19 Burst results for "Lisa Hagan"

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's the same comparison Georgia congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene publicly apologized for making last year. She said she knows the remark is offensive. Here, at the reawakened tour, many agree with the analogy. Clark says for now, he plans to continue these events well into next year. Reporting from NPR's Lisa Hagan, who's still on the line, at least a listening I can tell that many people like being at these events, but gosh, they seem pretty pricey. What kind of people are they drawing in? Most of these folks identify as Christians, but a number I talked to told me they've left their church communities. I talked to anthia butler of the University of Pennsylvania who thinks the pandemic did a lot to displace people from churches. And events like reawaken and other pro Trump rallies are filling that gap. So all of those things that people get sociologically from church connection, a validation affirmation at an election denial vaccine and anti government conspiracies and it's a very potent mix that butler says the Republican Party has largely embraced. There's always been people who have thought about what is going to happen in the end times or when is the world going to come to end. The real question you want to ask is why aren't they talking about that anymore? She says the focus has evolved to taking power now. Most everyone at the reawaken events say they're going to vote next week, but I also heard at least one speaker say that God is unconventional and doesn't need

Marjorie Taylor Greene Lisa Hagan anthia butler NPR Georgia Clark University of Pennsylvania Republican Party butler
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:09 min | 3 months ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Know, that night. I stayed up all night and saw all that happening. Behind a three in the morning four in the morning. Georgia lawmakers and election experts have tried to answer questions about the state's voting process. But the audience they're trying to reach has been taught to believe all those experts are either liars or fools. Many of the Georgia activists have taken in hours of instruction from a variety of election denying speakers who criss-cross the country. Among them is former Arizona sheriff, Richard Mack. Of all the conspiracy theories, take all of them put together, times it by ten, and that's how bad everything is. Mac wants like minded sheriffs to confiscate ballots after the upcoming election, as evidence of this supposed plot. Other speakers encourage tailgate parties to monitor ballot drop boxes. The idea that election denial is a belief needs an update, says New York University historian, Ruth van guilt. She says it's evolved into a set of actions. Ultimately, the goal of those who are denying elections is to delegitimize elections in the absolute. She's an expert on Italian history and sees troubling parallels from the past, specifically with the rise of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in the 1920s. He tried to make elections associated in the public mind with corruption and also threat. There is little chance these activists will force Georgia to abruptly shift to paper ballots. But for this November, they've come up with a way to avoid the QR codes. They so mistrust. Their advice don't vote early, don't vote in person on election day, don't mail in an absentee ballot. Instead, plan to apply for absentee ballots and hand deliver them the evening of election day. And if all that should fail to produce a Republican victory, all the more confirmation American elections are rigged. Lisa Hagan and PR news. Now, Georgia public broadcasting Stephen Fowler is here to give us more context for this fight over QR codes and touchscreen voting machines, hi, Stephen. Hey there. Stephen, electronic touchscreen voting machines are not new in Georgia, they've been around for quite a while. When did people start objecting to them and what were their concerns? In 2002, Georgia's democratic Secretary of State switched from a grab bag of every county being able to pick its own election equipment to a uniform electronic voting system where you pick your choices on a touchscreen and the votes were saved on a memory card. Several groups mainly these left leaning voting organizations had some concerns about that. Lack of a paper trail for humans to check, potential cybersecurity concerns, and more recently that technology and software being outdated. In 2017, some activists sued Georgia saying electronic touchscreens violated the constitution, and they had evidence of errors in recent elections that meant that it needed to be changed imminently. That lawsuit is still ongoing, even though we do have a new voting system in Georgia that rolled out in 2020. So to repeat there is a new voting system it's been there for about two years, but the lawsuit did not go away. Why is that? Right. So the voting rights group say Georgia's new system does address some of the issues because the new voting system is still a touchscreen, but it prints out a piece of paper that has the text of your choices and a QR code like we heard about that scans, the voter's choices and makes it easier and faster to count. They still have concerns about these QR codes and other cybersecurity issues. That's where it gets interesting. These far right election deniers that we just heard about have now co opted that lawsuit and some of the language to argue the whole thing is illegal and led to rig results in 2020, taking some of these more legitimate questions about touch screen voting and molding them to reject things they don't like. And like we heard in Lisa's story, these people are insisting upon more authoritarian remedies and the local and state elections experts who are the ones in charge are misinformed and not these people. Steven, on the surface, it sounds like these groups have concerns in common, but you're saying that's not the case? Well, in some ways, hashtag boils down to this. One side says they've got evidence voting equipment and rules are keeping some people from freely and barely voting. The other alleges without evidence I should add that a vast conspiracies manipulating results to hurt pro Trump candidates and their solution is to eliminate voting options they don't like. These are not the same. We are just weeks away from the midterms, Georgia is one of many states expected to have close elections again. Is that closeness affecting the level of trust voters have in the election system? Absolutely. I mean, organized opposition to voting is not something that's just isolated to that one county we heard. It's videos and anecdotes from all over the state and really many places all over the country where these presentations are given without evidence that voting equipment more specifically QR codes are illegal. And it's having a negative impact. There's a county in Georgia where the board of commissioners voted to ask the state to get rid of the voting machine. And we've had several local Republican Party groups claim to decertify the 2020 election. And local election offices are being bogged down with these complaints and even lawsuits as they're trying to run elections here in Georgia. Now, to be clear, democratic leaning groups suing over QR codes because of cybersecurity concerns are not the same as calling elections officials traders and showing up and harassing them over these things. But the overall question surrounding how George's election system works has led people to be down on democracy and frankly more prime to not accept unfavorable results. Pretty depressing. That's Georgia public broadcasting Stephen Fowler. Thank you, Stephen. Thank you. And you're listening to all things considered on 90.1 W ABE, good afternoon. I'm Jim burris. What happens in Georgia is important beyond

