19 Burst results for "Literary Journal"

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

Can We Talk?

08:26 min | 4 months ago

Sabrina Orah Mark Writes Into Brokenness

"Writer and poet. Sabrina or a mark likes to describe her stories as having little poems folded up inside of them. She publishes monthly essays loosely based on motherhood and fairytales in the literary journal the paris review. Here's the opening of her november essay. You break it. We fix it. I am inside. you break it. We fix it holding my son shattered. I-ipad hello i call out. No one answers. The counter glows white and the walls are empty. Hello hello. I wait a few minutes before calling out again. One minute says a raspy voice from the back of the store hopes swells in my chest. Here we comes. We will fix said i hold up the broken screen so we can see it on a little shard of glass. Trump's the floor with a plank. Yeah we says you know what i ask. We says the soldering work required would more than a new ipad. We says it would take weeks possibly months. Sabrina began writing this essay in the weeks leading up to the presidential election. She published it after the election when the sitting president and a large percentage of his allies still refused to accept the decisive results. Oh the next week. I returned. You break it. We fix it with a whole entire country. It's heavy but i managed to carry it through the parking lot leaving behind a trail of seeds in the crisp sent of democracy and something that smells like blood or dirt across. It is a growing crack. A trial too young to be alone is out in front holding a broken country to store is gone out of business as the child. I shift the country to one arm and tried appear in. But it's shuddered and dark. Told you says the child out of business. I text my husband. You break it we fix. It is closed. I've come here for nothing again. The texture of sabrina 's essays is a rich. We've of fairytales politics. The past and her children's voices. Sabrina joins us for the fourth. In our four part series on creativity in the global pandemic. We started off talking about how she's managing to find the time to write with two young kids. At home she drew parallels between the ways that motherhood and quarantine have shaped her creative process right now. we're home schooling. And so there's this. I mean it's it's it's a packed house like twenty four seven and there is like the endless ness of like of things everywhere and snacks and then trying to ride. And then you know I do feel like. I've been working harder than i've ever worked in my entire life like you know since march like because you just have to grab the pieces of time where you can find it. It was funny because i was homeschooling. You know all day long like all day and at one point i just it was like from four to five i just i climbed into my bed and just like sat there with like staring at a wall at five o'clock my signs come into my room and they're like you forgot about us like what do you mean i forgot about you like how could i forget like it was like a whole hour went by you know like where i wasn't just right i was. Yeah you write about your kids a lot and their voices creep into your writing sometimes in unexpected ways. Which is one of the things that i really love about your writing so just to back up a little bit. You've said that after you had children the form that you're writing took changed after. I had kids. Is i think in many ways like i became more porous like i allowed. I had to allow more of the world and and it was right around that time where In many ways my prose poems started sort of growing and growing and growing part of it was just time. Because i couldn't like live inside of a single poem. I used to write these prose poems. In the instance of lake hermetically sealed likes Boxes and spaces of time. And i couldn't do that anymore after i had kids. And so would sort of just keep returning and returning and returning to my writing and then it would kind of get bigger and longer and stranger and more porous and there was more interruptions and then in many ways my palm started turning into stories and then with these essays. Even more of the world's i think started coming in And i really believe in some crossing. John rouse and having things blurb because i do think that you know fiction will leak into reality and reality leaks into affection and i don't really believe in like you know the the strict border between between john or as For myself creatively lake. I need to sort of move back and forth in that fluid way. It's really interesting that you connect that with having children. Yeah i used to be able to like work in these. These of yeah on interrupted Spaces and then the interruptions actually ended up really feeling like like a gift you know. And that's sort of something. I've been thinking a lot lately. Just you know inside of a. You know these last seven months of That that in certain ways like a lot what we lose often. You know We gain in these other places Like i'm trying really hard to find those places where like the thing that feels like a loss is not really a loss. And i'll give you an example like i'm teaching A class in poland's on on zoom and one of my students is disabled and she was talking about how you know. Normally these students are all Brought onto a university campus in the states and in a millionaire. She never would have been able to participate in this program. And she said you know Your captivity like when the world's closed for you the world opened up for the first time for me. And i would never have been able to meet her otherwise i would never have been able to know her and know her writing and hear her voice and mike see her. You know and when i moved all of my classes that i teach online. I thought like oh god. I don't wanna teach these workshops online. I love sort of the intimacy of the classroom that i've created an ideal but i think that like i held onto this idea of how things are supposed to be all of the time like so intensely that had i not been forced into this like other space. I would never have known this. You know what. I wasn't seeing Like why did i ever offered classes online before thinking about like you know people who for a million different reasons like wouldn't be able to get semi to a classroom. It was like the perfect moment of like what we loses. What we gain

Sabrina Sabrina Joins The Paris Review Literary Journal Donald Trump John Rouse John Poland Mike
"literary journal" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

08:35 min | 6 months ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Channel 33

