17 Burst results for "Lisa Pickoff"

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Laying there as well I'm Peter finch for KQED at KQ at KQ weedy the time six thirty live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave manning lie the National Guard is running polling sites today in Wisconsin where this is primary day amid the corona virus pandemic laurel white with Wisconsin public radio says thousands of election workers resigned statewide ahead of the voting I've talked to so many poll workers who are just incredibly concerned about going in doing their jobs today they're worried about their own safety the safety of their families their communities and that's actually led to a really can a critical shortage of state poll workers all across Wisconsin governor Tony YVR sought to postpone the election the state Supreme Court ruled he lacked the authority to do that acting navy secretary Thomas moblie is apologizing for his comments about the captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt NPR's Scott Newman says captain Brad crozier was relieved of his duties for sending a letter to numerous navy officials asking for help to deal with an outbreak of the corona virus on the carrier mode we initially stood by his remarks in which he said captain crozier was too naive or too stupid to command the carrier Moseley later issued a statement apologizing for his choice of words but he also defended closures firing saying the captain intended that his email to navy leadership about conditions on board the Roosevelt become public this is NPR news from Washington live from KQED news I'm Brian white in Oakland state regulators want to put a sixty three dollar credit on the April electric and gas bill for tens of millions of Californians KQED's Lisa pickoff white reports the money comes from a state program that power and gas industries have to pay into originally Californians would have received the April money regardless of the shelter in place orders now state.

Scott Newman Lisa pickoff Oakland Brian white NPR secretary Dave manning Moseley captain crozier Peter finch Theodore Roosevelt NPR Thomas moblie Supreme Court Tony YVR Wisconsin National Guard Washington KQED
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"California courts. Science reporter Molly Peterson joins me. And Molly the juries have to decide about round up, even when the science might not be ready to. Yeah. It's a long long long standing tension because a court case has this define length, and you have to find an answer and scientific research continues on and on. And you don't always know when you're gonna find a clear answer. So in these cases, what do the people who save round up 'cause they're cancer have to prove exactly they have to prove that the key ingredient roundup glyphosate causes cancer. And then specifically that it actually caused the individual person's cancer, and that's hard. What does the science actually show lab? Studies show that glyphosate sometimes causes cancer in mice and rats that was enough for an arm of the World Health Organization to decide it probably causes cancer in people. But went comes to people research hasn't found a statistically significant connection between cancer and glycemic either. Because there isn't one or. People are exposed to a lot of carcinogens. And generally, it's hard to tease out the effects of just one thing. So who decides what science a jury hears well judges due at least in the federal cases, the ones everyone in the country are watching they have to follow a rule about scientific evidence. And the interpretation of that rule comes from a case called dough. Bear versus Merrill. Dow pharmaceuticals in that case people suspected that a drug called Ben dictum, which women took for morning sickness and that really nineties caused birth defects. So that case established the judge as the gatekeeper now that we have the roundup cases. How have the judge has been handling this? Well, they've all been doing it a little bit differently. But in the first case judge Vince Chabra held science week where he heard from all of the experts judge tabby thought science, connecting people to life to cancer was pretty sparse. He called those studies loosey goosey and were they well, that's the thing. To the judge. These studies might have seen that way because they didn't come out with a clear. Yes, or no. But I talked to Dr Steve Goodman about this. He's a clinical research expert at Stanford University. He says the question of whether round up causes cancer is really emerging area. What's happening here is that were exploring claim that even very very very experienced scientists looking at all day that have reasonable Steve's about and disagreements about and and any science will look loosey goosey. If you look at it right at the limits of what he can decide empirically. So does this mean a jury could make a decision following the law, and then later it turns out to be scientifically wrong. Yeah. Absolutely. That case about Ben decked in the jury decided that drug did cause birth defects and the drug was taken off the market, and then later scientific research showed that actually bend. Didn't cause birth defects. And today it's back on the market. So is it bad? If a jury makes that kind of a mistake. Well, it's only a mistake. If you think that illegal verdict is a verdict on the science juries may conclude that something causes cancer at a time when scientists still figuring out the answer with science and with the law. The reason we care about any of these outcomes. That's because we want to know what hazards people might run into and how to keep people safe from them. So with that morning sickness drug. It was taken off the market until we knew it was safe. Is that a mistake? Yeah. Okay. So yeah. This exactly right here. That's the core of the problem. You know, Dr Steve Goodman from Stanford says essentially that there are different goals in resolving a legal dispute and answering scientific questions the goal of most trials is not true. The goal is to win. So right there. There's a tension. Wow. I get this. I be like I understand how it works in a courtroom. But I don't know if I should be reassured by this, Molly. Yeah. I mean, things that are complicated aren't usually reassuring. But at least we have some understanding Molly Peterson you are a K Q E D science reporter with a law degree, and I'm really glad you're here. Thanks, brian. We've been talking a lot about Monsanto and round up on K Q E D. But we've also talked a lot about kids and bay curious team recently got a question from a listener who wanted to know where do the kids live in the bay area cake. Data journalist Lisa pick off white dove into the data to answer this question. Haley good morning. So San Francisco is known for having few kids. So where do kids and their parents live in the bay area? Well, like in the rest of the country kids, their parents tend to live in single family homes, and those single family homes tend to be in the suburbs. So the most kids in the bay area live in Santa Clara county, and that has a very easy to reason why which is the most people in the bay area and Santa Clara county. However, when we look at the percentage of age ranges to kids, we see the largest percentage of kids in contra Costa county, and that numbers also grow. Going in Solano. And this this really because you can find cheaper single family home in those places. That's what demographers who have spoken with have said they've said that, you know, people are still looking for larger places to live when they have a family, and that's where they're landing right now. So this seems like a normal trend. Young people live in the city, then they moved to the suburbs win. They have kids is this something we think will continue this way. This is a really interesting question because we're not sure I've talked to several demographers and city planners and they're concerned about some upcoming trends, which is basically that millennials are having kids later in life. They're having fewer kids, and they are not buying as many homes as people used to. So when city planners are looking twenty years in the future. They're not sure if this trend will entirely continue, maybe we'll see more people and multi dwelling homes, and it also is hitting up a lot of millennials especially wanna live closer to where. They work. I don't know whether millennials will be able to make that work. So we'll have to see how this plays out K Q E D, data journalist, Lisa pickoff, white, and you have a map online about this. Yes. You can go to bake dot org. And see how your local neighborhood stocks up to others and terms of how many kids live there and what proportion thank you. Thank you. You're listening to morning edition on Brian watt will be back with more local news. And if you minutes right now, let's see if there's still problems with Bard and Joe McConnell of no problems with me. But there are problems with part continuing major delays.

