16 Burst results for "Lisa Mcfadden"

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Community action agency is helping people with their taxes for free. It's called the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program in its run out of a Lynn based community action agency called Leo. What did they do? Success. Hopeful that makes $56,000 or left any year. No prepare and file their home in state income tax for three. Lisa McFadden with Leo tells me this is the third year they've provided the service and they're seeing a big uptick in interest this year, in part because so many people Have been impacted economically by the pandemic. Carl Steven, stop BBC Boston's news radio 50 Wait, Let's check on Wall Street on this Friday, Andrew a day Is that Bloomberg? I can envision it today. Speaking of Wall Street, you get a record, you get a record, not for you. Yeah, not everybody the down finish near its all time high. The other main vault street indexes, though, extended their records down Rose 92. NASDAQ up 79 Hasn't P 515 is the market bet The effort to go big on financial stimulus in Washington just got a big boost from today's weaker than forecast January jobs report. As much as the U. S economy suffered from the pandemic in 2020, the global economy suffered even more. The result was that we Americans bought a lot more stuff from other countries than people in those other countries bought our stuff. U. S trade deficit with automation spiked to $678.7 billion for all of 2020 That is the highest since 2008 the year of the financial system. Meltdown and wrote a Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's names Right guys ever.

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Except Hopeful that X $56,000 or less in a year. No prepare and file their bedroom and state income tax for three. Lisa McFadden with Leo tells me this is the third year they've provided the service and they're seeing a big uptick in interest this year, in part because so many people Have been impacted economically by the pandemic. Carl Steven stop BBC, Boston's news radio and see Alan Georgia Right now battle for the Jones got very well respected Invitational golf tournament down South WBC's drama, Holland tells us the talk among the players is still Masters champion Patrick Re for those who don't follow golf. Reed found himself in the spotlight for all the wrong reasons last week, winning the farmers Insurance open after a controversial free drop, claiming his ball was embedded in the ground when probably not local. For Nick Mark Cario didn't like what he saw from Reed. Even though Reid asked for a rules official, he almost went to the ball looking for that ruling, right? I'm not once I quickly give out the designation of like you're a cheater. You'll lay in the bed you make essentially which I think for him is unfortunately happy now a little bit, And he says he thinks the PGA might want to reevaluate how lenient they are with some of these pros when it comes to the rules of golf, you know, it's interesting. I actually feel like the rules officials in mass and otherwise are a lot more stringent than the One of the PGA to work and look in Georgia today, by the way, Nick Mark Cario, the Jones Cup on the line True Mo Holland WBZ Boston's NewsRadio in Pandemic Times..

