18 Burst results for "Literary Editor"

Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

This Day in History Class

03:08 min | 1 year ago

Jessie Redmon Fauset - Editor, Journalist, Poet, Author

"Day was April twenty-seventh eighteen eighty two Ryder Jesse. Redmond FO- set was born in Camden New Jersey. Fo- set was the literary editor of the Journal the crisis and an important figure in the Harlem Renaissance Jesse was the seventh child. Born to Redmond any faux set her mother died soon after she was born her father then moved to Philadelphia and married Bella Huff who had three of her own children together. Redmond and Bella had three more children Jesse graduated with honors from Philadelphia. High School for Girls Jesse got a scholarship to Cornell University where she majored in classical languages. She graduated from the University in Nineteen O Five. Because she was blacklisted he philadelphia would not hire her to teach in the public school system so she taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore for a year then she moved to Washington. Dc to teach French Latin at a high school for fourteen years before set began to write for the NWC PS magazine the crisis in nineteen twelve the ACP or the National Association for the Advancement of colored people is a civil rights organization that was formed in nineteen o nine and nineteen ten. The crisis was founded with W E B Two boys as the editor and Co founder published several short stories poems articles and book reviews in the crisis before she became literary editor of the Journal in Nineteen Nineteen. She moved to New York to take the position. And until nineteen twenty six. She took over a lot of do voices work at the crisis during her time there. She lectured in traveled around the

Literary Editor Journal In Nineteen Philadelphia Redmond High School Bella Huff Douglass High School Cornell University Camden New Jersey Harlem ACP DC Editor New York Baltimore Washington W E B Two Co Founder
"literary editor" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Probably I'm sure if that person is listening, please please let us I would love that list. I mean, and like hallmark and particulars beary bad are bad or good putting on how you look at it at hiring the same people every year to do these movies like lacy Shebir of mean, girls fame has been in so many all Bart ruby. Yes. And Candice Cameron beret who played DJ on full house. Oh, she is in a lot of them. Well, yes. I didn't know that was her name. I yeah. The the men actually get cycled through a lot more than the women like you'll see like one actor in like two or three movies, but not any of the level of lacy Shebir. She's the number one. I think so. As an actor. I know the dream is to get one successful holiday movie 'cause they play it every year. And so you'll at least have that that you can depend on good for them. I know I'm like, I probably is a very sweet job where you're like. I'm gonna go make these Christmas movies guys. I'll be back and you'll you'll see me again next year. So more power to them another true that I found a lot when I was researching this is the workaholic Grinch. Yes, there's a very good example of this in a movie called it's Christmas, Carol like with a comma. Oh, yes. And she is a book editor high powered and her former boss who is actually played by the late great Carrie Fisher. And she then comes back as all three of the ghosts. And she has to learn work, isn't everything. And you know, she goes to the funeral for self. And no one's there. And all of these things the part that made me almost lose by mind is that this incredibly knowledgeable book editor had to Google the basic plot of a Christmas, Carol. Oh, yes. About that. Just like the audience would know and just like if you're watching this movie, you're probably familiar and be expect me to believe a literary editor doesn't know one of the most famous stories. And so I was just like, okay. You got some points for Carrie Fisher. But I think you just lost them. That's a pretty big misstep. Yeah. There's a couple of other variations on the workaho. Alec grinches that often show up in these movies, and one of them is that there's a Christmas themed business like they make gingerbread or you know, they make plastic candy canes like various strange Christmas related items and this businesses in trouble, and it's pretty much the source of jobs for the entire town. So if they lose this business like the town is going to die. And then normally the head of the company is a man who's trying to preserve his family's legacy. Not not exclusively men, but I felt like that happens more often than women being in charge of these companies. And then a woman who is either work Hollick from a different company. That's like interested in buying this one out or taking it over comes in. And then. You know, she saves the company at the end. Of course, they fall in love and run this company together. But then there's also different female archea it with the same like workaholic company man, and that's just someone who loves Christmas so much and she can't lose this this part of Christmas, and it's been in her childhood. And for some reason this love of Christmas seems to magically give her powers to say businesses like she comes up with the idea that's going to save everything. Even though like these people have been running the company for generations couldn't think of it. And so, you know, she comes with an innovative idea and all it's all well by Christmas. Normally, they have a Christmas Eve or day like deadline like we have to show that we can save the business because of course, that's when people do the most business of the year. And there's also. A different archetype where there's typically female character who's working really hard at a job. That's not her passion. So she could be like an interior designer. But she actually really loves designing stage productions as in a Christmas kiss. And then she's working so hard at this job..

Carrie Fisher lacy Shebir Carol editor Hollick Candice Cameron literary editor Google Alec grinches
"literary editor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