Georgia Ruth van Stephen Fowler Lisa Hagan Richard Mack Benito Mussolini Stephen New York University Arizona Mac Lisa Steven board of commissioners Republican Party George Jim burris
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:28 min | 3 months ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"So far during this drive. My full name is chin sui. How does it make me feel when I donate to WAB? I feel connected. I feel like I'm contributing to what the good work public radio personnels are doing. I actually stumbled onto NPR by accident. I didn't know that there's such a good group of people working on giving people information and I want to be able to give back. And thank you, Sophie. She says she didn't know there was such a good group of people working to make this happen. Okay, so I'm going to be honest, there's a good group of people that make it happen. I work with some amazing colleagues, folks like Molly Samuel, who is dedicated to the environment and reporting on it in a way that just makes all of her reporting shine Martha Dalton who you hear with us besides this afternoon, a former teacher who brings that magic to her reporting on your child's classrooms every day, we had a Pulitzer Prize winner. The only one in NPR's history with Lisa Hagan, who unfortunately left, but she went on to NPR where she's now the disinformation reporter, it's the type of excellence that goes into every report every day and it's what your money supports. 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90. NPR news and Culver City California, I'm Dwayne Brown. White House officials say President Biden is looking to increase oil supplies ahead of next month's midterm elections back in March, Biden tapped the U.S. strategic reserve in response to production cuts by OPEC, releasing 180 million barrels over 6 months. White House press secretary, karine Jean Pierre says that helped some families save over $100 a month at the pump. Gas prices are falling again just to give you a little bit more of a stats there. The average retail price is down by 5 cents over the last week. States that saw cheaper, sharper increases in recent weeks are also seeing more rapid declines. That would include California, which ranks as the nation's highest at more than $6 a gallon for regular. Biden could order an additional release of oil reserves as early as tomorrow, but those reserves have now dropped to their lowest levels in nearly 40 years. The French cement company lafarge has reached a nearly $800 million play agreement with the U.S. Justice Department, NPR's Ryan Lucas tells us the criminal prosecution stems from the company's payments to terrorist organizations in Syria. The forest has pleaded guilty to conspiring to provide material support for terrorism. According to court papers, the French company and its Syrian subsidiary made some $6 million in payments in 2013 and 2014 to the Islamic State and the Nusra front amid the Syrian Civil War. In exchange, the terrorist organizations permitted the company's operations at a plant in northern Syria to continue. Here's Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco. Lafarge paid millions of dollars to both terrorist organizations and benefited from their brutality to the tune of $70 million in revenue. Monaco says this is the first time the company has pleaded guilty to providing material support to a terrorist organization. Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington. Stocks finished higher on Wall Street, adding to weekly gains. This is NPR. From WAB news in Atlanta, good afternoon, I'm Martha Dalton, it's four 32. Governor Brian Kemp faced off against Democrat challenger, Stacey Abrams in the first debate of their rematch, Raoul valley says Monday's debate is the first of two before election day. Nearly three months after Georgia's 6 week abortion ban took effect, camp was asked about banning emergency contraceptives and a ban on destroying embryos. Can you tell us right now whether you push for these measures or any other additional restrictions on abortion now that the 2019 law is in effect? No, I would not. Camp spent much of the debate promoting and defending his record of the past four years, including the speed in which he reopened the state during the COVID-19 pandemic. Abrams attacked Kemp's record on several issues. He is weakened gun laws and flooded our streets. He has weakened our privacy rights and women's rights. He is denied women the access to reproductive care. The Atlanta press club debate also featured libertarian chain hazel, who heavily pushed back on camp and Abrams about the role of government. Raoul valley W ABE news. The average price of unleaded gas continues to dip slightly at pumps across Georgia, the same is not true of diesel. Alec helmet has more. The cost of diesel is one of the reasons experts say things cost more, as big rigs move items across the country to stores, warehouses, even your front door. Georgia has one of the lowest average per gallon cost of diesel in the country, at $4 and 82 cents, about 45 cents a gallon below the national average according to triple-A. But Georgia's price is up 20 cents a gallon from a week ago. And this time last year, diesel was $1 and 40 cents a gallon cheaper than it is right now in the state. Alex, I'll make WAB news. This is WAB news. Support for WAB comes from AG roads, one

NPR Martha Dalton chin sui Ryan Lucas Molly Samuel Lisa Hagan NPR news Culver City California Dwayne Brown President Biden U.S. strategic reserve karine Jean Pierre Biden Lafarge U.S. Justice Department
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:45 min | 5 months ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That way too. It's the Ukrainian national anthem. The students join her and her daughter in singing along. Down in the basement, there is a bomb shelter here. But they've decided to do mostly online anyways. So wouldn't you? But our most important goal is safety. It says the head of school. That's why we're all online still. Before the war, the school served about 1500 students. Enrollment is actually up today, because students from other areas of Ukraine, like harkey, and Luhansk, have relocated to the city. We're sad everything is this way. It says more home. But we won't be discouraged. Our main task is to give the children this feeling in the northern city of harkey, classes are also online. But it's a much more tense situation. Nightly shelling and missile attacks have damaged several schools in just the last week. At a community center, a police officer is instructing 9 and ten year olds how to stay safe during the war. He's introducing the topic of the two wall rule. It was just the bottom of it. He draws a diagram on the board. There's a circle to represent an explosion. Two lines, and a stick figure, on the other side. The first wall will take the explosion, he says. The second wall will get the debris from the first wall. 9 year old Sasha is listening intently. He tells us he's disappointed he's not going to school in person. Sasha says he hates when things are out of order. And lately, with the war, a lot of things have been out of order. This makes me really uncomfortable, he says. What do you do when you feel that way? I take three deep breaths and then three normal breaths, he says. Just like his dad taught him when the war started. His mom and dad are at home with him when he's doing online school, which makes them feel safe. And he says the breathing technique, it's been helping. A list of AdWords NPR news, harkey, Ukraine. Jeffrey Epstein has been dead for three years, but his goal still wanders the dark calls of the Internet. In life Epstein was arrested for a series of sexual crimes with underage girls. In death, speculation about his suicide in jail has spawned a series of conspiracy theories on the far right. The most recent iteration has drawn in the federal judge who signed the search warrant for former president Trump's home last month, NPR's Lisa Hagan joins us now to explain more, welcome Lisa. Hi ayesha. So Lisa quickly remind us of who Jeffrey Epstein was. I think most people know he was pretty notorious, but why was that? Yes, he was a wealthy sexual predator who supposedly managed other very rich people's money whose money or how those arrangements came about are still pretty much a mystery. But why are we still talking about him? What does he have to do with the judge who authorized the search of Mar-a-Lago last month? Right. So within a day of that Mar-a-Lago search, right wing publications and Talking Heads have realized that the federal magistrate judge, Bruce Reinhart had previously represented some of Epstein's employees who had been accused of facilitating sex trafficking as well. The Miami Herald reported that any magistrate judge would have signed off on the warrant with probable cause from the FBI, but Reinhart just happened to be available that night. All of that got quickly boiled down into this guy was Epstein's lawyer, which he wasn't. That didn't, however, stop the anti semitic commentary about him online or having his home address posted, his synagogue was also threatened. At Lisa, you know, you spend a lot of time thinking about conspiracy theories. How do these theories related to Jeffrey Epstein work? What's their function? So experts I spoke with say so many of the details of just Epstein's life and death fit into popular theories that are already out there. I talked to this professor from the university of Warwick kaseem Qassam. Well, it's effective because lots of lots of these things are said about Epstein's life are in fact true and actually do kind of plug into a preexisting kind of narrative about what their leads get up to. And I've got to point out like these are valid concerns, right? You think about sex scandals in the Catholic Church, Hollywood, on and on. But Epstein's crimes fit so well into these existing narratives about powerful people running child sex trafficking rings. That's what he did. That in turn feeds into depictions of Trump as this mythic hero. He's unfairly maligned and cheated out of a second White House term while he alone takes on this sort of imaginary satanic network. Also, just to say that we know Epstein did like to hang out with rich and important people, right? So it is very easy to link him to almost anyone famous. He's in photographs with the clintons, royalty, Bill Gates, and yes, of course, Donald Trump. Conspiracy peddlers, however, tend to avoid mentioning that last fact. So what's the importance of these online conspiracies? Do they affect life in the real world? One very dangerous corner of this imaginary extended universe is ugly anti semitic fictions about Jews. Here's Michael Hayden with the southern poverty law center, which tracks domestic extremism. And we're talking about explicit anti semites here who like to portray Jewish people as being sexually deviant or being predatory, particularly with young women and things like that. This is propaganda that goes back decades and decades. And it's not that questioning what happened to Jeffrey Epstein or who he knew means you're on a one way ticket to anti semitic conspiracy town. But you might be in the same airport. And there are people who want to exploit that access and encourage physical violence. NPR's Lisa Hagan, who covers conspiracies and extremism. Thank you so very much. Thank