cancer Dr Steve Goodman Molly Peterson glyphosate reporter Stanford University Brian watt Lisa pickoff California Dow pharmaceuticals Monsanto Santa Clara county Vince Chabra Merrill San Francisco Ben World Health Organization Costa county Haley
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Offering free rides to the centers for NPR news. I'm Marty Michelson in Milwaukee. The Federal Reserve is keeping interest rates where they are for now. And NPR's Jim zarroli reports the fed appears to be taking a software approach on future rate hikes fed ended its latest two day meeting and as expected it chose not to raise rates again. It also issued a statement saying it would be patient as it determines what future changes to make to policy, and it said it was prepared to slow its reduction of bond-holdings if necessary the statement suggests that the fed is drifting toward a less hawkish approach on interest rates in its last statement. It seemed to leave open the prospect of further increases, but since then there has been new evidence that the global economy is slowing and fed officials see less of a threat of higher inflation. Jim zarroli, NPR news, New York. This is NPR from news. I'm Brian watt. PG unease filing for bankruptcy protection is just the first step in a long process for the embattled utility, take you at ease. Lisa pickoff, white explains PGE says they need to restructure so that they can face the tens of billions of dollars. They could wildfire victims US, bankruptcy judge. Dennis batali. We'll have to approve later this week PG and he's plant care. Billions and lunch to keep the company afloat in the near future. Now Montale has to work with a veritable f- abet soup of state and federal regulators who all have a stake, and how PG will be run P PG has four months to announce how they want to reorganize the massive company that could include selling off their gas division or even their headquarters. The judge has to sign off. And state regulators have to approve any increases to rates. PG genie expects the bankruptcies to take two to three years. I'm Lisa pick off white cake Cutie news series. XM is vying Oakland based Pandora that means the corporate parents for the music, streaming firm are major supporters of President Donald Trump. Sam lefavor reports the three point five billion dollar deal makes one of Oakland's largest employers, a subsidiary of Liberty Media who's founder and CEO together gave one million.

PG NPR Federal Reserve Jim zarroli Lisa pickoff P PG Dennis batali US Marty Michelson Brian watt Oakland founder and CEO Donald Trump PGE Milwaukee Sam lefavor
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This morning. Clay masters with Iowa public radio has more. The national weather service in Des Moines says some spots in northeast Iowa have already had wind chill readings of around sixty below zero this morning, the university of Iowa, and I will state university have cancelled classes today so far. The Arctic weather is blamed for at least six deaths in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Minnesota a nationwide walkout is expected today in Venezuela. It was called by the country's political opposition chief Juan quite does the man recognized by the US and about twenty other nations as Venezuela's leader. It comes a day after Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro barred Guido from leaving the country. NPR's Philip Reeve's says there are concerns about renewed violence with Madero under more pressure. To resign. The big question is how will go to security forces react forty people have been killed since this crisis erupted looks never wake ago both by then as well as security services, according to the UN human rights office. And you know, the worry is they'll be more bloodshed, but he is piling on pressure. The White House says President Trump spoke by phone today with quavo. This is NPR news from Washington from K Q E D news in San Francisco. I'm Brian watt. PGE's filing for bankruptcy protection. Yesterday is just the first step in a long process for the embattled utility K cuties leak. Lisa pickoff, white explains PG says they need to restructure so they can face the tens of billions of dollars. They could oh wildfire victims US, bankruptcy judge. Dennis montale. We'll have to approve later this week PG and he's plant care. Billions in loans to keep the company afloat in the near future. Now Montale has to work with a veritable f- abet soup of state and federal. Regulators who all have a stake, and how PG will be run P genie has four months to announce how they want to reorganize the massive company that could include selling off their gas division or even their headquarters. The judge has to sign off. And state regulators have to approve any increases to rates. PG genie. Expects the bankruptcy to take two to three years. I'm Lisa pick off white cake. UD news, the bankruptcy filing has some PG unease union workers worried, but labor leaders say jobs and benefits are likely safe. Tom Dalzell is business manager for IB E W, local twelve forty five which represent seventeen thousand PG, employees and contractors. He says protecting their members livelihoods is the top priority for the pension fund is not in the chapter eleven proceeding. And we believe that pensions will almost certainly be completely. Untouched. But it is such a great concern. Our concern is proportion. It to the calamity that it could it could be tells AL says the union does not support breaking up and selling the utility or making it city owned, I'm Brian watt cake. Weedy news.

PG Dennis montale Iowa US Brian watt Venezuela NPR Lisa pickoff Madero university of Iowa Des Moines Tom Dalzell Nicolas Maduro PGE Philip Reeve Arctic President Trump White House UD
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"She needed to treat her diabetes and instead began to rattling her medicine coming says launch an investigation into drug companies pricing practices, the Senate hearing focused on how government programs like Medicare and Medicaid can reduce drug costs. Alison kodjak, NPR news, Washington, a wide swath of US shivering under what's known as the polar vortex. The US postal service with that. Unofficial motto of neither snow nor rain or heating or gloom of night fairly. That's out the window with Mel service much of the upper midwest canceled for tomorrow that includes international falls, Minnesota were sandy Dexter who owned Sandy's place restaurant was pretty much taking things in stride today. We're having a big heat wave. It's warmed up to twenty one below without the wind chill forty eight below with the wind chill Dexter says for Minnesotans, it's nothing new, and we all move, and we help push each other out. The snow piles and we start each other's car. And we smile and keep moving show is falling in much of the midwest and the northeast with more expected to tomorrow from the Great Lakes to New England. A mixed close. On Wall Street today. The Dow was up fifty one points. You're listening to NPR from geeky weedy news. I'm Mina Kim. PG knees. Filing for bankruptcy protection. Today is just the first step in a long process for the embattled utility gay cuties Lisa pickoff, white explains PGE says they need to restructure so that they can face the tens of billions of dollars. They could wildfire victims US, bankruptcy judge. Dennis Montale will have to approve later this week PG and he's plant care. Billions in loans to keep the company afloat in the near future. Now Montale has to work with a veritable f- abet soup of state and federal regulators who all have a stake, and how PG knee will be run PG has four months to announce how they want to reorganize the massive company that Clin clued selling off their gas division or even their headquarters. The judge has to sign off. And state regulators have to approve any increases to rates PG expects the bankruptcy to take two to three years. I'm Lisa pick off. White. Katie news. Meantime, San Francisco supervisor has laid out the initial steps for the city to potentially by PG knees infrastructure and develop its own municipal power grid. Supervisor Hillary Ronen introduced legislation today to create what she calls a green new deal fund. She says it would be a place to put revenue earmarked for a city owned utility that would not be bound by shareholder, profits and executive bonuses priorities. When a utility.

