minutes
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They see little atoms, a radio show about ideas and coacher with me now. Denny. This week. We're taking the Janney to the wild ends of the with damages and he's name book outpost. Done Richards is the coal of Holloway with Robert McFarland and Stanley Dom would and the author of the beechwood SU interviews and climbing days. But which we've talked about on previous little atoms his written for the guardian Harper's bazaar. Caught by the river, Monaco and the quietest. He's an all rela fellow Bristol university, and Dan's latest book, which we talk about today is outpost journey to the world ends of the earth than welcome back. Hello. Thank you for having me back again. Let's talk about first of all, what the I guess the inspiration for this book was, it was a couple of things, and it was all to do with family, without one to sound to Queen Vic about it. The last book, I did the climbing one was about my Greg, great aunts, and uncle, and while I was writing and mountaneering in that footsteps, I spent some time as a high mountain cabins, these kind of very sort of altitude Innis quite spot and spaces, which I'd never really considered. And I think a lot of people don't really consider, how Alpina some works unless you're involved with it yourself. So, you know, you walk a day's worth in our in our case in my case, 'cause I wasn't terribly fit at least at first know the first time, it's at least today, the second time you go back at half a day had you don't hurt as much and you hike up through Heidi like grasslands up over glassy Aaron up above the snow line. And then perhaps you'll find sort of cottage or cabin. And if you're very lucky, and it's the right time of year, maybe will have a guardian who cook you sausages and rusty. And. Wake you up fiendishly early in the morning where you have a go at a summit, or, or a long trek along sort of rich.

Bristol university Janney Dan Denny Heidi like grasslands Queen Vic Alpina Richards Monaco Innis Robert McFarland Stanley Dom Greg Aaron Holloway
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"I mean, it's still just a little bit before that. So. Yeah. No. I felt like she had been so badly served by history. There was no way. I wasn't going to came back because she should be, you know, she. And it's it's terrible loss that we'd have the idea because it means that we lose her story and amend on the great Ethiopian warrior Hera who fights for Troy as well. And when you have to spend so much time defending classics against being pale, man and stale which is perpetual accusation. It's like, well, it isn't an something doesn't have to be. But it's frustrating, but the one poem which could have immediately given us a hero who isn't pale and a hero who isn't mail is one that we've lost maybe one more. And then I'll get you to read the book, if you should we bother talking about Helen, we should always buy the talking about Helen even their Kalliopi word because she said cross with her. Yeah. Helen is such an egg MMA because right from the very earliest versions of her story. We don't know who she is. And we don't know what happens to her and that's true virtually everybody ingredient to be fair always contrasting Mets. But Helen is really interesting one because even her parentage is contested mostly. We think it's use and leader who is a mortal woman, the Queen of Sparta, but there's one version of Hamath where her mother is nemesis. It's got us nemesis. She's born from an egg, which is relatively unusual. And then everybody knows that she is responsible for the Trojan war because she lives with Paris except that dating back to at least the mid eight century. So as all the Homer older does version of her story where she doesn't go to Troy, she doesn't let with para. She goes to Egypt lives at the war completely blameless Lii. And it's an ADL on an image of her goes to Troy and everyone fights over at the end of the war. They realized the Greeks reclaim her and she literally disappears. They realize they've been fighting over as the perfect metaphor for the futility of war. I guess, but my version she isn't Troy, and she is responsible for the war, and she is really powerful because she the daughter of use, and we should be scared of her a little scared of her because she has maybe not the potency of beauty of attractiveness that Aphrodite e has where she can weaponize beauty. And and you would jump off a cliff in a heartbeat, but she's not far short about. And so I wanted her to be capable of using that as weapon and prop. To be frightening when a deceased tries to be snarky with her. She scares him. And I wanted that to be possible. But I also didn't want to get to book down in the notion of her incredible beauty and not being the only kind of redemptive thing about what's so interesting in the versions of that we have in Euripides, for example. It's how a tickly he makes her an incredible speech in the Trojan women and an incredible and look at star of his play Helen and both versions, you think God Manolis, and I've had a chance, you know. He's only ever presented as slightly stupid drunk. And I thought really hard about having Helen's story play out as it doesn't the AUSSIE and this book, and in the end, I kind of had to let it go. Because it's so mad the version and the order see I thought I can't have this. I don't want it to be a focal thing, and I can't throw it away. Because I think modern readership just find it bad shit that when Columbus gets sputtering. I think it's book for the see he's asking his father might be any Asman Lassen. Helen what they remember him from during the war. Mandalay starts crying when he remembers his fallen comrades. And Helen doesn't say anything tool to him. She just called slave and has her bring a bag of of drugs, which she has been sent from Egypt from wound polygamous, I think, and she doesn't say anything doesn't do anything. She just puts these drugs in the wine and serves them up and the drugs are according to Homer Nepenthes as is the word in Greek which means grief banishing and homelessness about ten lines..