Nick Mark Cario golf Boston Jones Reed Pandemic Times Lisa McFadden Reid farmers Insurance Alan Georgia Patrick Re Carl Steven Leo Holland Georgia BBC official
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:29 min | 3 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Jill Schlessinger with more U Turn. Hospitality is having some tough times and retails having some tough times, but interestingly professional and business services added 97,000 jobs last month. I think that's a very good sign. I mean, I think that there are companies that would like to hire but are somewhat unsure. But post pandemic looks like And this time of year. Many of us are thinking about our taxes. In Lynn. There is now a community action agency helping people with that for free. It's called the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program in its run out of a Lynn based community action agency called Leo. What did they do that? Hopeful that makes $56,000 or less Yeah. No prepare and file their home in state income tax for three. Lisa McFadden with Leo tells me this is the third year they've provided the service and they're seeing a big uptick in interest this year, in part because so many people Have been impacted economically by the pandemic. Carl Steven stop BBC. Boston's news radio. The FBI says two local men have been arrested for their roles in breaching the U. S Capitol last month. They are from Maine and Massachusetts, and we spoke earlier with a B C's Eric hitters G about support in Washington from both sides of the aisle for domestic terror bills because experts are warning these kinds of attacks could grow. There's a real concern about the next couple of months specifically and whether it's some of the groups responsible for the capital seed will continue to try and Press the case over the election claims or or or whether they've seen that it's an emboldening act isn't as an opening act for what made you come to push it even further extremist agenda. And whether there's a new statute may or may not be necessary. We've talked to a number of law enforcement experts who say that there are plenty of statutes on the books that can handle these kinds of cases. You know, the FBI just have to bring them, but right now they're caught up in all of these. Capital cases so many cases. In fact, there's been an appeal to all the U. S Attorney's office is to send some personnel the D C. To help prosecute and investigate some of those cases. S O. The FBI says 37 year old Kyle Fitzsimmons of Lebanon Main and 33 year old Brian McCreary of North Adams, Massachusetts, were arrested Thursday in their home states. Documents out of court, alleging Fitzsimmons attacked police trying to get into the building. McCreary captured in photos already inside the Capitol. So Big week next week, the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Well, this time he's no longer president. The Senate trial is set to start and lawyers for Donald Trump called the trial itself unconstitutional. How do you impeach somebody? That's no longer in office. ABC is Jonathan Karl. With more from Capitol Hill, Trump has been convinced by his legal advisers and by his political allies that it would be a terrible mistake. If he keeps it simple and simply allows his lawyers toe argue that holding a new impeachment trial of an ex presidents unconstitutional, he is virtually guaranteed to be acquitted. For their part, the House managers will portray his refusal to testify as essentially an admission of guilt. And this particular impeachment is a single article accusing the former president of inciting the insurrection that unfolded at the Capitol last month. All right. We're going to go to SEA Island, Georgia, There is a big time local golfer teeing it up. Local golfer Nick Mark Cario, who holds the course record at Bradford Country Club. Behavioral is making his pushing the Jones Cup right now It's kind of mid AM's. It's a really great tournament to get an invite to. And as the pros continue on in Phoenix this week, I had to ask one of the big time golfers saying about Patrick Reid, who took a drop last week after declaring embedded Ball for most watching. The move was well, questionable. If you haven't embedded ball, you know right away, right? You usually don't need to bring in what they call a referee or whatever you usually don't need that whatsoever, so he didn't like it. He thought the whole thing was weird. And Reed went on to win the farmers Insurance open last week. And this is not Reed's first running with the rules because of what's happened Previously, he has to be perfect. There's no margin for error. That's what the golf is air saying, Enjoy. Whatever golf you watch this week is your Super Bowl appetizer. Ramo, Holland WBC Boston's news.

Donald Trump FBI Brian McCreary Boston president Leo Jill Schlessinger Massachusetts Reed Kyle Fitzsimmons Lynn Nick Mark Cario SEA Island Senate BBC Carl Steven farmers Insurance ABC
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