US PG Supervisor Hillary Ronen sandy Dexter Lisa pickoff Dennis Montale NPR Senate Alison kodjak Great Lakes New England Mina Kim Washington supervisor San Francisco Medicare Minnesota PGE Medicaid
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Where rapairs had worse saddles with higher rates. Do you think ratepayers will be better protected? This time. Oh, I think ratepayers are definitely going to pay some of this cost. First of all, they're just isn't going to be enough money to cover all of that liability in the company. So some of this is going to get pushed off somewhere, it could get pushed off the ratepayers. It could be paid by the government could be foisted on the people who bore the losses. I think the easiest thing politically is going to be to push it off on ratepayers. So I think it's very unlikely that repairs are gonna come through this unscathed. Shareholders that are certainly going to lose a lot of money probably all of their money. And then we're going to have this larger debate, regardless of the actions of PG, what is the right way of organizing system going forward, given the increasing wildfire risk. So then should it be a publicly owned utility? And what would be the challenges with that? It's time. It is time for the state to seriously take a look at the mechanisms that would be necessary to take it over we need to get the profit out of the system, and it's not a radical idea. Every state in the union has public utilities, even California has twenty two the biggest of Witcher Sacramento's, mud and LA DWP. They're not perfect. But there's sure a lot better than private profiteers. Well, I'm not sure I would agree with that. I think that there are some very good public utilities. But there are also some very good investor on utilities. I think the answer is not clear, I do agree with Loretta that. We should be considering that alternative particularly in light of the. The much greater regulation. That's going to be required on the safety side, given the catastrophic risk face now that just wasn't part of the situation twenty or thirty years ago. This used to be an industry that widows and orphans invested in because the investments were so reliable, and that's just not the case anymore. So I think we do have to consider alternative forms of utilities. How much do you think? There is other utilities and businesses across the country facing this kind of stress because of climate change. Well, I think it's different. It differs regionally, California. Clearly, the drought and forest fire issue is the major issue in other areas. It's hurricanes and its floods coastal flooding and all of these are going to be a threat one difference about wildfires. Is that the wildfire may start because of a utility action. Unlike a hurricane, and therefore, there's this question of how much of that, they are then responsible for and to the extent they are held responsible for the entire damage of it that is more than the value the firm, and so we are going to see that. Whereas when we've seen problems with after hurricanes with utilities, they weren't blamed for the hurricane. They were just playing, but like back to your earlier point though about how you know. You're not sure if it's if it's any better to have a public power company or an investor owned utility. There are many investment on utilities across the nation. It is a common model, but why don't they have the same problems? That has Lisa. Well, I think there's a lot of questions about infrastructure and maintenance, and who is maintaining those lines. I mean, there's no question that PG need does have more lions and rural areas of California that can be hard to get to that are more fire prone. They're also are more people living in those areas and that caused so when there is a fire this fires and more deadly. We've seen that unfortunately in the north bay and we've seen that three campfire. However, I think that PG any you know, they are committed. They are convicted felon there certainly been issues that they've had throughout the years. I think to me that climate change is certainly a part of this. But whether PG genie's maintaining their lines other regulators ensuring that they are doing so that's part of this equation. But I really disagree that we should let PG off the hook because of climate change if that were true, Southern California, Edison and ST, Jeannie. We have the same problems along with the Arizona utilities that face the same problems of the urban wild interface, and the only utility that has suffered as the catastrophes that has. Suffered and the only utility that is choosing to file for bankruptcy is PG any. So I agree that there are some good utilities out there who maintain their system. Protect their customers. PGA is not one of them PG has lost the trust of California. All right. We will leave it there. Certainly this story is not going away anytime soon. Lisa pickoff, white, Loretta Lynch and also Severin Bornstein. Thank you all. Thank you. And that will do it for us as always you can find more of our.