Helen Troy Mets Asman Lassen Egypt Homer Nepenthes Euripides Mandalay Hamath Paris ADL Lii Columbus eight century
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"In nineteen forty eight the war of the neck when between eight hundred thousand million Palestinians displaced prior to the supplement of the safest route. So. You've mentioned your grandmother and read in couple of places the mothers, quite a fixture in the what is this the Palestinians, the ex Pat community like in the and I'm like, I'm say vote is charity. That's kind of a main a main beat of cheeses such of matriarch not around facing their little Palestinians in London. Likewise, a new people sit of yet there. There are few around. Yeah. And so I have asked to extend the deposing identity is important here. Mid-on now becoming brighter again, you're a novelist or not this is a historical novels at an historical Palestine, I understand ask you a little bit later on about it a little bit the novel that you working on now a contemporary post Palestinian novel. This sort of is it is it sort of behold on Palestinian writers to somehow represent the Palestinian Kohl's it away that you know, is not necessarily expected of the will the rises yet. Nothing there. Is this history in literature from our vote in general to be committed to the these commitment to portray the suit like political and social circumstances that countries, and so they something that isn't like Natan a native idea away. But it will I think it's a pressure from western audiences to when when from Nome nine two countries, they should specifically not western countries should be representing their that country's in some way a into that. I've seen it as a pressure. I think I tried to engage it intellectually in some way, and I feel like in this novel, the Parisian is engaging with those ideas, which means to be forced to be Representative to be forced to into shape. I want to be in as a as a spokesperson for people something. I personally feel the pressure to do that. But I d is that these ideals to interest me kind of like, I'm interested in them creatively fail. Now. This book is just about other recall. By miss, if broadcast it will be way. But as recording miss the book is just about command, obviously, you are firmly in the minds base of the of the next novel perceive now, but you know, does that at any sort of additional way. Do you think as you waiting for hell book is going to be saved? I kind of not gonna hurry. The next book that is not only simplicity policy in London. But I just I think it's important when you right not to think about reception too much of have to define he'll brain not worry too much about those corrupt. You also you'll you'll create a bet. So I'm trying to worry about basically. Mentioned in in the fest, Paul idea that mid happy, and you know, growing novelist aspiring to to to the French condition is sort of tone between two coaches. On how you represent not in the book in the he has these feelings of being detached from his own body in some ways, he talks about that towards the beginning of the secret talks about the first time, he realized that he was the only bid and his body pulse pillow head. But also when he's on when he's on the the liner at the beginning. He starts to fail to be. If it was a bit of an outsider, not sort of represented in these these bodies into the feeling feeling in pain, his hands and things let's sort of psychological condition, the represented the book. Yeah, I guess this things that I feel like so much much writings unconscious announcing deuce of like possibly wrong interpretation by Iraq. I'm sure you attention equally valid I think they asked to do with the experience of what it means to encounter difference and to live with difference and the the. Understanding that you you are in subject position observing something separate from you, not kind of coming to consciousness that we as human beings, experienced growing up know a child you recognize what his part of you in. What is no party in? There are other consciousnesses will around the world, you can't access as that sort of a universal human condition is complicated. When when then explore larger structures power will that mean for that does the difference matab loves difference. He pulls even even you could say heterosexual, romantic love is hesitant love of difference in another something else's external to you that that always have complication because it's extended to you.