19:31 min | 2 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Him as a person because you saw his wife there as you say it was called Billy at the time. And his son Philip, but he had a lady friend. I don't mean car a mistress or whatever. Tell us that story and more about this person and money. I mean, you talk about his drinking is smoking. Things like that. Wendell when he reached a New York to to run Commonwealth in southern. Soon found very attractive. Woman named van Doren. She had been Carl van Doren wife. They divorced about nineteen thirty nine. And I think it was a it was a cocktail party that Sinclair Lewis and Dorothy Thompson through most famous the most famous couple in America at that time. And he saw he met her it eater. At that point. It's not politics that animates Wendell. It's it's being able to be rather cosmopolitan to be well read to talk about history and culture and soon he was reviewing books in the Herald Tribune as Rita van Doren was the editor. They literary editor of the Herald Tribune's famous book book. Page. And those reviews were really luminous. They were just so informed and sprightly. I assumed that Rita had everything to do with panache of those reviews. But she also was not just someone who was interested in culture. She was interested in politics and she began to encourage him to. Extend himself widen himself and begin to talk about public issues to talk about the economy to talk about politics to talk about liberalism and as the tension with TV grew. He indeed found himself a voice for those people who were quite concerned that the Republican party would was on life support. And would never be redeemed unless there were somebody who had somebody once said sex appeal, and and great smart you point out in the book when he was asked about his friend van Doren. Mrs MRs MRs van Doren who is you say was married to Karl van. And was the brother of Mark van Doren, the famous professor who I think was a professor where you went to calm. Jaren, oy. I did not I was a little younger. Go back to go back to the circumstances. When he was challenged about having this lady friend, what did he say to the public? And how did he how did that track with being raised in a small conservative town of Elwood, Indiana where you saying he hadn't been back in twenty years? That's right. Well, actually, everybody knows about us. That's exactly what he said. And I'm not going to say anything other than that. She's my good friend. Now, I two things that the press was in those days. Out of the mind that unless it was absolutely flagrant and couldn't be denied you cut the cut the bigamist say some slack. But he did say that and it was widely known that he spent most of his time in the village with this this van Doren his wife put up with it. I think that's part of the part part of the explanation is that. Mrs Wilkie was very delicate and had not really recovered from her pregnancy. And she was really not very outgoing as well. And here was a man who came from a very large family there were four boys and two girls. And there was simply one one issue. And I think that was something that explains when those receptivity to perhaps they relationship that was different. But certainly with Rita van Dorn. She was an extraordinary woman, and he benefited so so much so quickly from her stewardship those dinners and the silk stocking part of the east side those meetings at the Elgon Quinn with the literati all of that. Satisfied emigrate deal. And as his articulate and his public pronouncements became more notable. It was another man or another person who would also possess the man's mind soon arena door and found that she had a competitor in the man who headed the forum for fortune magazine forum, Davenport and Davenport invited will probably hearing more about him from Arita to speak to the foreign and he was just God's mocked. He said he rushed home and he told his wife. Marsha he said, I've just met man who should be the next president United States. She says who was yourself is. No, no, it's it's this man, Wendell willkie and. He alerted looted. Henry loose this stellar fine. Time magazine for the time magazine mad, and so came several dinners loose was quite impressed by Wilkie. He was something that everybody had been looking for at the same time. There are other people who are noticing Wilkie as he talks about the imperial presidency of Franklin Roosevelt and about the confiscation of private property defacto represented by TV and whatnot. They were the internationalist wing of the Republican party. Never a very large one in those days. Who of course, saw that what was happening in Germany. Was toxic and probably was going to metastasized and if this country where unaware of what was going on and not politically prepared to face. What was going to happen if it'd be a great disaster? And they thought they saw in Wilkie and a closet internationalist. Good reason to do. So they will okay had in nineteen twenty four and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six attended the democrat conventions. And in each case, he went as the floor manager and the acolyte of Newton Baker who was Woodrow Wilson secretary of war. And who was in fact, his heir to save if possible the league of nations and? All that that had meant that. Wilson head at fail to. To fail to bring to the United States into the Senate successfully. There was also a man named Frank our show who represented I think you would say. Jewish Americans who were quite concerned about the policies of the Third Reich and altruism had been the vice chair of the finance committee of the Republican party during during als Landon attempt in one thousand nine hundred ninety six and so a man of considerable wealth and contacts he began to push for. Wilkie candidate find you will case still a democrat. Of course. Show was a Republican. But he writes, an interesting document, which he sent to Dorothy Thompson who was one of the great publicists and sin sin, syndicated columnists of the period in which he said, let's look at all the Republican possibles he itemize and drew Xs across the as he talked about them. He said, there's just only Mr. unknown, and Mr. unknown was Wendell willkie. He thought man who had said and believe that the greatest tragedy to befall his country in the twentieth century was that we turned away from our obligations