Jeffrey Epstein Epstein harkey Luhansk Sasha Ukraine Lisa Hagan Hi ayesha Lisa Bruce Reinhart NPR Lago Trump The Miami Herald Reinhart university of Warwick FBI Catholic Church
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:35 min | 6 months ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The lemelson foundation. This is all things considered for NPR news, I'm Elsa Chang in Culver City, California. And I'm on a summers in Washington, social media platforms lit up with right-wing speculation, militant rhetoric, and political fundraising. After former president Donald Trump announced that his Mar-a-Lago home had been searched by the FBI. NPR reporter Lisa Hagan has been watching right wing media and message boards, and she joins us now. Hey Lisa. Hi wanna. So tell me, as you've been watching these channels, what sorts of things have you been noticing? It's been a lot of very hot talk and sometimes it's quite violent sounding, but what we saw this week is now a pretty well established pattern for people who follow this. Like I talked to Caroline or bueno a behavioral scientist who studies disinformation at the university of Maryland. She was looking back at social media posts from around when Trump lost the 2020 election or even before that when Trump was facing early calls for impeachment. Calls for Civil War, basically you could swap out the tweets and fairly noticed a difference. She's talking about anonymous posters there, but what she noticed that's different about this week is that elected officials and high profile media personalities are using the same Civil War language. She's used to seeing on message boards. The same comparisons of the U.S. government to totalitarian states from history. Okay, so there's still quite a bit that we do not know about the content of the documents that the FBI was looking for. How is that information vacuum shaping the way that former president Trump supporters are responding? It gets filled in with storylines and narratives that rely on the worst possible assumptions about the FBI and Justice Department. For example, this is meant to stop Trump from announcing a second run for president. The FBI must be planting evidence. We actually heard that from Trump today. Or there are nefarious deep state connections that the officials involved in issuing the warrant have that are driving this. A lot of this language gets couched, former White House adviser Stephen Bannon said, you know, the FBI is the Gestapo. But then backed off right away and said, Republicans need to win the midterms, which is quite a week way to respond if you believe that you're dealing with a Nazi style secret police. But bueno says it's a useful rhetorical device. So they kind of get the best of both worlds. They're able to get the message across. But also maintain that element of plausible deniability. Okay, so conspiracy theories and increasingly violent rhetoric from prominent figures. That stuff seems to draw pro Trump audiences in, but what are these influencers doing with that attention once they have it? Right, so these are not just moments to be seen loudly defending the president, but it's time for marketing and branding. Show host can sell gold politicians, including Trump, are fundraising off this search warrant. They're selling merch. You can get a defund FBI shirt on congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene's online store, for instance. All right, so looking forward Lisa, if the federal government proceeds with legal action against former president Trump, what does that mean? Does all of this online chatter will it turn into real world action? Every step that federal law enforcement takes is going to come with more of this cycle of speculation and self promotion. And it's important to say the vast majority of the audiences who hear or respond to these things aren't actually going to act on phrases about war or fighting or violence. But when you're talking about audiences of millions of some of these personalities on the media, it only takes a few or one person deciding that this is their moment for violence. That is NPR reporter Lisa Hagan, Lisa, thank you for your reporting. Thank you. Okay, now a look at the recovery in the Gaza Strip, and some of the harrowing stories from Palestinians after three days of fighting last weekend. The power is back on, but even as life resumes, people are still recalling the weekend of rapid evacuations and brushes with death. Just one year ago, 11 days of fighting between Israel and Palestinian militants left vast damage. This time around the damage was more limited, but it's a reminder that the cycle of violence continues. And pierce fought montanas joins us now from Gaza City high fat mom. Hi Elsa. So can you tell us, what is it like there today? Right, so electricity is back here in Gaza, it comes from fuel that's trucked in from Israel. Gaza's borders are controlled by Egypt and Israel. And Israel restricts imports to Gaza, which they say is for security. Now this conflict was mainly between Israel and the Islamic Jihad militants, the much bigger militant group Hamas, which controls Gaza stayed out of it, and that seems to have made it easier for goods to come back quickly. And so today stores are just getting supplies back because of the lack of electricity, the produce and that's already in Gaza went bad and one shop owner told me it was just in time as they had started running out of the essentials, like flour, milk, and sugar. Of course, for the people who lost family members or homes, they're trying to figure out how to move on. The Palestinians are saying that at least 46 people, including 16 children died, Israel says 20 of those were militants and they say some of the civilians were actually killed by militant rockets that fell short. And I understand that you have been personally talking to some people who barely survived. What are you hearing from them? So I spoke with 21 year old Muhammad Ibrahim shamala who is in his third year studying medicine and I actually found him standing over the rubble of his building, which had four apartments. It was targeted in an air strike and is now completely destroyed. Israel said they were trying to strike Islamic Jihad militants in Gaza, and we don't know exactly why this building was hit, but shamala says his brother got a call from the Israelis telling them they had two minutes to evacuate. And so the whole family ran across the street to the waterfront, where he says he was so scared and couldn't bear to see his home destroyed, so he just looked out to the sea until it was all over. And then came back to realize he'd lost everything. Everything, my books, my