03:16 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"We didn't really <Speech_Female> know what the future was <Speech_Female> going to hold <Speech_Female> So we really focused <Speech_Female> on short-term accomplishments <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that also allowed our team <Speech_Female> especially those who <Speech_Female> had children who <Speech_Female> no longer had daycare <Speech_Female> or school <Speech_Female> to be able <Speech_Female> to have a little bit more <Speech_Female> flexibility <Speech_Female> <hes> and <Speech_Female> be able to take <Speech_Female> care of their families <Speech_Female> as well <Speech_Female> as the pandemics <Speech_Female> gone on. We've been very <Speech_Female> fortunate that <Speech_Female> <hes> up until recently <Speech_Music_Female> we were pretty <Speech_Female> stable <hes> <Speech_Female> college kids <Speech_Female> going back to school <Speech_Female> has. <Speech_Female> Not. Surprisingly <Speech_Female> driven <Speech_Female> are a lot of <Speech_Female> numbers <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And you <Speech_Female> know I think we're <Speech_Female> continuing to monitor <Speech_Female> the situation <Speech_Female> for me. It's really <Speech_Female> made sure that <Speech_Female> I'm much more <Speech_Female> aware of what people's <Speech_Female> risk factors <Speech_Female> are as well because <Speech_Female> some people are much <Speech_Female> more willing to <Speech_Female> say. <Speech_Female> This'll be fine <Speech_Female> I'm willing to take <Speech_Female> risk and others are much <Speech_Female> more likely to say I'm I'm <Speech_Female> really nervous I'm really <Speech_Female> hesitant and so <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> one of the things I've been impressed <Speech_Female> from our organization <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> <hes> we <Speech_Female> as an organization <Speech_Female> immediately <Speech_Female> started implementing <Speech_Female> regular frequent <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> talking points <Speech_Female> just <Speech_Female> the ability for us to <Speech_Female> focus <Speech_Female> on what our staff <Speech_Female> needed whether <Speech_Female> that was in the clinic or <Speech_Female> in our world what do <Speech_Female> our teams need? What <Speech_Female> do we need to be telling them? <Speech_Female> How can we keep <Speech_Female> them informed and we started <Speech_Female> what we called our facts <Silence> over fear campaign. <Speech_Female> And that <Speech_Female> allowed us to push <Speech_Female> out tons of information <Speech_Female> whether it was about <Speech_Female> testing numbers <Speech_Female> are PPA supplies <Speech_Female> whatever was <Speech_Female> then we <Speech_Female> looked for a lot of feedback <Speech_Female> getting a lot of information <Speech_Female> back from our <Speech_Female> teams so that <Speech_Female> we could really understand <Speech_Female> where <Silence> they had <Speech_Female> concerns, <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> we have P. Dashboard. <Speech_Female> Now people are <Speech_Female> worried that we don't have <Speech_Female> enough personal protective <Speech_Female> equipment. So everyone <Speech_Female> can see how <Speech_Female> much pp we <Speech_Female> have, and that were were <Speech_Female> well-stocked <Speech_Female> and so those are the <Speech_Female> types of things that I think <Speech_Female> our organization <Speech_Female> has done as we really <Silence> transition to. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Focusing on our staff, <Speech_Female> communicating <Speech_Female> effectively <Speech_Female> as possible <Speech_Female> and just making sure <Speech_Female> we met their needs <Speech_Female> and we also focused on <Speech_Female> wellness in providing <Speech_Female> a lot of resources <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Female> think for us as <Speech_Female> a healthcare organization <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It was <Speech_Female> how do we take care of <Speech_Female> our people and <Speech_Female> how do we take care of our communities <Speech_Female> and make <Speech_Female> sure we navigate the sufficiently <Speech_Female> and I think that's <Speech_Female> what it's all about <Speech_Female> and that's for me by <Speech_Female> my lesson is <Speech_Female> people respond <Speech_Female> really well <SpeakerChange> when you focus <Speech_Female> on them and you take <Speech_Female> care of them and you take <Speech_Female> care of your community, <Speech_Female> the response <Speech_Female> is that people <Speech_Female> are are there <Speech_Female> for you as well <Speech_Female> and I think. <Speech_Female> That's been my <Speech_Female> key take home is <Speech_Female> take care of each <Speech_Female> other through this because that's <Speech_Female> the only way we're all GonNa <Speech_Female> get through <Speech_Male> this and <SpeakerChange> on <Silence> the other side. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Rate words. We've been talking <Speech_Male> with Dr Lisa. <Speech_Male> McFadden <Speech_Male> she <Speech_Male> is the director of Engineering <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> applied. <Speech_Male> Science at <Speech_Male> Stanford <Speech_Male> skews Me Sanford. <Speech_Male> Health <Speech_Male> in South Dakota <Speech_Male> North Dakota <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Minnesota as well as <Speech_Male> places in Africa <Speech_Male> Dr. McFadden <Speech_Male> thank you for taking <Silence> time to talk <SpeakerChange> to moving <Speech_Female> to live. <Speech_Female> Inc You so <Silence> much it's been a pleasure. <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> the latest episode of moving <Speech_Music_Male> to live they <Speech_Music_Male> check out the show <Speech_Music_Male> notes for contact information <Speech_Music_Male> for our latest <Speech_Music_Male> guest as well as <Speech_Music_Male> links about all the things <Speech_Music_Male> we talked about. <Speech_Music_Male> Intern <Speech_Music_Male> exit music is <Speech_Music_Male> traveling light by Jason <Speech_Music_Male> Chaffetz. <Speech_Music_Male> You can subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> to moving to live on stitcher <Speech_Music_Male> apple <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts and Google <Speech_Music_Male> play. It'd

Google Intern South Dakota Dr Lisa. Dr. McFadden Jason Minnesota director of Engineering North Dakota Africa
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