to the world to the. The league of nations and the vision that that Wilson had taken from America to Europe. Q&a on C span radio with Pulitzer prize winning biographer, David levering Lewis, don't wanna get too far ahead of time goes fast. And I wanna make sure that I ask you about this after he went to and got the nomination. He lost FDR got thirty eight states. He got ten FDR got twenty seven million votes. He got twenty two million. That means he lost by five about five million. Then I want to put on the screen. I would just say this is the best until Eisenhower though. He's still lost badly. But I want to show you on the screen and other. Figures, you can see right there than it shows what happened in congress and after the election. Why did they think they could win? And they were after the election was over there. Two hundred sixty seven members of the Democratic Party in the house representatives. And there were my list here on my screen. So I can't say there were one hundred and sixty two Republicans that would sixty one percent to thirty seven and in the Senate. It was sixty six Democrats to twenty seven Republicans he lost badly. Congress went kept the Democrats hand. Why did the Republicans think they can win the election? Well. That does sound pretty dire doesn't but by nineteen thirty nine. The gloss was off the new deal Roosevelt had made a catastrophic decision. Interesting stories about when John Maynard Keynes came to to see FDR to tell him about his new economics. And he went way saying, I don't think if d is an economics man, that's for sure. And it was true. Because he decided that that pump priming of the economy had been a mistake, and we needed now a balanced budget policy in what happened was the economy went into a tailspin that was almost as bad as nineteen thirty to ten million jobs again wiped out. Immediately. He discovered the wisdom of Kane's reversed course, but it was a slow reversal. And so the spread of disillusionment with the new deal amongst the middle. Classes American middle class was really quite extensive. There was also something else. Very contemporary that they supreme court had opposed all the initial reforms of the new deal and Roosevelt had even thought that social security would not be declared unconstitutional. It was not but fearing that Roosevelt proposed to pack this court to increase the number of justices as constitutionally it is yet today possible from nine to thirteen or fifteen and Americans were outraged Opole by that because this was the one unit of government that most people referenced it was it was contaminated. It was fair although that ignores history of being so pro business, but the combination of the economic reversal the combination of the supreme court gaffe, and then the fact that. That Roosevelt though, the Wagner act, and these other acts had empowered labor Roosevelt did a kind of. Dance on a on a rope between labor and business and the great mouthpiece of labor. John lewis. John Lewis said is labor having contributed handsomely to the coffers of the Democrats to be treated like a away stroll. No. And so the by one thousand nine hundred ninety nine there was every reason to think that this was the time, and of course, Roosevelt daring to run for third time. Is he going to violate what Washington said as you going to violate what no one had tried to do except maybe General Grant? But even there that debatable. So I think the Republicans sought with a Wendell willkie who who triangulate it who accepted the bonus the infrastructure that the TV that the new deal gave. But at the same time who could talk about business using an optimizing the the reforms of the new deal that he would indeed the great salesperson. What happens is that the economy does begin at the end the thirty nine. And early forty to rally because of defense spending. Slowly, we have by nineteen forty. The potent thing is that we have we have selective service during peacetime. So there are military contracts in the offing and by nineteen by the summer of nineteen the spring of nineteen forty the economy is beginning to rally and Roosevelt is not to run. We don't know that he's going to violate the code. No one knows even his party doesn't know the last week. There is uncertainty. So let show that of course, a number of people think that they can reach for the brass ring themselves encouraged by Roosevelt liked that sort of thing because they would eliminate themselves in the competition. But when he declares that he's in the game again. Those independent who had been shaken by the. Stumbles of the new deal now think but after all what's happening in Europe, this man's been there and. Wendell willkie maybe as good as Roosevelt put. He's not Roosevelt in terms of of of accomplishment until I think that's why that was, but I should say that if you look at those numbers, although they are. A great triumph for FDR in key states. The difference is a difference of a few thousand for those those electoral votes, use say in the book that FDR felt if it wasn't for Welke. And this is what's hard to understand as you read it as an outsider looking at it. We might not have had Lend Lease that is true. And what was the land lease, and why did Roosevelt saying that? Well, and. The country is still. Bound to neutrality. I can't take sides. But Roosevelt stretches the interpretation of that too. Have legislation that would give to. The belligerents. Under the Lend Lease. Cheerio to to keep them going and the Republican party was wholly against. And so their leader. Astonished then by returning from Europe where he had gone to England to see how likely the British were going to. Deal with the the blitz and the possible invasion, by the Germans, he returned to testify before the foreign affairs Senate foreign affairs committee. After Lindberg and our own ambassador, Joseph Kennedy, and an array of DeVine's and college presidents had said, no, no lend Lease's, not at all. That's that. Putting our water our foot into the water. And that will mean that we will all be drowned and will be returned and spoke so effectively and he could do so because no member of congress had ever been abroad in those days. No, member of the foreign service foreign affairs committee, not Senator Bora, not Senator mcnary, they'd never been abroad. And so he came back able to speak about the people..