FBI Lisa Hagan lemelson foundation NPR news Elsa Chang Trump bueno president Trump Lisa Stephen Bannon NPR Gaza Culver City Israel federal government Marjorie Taylor Greene Lago Donald Trump university of Maryland
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Helmig managing editor of WAB news and on this week in review we start with the federal hate crimes trial of the three men convicted of murdering ahmaud Arbery Earlier this week Travis and Gregory mcmichael had reached a plea deal with prosecutors the two were already serving life without parole and state prison for killing 25 year old Arbery who is black Under the plea deal they would admit the killing was racially motivated would get 30 more years in prison and be moved to federal custody The family of Arbery opposed the deal and the judge nixed it saying she did not want to be bound by the sentencing guidelines The mcmichaels along with William Bryan chased Arbery through their South Georgia town before Travis mcmichael shot and killed him Jury selection for all three men set to begin on Monday The judge in the federal case says some 1000 people cross South Georgia were sent jury duty notices for the trial Well let's move on to the state capitol where we are seeing quite a legislative session Republicans in the General Assembly are moving ahead with a bill that would allow Georgians to carry handguns without permits Supporters call it constitutional carry A Senate committee advanced the legislation on Tuesday NWA's politics reporter Sam greenglass told us about it Right now you don't need a permit to carry a long gun in Georgia But you do to carry a handgun That requires applying at a probate court fingerprints a background check and a fee Senate Bill three 19 would make those permits optional Here's senator Blake tillery questioning fellow Republican senator Jason and vitarte who introduced the bill Do the folks who break the law care if we have a law that says they need a gun permit Most lawless people and I know from growing up hanging around some pretty bad element and those individuals don't care about laws or anything So is that your premise then that the folks who are burdened by this process are actually those who are obeying the law Correct If the bill passes background checks would still be conducted when a gun is purchased at a store But background checks aren't currently required when guns are bought in a private sale for example So without a permit process democratic senator Elena parent says some gun owners would never undergo a background check Are you aware that in 2020 at least 5000 people were denied weapons carry licenses and the number one reason for the denial is criminal history It probably would make sense if we're doing background checks and there are going to be people who are going to probably be denied a license So your bill would eliminate that So why would we want to make it easier for these criminals to carry a gun in public 21 states already allow permit list carrying Governor Brian Kemp says he wants Georgia to join that list So some version of this bill is likely to become law this session Sam greenglass WAB news And among the supporters of the legislation for permitless carry is a group of out of state activists featured in the NPR investigative Pulitzer Prize winning podcast no compromise hosted by W ABE east Lisa Hagan Governor Brian Kemp is one of scores of Republican state leaders who have been pressed to support policies like constitutional carry which make weapons carry permits optional These laws have swept some 18 states in less than a decade as part of a movement of gun rights activists who scorn the National Rifle Association as weak on guns Among them is Aaron door the oldest of a group of Iowa brothers who raise money promoting absolutist gun laws Here he is at the capitol responding to democratic senator Elena parent Tuesday Is it the case that no right is absolute I would not agree with that when it comes to this It's totally fine Governor Kemp's recent public support for a constitutional carry law all but guarantees some version of the bill will become Georgia law Lisa Hagan W a B E News Also at the state capital this week the debate over the political future of gwinnett county This after a Republican drawn map for the democratic held county commission passed the Georgia House Republican state representative Bonnie rich of swani proposed the map which was put into place instead of the one commissioners themselves drew Earlier this week in a legislative committee there was this tense exchange between democratic state representative Sam park of lawrenceville and Republican House governmental affairs committee chair darling Taylor Representative rich is forcing gnat county down the path toward unnecessary litigation If this committee moves forward with the substitute that carries what appears to be a racially gerrymandered map A map drawn based on race Due to my direction you've made that comment several times and I find it offensive Let the information come out Your conduct is not becoming at this time The map gives Republicans a better chance to win one of 5 seats on the county commission WAB politics reporter Raoul bally spoke with Jim bursts about the drama Let me take you back to what normally happens So the census happened local county commissions and county school boards redraw their lines with the new data They send those maps here to the state capitol and generally the rubber stamped here at the capitol and that's going to happen with most maps that come up here But what's happening to go on that is what's getting all the attention right now The map as you mentioned the map drawn by the commission which is all democratic was replaced by Republicans specifically state representative Bonnie rich her reason was that the democratic proposal she said would not give residents in the northern part of the county representation She was saying that you know the representatives are all democratic and from the central part of the county in the southern part of the county Go on that Democrats are pushing back their accusing Republicans of trying to hold on to power by using partisan gerrymandering and racial gerrymandering You heard it You heard that in that exchange between representative park and Taylor also Democrats are upset that Republicans are going around kind of the regular process when it comes to the whole delegation getting involved in putting together these maps Now the scuffle over the commission is not the only entity that would be affected in gwinnett county right That's absolutely right So as this House Bill heads over to the Georgia Senate a Georgia Senate bill is coming over here to the house where I'm sitting and that makes school board elections in Grenada county non partisan Right now voters in May go on the party primary to pick candidates and then vote in November for those candidates What Democrats point out is this proposal to make the school board nonpartisan comes as the school board went democratic in 2020 The sponsor of that bill state center clinics and pointed out a number of things The firing of the longtime superintendent Alvin will banks he mentioned the curriculum CRT he says he wants to take politics out of the process the response you hear from Democrats is well then why don't you make all school boards in the state of Georgia nonpartisan I believe right now you've got a 109 school boards in Georgia that are nonpartisan 71 that are elected on a partisan basis and the reality is most lawmakers in this building don't want to change that The.