"We're going to get rid of delivery costs right which is pretty. Revolutionary. Nineteen Ninety six. I don't have to mail David Shoemaker the magazine he can just get on there, and then later on this, it's funny. He says people will read slate are the people that like to read time and Newsweek in the New Yorker except they have a computer right that that is literally what he is thinking of this is a magazine reader who just happens to have a computer and now realizes they can read another magazine I like how you referred himself the beginning or he said he would in a negative he's I'm not an internet junkie. Now. I mean I guess it just goes to show you how far does the concept of the Internet is come that you would have to qualify whether or not you are A. Unhealthy. Abuser. Of the Internet. They would be. You know th the level of Internet, obsession that we all have attained with something new kind of shy away from at that point in time. But yeah I mean. I mean. The fact that he's selling it to pretend readers and foreign countries I mean, that's a listen. That is selling point, but it seems to sort of fly in the face of what he's trying to defend I. Mean it's All, it just sound everything sounds so silly. From from our vantage point now I mean everything the biggest hangups were. How do I read this thing I mean it was really like you know. Like handing one hundred year old I mean a hundred year old to check out your podcast. It's just there's a huge. There's just a huge barrier for entry absolutely, and there was for a time a slate on paper. Leave was sold or early serve distributed through starbucks so you can get a copy of it printed out. If. You couldn't actually read it on a computer you. You can link Google image search late on paper as I'm doing right now and get a good idea I remember really really well, it's not. Much closer to A. High School Literary Journal than a magazine. Right including like. The skill. The like the layout skills and stuff involved. It's it's it's pretty spectacular now on the Charlie rose show both Rosen Kinsley have these very clunky computers and Kinsley. Then start showing rose the website. And they come across something that isn't yet called aggregation listen to how they described. This is the contents page. where we have a feature called. In other magazines which tracks what's going on in other magazines. And as a way of sort of measuring the Zeitgeist I think it's it's one way to get a sense of what's going on in the world. Very. Simply, what people are considering important is to see what time Newsweek put on their covers every day every week, and we will actually because we're in cyberspace have these Monday morning, which is long before most people get their own time and Newsweek if they subscribe the covers a little summary of their contents with a little bit of spin from us. So listen to that. You can read time and Newsweek before you receive them in your mailbox. Right, which is a little foreshadowing as an. This whole idea that you're gonNA. You're not actually going to read need to read time and Newsweek, there's going to be this thing that's just going to summarize it for you. And sort of take the content, and then you're gonNA think. Do I really need to read the original article at all. Yeah and the deeper question what will replace time and Newsweek on our coffee tables I think he he was not able to answer but. It is aggregation is A. It's a hard thing for wonder mine around even now I think but But yeah, it's Ed that's just hilarious and here's one more note from Rosen Kinsley on aggregation. One of the things for people who don't know much about the Internet. One of the amazing things is we have no relationship with the US news or any of these other things you it's you can just you you you you create a link anything else on the web and just click to it and and There's there's no need to negotiate or tell anybody about it or or or anything like that. No needed to go she had her tell anybody about it. This is like the founding principles of Agra content NEGRA Gagen, right. You don't have to tell the person you're aggregating as long as yes. This is I mean it's it's It's pretty hilarious. is now he's Morality that we're sort of trying to litigating like every year. There's some new some new problem. So new attempt to fix the Internet all kind of comes down to yeah, like the system of aggregation right I don't I think it's just built into the DNA. At least Kinsley was offering a link back in nineteen ninety, which you know not not even always apparent twenty twenty here David they go to a feature called does Microsoft play fair and those was Kinsley sort of half puckish half serious attempt to show that Microsoft was going to let him run the magazine without maximum editorial fear in interference right because Microsoft have been the subject of this big antitrust argument at the time listen to how that lays out. This is this is this is a feature it's sort of an email discussion forum and our theory on this is it will combine we hope. Some of the immediacy of television discussions with some of the more thoughtfulness and more more reflectiveness that comes from people writing things, and if you use emails a very good medium for argument's you you you. You read something I wrote you think about it for a while you bang out a response you send it back and then I respond to you we have three or four people including a Microsoft executive. So that David is the sees of social media. All right. I'M GONNA, make an argument you write to me, and then I'm GonNa Right back to you. And sleigh was gonNA thread all those in this prehistoric page, and of course, now, that would just be your average argument on twitter. Yeah. impossibly it just impossible again to wrap one's head around in. Nineteen, ninety-six that there would be a conversation happening I mean literally. The notion that I mean are an article in Newsweek would be you would read it and you would accept its premises as true and it would only if there is the only discussion, you ever hear about it would be you know possibly something at home but more likely. The one or two stories that would bubble up onto the Sunday. News shows i. felt like was the only kind of moment of investigation you know beyond that idea that there'd be a conversation going on about a story about the news around it. I mean that it just seems impossible. It just seemed like like how would I be privy to a conversation that you're having? You know it's it seems it seems so alien and decide just responsive reporting I mean not even aggregation saying like like, Hey, the Atlanta grow this thing here's my take on it. Here's my column I mean even that was seldom heard of back then right? I mean there'd be no. There'd be no reason to when he's talking about, you don't have to have an agreement with the other publisher is because Most of them operated weirdly in like silos workplaces right I mean we were only you're only sort of self referential you the expectation for most journalism was that your reader read like the daily life, the local newspaper, and then what you may with the magazine you made I mean, maybe they read more but you only get your speaking as if that was their purview. Do you feel profoundly depressed. Now, being witnessed the invention of the Atlantic road something. Here's my column. What what a dreary moment that must have been. A lot of this is funny prehistoric Internet but. In this final clip, David Charlie rose back into another issue, which would become much bigger later on weight is a technology company actually getting into content. And what happens then when the technology companies begin to overshadow the content makers? What reservations did you have about doing? Publishing a magazine online. In Association, with Microsoft A. Computer. Corporation. Well. I didn't have any of the reservations and some people have about Microsoft getting into publishing it seems to me that the problem of conglomeration. Of the media is a very serious problem but if a new company comes in even a big one, even a big powerful one that reduces the conglomeration increases the competition. So that seems to me to be a good thing. And Microsoft..

Newsweek Microsoft Rosen Kinsley David Shoemaker David starbucks US Google A. High School Literary Journa twitter NEGRA Gagen David Charlie Ed Atlanta publisher executive
Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

Bookworm

04:36 min | 9 months ago

Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

"Today. I'm very pleased and excited. My favorite thing on bookworm is when I'm talking to a first novelist. And it someone whose work I have not previously known my guest on the show today is a booth wet more Beth wet more. Her book is called Valentine. It's published by Harper and it's novel. Beth. Wet more is fifty three years old and this is her first. Book, she's published many short stories in many of the best literary journals, the Kenyon, Review Colorado Review but this is her first time in hardcover. Tell me Beth what feel nights is finally see the book in hardcover. Well. It's all been a little unreal honestly. I worked on the book for a long time and I was ready to have the editor sort of wrestle out of my hands. Honestly I think if if she hadn't wrestled it out of my hands, I'd probably still be tinkering with it to tell you the truth and even now I occasionally spot a sentence or a paragraph that I think, Oh, I'd like to have a do over on that. But on the whole, it's been wonderful and surprising to me I think I. Expected The book to come out very quietly and and so it's been. Marvelous to see how many people have reacted to it in such a positive way and how meaningful it's been to some people. Yes the book has made its debut as number two when it came out on the New York Times bestseller list and it's set where Beth was born in West Texas in Odessa. Now, if you're me, you think Odessa that's near where my family come from in Russia this is Odessa in. West Texas how does it get its name? Well it depends on who you ask You know the they're part of Texas was settled pretty late in the early eighteen eighty s and depending on on what piece of local you believe it was it was named Odessa in part because of the sort of grasslands that that people said resembled the Odessa in Ukraine. And and and that's really been the most sort of certain story I've heard. No was Texas. is known for its. Economy. I'm sure most of my listeners will know this but what is an oil patch? Well. Odessa is in the Permian Basin which is about eighty, six, thousand square miles inside. So and and of course, West Texas and. is is even more vast right than the Permian basin and it's an oil and natural gas rich region of the country I read recently actually that actually until the until the pandemic, it was on pace to outpace Saudi Arabia for the biggest production in world in the next five years That's slow down and been derailed a little bit by the pandemic of course but it's so an oil patches you know a a part of the world where that is the single economy oil and natural gas. It's not a particularly pretty place in the world at least not by most people's standards I think it's beautiful. There's no other way to make a living out there other than working oil and natural gas and Odessa where I grew up on differs slightly from it sort of sister city, of Midland, which is about twenty three miles away in the sense that Odessa's a very working class town most of the people who live and work in Odessa do the. Blue collar work of the oil patch. So they work is the roughnecks and pipe lawler's and fitters and water haulers and That's still even today a pretty male dominated industry women in that part of the world tend to work in support roles as bartenders and waitresses preschool teachers, teachers, that sort of thing So that's where I grew up.