Franklin Roosevelt Mrs MRs MRs van Doren Wendell willkie Republican party Mrs Wilkie Rita van Doren FDR Carl van Doren congress Herald Tribune Europe Dorothy Thompson league of nations Senate United States Woodrow Wilson foreign affairs Senate foreign Philip Rita van Dorn
"literary editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:54 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Claire Tomlin after writing biographies of dickens, Jane Austen, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin has written a memoir called a life of my own through her story. She tries to tell a larger story of British women of her generation. She was born in nineteen thirty-three. She describes her conflicting desires to have children and a satisfying working life. It took a while. But she eventually had both. She gave birth to five children one died in infancy when we left off. We were talking about her son, Tom who was born with spina bifida a birth defect in which the baby's spinal cord has not fully developed or has not closed properly in the womb. Tom has never been able to walk or stand. And you wrote at some point you stop taking him to the playground because it was painful for him. And for you to watch the other children. Able to do things that he'd never be able to do. Yes. I can remember him looking at the children. Quite recently. He said to me I was talking to him about this. And he said he said, well, I believe then when I grew up I would be able to walk. And it broke my heart. And he said that it hadn't crossed my mind. But of course, children have no idea what what is coming for them more. What there is in the world was quite natural Latisha thing that. When he was in his teens. I was bit heartbreaking because he would see other boys teenage boys and girls doing things, but she couldn't join in. He has had hard life, very hard life and quite a lonely life except for his family. Your husband, Nick who had you know. In the seventies. Become a pretty famous journalist in England. He went on a reporting trip to Israel. Just after the start of the kipper war when Syria and Egypt launched a surprise attack on Israel onion kipper, which is the holiest day of the year and the Jewish calendar. And he told you that he thought he'd be safe. He told you I wouldn't go anywhere dangerous now with four children with the Israelis know how to look after journalists and I'll be perfectly safe with them. While driving the frontlines. He was killed by Syrian heat guided missile and one of the things that really horrified you about his death was the idea of him dying alone. Chocolate. But about why that was such a horrible thought for you. I don't think anyone should die alone. I think we know dying. You really do need someone with you. And. It it. The German reporter who was the rang telephone mail after he got back and said that he heard Nick. Calling up saying is stub, of course. He didn't he didn't speak German. So what she called? That was I'm dying and terrible. Terrible. Latisha ivan. Awful. To that light think about it to this day terrible thing. So I absolutely insisted on his body being brought back to England. They wanted to bury him out there. I said, no he's he's got to come back otherwise for the children, if they don't see conc- his body, but they could see the coffin and his parents also. Otherwise, we just as he gone off once again, just not come back. Had to be funeral had to be somewhere where he was buried. Not seemed to be very important. I mean, these sorts of formalities are important in life. I think. You ready to change your life? When you realize you're now in charge of it. How did it change your life? Well, yes, because I was now in charge. I could now decide lots of things like what sort of Carter by bought my first call it was my car, which was absolutely wonderful. And I was then John gross. Who was the new statesman said, I must come. He wanted to go to the times resentment, and he thought I should come and be literature, the new states from and I had to decide whether to do that with two. Take a job or whether I to stay at home with children, and I talked about this with everyone works debated about it, and I decided, and I think the children agreed that it would be better for me to have a job. Why did you think it would be better to take the job because I think mothers who stay at home and live entirely through that children mean some people are very happy doing this. But I didn't think it was a very good idea. I by then my daughters miles daughter jobs was actually ready to go to Cambridge. So they will they will be goals. So your first biography biography of Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist who wrote a vindication of the rights of women which was published in seventeen ninety two and argued that women were the equals of men. How did this Astara look at feminism and Walston crafts life affect your understanding of your own life did it, and I should mention your biography of her was published in the mid nineteen seventy s. Well, it was rather interesting. I wrote it because. When I was taking maternity leave to have Tom the editor of the new statesman. I I've been working there already as deputy literary editor. And he said, we'll take leave and come back after the baby's born. But please keep writing pieces for the new statesman while you're taking leave, and that's how I wrote a page about Mary Wollstonecraft for the new statesman. And when it was published I got letters from agents publishers saying Russia biographer. That's how I didn't know what to do and Nikolai shut down together with piece of paper and pencil each pros and cons. Should I go back to the new statesman? Or should I try and write this book, and we both concluded that I ought to try and write the book. And so that's I decided to do that. The book is sort of associated when they cannot way it was helpful to me that his advice. And in fact, when he was killed. I had was just finishing writing the book. So it was the book Chris sort of bound up with that period of the end of his life. It was quite emotional. So did Mary Walston crafts writing. And how she lived her life. Affect how you lived your life. After your husband was killed. Well, studying how was amazing to me because I discovered this woman in the eighteenth century who seemed to be living life, very very much like mind, she was living in north London. She was working on the magazine, she was having difficult love affairs resit where all went once. She had a baby she was having having to deal with trying to work and have a baby. And this walking the streets of London that she had walked it seemed absolutely amazing to me, and she was so vivid in her letters writings and Gucci bench was getting average Paris to see the French revolution. And I went over to Paris. A good deal of the French rambling. And so I I it's sorta reinforced my interest in women's history. And it made me think much more deeply about how little really useful information. We got about women's lives in the past. How? We had biographies queens, and we had sort of books about actresses. But really close looking what women's lives in the past were like was Raleigh enroll the short supply. And I thought that is something I would really like to get my teeth into did her biography also give you a sense of strength or courage in pursuing an independent life. Yes, it did. And she was so interesting because she was all sorts of severe hardworking young woman who who've threw herself into all sorts of work. She works as governor. She tried to run off school. She she even helped one of her friends whose family was poor doing sewing work because she must people she took on practically every job that woman of her generation could take on. So she qualified herself to comment on on the situation of women. And then she had this extrordinary love affair. She went to Paris during the revolution. And she didn't believe in marriage if she had a baby with American lover and she had a bad time with him. He was he was faceless. And so she's she's slightly turned into a romantic heroine. She is completely fascinating figure to may still. If you're just joining us. My guest is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who's written books about Mary Wollstonecraft early feminist, Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're going to take a short break, then we'll be right back..