London Palestine Nome Representative Natan Iraq Paul
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They says little atoms a radio show about ideas and coacher with me nail. Denny. This week. We start now on how the Mehta's and his new book origins. Now is a professor of science communication and university of Westminster. He has several wards his signs waiting and contributes to the guardian the times and the New Scientist. He's also very patella vision in a paid on ABC, horizon Sky News, one does the universe. Stargazing live and the sky at night. His previous books include the bestseller the knowledge to rebuild our world from scratch, which you may remember we talked about in the previous little atoms and he's latest book origins. How the Mehta's we're going to talk about today. Louis. Welcome back. It looks like you've got a press release twenty at the blow. Nice of you to say, thank you. And what's the idea behind origins? The general concept that the kind of guiding principle behind the book was to all the different ways that features of the earth is kind of a planet have influenced the human stores, everything from a little origins evolution east Africa, all the way to the very beginnings of culture and the civilizations and cities through modern history, and even up to kind of politics and elections in the last couple of years and an older ways of is influenced and affect directed that story that narrative, and in what way is this sort of a companion piece to the knowledge. So it is it's it's not totally clear, doesn't it doesn't Clem that really my most book the knowledge it was a conceit. It was thought experiment on how you could reboot civilization from scratch off of some kind of hypothetical apocalypse. So in a sense. It was didn't have anything do with doomsday than the world. It was just way of peering behind the curve. Tunes of the modern world and just stuff. Works comes from hell things made. So what the important scientific discoveries and technological inventions that neighbors to go from ten thousand BC in in caves to the modern world of antibiotics trinity. So because all about the human invention human, ingenuity and making all world wants to do for the new book origins was to kind of step back even further and look at history and the grandest possible terms, and how the earth has has been involved us, right? How the planet? We live in is almost like a character in the play alongside humanities species. So let's about to leave lesion of our own species. And so the first of hominids start to stand on two feet, the African valley. What is it about that particular part of the world that made it the correct him via the suitable environment was was to evolve. And also, you know, why was it geologically so special? Well, so in the broadest strokes what needs to happen to turn in a forest welling tree swinging a into bipedal walking up rights. Intelligent, naked apes like like, humans was the whole region of east Africa dried out, an general terms. Went from forest to cross lands and on a whole series evolutionary up patients and are kind of every she line responded..

Mehta east Africa Denny university of Westminster New Scientist Clem professor ABC Louis two feet
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Adam way, miss work has been published in the guardian the Atlantic the new internationalist and by the BBC with his primary focus in their relationship between humans and the natural world. He lives on one hundred year old barge on the river Lee in London and his first book kings of the Yukon an Alaskan river journey which we're gonna be talking about today has also very recently won the Sunday Times young rights of the year award at welcome to little atoms. Thanks. I wanna talk about. I mean, say what inspired the book, but we should say what inspired the journey in the book yet because the someone was almost almost by the but really focuses on the summoned. I it's hard to know where these things not really I'd always been joined going to Alaska. I remember watching white FANG in the cinema. When I was about eight years old in a news public fascination. We've been asking that came about and then Radi. The I actually went to Alaska was in twenty thirteen I was dead rallying because I'd always been looted there, but was sensitive said environmental journalist and traveled over the state in a couple of months in one of the stories I picked up on his invited out onto the Yukon custody crime delta, which is far west Alaska, and I was invited there by guy might Williams who was then chief of the big nation and aided in Ovid's, very remote. But to get that you had to fly through this town called Bethel and Mike said it was a try on in town at the time in the phase that he said that stuck in my head was that Gandhi had is. We have on summoned, and I sat in on this case of peace about it for the Atlantic. And it was these twenty three ubiquitous woman who will try because they go out and fished when there was a ban on the catching of kings and the Alaska department of fishing game put this down on because this massive crashing Sam numbers in the past few years and the defending themselves, and that was understood that it was there that traditional practice, almost spiritual heritage fish defending themselves in the first amendment who the light to factors that religion. And it felt to me not to that different ways of looking at the wellbeing forced up against each other in this state land tick, but it felt to me that there was this much bigger story to be told what restrictions of input in place. So when I was in twenty thirteen the story was kind of focused on this one small part of actually a river, just slightly south of the Yukon the