Odessa Beth West Texas Harper Ukraine Permian Basin Colorado Review Editor Valentine Lawler New York Times Midland Saudi Arabia Texas.
"literary journal" Discussed on The Complete Creative

The Complete Creative

06:33 min | 11 months ago

"literary journal" Discussed on The Complete Creative

"I think professors and teachers in writing programs. They themselves may not really know what's involved and they may feel like the students aren't there to learn business. To learn about art and technique and craft and you know. To do something that's more along the lines of a liberal arts education and then. It's up to the students later on to connect the dots in whatever way makes sense for their future. And then I think part of it is also just the mythology of writing an artist's This idea that if you bring together art and business, you're somehow staining the whole endeavour. which I don't believe it's just something that we kind of learn you don't lower yourself or lower your art and get dirty in the business side, but of course if you if you do wanNA livelihood from top to quickly get up to speed on what that requires. Absolutely people told me. That That Like most of my life would be roading books from one show to another when I was like doing this full time, I I would've planned better. I may have done some more like work at the gym or something, so that I couldn't like so that I could be prepared. That will be warehousing in storing and and stalked talking about supply chain logistics. Way More than I have any that I had any prior knowledge that would be doing before I started. Indeed. so. I think that I'm GonNa just start and kind of try and go through the section by section a little bit. And pull out some of my favorite topics, and then I saw just which I think the part one you've talked about making a living as a writer. Before. We do that though I think it would be nice. People say that I don't introduce the guests enough and let them introduce themselves and talk about their careers so i. thought before we got started with all of that. Maybe you could tell us a little bit about your journey, and then we'll get into the meat of this. Sure, so I was born under a bit of a lucky star in that, my career has been solely focused on the writing and publishing industry. When I went to school I was focused on writing and English lit courses, and all of that from the start, I did the whole. School, Newspapers School Yearbook. School Literary Journal like all of that through high school and college, and then while I was still an undergraduate I got a paid internship at a book Publishing Company. So I went straight from college into a paid publishing job, and stayed there for twelve years, and when I left, I went into a university teaching job that was teaching writers. Then I went into another publishing job, and then I went full time freelance and twenty fourteen, and so it's you know it's been of very steady methodical linear career growth, not that there weren't ups and downs that there were, but you know when you look at it altogether, most people are like wow, that's really focused and consistent. And how did you do that and? Some of it was just having a very stable life. part of it was intentional. Of course. That's just where my interest lied. Absolutely it's. It's interesting to see how no two people S- careers are the same. Some people have very linear path like yours and some people look more like They just emptied their junk drawer on career and somehow figured it out along the way. So I think the the first question of your book Can you make a living as a writer That's probably the best one to dispel I just. I really know the answer to this question, but could you talk a little bit about that, so we can get to what I think. My favorite part of part one was okay, so making a living as a writer. It's rarely about book sales I eventually it can be about book sales and more on hopes. If you're focused on writing books that you, you will reach that point, but it's pretty rare at least in early career to make a living off of sales alone, so you have to think about all of the different ways that you might be earning money as a writer and they're. So. Many different potential income streams which I imagine. We're going to touch on some of those, so I think one of the first things I tried to do in. That book is just make it clear that you know it's. It's not wise to depend on book-publishing advances, or if you're self publishing to depend on book sales at least when save only got one book or two books, even three books it takes it takes a long time to ramp up and it also takes an ability to be producing material so in other words I see. A fair number especially coming from. Let's say the MFA side of the industry people who are in these more traditional creative writing programs. They might see their favorite bestselling literary authors, producing maybe one book every three five, or even ten years and say well. They seem to be making a living and. It may appear that way. Maybe they do, but they're probably other factors they might have. an inheritance, a rich spouse They might live in a place. That doesn't have a high cost of living. You know. There are all sorts of factors that affect. At what pays you can write, and if that is going to give you a living, so I just try to be really honest about know the fact that publishers aren't often paying authors enough to write books, and then to have that you know even at a twenty thousand dollar a year level. Even that's kind of ambitious when you're starting out. Absolutely I I think about Kurt Vonnegut, being a college professor for his entire career He put out a volume amount of bucks. Yeah, yeah, and or T S Eliot being banker for his entire career. Even though people kept telling him, he should go full time as a writer. Yes, yes, day jobs are so prevalence, and of course teaching as I don't know if it's the top occupation of writers, but it's definitely very close to the top. I mean even Brandon Sanderson. Who is the most iconic living probably living fantasy author.