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin Tom Paris Charles Dickens Nick England London Claire Tomlin Israel Mary Walston Jane Austen Walston John gross conc reporter literary editor Carter
"literary editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:54 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Claire Tomlin after writing biographies of dickens, Jane Austen, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin has written a memoir called a life of my own through her story. She tries to tell a larger story of British women of her generation. She was born in nineteen thirty-three. She describes her conflicting desires to have children and satisfying working life. It took a while. But she eventually had both. She gave birth to five children one died in infancy when we left off. We were talking about her son, Tom who was born with spina bifida a birth defect in which the baby spinal cord has not fully developed or has not closed properly in the womb. Tom has never been able to walk or stand wrote at some point you stop taking him to the playground because it was painful for him. And for you to watch the other children able to do things that he'd never be able to do. Yes. I can remember him looking at the children. Quite recently. He said to me I was talking to him about this. And he said he said, well, I believe then when I grew up I would be able to walk wrote, my heart, and he said that crossed my mind. But of course, children have no idea what what is coming for them more. What there is in the world was quite natural attrition thing. That. He was in his teens. I was bit heartbreaking because he would see other boys teenage boys and girls doing things which he couldn't join in. He has had heart life, very hard life and quite a lonely life except for his family. Your husband, Nick who had you know. In the seventies. Become a pretty famous journalist in England. He went on a reporting trip to Israel. Just after the start of the kipper war when Syria and Egypt launched a surprise attack on Israel onion kipper, which is the holiest day of the year and the Jewish calendar. And he told you that he thought he'd be safe. He told you I wouldn't go anywhere dangerous now with four children. But the Israelis know how to look after journalists and I'll be perfectly safe with them. Well, driving through the frontlines. He was killed by a Syrian heat guided missile and one of the things that really horrified you about his death was the idea of him dying alone. Chocolate about why that was such a horrible thought for you. I don't think anyone should die alone. I think we know dying. You really do need someone with you. And. It it. The German reporter who was the wrong telephone mail after he came back and said that he heard Nick. Calling up saying, of course, he didn't he didn't speak German. So what she called out? I'm dying and terrible. Terrible. Latisha ivan. Awful. To that light think about it to this day. Terrible thing. So I absolutely insisted on his body being brought back to England. They wanted to bury him out there. I said, no, he's he's come back otherwise for the children, if they don't see currency his body, but they could see the coffin and his parents also. Otherwise, we just as he got off once again and just not come back. Funeral had to be somewhere where he was buried that seem to be very important. I mean, these sorts of formalities are important in life. I think. You ready to change your life? When you realize you're now in charge of it. How did it change your life? Well, yes, because I was now in charge. I could now decide lots of things like what sort of car to buy. I bought my first call was my car, which was absolutely wonderful. And I was then John gross. Who's the new statesman said, I must come. He wanted to go to the times resentment, and he thought I should come and be literature. The new statesman, and I had to decide whether to do that with two. Take a job or whether I want to stay at home with children and talked about this with everyone works of debate about it. And I decided I think the children agreed that it would be better for me to have a job. Why did you think it would be better to take the job because I think mothers who stay at home and live entirely through that children. I mean, some people are very happy doing this. But I didn't think it was a very good idea by then right ocean miles daughter, Joe was actually registered go to Cambridge. So they were they will be girls. So your first biography biography of Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist who wrote a vindication of the rights of women which was published in seventeen ninety two and argued that women were the equals of men, how did this historical look at feminism and Walston crafts life affect your understanding of your own life did it, and I should mention your biography of her was published in the mid nineteen seventy s. Well, it rather interesting. I wrote it because. When I was taking maternity leave to have Tom the editor of the new statesman. I I've been working there already as deputy literary editor, and he said, we'll take leave and come back. After the baby's born. But please keep writing pieces for the new statesman while you're taking on maternity leave. And that's how I wrote a page about Mary Wollstonecraft, full the new statesman. And when it was published I got letters from agents, publishers say you mistrial biographer. I didn't know what to do and Nikolai sat down together with piece of paper and pencil each pros and cons. Should I go back to the new statesman? Or should I try and write this book, and we both concluded that I ought to try and write the book. And so that's how I decided to do that. The book is sort of aged when they cannot way it was helpful to me that his advice. And in fact, when he was killed. I had was just finishing writing the book. So it was the boot Chris sort of bombed up with that period of the end of his life. It was quite emotional. So did Mary Wollstonecraft writing and how she lived her life. Affect how you lived your life. After your husband was killed. Well, studying how was amazing to me because I discovered this woman in the eighteenth century who seemed to be living life, very very much like mine. She was living in north London. She was working on a magazine, she was having difficult love affairs. Whereas it were all when once she had a baby she was having having to deal with trying to work and have a baby and walking the streets of London that she had walked it seemed absolutely amazing to me, and she was so vivid in her letters and writings and Gucci bench was getting over to Paris to see the French revolution. And I went over to Paris. Roger goodell. French ramlet? So I I it's sorta reinforced my interest in women's history. And it made me think much more deeply about how little really useful information. We got about women's lives in the past. How? We had biographies of queens. We had sort of books about actresses. But really close looking what women's lives in the past relied was Raleigh enroll the short supply. And I thought that is something I would really like to get my teeth into did her biography also give you a sense of strength or courage in pursuing an independent life. Yes, it did. And she was so interesting because she was there all sorts of severe hardworking young woman who who've threw herself into all sorts of work. She worked as a governor. She tried to run off school. She she even helped one of her friends who family was very poor doing sewing work because she must people she took on practically every job that a woman of her generation could take on. So she qualified herself to comment on all the situation with women. And then she had this extraordinary. Love affair. She went to Paris during the revolution. And she didn't believe in marriage. She had a baby with American lover. And she had a bad time with him. He was he was faceless. And so she's she's slightly turned into a romantic heroine. She is completely fascinating figure to may still. If you're just joining us. My guests is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who has written books about Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're going to take a short break, then we'll be right back..