Arbery Sam greenglass South Georgia Helmig WAB news ahmaud Arbery Gregory mcmichael William Bryan Travis mcmichael senator Blake tillery senator Jason Georgia Elena parent Bonnie rich Governor Brian Kemp ABE east Lisa Hagan Governor B senator Elena Governor Kemp Lisa Hagan NWA
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Live from NPR news I'm Dale willman On the anniversary of the attack on the U.S. capitol President Biden today accused former president Donald Trump and his followers of holding a dagger to democracy and Biden warned that even though those who breached the capitol did not succeed in overthrowing the government the insurrection remains a serious threat Connecticut democratic representative rosa de Laura was in the chamber last January when rioters stormed the building Lying on the floor Behind those seats And Wendy Officer said hit the floor They're a gunshots We saw the chamber doors smashed We saw police with guns drawn and we heard the shots from the speakers lobby Lawmakers held a number of events today but almost every Republican and Capitol Hill opted not to attend At Georgia court is poised to sentence the men convicted of murdering ahmaud Arbery all three face mandatory life sentences for their part in the shooting of the 25 year old black man from member station W ABE Lisa Hagan has more A judge will decide Friday whether Travis and Greg mcmichael and their neighbor William Bryan will one day be eligible for parole Under Georgia law they will have to serve at least 30 years in prison The three men were convicted of murder and other charges in late November prosecutors argued each man had acted based on the worst possible assumptions about Arbery without any evidence he'd committed a crime Brian and the mcmichaels will next face a federal hate crimes trial set for February The jury in that case may hear evidence about racist text messages Social media posts and crime scene statements that prosecutors largely emitted during the state trial For NPR news I'm Lisa Hagen in Atlanta It was a down day today for Wall Street the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 170 points the NASDAQ was down 19 points of the close You're listening to NPR news From W ABE news in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim beres It's 5 32 The 2022 Georgia legislative session kicks off in just a few days And at the state capitol today powerful House speaker David ralston said he wants to prioritize legislation to fight crime and to bolster resources for mental health what he doesn't want to do is spend time on bills being pushed by legislators to help boost their conservative credentials before they make primaries We've got some important things to get done Public safety mental health the budget Sometimes we have some pretty silly bills that are introduced here Many of the bills particularly this year they're designed to get your attention and I've got a job to do and I'm going to do my job Ralston says the legislature is likely to consider bills on expanding access to guns and how race is taught in schools but he says he does not want to consider another abortion bill until the U.S. Supreme Court rules on the issue this spring The Cobb county school district says it won't contact trace for every case of COVID-19 anymore At a school board meeting today superintendent Chris ragsdale said governor Brian Kemp wrote a letter to districts outlining new COVID procedures for schools As we all know contact tracing has been probably the biggest lift on staff resources to have that accomplished And primarily in a timely manner Ragsdale says often families were notified of COVID exposure after the quarantine period ended He says the district may decide to contact tracing in some cases camp also says school staff who are exposed can immediately return to work if they're asymptomatic and wear a mask And finally Atlanta public school students are set to return to the classroom on Monday APS superintendent Lisa Harris says the district is offering tests today and tomorrow for students and staff and is strongly encouraging they take one She says APS will be implementing some new health protocols like several others the district decided to hold classes virtually this week because of the sudden spike in the COVID infection rate Some districts have already gone back to in person learning And this note of disclosure is broadcast license is held by the Atlanta board of education.

NPR news Dale willman rosa de Laura Biden Wendy Officer Georgia court ahmaud Arbery Lisa Hagan Greg mcmichael William Bryan Arbery Lisa Hagen Jim beres capitol today powerful House Donald Trump David ralston Atlanta Georgia Capitol Hill Connecticut
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"That Sarah farris from Politico and from PBS NewsHour Lisa Desjardins thank you both for speaking with us Thanks for having us Mostly cloudy skies in Atlanta 55° our time is four 44 I'm Jim barris Thanks for listening Governor Brian Kemp is about to turn up the heat on efforts to make it legal for gun owners to carry firearms without a permit known as constitutional carry Can voice his support for the legislative shift during a campaign event today at a cod county gun store W AE's Lisa Hagan is with us for some context about the announcement Lisa explained for us what is constitutional carry Constitutional care is sort of the branded way of talking about getting rid of the requirements for a gun permit to carry concealed in the state So in Georgia we've long had very broad rights with a gun permit to you know you can take your gun into church bars all over the place really And that was all done through the permitting system What this does is essentially frame the constitution of the United States itself the Second Amendment as being a blanket gun permit for everyone So there's no longer any kind of requirements that the government know anything about who is carrying a gun in the state This would not absolve say someone from if they had a felony on their record for example that had not been expunged this would not give them free reign to carry a firearm Correct No absolutely not This is for people who are able to legally own guns only However there's really no way for law enforcement to check on that because you're not allowed to ask currently if someone has a gun permit And in this case there wouldn't be any need to ask for a permit ever This has been a bill some gun rights activists have been pushing for unsuccessfully for years now quite today Why are we hearing about this now I think it has a great deal to do with the elections And the challenge governor camp is facing from David perdue When Kemp originally ran for governor he signaled his support for constitutional carry fairly quietly And he's waited till now to actually run a big presser and make this large announcement So it should really signal a step further to the right than Georgia achieved even with the infamous gun everywhere bill signed in the law in 2014 Georgia would become the 22nd state as I understand to pass a constitutional carry style law Talk about how this is gaining momentum across the nation Yeah this has been a movement sweeping the country for the last decade or so And it is further to the right of the NRA and it was interesting we saw governor Kemp thank the NRA for their support on this But they've actually had very little to do with this wave of pushing constitutional carry and getting rid of the permitting requirements for guns in many many states What has been behind it is a particular set of gun rights activists who work very closely also with anti vax activists and anti abortion rights to name a few This is what I spent the last two years investigating Will this come through clean As some people might say or are we likely to see amendments and riders and this morph into something else It'll depend on what kind of pressure probably we hear from David perdue and this particular set of gun rights activists that I mentioned Whatever it does end up with though it's fairly likely to pass with the governor's support WA bee's Lisa Hagen Lisa thank you so much for breaking this down for us We appreciate it Thank you Jim And.