writer Newspapers School Yearbook School Literary Journal Kurt Vonnegut Brandon Sanderson T S Eliot professor
"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the events in his powerful Russian novel, which is both statistical lyrical and deeply philosophical all against a background at the fear and paranoia of Stalinist Russia written in secret in the nineteen thirty s at the height Stalin's purges. It was any published a quarter of a century later when it created a sensation not just in Russia. But around the world, the master and Margarita is now considered to be the most successful Russian novel of the twentieth century. Hello. I'm Bridget KENDALL. Welcome to the forum where experts shedder knowledge with us and joining me to discuss master and Margarita pizza Muncie. Aclu's the director of the Bogach of museum in Moscow. Doctor Olga Voronin from the school of savannah can east European studies university of London professor Edith harbor from the university of Massachusetts in Boston. He has widely published on Bulgakov's writings and Julie cactus, professor of Russian literature at Oxford University and one of book Arcus, first English biographies. And just very briefly to begin with Julie, tell me why do you think the master Margarita has become such a cult novel for so many people around the world well to start within Russia when it appeared. It was an extraordinary contrast with what had come before the middle part of the twentieth century hit the scene socialist realism the official doctrine of Russian literature. Production novels boy meets tractor. While the dismal texts and suddenly this novel appeared which had been hidden for decades. And it was exuberant. It was funny talked to that the devil. It talked about literature talked about the theater it defied all the conventions associates realism and worldwide too. I think people just warms to a text, which is extremely inventive. And is not like any other text in any other literature. It's really original piece of writing. And do you think the fact that he was written in secret and hidden for decades was also reason that people were drawn to it? I think it was an aspect. But I think it's only part of the story. I think it was the fact that it was so different as Julie just said from what was published before that all of this was something so new for the Soviet reader at the time that I think this was what really caused a sensation an order in contemporary Russia, which is not 'cause pace Soviet Russia is still resonates. Yes. Absolutely. The Meister Margaritas often described as the nation's favourite novel. And I think that's one of the reasons for this is that it's really captures the essence of Soviet society. There are many aspects of that society that Bulgakov describes such as bureaucracy the importance of documents distrust of the police that's more than readers investor would still recognized today. But beyond that it also asks her universally important timeless questions and does it in such a unique way. What is the nature of good and evil water? The mall indications of our choices and Peter York joining us from Moscow, which is where the book is set in your museum is based in the apartment where actually the devil is said to her stay joining his visit the city in the novel. Would you say that the Moscow the novel still alive today? Yes. The Bulgakov museum is situated by the patriarch pawns the little square with bond in central surrounded by trees and old buildings where everything starts in the novel where the dental appears for the first time this place looks the same. I think has in Bulgakov's time, and it is a miracle for Moscow, which was actually destroyed in stunning time when his master plan of three building Moscow was realized. Well, as you've been hearing picture puns is the place where on a hot spring evening in a leafy part of central Moscow. The novel begins Nash devious memorial trust new violence, Zhukova Sakata Moskovia. The one hautes bring evening just as the sun was going down to men appeared at Petra palms in Moscow. Barriers and editor of a Soviet literary journal is telling off a young patch called Yvonne for an anti religious poem. He's written about Jesus Christ. Not because it's offensive about Christ. But because the pain and plies that Jesus existed which was unacceptable in atheist Soviet Russia. Just sketching for those who don't know about this. Why atheism was being pursued save vigorously in Soviet Russia in the nineteen thirties? Most people know Russia was a communist the Soviet Union said a communist country, and one of the basic tenants was anti religious the famous saying of Karl Marx founder of communism. That religion is the opium of the people that it prevented people from acting here and now because they expected reward and the other life. So there was a very strong anti religious campaign starting right after the foundation of the Soviet Union. So Julie for a Soviet reader from the very. Very first the very opening paragraphs of this novel. It's kind of playing with quite a political idea. Absolutely seemed extraordinary. It also alludes to the fact that by the time the novel is being written literature is being controlled by the state through the writers union, and that's parodied in the novel bond organization called muscle it. And then on top of that does this rather startling discussion which demonstrates that Christ did or didn't exist even that very subject with something that hasn't been discussed for years in rush nature will indeed and soon a mysterious stranger arrives who interrupts the conversation. But she in the two men, I'm challenges barriers statements about Jesus Oga, tell us he says, and how does he go about discrediting belly is atheist ideas? So this mysterious person we eventually find out is called Roland and bullets is Bulgakov's Satan. He is a figure who is meant to be recognized by the readers, but not. By the poets and the editor because they do not believe in the existence of the supernatural to them as as an eccentric foreigner who speaks Russian with an accent and has quite an unusual appearance. So we learned that he has different colored eyes and crooked mouth, for example. And he points out to billionaires who is an atheist, and who very much believes that it is man rather than God who controls man's life that this cannot be true because man is not one immortal, but unexpected immortal, and he reveals to the circumstances of his impending death and presents that as a demonstration of the existence of the supernatural as a demonstration of the existence of the devil. And that for him also serves as a proof of the existence of God and before long world Bellas ends in a horrible death. When he's run over by Trump. He slips and falls on the tram and he his head this cut off. Surely, we can sense here. Their religious themes going on. It's also quite satirical. But what inspired Bulgakov's interest in this religious thing? How did it come about as a subject? His novel. Pocock was brought up in fact in Kiev in Ukraine in a family where both his mother and his father had descended from priests and his father was a lecturer in comparative religion at the key of the logical academy. And so this was something that will gawk of of obscene knew a lot about then as young man as many people do in particular out, the death of his father. He lost his faith. Apparently, he became a doctor didn't the doctor say he had a scientific background is very much on the impact of Darwin's ideas and all the new scientific challenges that were being presented to Christian faith faith in general. But then I think he's a pooled in the aftermath of the revolution. When the state imposes this aggressive, atheism. And of course, it it was very brutal churches were closed down in us. Used for other purposes, priests were shot, it was forbidden to practice your religion. And he was outraged by the crass destruction philistine destruction of all these values of the past which comprise the framework for our debates about good and evil. Well, it turns out that the devils mission is to make a study at the citizens of nineteen thirty s atheist Moscow. And he concludes the best way to observe them is to gather them together to watch a black magic show, which she performs with the aid of his demonic retinue, a big black talking catch find man with flaming red hair and acquire master in a very loud. Check suit to the audience is consternation. The tricks performed defy any rational explanation. One point that compares head is temporarily decapitated and then ten ruble notes. Start falling from the ceiling of the theater and a thick rain of money. First merriment, and then astonishment swept the theater, it was all buzz with the words. Ten ruble notes. Ten ruble, notes and happy laughter was heard and shouts of. Some people were already crawling in the aisles looking under the seats and many were standing on top of their seats. Trying to catch the capriciously twirling bills. So what's Bugaku intention? Had surely what uncomfortable truths is the devil revealing about citizens of Moscow. Well, essentially, what is addressing is the fact that according to Leninist ideology, the justification for the revolution was that. You would change the material circumstances in which people lived, and you would produce a new kind of man, and you kind of society, which is sometimes mockingly called homo soviet-us and all the statistical writers of the nineteen twenties and Bulgakov foremost amongst them kept pointing out that actually human nature doesn't change and that even though people living under Soviet system. They can still be tempted by pretty clothes such as an offer to the women in the audience to exchange what they're wearing for designer dresses from Paris, which then turned into nothing at all. And the left running around in their underwear in the streets to them. Great embarrassment that people still want money that people are greedy that people. Tell lies and has fallen concludes when he looks at the audience at the end of that show. He says we'll just people like hopefully, people nothing has really changed. A needless to say the devil's money raining down on the theater audience will say turns out to be fake. So when the devil comes to town chaos. Rules, one manager becomes an empty talking suit. And the rather distress staff at the entertainments office find themselves singing an old Russian fix song. I'm able to stop. They finished the second verse they went.