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin Tom Paris Charles Dickens Nick England Claire Tomlin Israel London Jane Austen Roger goodell John gross reporter literary editor Nikolai Syria Joe
"literary editor" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Short answer accurate answer really put me my place right there there's no comeback to that i can't say anything yeah but this win win fencing with talking absolutely true joe thanks so much thank you that was bestselling author tv personnel nigel lawson her new book is at my table i suspect it and i gela doesn't suffer fools gladly anyone who quotes character guard and who was the deputy literary editor for the sunday times in london in her twenty s is no skin deep celebrity jello was told me that if one lives long enough one inevitably experiences to support or writer quentin chris pointed out the british do not expect happiness they just want to be right right now i'm heading kitchen milk street the chat would win clark about this week's recipe lynn how are you i'm great chris as you know while you were sitting here in boston i read a few months ago i went to a little park and there's a restaurant complex in the park of florida material run by geico joaquin be cool guy you know sort of new wave chef in spain big sideburns and they had this variety show at night with the jugglers and magic tricks and everything else and they have a restaurant restaurants there so this is new age cooking right so why did i go there not being a new guy well we decided to make a spanish renton tweak piece does just a bunch of vegetables essentially sauteed and cook together eggplant peppers etc.

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"literary editor" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on The Editors

"Put it in a kind of broccoli as you put it in a kind of butter soup gets even oh my god oh it's perfect do you look back on yourself as a devotee of plain broccoli and think how naive you're shames me honestly the less said about that benighted era in my life the better so i want to say if you words about mike tamra are longtime literary editor who we lost this week passed away at the age of fifty three amazing talent no one i've ever known has read is as many books as mike i actually helped him when he first moved to new york from washington to come up as an editor for us and all he had basically and enormous moving it was like eight thousand books and he just knew something about everything especially anything having to do with literature or film and many other topics as well he moved to la several years ago which was quite an undertaking for mike because he was afraid of flying and did not fly so he took a gray how bus out to la to scout a place where he wanted to live and then had an ex girlfriend dr him cross country with his cat as beloved cat puss bell nap la but he was very missed in the office because he was just such a unusual and delightful person every time in the office you'd hear these random exclamations and laughter emanating from his office he'd come in round two pm which was early for him carrying usually a couple of plastic bags with with one half consumed to leader bottle of diet cherry rc cola.

literary editor new york washington editor mike mike tamra mike i la
"literary editor" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"A new book idea i mean you live in one of the great sports cities of in the world that should not be that tough to figure out if you wanna do it in sports you also live in an interesting place just culturally as well so you get something funny agent that's usually the key get an agent agent agent hook you up with a literary editor larry give your book idea and you're off to the races all right charlie from what a right it well yeah that that i can't up with richard before i got did you know that tad night we are desks used to be like hemp feet away boss dot com really tell over and bug while he was trying to write and like make fun of him from having a stock of old newspapers on his desk this this this building would make yeah this show this to be one of your early jobs right it was a it was second and they no no and then you left up and you left boston for new york for the for dc for year that usa today and then if b nation so good a been a weird ride but here i am think think think the lord you gotta trunk and that night her good job getting onto a horrible company no offense charlotte wild as work that company but none take terrible all right charlotte wilder and chatfield they will certainly be back podcast round table guests as we get this thing going chattan troll have a great day thank you very much for.

charlie new york charlotte wilder chatfield literary editor richard boston usa charlotte wild
"literary editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the app store and google play on the next on being an exchange you haven't heard before between a rabbi and an imam it's so interesting what you envy of islam i envy the opposite direction in the jewish tradition our inability to talk about no your discomfort due it got and christy tip it please china's tonight at nine on 939 fm wnyc this is fresh air interior gross was there ever a time when you thought you were going to die because of an accident an illness a stupid risk you took an assault or a stranger who seemed on the verge of attacking you my guess maggie o'farrell writes about her seventeen brushes with death in her new memoir i am i am i am as a lot of brushes with death among those experiences and illnesses that nearly killed her our childhood encephalitis being rob with a machete held to her neck nearly drowning after jumping off a harbour wall into the water amoebic dysentery while travelling and nearly bleeding out in labour with her first child her memoir ends with a chapter about her daughter who was born with lifethreatening exzema and food al oh jeez and has been hospitalized many times of farrell is a novelist this is her first memoir she's worked as a waitress chambermaid teacher arts administrator a journalist in hong kong and london and his deputy literary editor of the independent on sunday she was born in northern ireland and nineteen 72 and now lives in edinburgh scotland baggio farrell welcome to fresh air the first story in your book as a story i think a lot of women will relate to and some 'bout that moment when you realise the you suspect might be following you with bad intentions is actually following you with bad intentions this happen when you're working at a holistic alternative retreat at the base of a mountain you were we are a teenager annual early 20th i was eighteen nicotine cocaine your rob at this retreat was cleaning and serving food i want you to read the first couple of paragraphs from this autobiographical story that opens your new book on the path ahead stepping up for behind a boulder a man appears we are he an eye on the far side of the dark time that lies hidden in the bowl kurds summit of this mounted this guy is a nukii blue above earth no vegetation grows this far up so it is just.

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"literary editor" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on Little Atoms

"This is little atoms a radio show about ideas and culture with me nail danny on this week novelist tony why on his latest book the fans in in the fall tony whites is the altar of five novels including socks ct previously literary editor of the idler he has written for the guardian and the new statesman in recently collaborated we've artists bless theory on the libraries live streaming projects place we have to german white was creative entrepreneur medicines in the french department at king's college london as the writer a measured say you see i will cease and at the science museum and we should also mention that tony is currently chairing the board of our own radio station resonance fm and sunnis latest novel which we'll talk about today is the founded in the forest tiny welcomes in atlanta gms hunt nielsen's for having me on to how would you describe the founded in the forest fence in the forest is the first three novels which explore the immediate aftermath of the minestrike all let's say that the ninety days immediately following the minestrike sweden the the ends a strike and the battle of the bean field first ju 1985 but with a view of course was when a couple of hundred vehicles traveling to start an inch festival in june or july 1st was forced off the road ambushed effectively by the two police vehicles destroyed and property destroyed families separated 500plus arrests the largest civilian mass arrests i gather in british history outside of sect mobile and found in the forest is a detective story set in london right now he set in the south of france in the mid 1980's and at the title of the bean field itself and the novel pigs up with detected sought rex king who works out of the serious crime commander hogan police station and he's been cold to a an incident backstage at the royal palace hit a body has been found in the paint frame of georgian seen painting studio which in fact belongs to a mate off rex is and the no kicks off with that and.

tony whites literary editor writer science museum sweden france royal palace danny king atlanta nielsen london commander ninety days
"literary editor" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on RobinLynne