California Lisa pickoff PG genie Loretta Lynch rapairs LA DWP PGA Edison Severin Bornstein Arizona Jeannie thirty years
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You need to perhaps split them off. They have a gas and electric division, which will give them into a position and a size. It's more manageable. So that they can work with and not as cumbersome as it has been. So I think that's a first step that we can look at it. And then also changed the management of the company. It has not been a good management effort in team changed the board of directors to really change the culture of PG what we want at the end of the day is a utility that provides a safe reliable service at a reasonable rate. They failed you seem to be saying that you would support all this restructuring and let them stay private. Do you think the state should take over PG? Well, their conversations right now the state probably not take over PG knee. But there are other opportunities, and perhaps other governmental opportunities that could do at San Francisco's right now talking about becoming taking over the PG distribution system within the city you're talking about it as well. What about wildfire? ATM's? They're suing PGA d they're concerned that a bankruptcy will mean, they may not get the kinds of payments. They're entitled to if they win their cases, are you planning any legislation that would help them? Well, they should be concerned about that. Because bankruptcy could wipe wipe out a lot of those claims, but going back many years ago, there was the best settlements in the bankruptcies that were involved there there were trust funds established for asbestos victims. And we could do the same with fire victims. So at the end of the day. The public utilities commission will be the we'll have to approve any bankruptcies settlements or restructuring, and that will give us and the state and the PUC an opportunity to structure that in a way to protect those victims something you'll push going to push for that that's ratepayers and victims are the most important part of any settlement that we have to deal with the peachy need declared bankruptcy once before in two thousand one as a result of the energy crisis. Then what lessons which you say lawmakers learns from that situation that could be applied to what we're seeing. Now. Well, I think two things one. PGA was negotiating with the governor at the time in two thousand and one and then they were looking to find a settlement to prevent bankruptcy. Then the next day they filed for bankruptcy out from under the governor said at the time what a slap in the face. That was. So what we've learned is one you you can't really trust PG in those negotiations in two you have to be able to have a public utilities commission and members of that commission, who are honest, and who are looking out for the ratepayers best interest back then during that bankruptcy. We did not have that we had what I would consider a more corrupting relationship had an incestuous relationship between PG and the public utilities commission in that pretty much gave PG everything they wanted out of bankruptcy, which cost us a lot more. But also there were problems with the relationship with PG not only after that crisis in two thousand one. But even after the San Bruno explosion that happened in your district. We started learning about very cozy relationship. Very cozy. And that's because the same people who were there in two thousand and one we're still there in two thousand ten you have more trust in the UC. Now, I do I have a greater confidence. And then they are good people. They're honest people, and they're putting the public's best interest at heart in thatched, really which critical and how would you like to see governor Gavin Newsom handle this situation? He's barely in the governor's office. And he's facing this too tough job for him right now a tough position. But I think so far he's done a great job. Because what he's studying step back. He's kind of evaluating everything. He's not making any rash decisions. And we have to really find out what PG and he's going to do are. They actually going to file for bankruptcy or not. All right. Say Senator cherry hill. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. It was it was a pleasure. Serves about sixteen million customers over seventy thousand square miles. And while it's unlikely their license will go out could eventually end up paying more for their power. Bankruptcy proceedings. Could also jeopardize the Golden State screen energy goals. A Bill signed by former governor Jerry Brown last year requires the state to get all of his energy from renewable sources by twenty forty five but investing heavily in solar and wind projects may now be out of reach for the troubled utility joining me now to discuss this. Are we data journalist Lisa pickoff white seven Bornstein, a professor at the energy institute at UC Berkeley Haas school of business analyst Lynch, a former presidents of the California Public utilities commission. The state agency tasked with regulating utilities. Welcome to you. All well, Lisa. Let's begin with. You is a bankruptcy filing inevitable at this point, Oregon. We see a plan emerge over the next two weeks that could be that from happening. Well, we could see a plan like that the state could step in or the administration. Or also genie could decide not to file which does seem unlikely at this time. We also have seen some shareholder activity in the last week one. Hedge fund, for instance, wrote a letter protesting the bankruptcy saying that it's unnecessary. Loretta how likely is scenario did consumer groups are accusing PG and he of using this bankruptcy decision to pressure lawmakers into giving them a deal PG nieces has no choice, but to do this because of a wildfire bought liabilities and other liabilities from climate change. What do you make of the company statement? Oh, it's absolutely PG new strategic choice to threaten bankruptcy, and perhaps file for bankruptcy in order to leverage the state the policymakers and in order to just get as much money as they can out of the ratepayers pocket. To happen. PG has plenty of money. They're talking about future liabilities that haven't even been assessed by Cal fire much less by a court. So and the PUC has provided them plenty of money to keep the lights on this is a strategic corporate choice by a corporation that has proven that it is out of control. And what is the role of the California Public utilities commission. Here. UC beat the president. Is this CPU say partially to blame? Because it is the agency that is responsible for overseeing utilities like genie. Absolutely. Personally to blame the PUC for the last fifteen years has been way too cozy with the corporations it has regulated and has let them get away with way too much and mostly the PVC has failed in their central job. Which is to keep the system safe to protect the ratepayers the victims and the workers. So what do you think they should do? Now, given the plan that PG has declared that it will declare bankruptcy. Well, the PUC is an integral part of any bankruptcy reorganization. The utility cannot emerge from bankruptcy unless the PC supports and approves the deal. That happens the bankruptcy reorganization plan. And that's why it's so critical that the PUC is aligned with the new administration and professor Bornstein. There are some environmental implications here as well. California has an ambitious plans to transfer to thirty three percent renewable energy sources by two thousand twenty page is currently the state's largest investor in infrastructure for energy efficiency. For electric vehicles. How will this plan to declare bankruptcy affect all of that? Well, I think regardless of whether they declared bankruptcy PGN is going to be very distracted over the next few years with the lawsuits and with dealing with the fires. So this is going to be a major distraction. I've talked to people in the company who are working on those environmental initiatives, and they've confirmed that that's just not where the focus is right now. They're worried about what to do in the next week over the financial issues. This is gonna be a much more complex bankruptcy than we saw during the California electric crisis back in two thousand dollars in two thousand and one because now we're faced with a lot of choices of how to move forward from here that really weren't disgusting. Nobody was talking back in two thousand and one about converting the entire utility to publicly owned are breaking it up into smaller pieces. Now, we are talking about those. And I think that's going to be a central part of the discussion through this bankruptcy. Can you give us a snapshot of the potential ripple effect here as well to other clean energy sources that do business with PG, and he gives us a snapshot of how big the market is for that in California. And how this bankruptcy could begin to affect those providers. Well, we're what we're nearly at thirty three percent renewable energy right now, we are headed towards fifty percent by twenty thirty. There are a lot of providers that have long term contracts with PG, and that's one of the things the bankruptcy judge will look at and try to harvest money from and so this is going to have a ripple effect throughout the renewable community if PG and he doesn't pay bills, and if they are have to transfer money, a bankruptcy judge is looking to harvest as much money as they can for a certain set of certain set of creditors. And that is their primary goal. And that's not how the company runs or the or the regulator is Ron. So this really changes the focus away from these state goals and more towards. Simply moving money around. I like to respectfully disagree with my good friend Severin. I see several disturbing parallels between the bankruptcy in two thousand and one and PG's choice to file for bankruptcy in two thousand nineteen both of them are corporate strategic choices to be able to leverage state policymakers and to get every single penny. They possibly can from the rate payer, and I also disagree that other options on the table in two thousand and one Senator John Burton the head of the Senate, then argued that we needed a dollar for a hotdog if we were going to pay a dollar, we should get a hotdog. Meaning we should take over PG knees. Transmission system that wasn't accepted by the Davis administration. Then I certainly hope that the new administration seriously considered all options on the table because frankly, it's time to get the private profiteering PG corporate executives out of the picture. Get the profits out and spend those profits on the victims. I think one of the things that's also really different than in two thousand one. Is that PG is now convicted convicted felon and? There is a San Bruno explain exactly from the San Bruno explosion. So they're under a court. Order cannot commit any more crimes than there's currently federal judge. Also who is looking to see and there's going to be a hearing in two weeks to see whether you know, some of these fires on the electrical division said of the natural gas division, which is what you know, blew up in San berno. What's going and go on there? And he's already issued an order ordering PG genie to look at their electrical lines and see whether they are safe right now. Lisa really has an important point. This judge also ordered to show cause and what it does is Kim critical right now the probation convict conditions of the convicted felon PG corporation only address the gas system the natural gas pipelines. The judge is saying for the first time he's going to add probation conditions that that address the electrical system. The transmission lines now how PG responds and whether they agree or whether they fight is going to be a critical piece of. Information that we all should assess in terms of their willingness to step up, take responsibility and do the right thing or their continued rogue actions as a corporation that denies responsibility at every turn. So where do you see all of this going right because back in two thousand one that bankruptcy deal resulted in a bailout package.