Moscow Bulgakov Soviet Russia Russia Julie cactus Bulgakov museum Soviet Union Bridget KENDALL Margarita editor Soviet literary journal Aclu Doctor Olga Voronin Muncie Oxford University Bogach of museum professor official Boston
"literary journal" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"Yup. Jewish experiences bell. Yup. Yup. The literary journal which published this poem received threatening letters threatening phone calls when they publish it. So what was this literary journal? I'm just wondering if they're kind of like, no, this is a group home in like, we don't believe in censoring ought controversial deserves to be published or it will like click late. Yeah. Yeah. I go out. I'm not sure that could be poets Zelda often to this point was a friend of Janas said when I saw you on his poem. I thought that I wished I would did hauling this you break off into with Yana, and she refused to have published alongside Janas ever. Again. The deputy minister of education Mariam tussock Leiva described you on as quite simply disturbed and an animal in heat. So went to this point, you wanna had been pretty well known in poetic cycles, but she wasn't as poems generally onto US generally known by the dental populace often Miriam has a glaze on made these comments it brought you on into the public high as having been denounced by the deputy minister education, and she became a household name. Okay. So we've mentioned that she has a bunch of of sexual homes that we read the story, but the sober one is fall as shocking and provocative than to fill. You do you feel like distributors more indicative of like a general? She does from another series of calls, which she published. You're too often to the same time to publish the store. We wanted to United story want. I've been when you come to live with me. She thought a whole series that argument with when you come to live with me. We'll when you come to sleep with me, I'm not talking about two different translations slightly different sentences. But it's part of a series. Strawberry. Juan is definitely the most palatable. Maybe it's the way Senate of the ones when you come to lie with me come like, a policeman on is calm like John. Come like, my father and one is come like God. Yeah. Because there are four of them in this soil much in the mind is like we just don't have space. Okay. That's certainly more like fodder for people willing to find out about feelings about male authority figures in a sexual go. Tell. I Addy and the policemen. One is definitely also sat as a kiss take. The God one is obviously also United slightly about really about relief. This is a lot happening. Okay. So put them on the blog. So you're not obviously, ROY this poem knowing the reactions she would get. Yeah. And she didn't turn down or anything in response. She doesn't seem like she would not. So the following in nineteen eighty three. She dies in the magazine monitoring boy series of graphs, which were inspired by. Oh. In which she fully closed appears alongside model a male model who is nude except full to that sounds like it could be like quite tastefully, dawn finace, please do show me..

US Janas dawn finace Yana Juan Zelda Senate Miriam ROY John
"literary journal" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on KCRW

"Sexton's poetry is like blood on the page the most intimate kind of writing about, depression and death, motherhood and sex religion and family. She won the Pulitzer prize in nineteen sixty seven and had a prolific but tragically short career, she took her own life at the age of forty six now to poetry hunters. That's right. That's the thing have discovered more of her works. Previously, unknown works that show how she became one of the pioneers of confessional poetry to call exactly Turpin of the university of Idaho. And errand singer from Louisiana tech are the scholars who found the four poems along with an essay. And Aaron singer joins me. Now. She's an assistant professor of English at Louisiana tech university. Welcome thanks for having me. So you found these works along with your colleague Zachary Turpin, and one was the moment that you realized oh, no one seen these before. Well, back look at them and said, you know, these look like Sexton, but they don't look like the section I've read so even from the beginning, we had a very. Clear idea that we might have found something special here. So the next step to reach out to other more established Sexton scholars who hadn't seen them. And that was when we got really excited named put us in touch with her daughter and literary executor, Linda, gray Sexton who also said I have never seen these either. So Anne Sexton as we've said is one of the poets really introduced the idea of confessional poetry poetry. That's personal so much about the I how do these poems fit into that emerging style? While I think one of my favorite things about Sexton is how she kind of emerges almost fully formed. Right. So she she wasn't a childhood poetry writer. You know, before she even started taking a poetry class where she's writing for therapy twelve years after that, she's winning the Pulitzer prize for poetry poem show is yes for development, but also very much her initial poetic power in nineteen fifty seven. She presents her mother with a sort of homemade book of. And she says this was the first year of an Sexton poet, and that's before she even starts publishing very shortly after it has a a meteoric rise to fame. So I guess I'd like to know what these poems are about and something that really moved. You can you give us an example in some ways there? Almost a young person some of them. The thing that I really like is her gestures towards imaging metaphor that really shaped her whole career. So there's this line that particularly moves me say, I am the air. I break or say, I am unwinding. I am the school that unwound while riding this guy down. And I just think that's incredibly beautiful and evocative Aaron singer. She's an assistant professor of English at Louisiana tech. You can see those poems in the next issue of the fugu literary journal of the university of Idaho. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me. You're listening to weekend addition from NPR news..

Sexton assistant professor Louisiana tech university Anne Sexton Pulitzer prize Zachary Turpin Aaron singer university of Idaho gray Sexton writer fugu literary journal NPR twelve years
"literary journal" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I'm Nora mcenery. Terrible. Thanks for asking. We got this message from Rachel, the one that you just heard and we were like, yes, good point. How do you communicate the OCD brain to someone who doesn't have OCD? How do you get people? People consider like all of us who liked to say, I'm so. After we like organize our spice door to try to understand what those three words feel like to actually live because it is a hard thing to understand and not just for you. It's a hard thing to understand for us. It's a hard thing to understand for Rachel even and she's the one living. It. The minute I wake up my brain says to me what if it's today, what if they died today? What if they die today? And so I don't like to take them places all in one fecal. I'm freaked out for my daughter to join my older two kids at school. Sounds so dumb. It sounds so dumb. I know it's dumb. I know how dome it is. I know this fear isn't logical. But you can't use logic with an OCD brain. I think a lot about hidden illnesses. The ones that you can't see if it's not obvious for me, calling it a hidden illness, you know, you can't see him. Mental health often falls into that category and CD also within mental health falls into that category. And those of us who don't have OCD we do talk about a casualty and we kind of -ssume that OCD is just people who love cleaning or who closed the door too often or who just worry too much. I would love to come talk to you and be honest. But what it's like living with OCD. Humility time. A lot of our best ideas here at TI come from you specifically you. I don't know if you're the terms and conditions of downloading this podcast, but granted me access to your thoughts, feelings, and emails. You're all fascinating, but this is an idea that came from you or one of you. Rachel did not come into the studio for this episode. Instead after we got her message, we reached out and we had her a few other volunteers, people who have OCD share what one day in the life of their OCD is like, we all agreed on a day and these three people each turn on their phones and shared what was happening with their OCD throughout the day. So this episode is Rachel's experience believe I'm saying this out loud because I worry about. People not understanding what this is. And this episode is Alex is experience. My name is Alex. I'm twenty seven years old. And I'm currently short story format editor for a literary journal, and this episode is Teresa's experience. Or a day of their experience. One day in August of.