"You know uh and we need to do better men and that rose mcgowan who uh has really led frankly the sort of the had been a leading voice frankly for survivors shot back over twitter i told you basically like i told you about this when it happened and your response at the time was dammit i told him not to do that so she basically out at him as having knowledge of the harassment that was going on at the time and and it basically stole all his credibility on this topic by highlighting the role of by standards whether the error active ones like billy bush who in that access hollywood take not only supports trump by set of agreeing with him but he actively dehumanizes ari on sucker the actor they're both slobbering all over but the the the quiet complicit ones who are um sort of in quote willful denial which is the term that franklin four at the former editor of the new republic used to describe his experience supervising leon weasel tear the literary editor so there there's a did you can be a buys at you're a bystander whether you're actively engaged in that kind of harassment by egging on the harasser or your side and a silent witness to it because the that's a choice that only men have women don't have that choice in this quite the same way and so by going on the record and that can be publicly in the media or it can be by providing testimony to a he human resources complaint men are putting skin in the game which currently they don't have any what's the anthony boredin story contrast oh source of anthony bore dane who who is not implicated as either of istat juror or a harasser but it happens to in fact be the uh currently involved with asia are gento who has told her story publicly about hat being and i really complicated and persistent abusive relationship with harvey weinstein that.

harassment billy bush hollywood editor literary editor dane asia harvey weinstein rose mcgowan franklin leon anthony boredin
"literary editor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"You know uh and we need to do better men and that rose mcgowan who uh has really led frankly the sort of the had been a leading voice frankly for survivors shot back over twitter i told you basically like i told you about this when it happened and your response at the time was dammit i told him not to do that so she basically out at him as having knowledge of the harassment that was going on at the time and and it basically stole all his credibility on this topic by highlighting the role of by standards whether the error active ones like billy bush who in that access hollywood take not only supports trump by set of agreeing with him but he actively dehumanizes ari on sucker the actor they're both slobbering all over but the the the quiet complicit ones who are um sort of in quote willful denial which is the term that franklin four at the former editor of the new republic used to describe his experience supervising leon weasel tear the literary editor so there there's a did you can be a buys at you're a bystander whether you're actively engaged in that kind of harassment by egging on the harasser or your side and a silent witness to it because the that's a choice that only men have women don't have that choice in this quite the same way and so by going on the record and that can be publicly in the media or it can be by providing testimony to a he human resources complaint men are putting skin in the game which currently they don't have any what's the anthony boredin story contrast oh source of anthony bore dane who who is not implicated as either of istat juror or a harasser but it happens to in fact be the uh currently involved with asia are gento who has told her story publicly about hat being and i really complicated and persistent abusive relationship with harvey weinstein that.

harassment billy bush hollywood editor literary editor dane asia harvey weinstein rose mcgowan franklin leon anthony boredin
"literary editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"One this is on point i'm tom gelatin we're looking back at 27 teens literary landscape what we loved what you loved why they were so special you can join the conversation will you reading fiction this year nonfiction biographies follow us on twitter you can find us on facebook at on point radio and we've been joined by elizabeth taylor coeditor of the national book review and literary editor at large for the chicago tribune also kevin new when senior editor for gq where he reviews books and betsy burton co owner and cofounder of the king's english bookshop in salt lake city and first elizabeth taylor you talked earlier about the you're number one book which was the evangelical we've also talked about lincoln in the bardot the third i heavier top to have a list here and the third on your list is because the life and times of michael a tell us a little bit about that book and maybe and get you to read something from it is sure it's a wonderful book and it it's not a buck it's um and it's very powerful it's it's sort of a blend of of a family memoir philosophy and also sort of berry fierce indictment of uh of the mass incarceration crisis in america it's a the story and if you're if anyone likes these serbs separated at burst stories like the other west more he'll think of that this is the story of danielle allen a prominent harvard professor um hiatchi bang uh is the been macarthur genius though and then her cousin it's spelled see uz cuz um and it's about her younger cousin who was murdered at the age of twenty nine he sort of gets into petty crime at a young age you know just like.

twitter facebook elizabeth taylor coeditor literary editor chicago tribune senior editor betsy burton salt lake city lincoln kevin new elizabeth taylor michael america danielle allen professor
"literary editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We to black music because he said it was more intense in authentic than anything made by white people he spoke as of white people were the name of an army are gang some organization to which he didn't belong a pay no minders garbled explanation for the source of this black intensity the sound was good and i noticed something extraordinary that was occupying most my attention as listened to the songs had been recorded twenty years before and they had no ill effect on me there was no backwards pool no sensation of vertigo i forgot what it was had been scared of i let it all go i cannot remember the last time i felt so happy in carefree though this was interesting cultural appropriation kevin his better big issue in sort of cultural and and political circles we have here story of white boys writing about our abdul bean interested in black music meanwhile threatened by hurry comes route tell us who hurry koons is yeah a i think he's indianbritish and he is an extraordinary novelist i think this is probably his fifth or sixth book um but he just now he writes brilliantly um about music nick he writes brilliantly you know in fiction just even the passages red there's so much going on there at first were kind of making fun of these two white boys in immediately moved in to like a real appreciation of the music and that's kind of authentic to so he kinda moved between genres really seamlessly and the book is just a great john her match up with just really smart ideas kind of underlying everything let's go now to elizabeth taylor whose coeditor as i said of the national book reviewer literature literary editor large the chicago tribune elizabeth what was your top book of 2017 oh.

koons literary editor abdul elizabeth taylor chicago elizabeth what twenty years
"literary editor" Discussed on I Have To Ask