Cusco Quinn. I came back to follow the story in twenty fourteen in twenty fifteen it was a fishing ban on the entire length of the Yukon river. That's too. Thousand miles at SCA and going into Canada, which is totally unprecedented. Never happened before amount was a ban on catching not just commercial fishing, but also subsistence so would indigenous people that rely on it for the menu harvests. And that that's a blanket ban has been pullback slight announced try and get a balance between indigenous fishing and protection. Sam is will Wade conservative at the moment. There's a number of species of Pacific, salmon, particularly are obviously digital to Alaska, but your book is mainly concerned with what's called the king salmon, tell us about that face. What's special about it? Yes. It was in on the Atlantic. Brioni, Hans one type of salmon on the five and have kind of different niches and the king of the the biggest ones that travel furthest, and they used to be absolutely enormous specimens eighteen ninety one hundred pound fish when on common. The biggest fish of the biggest king salmon ever caught on line was the same. Wait is the limit of Fenway books, which gives you some of ideas of how big they used to bait and December that travel furthest in the world's on the Yukon and ones that travel very furthest to give an idea that nice cycle that Bowen way way way up with the the furthest one of the travel born in place McNeil lake which is almost two thousand miles from the spending first year up in this lake, and then they'll just down with the cone guy out to the Pacific and feed off the coast of Japan going up to northern Russia would the Pacific and then in the last few months of their lives that will return to the Yukon and swim against the Covent..

Alaska Atlantic Yukon river Pacific Yukon Sam river Lee Alaskan river Adam BBC McNeil lake Cusco Quinn Brioni London Mike Canada Fenway Russia Japan
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"You're listening to little items with me porta, greedy. And this week. I'm talking to pull you in his the author of France's plug writer in residence Francis has picked up this residency Greenwich on he quite literally goes it goes into residence in the university, and because of trying to commute from his Sheddan westbound said to to Greenwich is a bit before freely. Yes, I mean, it was once he did the sums and Tim's of bus fees and time it was just not going to be very workable say he kind of does it on this lie because it's not part of his agreement to to live in residence at the university. So he kind of ends up finding a spare room in camping down there and hiding really, but again, it's another aspect of his life. We trying to make ends meet in stretches money around his his drinking spice. I was so it was I think we met you mentioned he's so he's running slit referral. Does it becomes increasingly desperate trying trying to pull in names while his people that departments remarkably patients? His his attention is increasingly desperate times to to pull people in which end up with writing to Philip Roth. Without being offered tickets to fly over, but there's also, you know of where he has to teach us to teach. He basically doesn't know where it starts aging. Does he know? I mean, he's very much Shum at least in the and originally he doesn't think he would have to teach because apparently you have to have a PHD I think to be properly, and he thinks off you I didn't have one of those. But because he's brought in as a visiting lecturer that doesn't apply to him as Russian residence. So he suddenly faced with the prospect of teaching the students, and he really funds that to court, and I guess to either come his competence issues. He tends to the bottle again, which just makes things with really. Trying to use props. This very elaborate props which don't really help. The book this being a great reviews in in in the garden. And I think there's a very straightforward kind of. I think the spectator described it as basically almost the savor of comic writing this country. But there's there's a real undertow think of loneliness too to Francis plug. Yes, I think I mean, he he finds himself very much on the outside of this wheeled, let the literary world, and then I guess the academic world, but still from a literary point of view like I guess it's about being a riot out, which is a very lonely, proficient and spend hours by yourself. It's a very personal thing to write a book and guess for me the one of the starting points for the whole front plunk series. Was this jarring between someone who is very shy? His no lonely person. And what is expected of offers these days in going on stage and an infused and book signings and sort of heading the publicity sick. And I mean, I originally thought that's that's potentially a really good springboard for comedy. And I think it has been when you put those two worlds together, it's there is a lot of comic stuff comes out of it. But at the same time, it is it's a fact of of being north of these days as well as well as spending all that time by yourself. If if you want to be successful you to sell yourself as well and push your self in your book and public. So it is actually a genuine effective lot to do that. So yes, he is a very. Only person, but I guess at the same time. He he uses the books. He reads and gets involved in those worlds say he's he's not altogether said he's just struggling bit to deal with both hilltops by. I think. On London pub views man throughout the fronts. Plug his enormous imaginatively topping very quickly within the cards. There is done. I guess, Freddie. Writer of living with your motivation, same engage with everyday facts of trying to settle your imagination..