PG PUC PG corporation California Public utilities co UC Lisa pickoff California San Francisco San Bruno Gavin Newsom professor Bornstein PGA Jerry Brown Oregon
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Going to be a critical piece of information that we all should assess in terms of their willingness to step up, take responsibility and do the right thing where their continued rogue actions as a corporation that denies responsibility at every turn. So where do you see all of this going right because back in two thousand one that bankrupt CDL resulted in a bailout package where rapairs had were saddled with higher rates. Do you think ratepayers will be better protected? This time. No, I think ratepayers are definitely going to pay some of this cost. First of all, they're just isn't going to be enough money to cover all of that liability in the company. So some of this is going to get pushed off somewhere, it could get pushed off the ratepayers. It could be paid by the government could be foisted on the people who bore the losses. I think the easiest thing politically is going to be to push it off on repairs. So I think it's very unlikely that ratepayers are gonna come through unscathed. Shareholders are certainly going to lose a lot of money probably all of their money. And then we're going to have this larger debate, regardless of the actions of PG, and what is the right way of organizing our electrical system going forward, given the increasing wildfire. So then should it be a publicly owned utility? And what would be the challenges with that? It's time. It is time for the state to seriously take a look at the mechanisms that would be necessary to take it over we need to get the profit out of the system, and it's not a radical idea. Every state in the union has public utilities, even California has twenty two the biggest of are Sacramento's, mud and LA DWP. They're not perfect. But there's sure a lot better than private profiteers. Well, I'm not sure I would agree with that. I think that there are some very good public utilities. But there are also some very good investor on utilities. I think the answer is not clear, I do agree with Loretta that. We should be considering that alternative particularly in light of the. The much greater regulation. That's going to be required on the safety side, given the catastrophic risk we face now that just wasn't part of the situation twenty or thirty years ago this used to be an industry that widows and orphans invested in because the investments were so reliable, and that's just not the case anymore. So I think we do have to consider alternative forms of utilities. You. Do you think there is other utilities and businesses across the country facing this kind of stress because of climate change. Well, I think it's different. It differs regionally California, clearly the drought and the forest fire issue is the major issue in other areas. It's hurricanes and its floods coastal flooding and all of these are going to be a threat one difference about wildfires. Is that the wildfire may start because of a utility action. Unlike a hurricane, and therefore there's this question of how much of that, they are then responsible for and to the extent they are held responsible for the entire damage of it that is more than the value of the firm. And so we are going to see that. Whereas when we've seen problems with after hurricanes with utilities, they weren't blamed for the hurricane. They were just playing. Back to your earlier point though about how you know. You're not sure if it's if it's any better to have a public power company or investor owned utility. There are many investor owned utilities across the nation. It is a common model, but why don't they have the same problems that PGN e has Lisa. Well, I think there's a lot of questions about infrastructure and maintenance, and who is maintaining those lines. I mean, there's no question that PG need does have more lines and rural areas of California that can be hard to get to that are more fire prone. They're also more people living in those areas and that caused so when there is a fire this fires more deadly. We've seen that unfortunately in the north bay and we've seen that during the campfire. However, I think that PG any you know, they are committed. They are convicted felon there certainly been issues that they've had throughout the years. I think to me that climate change is certainly part of this. But whether PG genie's maintaining their lines and other regulators ensuring that they are doing so that's part of this equation. But I really disagree that we should let PG off the hook because of climate change if that were true, Southern California, Edison, and ST Jeannie would have the same problems along with some of the utilities that face the same problems of the urban wild interface, and the only utility that has suffered as the catastrophes that has. Suffered and the only utility that is choosing to file for bankruptcy is PG any. So I agree that there are some good utilities out there who maintain their system. Protect their customers. PGA is not one of them PG has lost the trust of California. All right. We will leave it there. Certainly this story is not going away anytime soon. Lisa pickoff, white, Loretta Lynch and also Severin Bornstein. Thank you all. Thank you. And that will do it for us as always you can find more of our coverage at.

California PG genie Loretta Lynch Lisa pickoff rapairs LA DWP Sacramento Edison Severin Bornstein PGA thirty years
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Democrats appear likely to choose Nancy Pelosi as house speaker will ask her former chief of staff why she's the right person to lead. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm David Greene is our white President Trump's threat to close the US Mexico, border matters to people who live on either side and commute back and forth to work or to school and flight data. Recorder reveals the final moments before plane crashed in Indonesia, investigators believe flight controls that were meant to keep the plane level instead pointed downward it is November twenty eighth comedian and TV host Jon Stewart. Turns fifty six years old today. The news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. Senators who are angry with Saudi Arabia over the killing of a Washington Post columnist want to see the US stop supporting Saudi Arabia's military campaign in Yemen. And they could vote on a resolution soon as NPR's. Michele Keleman reports. The resolution would withdrawal US military support from the conflict in Yemen, whereas Saudi led coalition has been fighting rebels backed by Iran to devastating conflict that has left millions on the brink of famine secretary of state, Mike Pompeo argues at the Saudi partnership is vital to counter Iran in the region and in bed he criticizes what he calls. The Capitol Hill caterwauling in media pylon in the wake of the killing of Jamal kashogi. He's also making the case to senators that the conflict in Yemen would not end if the US was not involved. It would be a hell of a lot worse. He says that Cording to prepared remarks for his Senate briefing. Michelle Kellerman, NPR news. The State Department. There's been a large explosion in Kabul. Afghanistan's capital, Jennifer glass reports the target of the attack was a private security compound of Yakubov, constant explosion. That was heard in felt across the city is the latest attack here this time. The target was an international security firm in the past two weeks, dozens of Afghan civilians and soldiers have been killed in bold attacks. No one has claimed responsibility. So far for this one. It comes as the Afghan president is at a conference in Geneva and trying to focus on restarting peace. Talks Jennifer glass reporting, the high profile trial of three Chicago police officers is underway. The trio was charged with covering up for a white officer who killed seventeen year old McDonald who was black from member station. WBZ Patrick Smith reports. One current and two former officers are charged with obstruction of Justice official misconduct and conspiracy. Prosecutor Patricia Brown home says the officers filed false reports instead of serving in protecting all citizens of Chicago. The defendants tried to protect only one Jason Van Dyke by trying to create a false justification for the shooting of the quantum McDonnell in his opening statement defense attorney James McKay focused on the actions of McDonald before he was killed. About law and order. Look, one McDonald not following any laws that night cases. The charges against the officers are baseless and politically motivated for NPR news. I'm Patrick Smith. In chicago. The Associated Press reports President Trump's former campaign chairman has been communicating with the White House as he cooperated with special counsel, Robert Muller, Paul Manafort faces sentencing onto federal counts of conspiracy and had agreed to cooperate with Muller. As part of a plea deal. Muller is saying that Manafort lied to investigators during his cooperation a charge. Manafort denies on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrials are up one hundred seventy points. The NASDAQ is up more than twenty five. This is NPR from take you news. I'm Brian watt. A federal judge is calling for PG to explain any role. It may have played in the campfire in Butte county, the wildfire killed eight people and destroyed some fourteen thousand homes cake. Lisa pick off white reports peachy and he was put on probation last year. After a jury found the utility guilty of violating pipeline safety rules and obstructing an investigation into the deadly blast in San Bruno and twenty ten that sentence required. PG not to engage in any other crimes for five year period. Now, the federal judge wants a review of the utilities power line and implemented safety measures. Frankly, we need all the help we can get that state Senator Jerry hill PG and is a powerful entity in California and a powerful special interest and any outside help. I think can bring some fresh independence to the topic PG. He says it is reviewing the courts notice. I'm Lisa pickoff white cake. UD news Cal trans later today. Plans to shut down a section of highway one near Big.