I Have To Ask

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on I Have To Ask

"We'll have more from i guessed right after the break cybersecurity digital transformation mobility these trends are reshaping business in the technology that powers at today's digital workers need uptodate secure tools to compete in the digital economy but heavy about security cost and performance one key modern computers powered by modern silicone the endpoint imperative a podcast series from intel brings together it experts in leaders to tackle these and other important issues impacting today's fastchanging digital universe the latest episode examines how cloud mobility and the internet of things have transformed the traditional ways organizations work and how exactly this impacts end user experience downloaded subscribe to the end point imperative wherever you find your podcasts i want to uh i wanna ask you a little bit about the media um you write in this piece a little bit about the new republic which is a place that i should tell people that we both we overlapped we were working in different offices but we overlapped at the new republic and the reason you talk about the new republic partially in this piece is because lien weasel tear who is the literary editor of the magazine what has lost his new magazine which he was starting and been fired from the brookings institute in the atlantic where he was on the masthead four allegations of sexual harassment and forcibly kissing a former new republic staffer and you you write about that there and and so i was some i just wanted that is a since since we both were both on staff i wanted to say that but i also wanted to ask you one of the things i don't think was directly connected to leon losing his positions was this shitty medium enlist it's been called where this.

literary editor brookings institute harassment intel end user leon
"literary editor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of sexual harassment at the state house speaker bob delay always ordered a sweeping review and in an email blasted the entire executive branch governor baker says there is zero tolerance for sexual harassment is wbz's lanta johns reports the governor also wants victims to feel comfortable reporting at governor baker is hoping some good comes from the allegations from a dozen women that seem to take many by surprise a reaffirmation of that position among all of us who are in leadership positions anywhere in government here and the more the we take seriously the role of responsibility we have to ensure that are professional work environments are as they should and the people should never have to worry about this sort of thing and if something does happen god forbid that they know their places they can go to get it addressed the with baker says policies will be reviewed and updated as appropriate at the state house lana jones wbz newsradio 1030 kevin spacey says he is sorry for drunken harassing actor anthony rapid 1980's six but some are questioning the timing of his coming out of the closet sank spacey is trying to deflect attention from the allegations heather unreal a former channel five anchor tweeted yesterday i applaud your courage actor anthony wrap you are not alone two weeks ago when the harvey weinstein news broke on route tweeted the weinstein scandal has emboldened her and it's truth time she says she was a kevin spacey fan until he assaulted a loved one adding it's time the domino's foul the president and publisher of the new republic as on a leave of absence amid allegations he harassed women employees in a company memo the magazine's owner promises and immediate independent investigation of hamilton fish fish as a former publisher of the nation who joined the new republic last year last week a magazines former literary editor offered a quote shaken apology after numerous women said fish sexually harassed them he was dropped from his job as an editor for the atlantic identification ceremony was held for a new mixedused development in 'have role is wbz's bernice carpoolers reports local leaders it's believed the project will help rejuvenate the city's waterfront area buildings had risen away.

editor bernice carpoolers wbz weinstein harvey weinstein lana jones governor baker executive house speaker harassment literary editor publisher president anthony wrap kevin spacey lanta johns zero tolerance
"literary editor" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Amazon tv executive roy price lost his job amid allegations of of this kind of misbehavior john bash in new orleans restaurant tour lost his job at the head of his own restaurant empire for it leon weasel to your literary editor and longtime public intellectual was dumped by the brookings institute and also by steve jobs widow maureen morin powell jobs who'd been bankrolling his new magazine after a group of former colleagues have weasel tears complained of his sexual advances and what us and harassing behavior and more and more and more so is it all over it's all over for the two men is it just can we finally put a pen in these asshole felt sure there are more people out there who are quaking more than they were last month and i do i do think before i say what i felt like hasn't changed so it does seem like since the bill cosby revelations and maybe there's a way in which you could dated earlier that i'm not thinking of it when a group of women come forward in solidarity there is a way in which the numbers themselves are giving way to accusations even if we don't have a ruling in a court of law that in either the form of a criminal conviction are a civil suit backs them up and that wasn't true before right it wasn't true when a group of women accused bill clinton of various forms of harassment and abuse so that does seem to me like a real cultural shift on the other hand a group of women accused donald trump of these exact well some of the same forms of misconduct and he was elected president so i'm not sure how we can say that nail impunity has been forever rectified and i should say win one of the things that he did on the way to becoming president was bring some of the accusers.

Amazon literary editor brookings institute steve jobs bill clinton harassment donald trump executive roy price new orleans maureen morin powell bill cosby
"literary editor" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:36 min | 4 years ago

"literary editor" Discussed on WLAC

"Back to the michael berry show on newsradio fifteen ten wale ac van fix to fit the lawn a mob favored rig oh as the 20th steadham whoa whoa nawaz plan i gave her in that game paying oh yes cinema fuel the sale republic apparently is has severed ties with former literary editor leon v celta i guess that's how you pronounce that after learning of past inappropriate workplace conduct one of the editors at voks has stepped down over charges of sexual harassment or harassment john bash has stepped away from his empire of businesses over allegations or i don't know exactly what the official state of of over talk of sexual harassment and there are more we could go on for a while but let me finish this on article because this is important the democrat party and hillary clinton were paying people to create things some of which was created um and released that turned out to be debunked including the urinating in the russian hotel room salacious stories i'm sad to say but it's true people in the political world no that if you want to take down a candidate don't take him down because plank number seventeen of their tax reform package relates to the inheritance tax and longterm investing you take them down on the basis of having sex that's just what you do have debts we are a prudish people and you could be the best candidate in the history of mankind just don't let us find out that she had sex at some point because that's that's those are the things we care about its we've proven that an election after election so if you don't have details on somebody have sex actually just make it up because why on earth would it be out there if it wasn't true those on trump has adamantly denied the allegations in the dossier and has dismissed the fbi probe as a witchhunt us intelligence agencies later released a public assessment which asserted that russia intervened in the 2016 election to aid trump the fbi has been investigating whether any trump associates helped the russians in that effort fusion gps is work researching trump began during.

voks harassment john bash democrat party hillary clinton russia fbi michael berry literary editor official