Sarah farris Lisa Desjardins Jim barris Brian Kemp cod county Lisa Hagan David perdue Georgia PBS Atlanta Lisa NRA governor Kemp Kemp United States bill Lisa Hagen Lisa Jim And
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is WNYC 93.9 FM and a.m. 8 20 NPR news and the New York conversation Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Luis Giovanni In Charlottesville Virginia a civil trial related to the deadly 2017 unite the right rally has resulted in a jury decision that 17 white nationalist leaders and organizations paid $26 million in damages over the violence that erupted there NPR's odette Yusuf has more Each of these individual defendants has been ordered to pay at least half a $1 million in damages and one of them the man who ran his vehicle into the crowd It was assessed $12 million One civil rights lawyer told me that these amounts are high enough that they can't just chalk this off as a cost of doing business as a white nationalist You know they might be paying this down for the rest of their lives And Pierre zod Yusuf jewry deliberation and the Ahmad Arbery case resumes and Brunswick Georgia with the panel weighing the prosecution argument that the defendants provoked the fatal confrontation against the defense case that the men acted in self defense Lisa Hagan has more The rittenhouse trial has shown us that juries do affirm very often that if you can say that in the moment you feared someone getting a hold of your gun That's a mortal threat and that justifies killing someone and that's the way the law has been crafted in states including Georgia and Wisconsin It's very hard to overcome Dow futures are lower this morning This is NPR news in Washington And it's WNYC in New York at 6 32 Good morning I'm Michael hill clear 31 sunny and 45 today Some Long Island railroad.

NPR news Luis Giovanni odette Yusuf Pierre zod Yusuf jewry Ahmad Arbery Charlottesville NPR Lisa Hagan Washington Virginia New York Georgia Brunswick Wisconsin Michael hill Long Island
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"If I'm a little nervous about things as well sometimes Howard kingfish Franklin he died of COVID-19 in August at the age of 51 You're listening to all things considered for NPR news Our time now 5 44 glides are long for all things considered on members supported 90.1 W ABE I'm Jim beris After taking the better part of three weeks to see the jury the trial of three white men accused of killing ahmaud Arbery a black man got underway in Brunswick today Lisa Hagan is in Glen county to cover the proceedings and Lisa what did jurors hear on this day one Prosecutor Linda Dana cossy began the day of opening arguments and what we heard from her was an argument that the defendants in this case all acted on that day in February 2020 based on the worst possible assumptions She walked the jury through the facts of the case from the states side which were that the mcmichaels they didn't know the owner of the house where Arbery had been sort of jogging and looking around and they made decisions to get the guns At their houses they they didn't call the police right away She was saying you know that they did everything they could to trap Arbery which is where kidnapping charges come in in this case And she also made sure to say that no one declared during this incident that they were making a citizen's arrest So this argument that we are likely to hear from the defense and have in fact heard from the defenses that about a citizen's arrest being made is not relevant Because presumably the law that was in effect then that is not now but you would have to announce that The person would have to know that they were under citizens arrest for it to be valid I think there are some other very specific parameters about that And I'm sure it's going to become a central part of the case but it's simply trying to get at the idea of intent that there was no sort of formal reason the mcmichaels and roddy Bryan should have been out doing what they did that day She says That's one side Yes And you heard from the other Yes indeed Well we've heard from bob Rubin who is the defense lawyer for Travis mcmichael That's the son in this case He's the one who actually fired the shotgun but killed Arbery And Ruben sort of explains his way of framing this is that this is a case about duty and responsibility Any sort of lays out all of the ways that he believes them like Michaels or Travis in this case 'cause that's his client we're trying to protect their community from alleged acts of burglary There was really only one theft that happened So there's a lot of discussion about that One thing that I will note it's very clear that the defense is doing everything it can so far to tie the mcmichaels to sort of notions of law enforcement Of course we know that the older mcmichael Gregory had some experience in law enforcement as an investigator And they're also playing up the idea that Travis the son had coast guard training and was actually a trainer within the coast guard So I think we're going to see a lot of arguments around these guys were trained law enforcement and even though they didn't have arrest powers that day They did everything within the normal parameters of how police officers might act in that situation And the jury which has so far been the focus of the entire trial Did you get a sense of how they took both sides Could you read like a facial expression or did they show any type of engagement You know it's difficult because some of the jurors have masks on What I do know is that the parents of ahmaud Arbery are in court today And you know they have had to take moments Marcus Arbery senior walked out of the building when they were showing video of the incident and my understanding is that Wanda Cooper Jones Arbery's mom has been crying through the video and sounding fairly upset at the defense's argument thus far There's speculation that the trial may go much longer than initially thought Do you have a sense on that I do not it's hard to say it's really going to depend on how quickly we get through the rest of these arguments But we do know the jury selection has taken longer than expected So we'll see about the rest of the trial Lisa Hagen is covering the Arbery trial down in Brunswick Georgia Lisa thank you so much for joining us Thank you Jim 5 49 on this Friday afternoon Welcome to the weekend taking a look at traffic.