OCD Rachel Nora mcenery Alex editor Teresa twenty seven years One day one day
"literary journal" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"The impromptu imprimatur of auspicious literary journals can't we just say, look, if you've got something you want to say, set up a WordPress, knock yourself out, and it's not going in my magazine. I think that would be potentially even more dangerous because then you're opening the door to all sorts of Breitbart style rabbit holes, me information. What we do need to do is make sure that we have an open conversation about all of visit. The only way we're going to stop sexual predatory behavior in the in the future is by working out where that sexually predatory behavior comes from. We've got to understand the root causes of an old otherwise, how we ever going to stop it from happening in the first place. It makes us all feel uncomfortable. No one likes much people don't like the idea of sexual assault, but it doesn't matter if it's uncomfortable. You've got to understand it. Otherwise you're ignoring it and it absolutely will happen again. This may to move in doesn't mean sexual assault is now finish Deng with its. It's gone, of course, just means that people are going to come forward about a mold, but what are we going to do about that current? Do we learn anything from this pace beyond the fact that this man acted like entitle jerk when he thought he could get away with? It turned out that he couldn't. He got his come up and good. That's the way the world supposed to work. It's it's. It's actually it's actually more of a horror story than I mean, when you read this, this piece it just and if you've ever been on any of the dating apps, this is sort of the sort of what you run into. I thought it was a fascinating insight into someone who actually became a referee's reprehensible person quite reprehensible in his own attitude to himself and also seeing the the women he was with as as totems. And in the PC says, he got a text from somebody who is a colleague. The never spoke to him before it's it said sewing with really young woman and said, you're the king, and that was kind of the selling point. And I thought there have been times when I've been out and I've been with a good looking guy and I'm thinking, yeah, I'm the king, but I would never sort of base my whole career on that. I would never get my identity from that. And I think it's interesting to see how fragile he was. It doesn't mean that we should be on his side. But I think it's an interesting look into that kind of personality from did you? Did you see the fragility plea that he was making there? Were you over well-made with sympathy for remote? Well, not with sympathy for sure, but I have to say, I thought it was an interesting piece no to to see what's on his mind in a way. But again, if you are the editor of a magazine, I have to say disclaimer heaven, the opinion of the New York review of books about him in a way, I would allow his opinion to be a magazine, but you know, we've my detoro. I don't know if I have an opinion piece of myself just to give clarity to my readers as well. I also thank you for your. I also think that he took a chance. This is an inflammatory piece, really. It's to sending really close to the wind in Baramula exact he. He would've known any backlash was coming exactly, but unfortunately it smacked him in the face. I mean, we should look just quickly before we move on Ben at at the backlash itself. D d does commissioning. This. Piece and I guess, therefore, inflaming opinion to that extent count as a resigning issue or not. Yeah, in the case of this, yes, because the outrage was just too severe, but the he could have preempted that outrage by taking certain steps and maybe maybe thinking about this from a different perspective. I mean, look, the idea at the moment is that the conversation about sexual assault has has obviously been happening in completely different bubbles..

assault Ben Breitbart Baramula Deng New York review editor
"literary journal" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Changing spiderweb of of people saying things in realizing, Ooh, I. Just spoke like a dinosaur. Someone voice because at the moment it's all been about politicians and how politically this is going to be playing out. But we've got to remember that this is coming in the context of all of this me too backstory. So that is playing into all of this. The Republicans already know that if they play these incorrectly, just imagine the backlash, it's going to ignite. They don't even know how deep the backlash to Donald Trump's election is running within their electorate yet they still still no telling them pulling data, but that's about it. The midterms are only a few weeks away terrified. Well, indeed, Yudhoyono rebel six or seven weeks from finding out how big that backlash is or indeed if it exists falente Trump's tweet earlier today, actually not even implicitly actually explicitly suggesting they can't be anything to these allegations because otherwise she would have reported at the time even by his standards, a completely appalling thing to say out loud it would you would hope be career ending for literally any other. Titian how does he continue to get away with it? Well, I dunno, Andrew, but the thing is I don't think it's actually only Trump. I think we have a kind of new genre of populists around the world. And we have many examples who have the Tareyton the Philippines, perhaps both our in Brazil have Madero. I do think those leaders, if they tweet what Trump said, probably nothing would happen to Dan is, oh, I think that's, that's quite sad. You know that they kind of have so much power that they Kim basically say whatever they want, and they know they'll be no. Strong actions. I mean, I is very for say that perhaps just Trump, but there's so many other examples. I think it's something that is praising globally in a way encour- annoy return. What my bleak assessment of these things has come round to the point of, I used to think that maybe people like Trump and other populists of belligerent populist of the salt that phenomena mentions despite there will be as flaws in stupidities. I'm now starting to think it may actually be because of them does that Trump's Trump's Trump's finds read something like this, this obviously crossing the pulling thing he said about, you know, a woman alleging sexual assault and they think great. He's my going well, he is endlessly amusing and this Lee, I think he's been in so much. I rolling in my country or around the world. In fact, since Hitler probably on the actually we can't even I roll fairly. That was just a horrible. But this is just incredibly the stupidity level. Is astonishing. And yet you meet people like for example l. balden we'll say that he doesn't want you wanna play him on l. anymore because he's feeling it's, you know, it's agonizing and then you, you talk to people who know Trump and saying, we sister nice guy, you know. But that's if you know somebody on a personal level, of course, they're going to be nice to you. I mean, and I think we can talk about detective jumping jumping the gun here a little bit, but you know the Murphy Brown with with the we'll talk about later about Trump and Moonves is that we say his name, invest invest. I mean, it's it's exactly the same sort of thing with Leslie Moonves at CBS. The currently ousted former chief of CBS. Everyone jumped to his defense and said, if you know him personally, he is a lovely guy that you know people who are lovely to you in person can actually do terrible, terrible things in other contexts, but just to return more more specifically to your point, Andrew, how can Trump say something like this on Twitter and it not be career ending? Let's remember that. In before Trump. It was usually quite a big deal. If the president, all the prime minister of your country told an outright lie. If they were caught out in a line that was like, you know, it was the near the top of the evening news that that evening at last count four and a half thousand lies that Donald Trump the press while he's president has told. So there is a context here he's created. He's own context that that's what he does. That's the secret to his success. We'll own dissimilar theme looks Luke. Now, this wakes up evils at the New York review of books, the editor of the venerable literary journal and Baramulla.