Philip Roth Francis Shum Tim Greenwich France writer Sheddan visiting lecturer Freddie Writer London
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Listened to little atoms. I'm now Danny took it to Thomas page McVeigh with took it by his book, the true story about what makes a man and Thomas as you just reiterated before we broke and engine at the beginning trends and Madison Square Garden, but in Tokyo about in the first half, we didn't really mention that too much. And indeed in the book, it don't talk to many people in the box in fraternity about wants to about why and other things perhaps festival again either really about. Let logistical reason. Yeah. I mean, the main reasons were safety-oriented, I didn't know what to expect. And I didn't wanna put myself at risk, you know, on that level. The other main reason was around like, you know, actually for the sake of the story. I felt that if I put that out there with change, I didn't wanna be you know, it's like the observer effect. I wasn't sure how that might affect the way people interact with me, and I didn't wanna have to think about it later and wonder, you know, so I have privilege people don't know him trans unless I tell them. So I really wanted to sort of like be in this world and not make a point of it. There is kind of boring logistical thing in the sense that like regulation issues that I think would have been fine. But around the people who regulated the event that around per transacts, and like what we have to prove to prove that we can fight cetera. And it's not that that wasn't. I don't even know how that was resolved. Honestly, I know obviously, the charity new trans, and I kind of like if you need paperwork, whatever. But it was a pretty awkward thing. And I didn't really feel comfortable with the situation and never really heard much about. Afterwards. So I guess who knows exactly we we did it who knows if the regulating body understood what was happening. But you know, it didn't really matter. So, but yeah, the main issues around my feelings of safety and mostly mediating not wanting me being trans to be sort of like what led with and therefore potentially created an atmosphere around me that that changed the way people behaved, and I mentioned that you masculinity for vice. I don't know..