Arbery ahmaud Arbery Howard kingfish Franklin NPR news Jim beris Lisa Hagan Glen county Linda Dana cossy mcmichaels roddy Bryan bob Rubin Travis mcmichael Brunswick mcmichael Gregory Travis Lisa Ruben Michaels Marcus Arbery
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"They're in There are a handful of diversion initiatives like pad popping up across the country Albany New York Santa Fe New Mexico Louisville Kentucky Most are modeled on a Seattle Washington program that started almost ten years ago Lisa dugard is a former public defender who helped start the program in Seattle The next thing Atlanta will have to learn she says is how to keep up with demand for the long haul The main comparative advantage that the policing system has always had in the popular imagination is that people is that officers come Day or night the deal is eventually someone shows up Both in Atlanta and Seattle these alternative services aren't available 24 7 Here pat is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays Another challenge Stuart says is that as more people learn about the program it gets harder to show up on each call And she said she's seen how that can work to undermine the whole idea Lots of appropriate referrals are made and then community members see that there isn't a response and that tends to reduce people's belief and enthusiasm for the idea of an alternative but they would have supported had their banner response Atlanta's pad initiative was able to expand citywide because the city council approved a $1.5 million infusion In Seattle the diversion programs annual budget has grown to 13 million Atlanta's police department meanwhile runs on 230 million For now in Atlanta Moki mesa is just trying to find a funding stream that will last long enough for pad to show some consistent results Lisa Hagan W ABE news This story was made possible with support from the four a.m. fund for reporting on mental health and policing Finally today an increasing number of metro Atlanta police officers are undergoing mandatory martial arts training The idea is the skills learned there will help them deescalate situations and not immediately use a taser or gun A recent article from the Marshall project and nonprofit news outlet focused on criminal justice profiles the Marietta police department Jamal's larte wrote the story and he spoke this week toward Jim burruss There is a history here the idea of jiu-jitsu for law enforcement or martial arts for law enforcement is certainly not brand new But it did seem like in this national moment of reckoning around police it did feel like an approach that was worth investigating And one that maybe picking up interest around the country Not everybody is on board with this Talk about the tension are those who aren't quite sold I think the critics of jiu-jitsu training for police are really focused more systemically that we need to be asking more incisive questions about the types of incidents that police are called to to respond to in the first place And to the question this idea that we can arrest our way out of crime and other social problems In other words if all you do is make arrests slightly less dangerous with these folks who argue is that's not really getting to the real problem which is that policing in America is synonymous with the keeping of a racialized social order and that that is either not reformable or if it is it requires a wholesale reimagining of who police are and how they approach their work not just more confidence or hand to hand combat skills James larte from.

Atlanta Seattle Lisa dugard Lisa Hagan Albany Marshall project and nonprofit Louisville Marietta police department New Mexico larte Jim burruss Kentucky jitsu for law enforcement or m Stuart Washington New York city council mesa Jamal
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Your chances of winning are one in 38 pretty amazing gym Absolutely Let me ask you do you feel guilty sometimes when you don't contribute to these drives to public radio Why Maybe because you know it is the task you've wanted to do or something tells you pay it I probably should because I listen Well right now the voice in your head is telling you you should probably chip in And you should listen to that voice because it is the collective audience It is our members who make this possible If everyone had the I'm not going to give this drive mentality then we would just have silence every afternoon And nobody wants that 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 org slash donate That's the way to get in and to become part of that 84% 84% of our funding comes directly from this Atlanta community So thank you if you've made a pledge of surprise of if you made a pledge of support so far during this drive as well as to our sustainers I'm Lisa Hagan co host of no compromise a Pulitzer Prize winning podcast from NPR W ABE Atlanta and Casey or Kansas City Our series starts as a story about guns but it ends up being about so much more Like the power of social media to amplify misinformation and how we find ourselves in a political landscape where the very concepts of democracy or public health are villainized Never in my life did I expect to win a Pulitzer Let alone the first one ever for NPR and W ABE Because awards aren't why reporters do this work The goal is to tell stories that can teach us something new about our world You make deep investigative reporting possible when you donate Here's how You can do that right now by giving online a W ABE dot org slash donate or with a call to 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 and think about it as a supporter of W a BE You won that Pulitzer too right along with us because it's your investment in our station that may Lisa's work possible Thanks again to our very own Lisa Hagen for the work she's done to win that Pulitzer Prize and thanks to you for your gift of support right now It really does feel all the powerful stories you hear on W ABE that we produce with you in mind 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 is the number to call in with your contribution and possibly win that $1000 Visa gift card gym Absolutely the odds are very decent but don't let the.

Lisa Hagan Atlanta NPR Pulitzer Prize Casey Kansas City Pulitzer Lisa Hagen Lisa
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Com You're listening to all things considered on 90.1 W ABE Atlanta where ETL meets NPR Clear skies in our weather forecast for tonight with overnight lows in the mid 40s tomorrow and Wednesday sunny skies both days with highs in the upper 70s It's 5 30 Live from NPR news and Culver City California I'm Duane Brown World leaders are reacting to the death of Colin Powell today who rose to the rank of four star general and became the first black chairman of the joint chiefs of staff He then went on to serve as Secretary of State under the George W. Bush administration Powell was remembered at the State Department today for his leadership patriotism and decency Here's Secretary of State Tony blinken He was a man of ideas but he wasn't ideological He was constantly listening learning adapting He could admit mistakes It was just another example of his integrity Powell ultimately regretted his role in helping the Bush administration make the case for war in Iraq A Republican he endorsed Democrat Barack Obama in 2008 Paul died of complications related to COVID-19 he was fully vaccinated but he also had Parkinson's disease and had been treated for a blood cancer that compromises the immune system The Justice Department is formally asked the Supreme Court to block the Texas law aimed at preventing almost all abortions in the state the court's conservative majority previously refused to intervene as we hear from NPR's Nina totenberg In its brief the Biden administration told the court that Texas law defies a half century of precedents and puts a system of private bounties on the heads of any one who aids and abets in abortion after the first 6 weeks of pregnancy a period so early that many women don't even know they're pregnant This system the government said is designed to thwart review by the court and it has made abortion effectively unavailable in Texas effectively nullifying the Supreme Court's previous decisions within the state's borders Nina totenberg NPR news Washington Stocks finished mostly mixed on Wall Street the Dow lost 36 points The tech heavy NASDAQ added 124 points This is NPR From W ABE news in Atlanta I'm Emile Moffat It's 5 32 Jury selection is underway in Brunswick Georgia on day one of the murder trial of the three men accused of killing ahmaud Arbery W a bees Lisa Hagan is there This afternoon lawyers have started questioning the first batch of a thousand potential jurors summoned for the case Much of the morning was spent reviewing which questions those lawyers can ask Outside the courtroom about a hundred demonstrators are gathered in support of Arbery's family His father Marcus Arbery senior spoke briefly before heading inside You know we got kids grandchildren all that stuff we got the world idea on the future And I'm scared It can't be going for a run fair for their life 25 year old ahmaud.