05:20 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"We knew that we wanted to bring the experts together with the athlete in mind to really be able to help that athlete perform their best in order to do that. You can't just have each person handing off. Right. You all have to understand each other's areas and whatnot. So we really did in the beginning prioritize like about each other's areas having some of those conversations and built a program together. We golf research are golf head golf pro has always been involved in the conversations about where we're taking our research. What those research questions are. He's not a researcher, but we can't answer a question unless we know what's actually important and we researchers aren't going to know what's important without talking to the golf professional. So a lot of these conversations were not meant to be conversation say about pelvic tilt, they were meant to be conversations about programming and operations and things like that. But out of necessity, you have to be able to understand what you're talking about and luckily people were able to say I don't understand what you're saying here I don't understand what you're saying there so I think just Being a team that works together some of these conversations happen more naturally, and then you end up making the time because if you don't understand then you actually can't get to the point where you work with the athlete and help the Athlete get better and we've gotten to the point now where are three bio-mechanics testing with motion capture is an integral. Part, of our golf instruction you know in our PT's have a movement component that's an integral part of working with golfers, and so we couldn't get there without all these pieces to get us to that point. Does that make sense? It does I know one of the conversations that I can't recall when I had her who I had it with. Probably was not more like a conversation with more likely teaching to me is you know there's always the push poll that I know and what might professional organizations you know the applied people always say well, there's just too much research at this conference and the researchers always say there's too much applied stuff. And? I think very many of forget if you're saying there's too much research stuff you're in your applied silo or vice versa, and the fact is if there wasn't an applicable use, you wouldn't be able to do the more basic things the research on the other hand. If there wasn't the research, we probably would still be saying you know you lost a leg. Well, here's a wooden stick to put on your leg and good luck with getting down the Ski Hill. Absolutely and I think it's interesting because the medical communities really adopted like we need to do both right and so the sports community getting their one of the things that's been really fun has been being involved with like We're GONNA be the next host for the World Scientific Congress Golf that'll be here in Sioux falls next year and that's been really fun. because..

researcher golf Ski Hill Sioux falls
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:34 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"And. So I think that was one of the most impactful things that he did. So actually that's the story I share with people as one of the first thing. fucking interject on that I had a similar experience I had one of the members of my committee exercise physiologists his area of expertise lactate metabolism, and we had a lactate seminar and somebody said you know, could you draw molecule of lactate up on the board because you know might help us understand these things you're talking about he went up on the board and started drawing said you know we're GonNa? Take a five minute break because I think this is correct but I wanNA check and make sure and I remember talking with a couple of my friends like nobody awhile he's an idiot it's like, wow, he's got enough confidence to say I don't know. Let me go check and I think when he said something for in subsequent years you had a tendency to take more seriously because you realize he wasn't. Trying to say I know everything. Right and I think those are important things and I don't know when you were defending but I know I didn't have smartphones back when I was defending and so that wasn't a thing. You can just pull up quickly add to go get your book Ouden. But Yeah I mean I think that's an important thing is to to help people understand that perspective and you know my adviser helps me with Abbott really to help mentor weather it students or your staff or You know even others let's just that perspective because I think we do all have the ability to learn from each other and You know I think that's what I try to model and try to encourage in. It's really hard because you have to be able to deal with being vulnerable and that's a really difficult thing is we can't old deal with being vulnerable in front of other people and the there's a trust of about that and there's Opening yourself up to being wrong or not knowing and if you get shot down for that quickly, you're going to be less likely to do that again. So it's really just helping people to know that that's sort of expected. It's expected that you open up to that and I think too sometimes it's GonNa be having difficult conversations I remember back to one of our very first conversation. So we like to try to break down the silos. That's what we what we do and I think back to one of our first conversations with our golf instructors are physical therapists in our biomechanical engineers where we all had different definitions on what pelvic tilt what's You know some of us were thinking about it one way some western hanging about it in another way, and the golf instructors have different jargon than the physical therapists and physical therapists have a different jargon, the biomedical engineers and we set in our all arguing same point. And The two good things happen from that one is we weren't afraid to have the conversation with each other..

golf Abbott
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:04 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"So I am actually private pilots a lot of insight into the the aviation world as well, and if there's ever an accident pilots dive into that, right whether you know it was a simple hangar rash accident for you Kinda just. Dented, you're playing on the hanger. Everyone's supposed to go back and say, okay, I reflect on this. What did we do? Wrong where can we do better and so we've been starting to implement what I call lessons learned whether it's a quick email from everybody who participated in something just saying, okay. Let's talk about what we did really well, and let's talk about where we could have improved or if it's something that's a little bit more complicated getting everybody together and having a more difficult discussion you know something a little bit sideways. How do we get together and talk about that? The other thing we're trying to do is Kind of be more proactive as well. So like with our bio mechanics team were really starting. We're actually GONNA start having a bio mechanics, grand rounds and really start saying okay. Let's start learning from each other. Let's actually present on what we're doing and open it up to comments and those types of things and I know one of your specific areas as well as how'd you take break these silos in one of the things about the silos is that? y'All speak a different language and there's a little bit of ego that comes into it as well. Right I mean you end up with a lot of people who are experts in their fields trying to talk about something that's very much related to their field but I'll talk about a differently and they all see it a little bit differently we all. Bring in our own perceptions and our biases in our expertise that all kind of can cause people to to butt heads and so one of the things we're always trying to work on as well as hearing other people and challenging other people respectfully and professionally because we can challenge.