falente Trump Trump Andrew Leslie Moonves CBS New York review Yudhoyono Kim Baramulla Luke Hitler Murphy Brown Madero Philippines stupidities Twitter Dan assault Brazil editor
"literary journal" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"She's. So you to have all the power now. No, not all of it. There's other. There's other student editors. Yeah. So and we're seeing editors as well. And then we have our faculty adviser Heather winter. And then we also have another faculty adviser okay now Kim here was forced to join tricks. Yes, why you're? Faculty adviser, would you be surprised if you found out, but so was I? Yeah. Not to graduate. You're not gonna. Your life is going to be ruined. The fact that you liked the power or you like to write I actually didn't really know what trickster was or what a literary journal was. And so I was a student of Heather I was actually a student when I was like the age of the guys that were on a while ago upward bound, I was taking dual credit classes when I was in high school. And that's when I first met Heather taking my English, my core, English, classes and. So the second year that I was taking it. She was like, hey, you should join this. And I was like, oh, okay. What is it? And she was like you should just join like, okay. So it was a class. Yeah. So I was kind of hesitant president bailing. I know. I was hesitant. Because I didn't really know what it was. I didn't know what a literary journal was. But you're still doing it. But I'm still doing it. He likes the like Phyllis traitor. He likes to read the experiences of people here. Right. I'm definitely a reader. And I think that's what kind of hooked on your favorite form in here. A poetry is a screenplays short stories. Would you like to read? I definitely like the short stories sometimes the poetry confuses me. But I like that too. It's it's really neat. Just getting to read from all of these different people in the community and all over New Mexico. Really does the trickster faculty adviser? Would you like to join trickster? I'm going to be a member of trickster here before I'm allowed to leave. It's it's slick. It's nice is well done. Apparently, you're doing something, right? Hasn't wanna work? Do you enter it in we haven't? We haven't such thing as the word for literary. Yes, there are there are awards for undergraduate literary journals, which I haven't kept up the up to date. Care. You just want to put out a good product. It is a very very wonderful process. But it's also super time consuming. And ready to give it up. No, no, no, no. It's actually really fun. But it's it's work. I I wanted to do it. I'm the one that. So my name is winter, and I teach English and humanities here at northern New Mexico college. And I myself a poet. And so I went through creative writing programs, and of course. I was lonely for a literary magazine here because we did not have one. And so I I whenever I see talented students who liked to read unlike to right, I do snag them. And I do twist their arms, and I do try to get them to join us all the pressure points. I do, but we have also been really lucky this last year because president Bailey got us a grant from lanell, and we were able at all of us student editors were able to go together to the Tucson book festival, which was really fun and a great place for them to see. These are all the literary journals and book stands. And we'll take a timeout here. We'll come back and find out we have one young lady who is looking at it or watch like where do I get in here? So she do the entire next segment, and I want to find out how did you fare? How do you guys think you fared when you went to Tucson just looking at other people's journals is yours? Good is yours up to snuff. It's been around. I think the oldest one I have here. Twenty fourteen is at the first one. All right. We'll be back. We'll find out more about the trickster literary journal crew up Lupe salads are four o'clock for.

Heather New Mexico president Heather winter Tucson literary magazine Bailey Heather I Kim Phyllis lanell
"literary journal" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on What's Good Games

"To get video game abominations they have quite a few different rewards here's so if you guys are interested in some of the really unique art and writing their over there so thank you so much for sponsoring the show do it we're going to get into some news cyber have you recovered from champaign we ask oh yes so what happened with spilt the champagne but the prob spilt spilled she was grooming herself like a cat like i literally just glance over and she's like looking trying to liquor elbow lexa tolls data we don't have any napkins here we we really don't it's one of those shows rear form we go okay so we were talking a little bit about this before we started recording but some news that have an early this week valve but a development studio and they're they're going to be actually publishing a game lease gentleman what so the folks at capo santos the team behind fire watch have written a statement the twelve of us a couple of us have agreed to join valve where we will maintain our jobs is video game developers and continue production on our current project in the valley of the gods if you're the type of person who gives to flips about this news we can elaborate a little bit more on this big decision i we really like making video games for the more perhaps more accurately we really like making producing entertainment from the day to day production of our last game fire watch the way we run the company make merchandise meet players at expos and show senator quarterly literary journal they're open to the public games on the middle of artificial force all of it's geared toward surprising delighting in entertaining the customers have shared in our success speak this files like some auction near.

champaign capo santos senator
"literary journal" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"And we're also brought to you by marvel puzzle quest in me undies but i'll tell you about that later for now let's begin the show with what is and forever will be the rope report time for some news pray for kevin xiv four items on the rope report bankers doesn't signed you kevin one of the biggest stories that broke over the weekend this valve his bought campo santo developers of fire watch did not see this coming either let's read the capable santo letter to you the twelve of us at campo santo have agreed to join valve where we will maintain our jobs as video game developers and continue production on our current project in the valley of god's trying to quietly put my phone if the type of person who gives to flips about this news we can elaborate a little bit on this big decision i we really like making video games furthermore perhaps more accurately we really like making producing entertainment from the day to day production of our last game fire watch to the way we run the company make merchandise meet players expos an shows send out according quarterly literary journal journal jeez throw open to the public game demos in the middle of an artificial forest all of it is geared toward surprising delighting in entertaining our customers who have shared in our success in valve we found a group of folks who to their core feel the same way about the work that they do this you may be surprised to learn doesn't happen every single everyday in us they found a group of unique a unique experience invaluable.

kevin xiv campo santo santo literary journal journal
"literary journal" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Could go to cvs couchbase studies they called it the coloring book school you know so but i got into a smaller liberal arts college for again that was a little more lenient i was very good at it the okay schools if you had the money would let your troublemaking middleclass kit in curry college i went to that's where he started and then you freshman year hurry and i was i was really hyper applied myself to it in got out of there with three five three seven and was able to transfer into the regular bu i don't know why hung up on bu but i was in the arts on there what was your major rethinking about why it sort of kind of pulled it all together towards the end you know i did a lot of things you know it'd be you i i majored alternately in english literature with a concentration on romantic literature but like i really the the focus classes to the year i had to do study the romantics i you know i was sobat our for me it was like nine in the morning for the whole year as drinking and doing things you know being in plays and stuff but throughout college i was able i did a film criticism minor so as pretty well rounded i bailed on my language requirement i took some sort of more on tests so i didn't have to study french i just couldn't deal with their certain things that just can't wrap my brain chemistry algebra languages you know i did plays i wrote plays i was you know in stage troupe which was the non theater school play i did several plays with them i wrote for the college paper music reviews film reviews stuff like that i was editor of the literary journal one year i don't think i did a great job i was published as a poet in that for two or three years i did comedy for the first time in college inlet way i think i did some sort of town show initially but then later on i hosted thing but it was after my sophomore year or maybe in my sophomore i can't remember exactly the time i was i became.