Thomas Madison Square Garden Tokyo Danny McVeigh
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"But it was really like just a not quite a red light district. It was some kind of poor. Born district, but it was right where the main bus station was where the New York Times was. It's time square where people would watch the, you know, the ball fall and newsy and anyway, in the midst of this was a bar called Sally's where transsexual prostitutes. And you know now maybe say transgendered, but it was back then I guess would say transsexual prostitutes would gather, and then the men who were interested in them would also meet their and also would be a place of just dancing. And you know, probably like Paris burning sort of shows and drag shows and beauty pageants. And so Louis is kind of fascinated by this world and begins spending his nights. They're talking to the ladies of the Spar and becoming friends with them and falling in love with some of them in a way. This is fascinating yourself not time I was yes, fascinated by time square. It. You know, as a young man in his late twenties confused and strange and on and a sort of observer, kind of like a, you know, the narrator I wanted originally, one of the influences for the book was the Berlin stories by Christopher Isherwood, which became the basis for cabaret. And I think is the regional short story was I am a camera and so I want I saw myself as an observer. And so I went into these worlds and I had been told by a writer findings, you're in love with fascinated by, and he's also said, writers, hang out. That's how you learn about things began to hang out in this world. And I saw an some ways. I guess it was somewhat prescient. I, you know, I saw the trans gender community as those a shift going on of, you know, maybe away from binary thinking in some of the outer edges of society, and now it's actually become much more mainstream. I don't know where human beings are going in terms of gender. And male and female, but I was intrigued by the intersection there. And of course this has been going on for you know, thousands of years. You know in mythology, you had people who were men and women, you know, Tyree ceus, you know, in native American culture, you had the people that were considered both male and female, and but this was a, this was very much for me and as for Lewis, the narrator, it was a little bit like being in Berlin in the thirties, you know who trae risk. I, what other French were hurts, you know, but just full of life and sex to have another sure or this one has a little mention of Trump. So Henry went off to Palm Beach where we know Trump has a place. But this was in the early nineties and he comes back from the season in Palm Beach role. Yeah, we're all rich ladies are, but he's come back and now he's living again with Louis. I woke Henry at seven, and I was very surprised, but he didn't put up much of a protest despite only sleeping for a few hours when I came out of the shower, he was putting on some music for dancing. Thank God. I've come back to New York so I can exercise. He said to me when I came into the kitchen, didn't you size in Florida? I asked, I had no time. Something was always going on. It's very competitive Trump tried to break in again. He threw big party at mar-a-lago. The night of the Red Cross ball said he was going to have beautiful models. They were nothing but prostitutes. And then at the end of the party, they did the inevitable jumped into the pool. So he's finished for another year to vulgar. You couldn't go for walk in the afternoon. I didn't want to be in the sun. I don't do my exercises after five o'clock. I was invited to play tennis, but no one wanted to play after five. How did you get so ten? I was in the ocean few times to kill the fleas, but that was it. I wore white gloves to protect my hands from the sun, but then I lost the right one had to keep my hand my pocket, which isn't very attractive. So anyway, Henry had gone a case of fleas in New York it. So Florida and the ocean, hopefully cured him of that..

Henry Louis Trump Christopher Isherwood New York Times New York Berlin Florida Sally Red Cross Palm Beach Paris tennis writer Lewis
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"It's a little atoms i'm nailed any today i'm talking to him around the doyle and we're talking about her memoir a book of untruths and you mentioned a couple of times related to your father's infidel so let's talk about that now and i guess your mother's slaves that have realize asian and it was going on and how she dealt with over the is when she still telling her trees after he died it's clear that she was aware of things populist time and because when she fell pregnant with my anger brother ed's she can try to sexually transmitted disease from him which can only be approved that he that he was a monster so i think she was always aware of it and i think what with sides for her and continue all the way through her life was that he would shock her friends so that kind of disloyalty not any him buzz her friends too and i i wish he'd been kinder and played further away from home but i think it felt easier just to look in the nest and see what was the bailable does that particular letter as well that gives him away in the book oh yes so she the ways that she told me that he of course i idea he went to i i had no idea that he was such a disloyal man so when she told me that she had found a latin history collection which is again another found the friend that they'd been having a relationship with one another i just couldn't believe i just couldn't believe her i thought who he wouldn't do that but the more time when tolan in the more evidence that she showed me and the more i i doubt myself i realized that's the reason i didn't believe her was that he had always made her unbelievable to the rest of us and that's very sad too so we've talked about how there was violence in the household yes what's the relationship like between you and your three brothers joe in all of this time how do you deal with it between yourselves or not at all well i felt that we were very close my younger brother at but hsun would play off against one another and be favoring one person over another way of kind of finding control in the world that he had no control over and i think that was very difficult and my eldest brother pots son adrian was very remote think he was thoroughly depressed and no one talked about his mother anymore any evidence hard disappeared and he was beaten a lot as well and he's ten years older than i and an eight years older than me and so he he was always very remote around this time your father job in saudi arabia goes off and there's a period of time where your traveling over there periodically and recreate vividly in the book what it was like this time which would have been in need early nineteen eighties to be traveling to saudi arabia yes what was that like apple of radi improved there's more than a toilet now very uncomfortable i think i fund it very i think he was the destination heading out of sunshine and and she saudi arabia then when you when i was young and i wasn't having to cover up i wasn't having to wear caftans or or cover my have i as a child it was very free and the beach was great and then having to head back to rainy rainy rainy rainy scotland with very very severe heart and the flights would leave it one in the morning from horon and we get into a teen i didn't know but eighty clock in the morning and it would always be freezing and we wouldn't have slept all night i yes it was it was hard and lonely yeah and you appointed to boarding school in scotland and as it turns out golden stain which is everybody will know is where prince charles wed it's not hukou says it isn't it really really isn't at we tell you that he enjoyed he enjoyed his time there very much and i think many many children did butts i didn't think it was a safe environment and my mother i think was delighted to be a fellow parent the queen having married to sort of poor ours mon to not be able to call us up an equal to to those other parents was delicious so when i did try to speak to her.