US NPR president Yemen Chicago McDonald Trump Patrick Smith Jennifer glass Lisa pickoff Nancy Pelosi Steve Inskeep Saudi Arabia Mike Pompeo Jamal kashogi Robert Muller Indonesia David Greene Paul Manafort
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As some evacuation orders are lifted and Butte county, some survivors of the campfire are now heading back home. And as cuties Alex hall reports they're suffering all over again with the electricity back on but still no internet or phone Lafond coup. Barrows her husband and mother-in-law are now back in their home in the Woody hills north of Chico when they left they had no idea how bad the fire would get it eventually spread to a mile down the road from here. Now, some of the roads remained closed in many other people are still displaced Kubo says she feels isolated. We do have many friends that lost their homes. So that's upsetting. And then it makes us feel guilty Castillo. We have our beautiful home Cabrera's offered France to stay at her house with businesses closed few people around. She says her main concern now is looting. I'm Alex hall. K Q E news in Butte county. Meanwhile, a federal judge is calling for PG and E to explain. Any role? It may have played in the campfire and Butte county the wildfire killed eighty eight people in destroyed more than fourteen thousand homes kqeDorg, Lisa pickoff, white has more peachy and he was put on probation last year. After a jury found the utility guilty of violating pipeline safety rules and obstructing an investigation into the deadly blast in San Bruno in two thousand ten that sentence required. PG any not to engage in any other crimes for five year period. Now, the federal judge wants to review the utilities power line and implemented safety measures. Frankly, we need all the help we can get that state Senator Jerry hill PG is a powerful entity in California and a powerful special interest and any outside help. I think can bring some fresh independence to the topic. PG says it is reviewing the courts notice. I'm Lisa pickoff white cake UD news as the migrant crisis at the US Mexico border continues the mayor of Tijuana says. Sunday's closure at the border crossing near San Diego came with a hefty price tag cake lily Jamali reports from Mexico Tijuana mayor one Manuel de Stella says the US government closure of the border at Sanusi dro- on Sunday cost his city one hundred thirty four million pesos or six point five million dollars. You recently declared a humanitarian crisis in this city of one point six million where an estimated five thousand migrants have descended many of them hoping to seek asylum in the United States Mayorga Stallone has asked the Mexican federal government for funding to feed clothe and shelter the migrants, but he expressed frustration that Tijuana has yet to receive the help it's looking for. He says the price tag take care of the migrants is about five hundred and fifty thousand Mexican pesos twenty-five thousand US dollars per day. I'm really drew. Molly news in Oakland man, accused of setting at least one of several recent construction site fires in the East Bay has agreed to wait in jail for two months while federal prosecutors review potential charges against him. Here's kqeDorg Alex Emslie defendant, Dustin Bellinger, appeared briefly in an Oakland federal courtroom today. He was appointed a federal public defender and agreed to wait until late January to be formally charged a criminal complaint against Bellinger was briefly unsealed last week. It says he was connected to an October fire at a west Oakland apartment project by DNA swabbed from a reddish Brown smudge on a broken window sill match to sample from Bellinger in a previous criminal case against it..