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:25 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Medicine example is you are the person at the top one of the People's the top. How do you work to develop a good culture versus a bad cultured? Obviously, this could be a five hour or five day conversation. But you know we we don't have five hours or five days if you were. If you were to offer somebody a suggestion or to mentor, you know a young professional who was in the leadership role. What two or three tips that somebody can really do to promote a healthy culture? In their work environment. I think the first thing is is I'll be I'll be honest like you know there's there's always going to be moments for your question. If you have a good culture, there's always going to be kind of those those valleys for your like all no one's getting along or people are grumpy or whatever and I think one of the things is not to get discouraged. To think what's going on what we stopped doing, what are what could we do better and really just keep that always keep a pulse on it. Always the what can we do better? Where is this grumpiness coming from or whatever Is it a lack of communication as at a lack of those those appreciation moments what are those things I think the other is to just really get to know your staff and gets know how they feel appreciated get to know You know how to communicate with them. Cascading communication is incredibly important One of the series one of the authors I've learned a lot from over the last year has been Patrick Schone I've read a lot of his books and I think I would encourage any new leader to read five dysfunctions of a team to be honest. It's one of the most difficult things is to try to build a culture. I'm still definitely not saying I'm an expert, but how you build trust and accountability and honesty and openness, and all of those things across the team is really important and something that I'm even revisiting right now I think the last thing I would share just become comfortable with being uncomfortable That's that's the hardest thing for me. I've taken a lot of personality tests in one of the things that I am is an achiever from the Graham and I'm an achiever helper enthusiasts. Those three things really define me. But as an achiever, it's really difficult to be uncomfortable because you like to collect your gold stars and I think that's one of the things that I've learned is, how do you become comfortable with being uncomfortable with challenging other people challenging yourself because project onto others to if I have to have a difficult How they're feeling and that makes me even more uncomfortable. I guess Italy me to my last point which I lied last but self reflections important in really getting to know yourself. That's I think AAA important as well..

Graham Patrick Schone Italy
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

03:27 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"It's a little bit of both. I actually probably don't travel as much as I would like to part of that is because. I had a unique situation when we moved out from. California that my husband stayed there and I brought my two young children with me and so There's there's a little bit of personal work life balance that has to go into your decision making as to how you manage across a big enterprise like this Luckily, I'm very tech savvy. So I believe in lots of face to face communication like we have right now of zoom or. skype for business and lots of visits whenever possible but it is it is difficult to be able to do things. So it's really about building a team that you trust on the ground and being able to have. Good communication with them and really understand what everyone's trying to accomplish. So the people can get their jobs done without you being there in really just making sure that people know what they're supposed to be doing and have ownership over that I'm very fortunate I have a really good team. So in general, my travel is limited because of that. And I know from looking at your bio in the questionnaire you filled out even though Sanford health is pretty good size you have been involved with other organizations that are larger This may be a loaded question it's not meant to be Do you find it's easier to do as you said, you are an individual with unique traits, unique skills, which we all have defined. It's easier to have them recognised and it makes it easier to do your job because the other people are because it's a smaller organization than some of the larger organizations or institutions you may have been involved in the past. I think that. The question you're asking actually comes down to culture A small organization can have a not great culture. A large organization can have a great culture and it's really about being a place that makes you feel home and that makes you feel valued an I've been very lucky. I've had a lot of really really good support in champions throughout my career you know. Being being in a male dominated field you sort of have to have a lot of people who support you and I've been very, very fortunate whether it was in Grad school with a lot of support from faculty across multiple departments or working at L. Three where I have a tremendous leader that I worked for when I started. There Dr Chan was was great and trained me up and then Dr Similar as well. So we really had a family there. We would play Frisbee twice a week and it was it was like being a family we have birthday parties. And everything and it was a huge organization but our our group was was very close and now here seeing inferred is the same thing we're like a family we talk to each other we have regular communication and we're really focused on what kind of culture we want to build because we wanNA make sure that we're acknowledging the special traits of everybody and That's what I've I've really appreciated about all the places I've worked is that when I go and interview I'm really looking for culture fit and I've been very fortunate to find good cultures wherever I've gone. Well, put on I'm always curious with this especially since we're in the middle of COVID. As I mentioned the beginning of the interview. Some of our best interviews come from somebody that I've interviewed in the pastor says, Hey, you need to interview this and Dr Gillam said you know you need to talk to Lisa she's. You talk about a a culture and you're somebody who's in a position with sports..