eight years ten years
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms radio show about ideas and coacher with me nail denny sweet shares a riveting memoir brookhaven truth mill ended graduated with an emmy from goldsmiths in creative and life writing and has been mentored through the arts council escalator scheme autobiographical story autopsy was selected by irving welsh for inclusion in the scottish book trusts day like this unthought edgy and broadcast radio scotland and a book of untreated which we're going to be talking about today is miranda first book miranda welcome to little atoms lowly be thank you so the first thing i want to ask is why a book of untruths this book is structured chatting headings lies basis so why i was lecturing to flossy students on south and the food books that we were given recent commu and there will be lies attached to them but it was when you think about the jar of memoir so disreputable partly because there are so many fake memoirs as the fray million little pieces does the holocaust holocaust men was a found out to be not true and then there's a celebrity memoir i know ghost roy to who does liberty member on then you think really that fits on the same shelf as what's supposed to be true what supposed to be nonfiction and so this was a kind of play on that and of course in terms of reliability of straightforward memos not ones explicitly like a mini little pizzas yes obviously first of all your your memory of events is obviously one side of that thing is probably a bit shaky also you're entirely presenting you're creating the story of your road life in a memo of yeah and the so so many problems with outs because i can't remember what i said he two minutes again so the idea that i would have any dialogue i'm pretend that i was being honest is ridiculous but also that were growing up in families were well this particular family tend to disagree and about the past week parts disagree a lot as which is the most honest version and maybe it's not about being honest about trying to be the most truthful with our for their own idea of what the poss was like little thing you do in the book is this regular sides about the brain and people like elizabeth loftus false memories and why did you i worked for professor he looks into inherited stress.

roy elizabeth loftus professor denny irving welsh scotland miranda two minutes mill
"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"little" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Talk a little bit about matthew's about who he is my is a he's a he's somebody from a much more conventional and religious family than the than the sheriff follows the sister who the sister who marries him is a bit of a cuckoo in in the in in the family she wants she longs for a more conventional way of living she asks if they if they will arrange a marriage for her which is really unheard of in these secular intellectual bengali families they just wouldn't you know one of the things that they're absolutely devoted to and happy for over one hundred years is the women's should be properly educated and should have professions so that would be an absolute anathema to them my comes from this this conventional family is also that sort of family rates religion over secular culture and so would be naturally more attuned to the pakistani government in islam but a lot of those people did become collaborators he because of what happens in bangladesh after independence he answered here if lead to england and they take up they take their lives here and then if you years later the political situation bangladesh changes and the rest of the family start to think that they ought to go to england as well but they never meet once again and i think that's probably quite that's probably quite common experience in families that divided like this there was another there's another sequence in the book where what your way my food saudi has died at some point of screen and foods has been married to somebody out they go on their honeymoon to to lands end and it's call more of course everybody's staring at these people she's awfully covered up and.

matthew pakistani government bangladesh england saudi one hundred years