Butte county PG Dustin Bellinger Alex hall Lisa pickoff Oakland Cabrera Tijuana US Mayorga Stallone Chico San Bruno Kubo Alex Emslie US government Senator Jerry hill Mexico Tijuana Castillo San Diego
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From K Q E D news. I'm Tiffany Cam high. The national weather service says another storm hitting northern California will cause a temporary closure of a major state highway. This storm is predicted to move towards southern California bringing in heavy rainfall in coastal areas. Meteorologist Steve Anderson says Cal trans will be closing a section of highway one near Big Sur tomorrow morning for forty eight hours. Now, the policy is when they expect a lot of rain down there. They just go ahead and close it preemptively to keep the public safe because there will be rocks and coming down onto the roadway at times last year, heavy rains caused multiple landslides along the highway one was so large it closed down the road and forced crews to build a new stretch of highway. The current storm is predicted to bring in between three to four inches of rain in the greater bay area. As some orders are lifted and view county. Some survivors of the by are now heading back home, and as KiKi Dee's, Alex hall reports they're suffering all over again with the electricity back on but still no internet or phone Lafond coup. Barrows her husband and mother-in-law are now back in their home in the Woody hills north of Chico when they left they had no idea how bad the fire would get it eventually spread to a mile down the road from here. Now, some of the roads remained closed in many other people are still displaced Kubo says she feels isolated. We do have many friends that lost their homes, so that's upsetting. And then it makes us feel guilty Castillo. We have our beautiful home Cabrera's is offered France to stay at her house with businesses closed and few people around. She says her main concern now is looting. I'm Alex hall. K Q E news in Butte county. Meanwhile, a federal judge is calling for PG and E to explain any role. It may have played in the campfire in Butte county the wildfire. Fire killed eighty eight people and destroyed more than fourteen thousand homes kqeDorg Lisa pickoff, white has more peachy and he was put on probation last year. After jury found the utility guilty of violating pipeline safety rules and obstructing an investigation into the deadly blast in San Bruno in two thousand ten that sentence required PG and not to engage in any other crimes for five year, period. Now, the federal judge wants a review of the utilities power line and implemented safety measures. Frankly, we need all the help we can get that state Senator Jerry hill PG is a powerful entity in California and a powerful special interest and any outside help. I think can bring some fresh independence to the topic PG and says it is reviewing the courts notice. I'm Lisa pickoff white cake UD news as the migrant crisis at the US Mexico border continues the mayor of Tijuana says Sunday's closure at the border crossing near San Diego came with a hefty price. Price tag cake lily Jamali reports from Mexico Tijuana mayor one Manuel de Stella says the US government closure of the border at Sanusi dro- on Sunday cost his city one hundred and thirty four million pesos or six point five million dollars. You recently declared a humanitarian crisis in this city of one point six million where an estimated five thousand migrants have descended many of them hoping to seek asylum in the United States. Mayor Stallone has asked the Mexican federal government for funding to feed clothe and shelter the migrants, but he expressed frustration that Tijuana has yet to receive the help it's looking for. He says the price tag to take care of the migrants is about five hundred and fifty thousand Mexican pesos twenty-five thousand US dollars per day. I'm really dramatically news in Oakland man, accused of setting at least one of several recent construction site fires in the East Bay has agreed to wait in jail for two months while federal prosecutors review. Potential charges against him. Here's Alex Emslie defendant. Dustin Bellinger, appeared briefly in Oakland federal courtroom today. He was appointed a federal public defender and agreed to wait until late January to be formally charged a criminal complaint against Bellinger was briefly unsealed last week. It says he was connected to an October fire at west Oakland apartment project by DNA swabbed from a reddish Brown smudge on a broken window sill in match to sample from Bellinger in a previous criminal case against it..

Dustin Bellinger California Butte county Lisa pickoff Alex hall Tijuana Mayor Stallone Oakland United States Cabrera Alex Emslie Big Sur Senator Jerry hill San Bruno US government Kubo KiKi Dee Steve Anderson Mexico Tijuana
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Year at this time she and her colleagues logos. And Lisa pickoff white reported on a fire that scorched wine country in Napa and Sonoma counties, they found that emergency response systems, including Cal fire. The state agency that response to wildfire aren't built to keep up with the fires that are burning hotter and faster than ever before. We're going to listen back to that story. And then dig into some of the lessons learned the research starts us off in the hills, above sonoma's counties. Biggest city Santa Rosa. Greg and Christina Wilson spend, October eighth puttering around their house, it's close to coffee shops and grocery stores, but from here, all you see are treetops and grassy hillsides. On sundays. We hang out at home. You know, I'm always working. So I was probably doing work and watching football whatever they're in their early fifties. She's a mortgage adviser. He's a lawyer. They have a two year old dog Shitsu named Maximus max for short. They live in a tight knit neighborhood up on a hill where neighbors take time to chat and after years of work remodeling. The house finally felt fully there's if feels like, you know, you're just in this serene setting so far away. This is like our dream on that Sunday, Christina stands in her new kitchen looking out of the windows. It was a lot windier than normal. And it was very warm was a warm day, Christina doesn't think much of the wind. But what she doesn't realize is that wind will soon bring fire to her doorstep inside the Cal fire war room. They're worried that something like that could happen sukey takes us there were officials are already on standby. I just watch firefighters are ready to mobilize. Because the national weather service has issued a red flag warning the highest alert for fire danger. Then around.

Christina Wilson sonoma Sonoma Lisa pickoff white Cal Napa football Greg two year
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KCRW

"Four lives injured hundreds of people number more than nine thousand buildings to the ground. They were the deadliest wildfires in state history. Until now. Just over a year later northern. California's campfire has been even deadlier research joins me with more Hamer. So Morita I go back to the fires you reported on in the show again it's been over a year. Do we know yet what sparked them? Well, we don't know what sparks the biggest and deadliest the tubs fire, which was the one that hit the city of Santa Rosa. But in about sixteen other cases throughout the northern part of the state. We do know that the electrical utility Pacific Gas and electric or PG any is being blamed by state investigators. And in many of those cases, we also know that the state says that PG knee acted negligently in that they did not upkeep their electrical equipment to the standards. They're expected to by law PG, and he could have powered down portions of the electrical grid preemptively during extreme weather, but it wasn't company policy to do that has it changed at all in the last year. Yeah, that's right. And this spring PG did come out and say that they were changing their policy that they now in certain conditions where it's very hot and dry in. The winds are very strong. They may in some situations. Tell residents that they could lose their power. And we actually did see them do that once this fall. But they did not do it in Butte county where the campfire broke out. And so there's questions being raised about whether that was the right decision. PG did report a disturbance on one of its big transmission lines, very close to where firefighters believe the campfire started. That's led to a lot of speculation about whether PG needed 'cause this latest fire, and what it could mean for the utilities future prison. Trump just visited the fire zones in both northern and southern California. He pledged federal help, but Trump has also been critical of state leaders blaming these fires on poor force management. What should we make of that criticism for about one hundred years the state and federal officials really worked to aggressively? Suppressed fires in wildlands. And what happens is that means a lot of dry fuel has built up over that time. But. This is well beyond just a forest management problem in California. We've had really extreme drought conditions in California. The heat that we're seeing year round which many attribute to climate change. So to say that this is just an issue of cleaning out more dead brush and trees is to really oversimplify a problem that has just exploded in its magnitude over the last couple of years. Thanks so much for talking to me today. Thanks for having me. I'll recent is reporter for she and her colleague Lisa pickoff white in sukey Lewis reported on last year's fire force. We're going to keep investigating the effects of wildfires including smoke year that is blanketed much California this year if you had to get treatment for heart or breathing problems. Or if you treated people for conditions related to smoke get in touch with us just takes the word fire two six three seven three five again takes fired two.