Dr Chan Sanford health Dr Gillam Lisa COVID California
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

05:54 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Yep for sure you know and and I think that's They're still days for I. Personally Love Love Surgery Right I still do I've watched surgical shows on TV. I. Love Surgery I was very lucky that I was able to actually do a little bit of that kind of stuff in in SM animal labs when I was in Grad school as well and so I do love surgery I enjoy it, and I will say there's some days where I kind of go that would have been a lot of fun and then there's other days where I do get to do those things with my kids and be at their competitions and things like that and I go. I'm really glad I'm here. So you know I. It's definitely a personal decision as to what direction you choose, and I think also really being able to reflect upon who you are and what's important to you and really go down a path that allows you to reflect your values. And really be true to yourself and values are different. That's very legitimate and we all end up in different asset fit us very well. I think that's excellently put i. know there's often the pressure even as graduate student that depending on the lab that you're in or depending on what the other students goals are. There's kind of the pressure if you don't do this, whatever this may be then you're either lesser than the rest of us or you're not fulfilling your goal of your duty and you're describing your decision, you went through to where to pursue a doctorate and I am one hundred percent with you tick the mountains because you never know when you could when you can have the opportunity to do that. I mean they're just absolutely beautiful quality of life. But. I'm curious. From what you're describing, you would think that you would end up to no negative connotation here but a nerd in the lab pumping out research and it sounds like working at Sanford Sports Science. You do a little bit more than that. What was the decision behind that? When you finished your doctor said, you know do I wanna go hard core quote unquote nerd in the lab or do I wanna be more broad and maybe not only basic, but also applied in the direction that I used by degrees. That's a that's a great question I. think part of it is really about who I am as a person as well. So in Graduate School I was also a chair of a conference I was Graduate School Advisory Council. Chair, I was an instructor and my adviser left after my second year and I did my phd over skype for two years because he went and worked at the Australian Institute of Sport as the director of bio mechanics there, and so I ended up doing a lot of that. So I've always had somewhat of a unique experience which I think lended itself to me. Being open to those, I'm also a very social person I like helping people and So actually after Grad School, I ended up taking a job as a an engineer. At L. Communications, which is a defense contractor San Diego and I was the scientist who was diving into data and solving problems and all of those types of things But some of the skill sets that I have in terms of communication or project management organization. That I had developed in other experiences lend itself well to identifying that I'd be really good at working with our customers would be really good at putting together strategies and things like that, and so some of those those skills and natural talents lended itself to my taking on some of those roles and then really training those Al Flurry and then Sanford came looking for somebody to help lead..

Grad school Graduate School I instructor Sanford Sports Science graduate student Graduate School Advisory Counc Al Flurry Sanford L. Communications San Diego engineer scientist Australian Institute of Sport director
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:03 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well? I know I remember when I took an adapted class. In my undergraduate degree we had a student on campus. This is a very small college Gettysburg College who had lost above the knee amputation due to bone cancer and he came in and talked to are adapted class that know seen him around campus and he played pick up basketball with but I never realized one of the things he said you can probably correct me on this by numbers are off that. He said he typically took him. Almost twice as much energy to play basketball save for forty five minutes than somebody like me who was able if that's the correct term I remember that time thinking that's just absolutely amazing. Yeah for sure I, mean, there's a lot of things that we take for granted I think and things that we probably don't understand There's definitely opportunities out there to learn and then to figure out how we can take those in improve people's lives and and help them out in one of the people who's really inspired me was. Dr Hugh Her from the He's I think he was at mit I could be incorrect. A Harvard but he was an amputee himself and has really made significant strides in the way that we look at prosthetics, ankle movement and those types of things so..