editor three years one year
"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The next year papa dopoulos these arrested and cooperating with federal investigators i'm ari shapiro how george papadopoulos fits into the russian investigation this afternoon on all things considered from npr news weekdays starting at four on wnyc the man two thousand thirteen a first generation yemeni american named mokhtar akon chile was carrying a business playing around with them nearly every way round wasn't picked up instead it was all laid out on a rolled up he's paper the kind you'd see in an easel and it's spelled out his plan to start importing coffee from yemen at the time that country was no more for religious extremism than coffee farming and a friend called all consciously as initial plan the ghettoised business plan i've ever seen but his unlikely journey to become a coffee importer against all odds is the subject of the monk of mocha a new book by dave eggers road of agar's he's the author of the bestselling memoir heartbreaking work of staggering genius as well as numerous other books of fiction and nonfiction he is also the founder of the literary journal mcsweeney is the monk of mocha is published by alfred a knopf and i am so pleased it brings dave eggers and motor arcand shali the to our studio welcome thank you thank you so much for having us okay how did you guys meats we met uh through mutual friend uh the play rate uh widjaja the he probably obscene is work around he's a commentator and uh media personality and uh and we were all living in the bay and um so it's not such a big community and we we worked on have failed project together the three of us a long time ago in at that time mohktar was working as a doorman slash lobby ambassador at the nausea infinity residential towers downtown san francisco and um and couple of years later watch a high wrote to me said hey you hear what happened to mokhtar end and i'd known about the yemenis and yemeni americans got stuck during the.

papa dopoulos akon chile yemen dave eggers agar founder san francisco ari shapiro george papadopoulos npr
"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And she's wearing a white sort of suit and big swiss day fred backus seeing how terry these people come the cult chevy praying is gusting better rubber and we're just fascinated the photograph because right there in the front all of us may release single that at wrote on nonmilid jackson and that's my story that was mukoni gunned live at the monstrous land in london mazzone says that her father never discovered the truth about the concert and she said that she didn't see the newspaper article and photo she was to intent on destroying the evidence i spend a little time looking forward maybe someone out there are confined it let us know and will add the photo at them off dot org makoni says the year was nineteen seventy seven and the paper was either nation or standard when she's not scaling walls as a million jackson fan massoni garland is an author she published over forty books for children to novellas for adults and several stories and literary journal's if hanratty he's and then she added rather than the mall next up we visit a story slam in pittsburgh where we partner with public radio station wefa this is a story that might illustrate why parents worry so much it's a dangerous world out there quick warning the story involves a predatory individual here's joann fear correct if you live in pittsburgh you know the north side and yeah if you know the north side you're probably familiar with the garden theater when i was little my big brother used to take me to the garden theater on saturday mornings they showed one hundred one cartoons on saturday mornings i'm i'm old in and when i was a little older that's where i saw my first clint eastwood film uh fistful dollars but by the time i was a teenager the garden theater was a porn joint and about that time was our neighborhood was kind of being dissect it to to make room for to seventy nine north and in and out of high school i worked at allegheny general hospital which is down there by the garden theater and i used to walk home on north avenue turn onto my street walk home move the long.

nonmilid jackson mazzone massoni garland literary journal pittsburgh partner allegheny general hospital fred backus terry dot joann clint eastwood
"literary journal" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on KPCC

"Either nation or standard when she's not scaling walls as a newly jackson's han massoni garland is an author she's published over forty books for children to novellas for adults and several stories in literary journal's if the in spain at the moment next up we visit a story slam in pittsburgh where we partner with public radio station wefa this is a story that might illustrate why parents worry so much it's a dangerous world out there quick warning the story involves a predatory individual here's joann fina ricki if you live in pittsburgh you know the north side and yeah if you know the north side you're probably familiar with the garden theater when i was little my big brother used to take me to the garden theater on saturday mornings they showed one hundred one cartoons on saturday mornings i'm i'm old and and when i was a little older that's where i saw my first clint eastwood film fistfull dollars but by the time i was a teenager the garden theater was a porn joint and about that time was our neighborhood was kind of being dissect it to to make room for to seventy nine north and in and out of high school i worked at allegheny general hospital which is down there by the garden theater and i used to walk home on north avenue turn onto my street walk home for.

literary journal pittsburgh partner allegheny general hospital spain clint eastwood
"literary journal" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In the body before a friend came in retrieved him it does seem as though seeing caroline's decaying body helps griswold to finally process her death to a point that he could move on he wrote of the experience quote in all this i know i have acted against reason but as i look back upon it it seems that i have been influenced by some power too strong to be opposed the same account continues quote i go forth today a changed man i realized that links that she is dead i turn my gaze from the past to the future and roofers griswold still had two daughters to provide for so he venture li he went back to his work his turn at the philadelphia daily standard marks griswold transition into literary krizan criticism and that's something that he would actually do for the rest of his life in 1840 to griswold became assistant editor on grams bags zine after the post was left by his predecessor po griswold state of the job for a year her and he ended up leaving the position as his animosity between him and perot started to escalate a new review of the poets and poetry of america had appeared in the philadelphiabased literary journal saturday museum and it was scathing griswold believed po had written it although it was in fact one of post friends this caused ongoing friction between the two men until it finally reached this point we're griswold wanted to get some distance from his rival these he'd 40s though did end up being really quite productive for griswold in something of a surprising twist giving his ventures in publishing novels in brother jonathan without permission griswold along with a number of other figures from his literary circles started the american copyright club which is designed to promote copyright law and the protection of creators from doing exactly the sorts of things that he had been doing just a few years earlier he also continued to publish anthology.

caroline editor perot griswold jonathan copyright law philadelphia america
"literary journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"literary journal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can be beautiful because these letters or so exclusively beautiful and more than beauty there can be meaning which club the remains beauty but it in one of the first letters add between posture not comes with high of a he raced heard that he's going to send her some passengers from an article that he'd written a few years before and he didn't for literary journal and that articles called a few principles in a was a kind of manifesto for art and ended he talks about how traditionally are is conceived of as a found kind of you know flowing ouch but it should be thought of as a sponge joking and and then constantly absorbing and he writes this our missed always remain among the spectators and see things more clearly more true elite more perspective we've had the others but in our data has resorted to using face pattern dressing rooms and displaying itself on the stage and it struck me that you know you read this one year fifteen this past saves the part about our being always among the spectators always absorbing almost like a true no manifesto for performance aren't in a way and wondered bats if you found something of that and about that it was just significant this was also just to me you know first to fall i've slot make and every come from deuce are you know kind of drama we just stole and the he's the i'm not he still suffering from depression because the pressure is disease and could be treated the tweet the suffering from the suffering from for the universal chandler leads from this every point she had the ball can also those three have skate and the money of an of deployed through the music and i think have to try and this it's like what really touching a looked morse my work i mean just this the frank into she had his role to feast assault case and his say overall who actually kosar that is unbelievable that actually in every artist already come have the same see developing was on life of his on and which is incredible you have to break the most in your life which is so important for everybody that's the main whatever you're doing you have signs in your life about your destiny and this is what can eventually take shy slot a concussion so clear you know that kind of this thuney to prepare when you shouldn't something which i think is so important to falling.

literary journal assault one year