PG California Trump Santa Rosa Butte county Morita Pacific Gas Hamer reporter Lisa pickoff sukey Lewis one hundred years
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on KCRW

"Paradise. Backlash. Mandatory evacuations means that law enforcement starts going door to door to give people outright. Yeah. So they're going door to door, but already there are reports of people who are getting trapped including firefighters and first responders on the tape. I heard so many of these reports of first responders getting stuck inside the fire line, and they had to evacuate hospitals schools. And even once first responders made it into people who are trapped they still had to get them out to safety. So I've read that paradise actually didn't have plans for evacuation did that help streamline this incident. Their plans were were pretty much overwhelmed. As everybody rushed to get out of town. Traffic becomes this huge problem, and they try to shut down the main arteries leading out of town to have all traffic going outbound to help people escape from the fire. But even just setting that up, I becomes really chaotic, you know, people are abandoning their cars at one point they have to actually. Take another giant truck to push cars out of the way to clear the way for residents who are trying to stream out of this town and escaped from this fire. And the next big problem that I see Al is that people can't get in to help. And as we know now, many people did not make it out in some ways hearing this unfolded brings this horrible feeling of deja vu. I mean just last year when we talked about the worst wildfires in state history. The north bay firestorm. Yes. And so many issues are the same like as a reporter for me in in many ways. It feels like I'm having to tell the same story over again from the evacuation alerts that are not getting out to, you know, many of the people who are the victims of this fire who are elderly and disabled, and it's just heartbreaking. Sukey? He's been covering more of these fires because they keep getting worse. Last year at this time she and her colleagues Reza logos. And Lisa pickoff white reported on a fire that scorched wine country in Napa and Sonoma counties, they found that emergency response systems, including Cal fire. The state agency that responds to wildfire aren't built to keep up with the fires that are burning hotter and faster than ever before. We're going to listen back to that story. And then dig into some of the lessons learned.

reporter Lisa pickoff white Reza Napa Al Sonoma Cal
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on Reveal

"So many toy evacuations means that law enforcement starts going door to door to get people outright. Yeah. So they're going door to door, but already there are reports of people who are getting trapped including firefighters and first responders on the tape. I heard so many of these reports of first responders getting stuck inside the fire line, and they had to evacuate hospitals schools. And even once first responders made it into people who are trapped they still had to get them out to safety. So I've read the paradise actually did have plans for evacuation did that help streamline this incident. Their plans were were pretty much overwhelmed. As everybody rushed to get out of town. Traffic becomes this huge problem, and they try to shut down the main arteries leading out of town to have all traffic going outbound to help. People escape from the fire. But even just setting that up, I becomes really chaotic, you know, people are abandoning their cars at one point they have to actually take another giant truck to push cars out of the way to clear the way for residents who are trying to stream out of this town and escape from this fire and the next big problem that I see I'll is that people can't get in to help. And as we know now, many people did not make it out in some ways hearing this unfold brings this horrible feeling of deja vu. I mean just last year when we talked about the worst wildfires in state history. The north bay firestorm. Yes. And so many issues are the same like as a reporter for me in in many ways. It feels like I'm having to tell the same story over again from the evacuation alerts that are not getting out to, you know, many of the people who are the victims of this fire who are elderly and disabled, and it's just heartbreaking. Sukey has been covering more of these fires because well, they keep getting worse last year at this time she and her colleagues we so log on and Lisa pickoff white reported on a fire that scorched one country in.

reporter Sukey Lisa pickoff white
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Singular focus is saving human lives including their own at ten thirty cal fire starts calling local law enforcement agencies and napa and sonoma to initiate evacuations in this game of telephone you can hear a lot go wrong hi it's michelle i need a reverse nine one one done okay she'll cal fire for the calistoga area mandatory evacuations this cal fire employee is asking a napa county operator reverse nine one one that's an evacuation alert that can target specific neighborhoods warning people fire is approaching it calls home phones but only about half of americans have landlines these days copy will advise cal fire okay i'm sorry what's your question okay they reversed when are you seeing nichole or i need you guys to send out a reverse nine one one so we can tell them evacuate i'm just not i'm sorry i'm not familiar with whatever verse nine one one is i'm sorry this is another one of those places where you can hear the system breaking down the operator doesn't even know what cal fire is talking about but that's actually because each county in california there are fifty eight uses different technologies with different names to alert people to cal fire it's reversed nine one one to napa it's called nixon okay it's going out to the public and everyone needs to go to all their phones mandatory evacuation reporters maurice logos and lisa pickoff white are here with me in studio and i gotta say listening to that again it's it's really intense i know you guys got a lot of reaction with this story but marita it's now been more than six months since all those fire started do we know anything more about what sparked them here in pg the local utility company they told you that it wasn't their policy to shut down the grid when they're these high winds going on has that changed at all.

california nixon lisa pickoff marita napa sonoma calistoga cal nichole maurice logos ten thirty cal six months
"lisa pickoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"lisa pickoff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The night of sunday october eight the northern california hills are parched after a long summer a hot dry wind is blowing a woman is enormous wine country calls nine one one i we need fire engines out your media we needed him out here and our ago people are in the past of his wildfire because how big is the fire fire ma'am listen i warned about that become the deadliest wildfires in california's history forty four for weeks fires burned across eight counties including napa famous for its vineyards on the night the five start cal fire the state agency that response to wildfires gets call after call all night and it was unbelievable i mean that is really the sound that i remember is just the phones did not stop blaming the calls did not stop coming for how unit chief anatoly berlioux supervisors cow fires regional command center in napa valley it's basically her war it smells of coffee and sweat to dispatchers answer the phones as fast as they can they can sold a giant map northern california pinned to the wall dotted with maggots purple ones stand for medical use yellow for bulldozers small red ones for engines in big red arrows for fire they deploy these resources using a system that ridge needed in california one called mutual aid cinema outta resources what do they do they call their neighboring county napa county and ask for them to help and napa county would ordinarily say sure we'd love to come help you and sends there's resources that's the normal thing that happens birla believed the states mutual aid system be able to handle whatever nature throughout it but like the floods in houston and the hurricanes in florida and puerto rico climate change has changed the game making whether events more extreme across the country so while emergency responders put their lives on the line are the systems prepared to handle disasters of this magnitude that's what reporters lisa pickoff white sukey lewis imerese logos of in san francisco wanted to find out after listening to thousands of nine one one calls and dispatch recordings and talking to dozens of first responders and state officials in.

california napa napa valley napa county houston florida san francisco anatoly berlioux birla puerto rico lisa pickoff