Robotics Institute basketball Carnegie Mellon Dr Hugh Her Utah Gettysburg College University of Utah US Harvard skiing NSF Grad School
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. . We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, , anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. . Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. . Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. . now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. . To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. . So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. . Absolutely thank you for having me. . My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. . Always ask is to get an elevator. . You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so , what do you do what your thirty second? ? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. . I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats <hes>. . But yeah so. . The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with <hes> athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. . So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better <hes>, , and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. . Students through mentorship in education. . Right. Now, . , if I'm correct your in South Dakota. . Yes that's correct. . I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. . And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. . York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. . Pennsylvania, , I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. . Well, , it's funny. . I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. . Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama <hes> on a couple of different business trip. So . it sounds like we've got a similar. . Set of journeys <hes> But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go <hes> not quite as little as where I heard you up. . But? ? Yes. . So I grew up on Lake Ontario <hes>. . My Dad was a doctor in I. . Always always wanted to be a doctor <hes> specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, , and my dad always told me no, , you do not <hes>. . He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, , no, , No, no , dad engineers are big nerds. . And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and <hes> I. . Really suggest you become an engineer. . So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. . But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. . Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, , which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in <hes>. . In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. . decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering <hes> where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. . <hes> throughout my Undergrad <hes> I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next <hes> I started getting really interested in robotics and in two <hes> that feel that was emerging <hes> back. . Then <hes> decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. . So <hes> I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of <hes> ski. . Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. . They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. . So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to <hes> kind of help <hes> people that you needed additional help outside of. . Being Super, , rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives <hes>, , and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. . My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon <hes> at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School <hes>, , and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, , we should go skiing. . So, , <hes> Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but <hes> decided to go out to Utah <hes> where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, , and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. . So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My . my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, , supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, , and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. . So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. . And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. . If you contract one all the way, , you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles <noise> eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. . So what does that look like as well? ?

Lisa McFadden South Dakota Pittsburgh Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Alabama Meyer Grad School York New York Pennsylvania
Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 8 months ago

Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar..

Lisa McFadden South Dakota Pittsburgh Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Alabama Meyer Grad School York New York Pennsylvania
"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

01:49 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"Moving to live is a podcast about movement and exercise would bring you interviews with.

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

Moving2Live

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"lisa mcfadden" Discussed on Moving2Live

"One of the really unique things about the shop that I work for here Sanford Power Stanford Health is under the same roof. We have strength conditioning coaches we have trainers, we have physical therapists, team docs we have the physicians, the surgeons we have me doing the sports side. We've got an excellent crew by mechanics, folks, performance bio mechanics moving analysis. We do some really awesome three d motion capture stuff with with golf with. Throwing mechanics with kicking mechanics. I don't know all of these people's. Degrees and what's required I I don't know I. Do know that when I have an athlete that I'm working with a maybe a little moving balance that I see something I can go to my colleagues and say, let's let's figure this out. So again I recognize your question was about certifications in licensors and those big fancy. Let's go get them from an academic. Prep sort of thing, and so. Attempting to respectfully sidestepped that and say regardless of all of that when it comes down to the individual athlete, which is what we're supposed to be working with. That's the person that we're actually supposed to be doing and helping. It takes other people the PTA. The skills or coach the sports site the bottleneck to actually work together and help that athlete. So it's not enough to just simply say I've got the credential now all Komen worship at my altar it's much more about less off the group lets us the colleague Let's Austin Movement professionals help with that and it really does come down to people. Trying to help people. I don't think that's. The question it's interesting that you said that it podcast is not aired yet. I interviewed Dr Michael Snyder who is a chiropractor? Who teaches in the University of Pittsburgh Physical Therapy School and we had a conversation you know what's it like to be a chiropractor teaching in physical therapy school and his answer although slightly different from you was the same thing. It's like look at the end of the day we're trying to do the same thing and I know I've talked to some chiropractors and physiotherapists in Canada and they. Said look you know the training is very, very similar at the end of the day the goal is to help make the patient better. So I think your answer is not really a sidestepping saying look, it's not all the sudden I have a licensor. So I had magical and I can make thousands of thousands of dollars and everybody can say, Oh wow, I like the bow down. Happy. That's just not the way it is, and so I'm really fortunate with the colleagues I work for my director Lisa McFadden is absolutely awesome in trying to push us to work together. She is absolutely awesome. That is the point or whoever walks.

Lisa McFadden Sanford Power Stanford Health University of Pittsburgh Physi golf Dr Michael Snyder director Austin Canada