NPR news Culver City California Duane Brown Nina totenberg NPR Secretary of State Tony blinke Powell COVID Parkinson's disease blood cancer Biden administration joint chiefs of staff Colin Powell Atlanta Texas George W. Bush State Department Supreme Court Washington Stocks
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Throughout the course of the next several weeks Thanks Lisa Thank you You're listening to all things considered on 90.1 W ABE Atlanta And good afternoon glad to have you along for the program And you just heard from of course Lisa Hagen at the coastal Georgia south and east Georgia for the imad arbitrary jury selection and Emil Moffett interviewing her and ayesha Hyman I don't know about you but I felt like I had a front row seat to today's happenings and not just a front receipt but somebody guiding me along And it's that type of coverage that you can only get here on W ABE And that's why we're asking for your support this afternoon 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 slash donate Jim I remember when the story first broke and I remember thinking wow if W ABE weren't there on the ground in Brunswick covering this story would it have made national headlines That's the question that I pondered then and I still ponder now And if you hear a little break in my voice get into a little emotional It's just why I think the station is so very important The work that Jim you and your colleagues in the newsroom and our news department do is so critical stories like this they deserve to be to be spotlighted you know and to be brought to the national consciousness and national awareness and international awareness If you really think about it you listening right now you helped to make this story something that people in other countries would be aware of and feel connected to because you funded the work of Lisa Hagan and Jim berez and Molly Samuel and Sam Whitehead and rose Scott all of our folks here who bring you these stories and the reporters whose names you often don't hear who do the research You know who do the pre-production Who do the editing There's a team of people who work really hard they're so committed of course I could go work someplace else and probably earn a whole lot more money but they are here because they believe in the mission of public radio and we know that that's why you're here listening to The way you demonstrate that you believe in the mission is by supporting it with your financial contribution because that's honestly truthfully that's how we keep going 6 7 8 5.

Lisa Hagen east Georgia Emil Moffett ayesha Hyman coastal Georgia Jim Lisa Atlanta Lisa Hagan Jim berez Molly Samuel Sam Whitehead rose Scott Brunswick
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Hopkins University reports more than 700,000 U.S. lives lost to COVID in just 17 months The Biden administration is asking a Supreme Court to block a Texas law that bans most abortions after about 6 weeks and PR is Gary Johnson reports the Justice Department calls the law unconstitutional In a new court filing the Justice Department says other states have tried to overturn the landmark precedent in roe V wade but that only Texas took matters into its own hands and devised a quote unprecedented scheme to thwart judicial review The Texas law took effect September 1st since then it's severely limited the number of abortions in the state leading some women to travel long distances for the procedure Texas says the new law is constitutional and that the DOJ is wrong to sue the state over a law that puts enforcement in the hands of private individuals Carrie Johnson NPR news Washington In Brunswick Georgia jury selection underway in the trial of three white men charged with murdering African American jogger Ahmad Arbery Lest my white mall are very father Marcus speaking outside the courthouse today the defendant the father his son in a third man claimed they acted in self defense It's NPR From W ABE news in Atlanta I'm a meal Moffat It's four O four Jury selection is underway as you just heard from NPR in Brunswick Georgia on day one of the murder trial of the three men accused of killing ahmaud Arbery Lisa Hagan is there This afternoon lawyers have started questioning the first batch of a thousand potential jurors summoned for the case Much of the morning was spent reviewing which questions those lawyers can ask Outside the courtroom about a hundred demonstrators are gathered in support of Arbery's family His father Marcus Arbery senior spoke briefly before heading inside You know we got kids grandchildren all that stuff we got to worry about there on the future And I'm scared It can't be going for a run family.

Justice Department Hopkins University Biden administration Texas roe V wade NPR Carrie Johnson Gary Johnson Ahmad Arbery Brunswick ABE news Supreme Court Georgia U.S. Lisa Hagan Moffat Marcus Washington Atlanta Arbery
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The quality And when I say quality I have to brag a little bit because in our newsroom this year we have a Pulitzer Prize winner The first ever for NPR in its 50 years and Lisa Hagen who you hear on our airwaves and her podcast that she did in partnership with Casey you are in Kansas City and NPR one a Pulitzer I mean it's just it's almost crazy to say that's the top journalism prize right here I'm not surprised because Lisa is an amazing journalist but it's just great to be able to say that and your support is what makes that happen You keep our local newsroom employed You keep on out on the street you keep them reporting the stories that matter to you And that's why we're asking for your support We need it 6 7 8 5 5 three 90 90 or slash donate And it's money well invested I may be a little biased Aisha but I would say it is Well and it really it's our model that keeps us free to bring you stories like the ones told in no compromise the project that Lisa Hagan won the Pulitzer with and the ABE was an NPR was able to win the Pulitzer with I mean I can't even imagine what she had to do to kind of prepare herself not just for the reporting but just to have the courage to cover And I don't want to give it away I'll just say that she had to have a lot of courage to do that reporting You make it possible Lisa had you in mind She wanted to bring that story to listeners right here in Atlanta.

Lisa Hagen Pulitzer NPR Pulitzer Prize Casey Kansas City Lisa Hagan Lisa Aisha ABE Atlanta
"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"lisa hagan" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"White House officials say COVID-19 deaths are coming down across the country as fewer people are hospitalized and the number of new cases hits a two month low following a summer surge led by the highly contagious delta variant White House COVID response coordinator Jeff zyg says the news comes as new requirements for the shots are being put in place by government and private employers Vaccination requirements work new data reinforces that fact each day On Monday New York City reported that 96% 96% of its roughly 150,000 full time school employees had at least their first shot by the city's vaccination deadline Today the city of Los Angeles enacted one of the country's most sweeping vaccine mandates that requires everyone entering a bar Jim restaurant or nail salon to show proof of vaccination beginning in November New federal projections show energy related greenhouse gas emissions will continue to rise through 2050 unless there are big changes to current laws and policies as we hear from NPR's Jeff Brady The U.S. energy information administration projections show renewable energy will continue its fast growth rate becoming the number two source of energy by 2040 behind petroleum The agency projects the number of internal combustion engines will peak in a few years in the west but even with increasing electric vehicle sales energy related emissions will continue to grow That's if current laws and policies remain Scientists say emissions must decline fast to avoid the worst effects of climate change world leaders will meet next month in Glasgow where their expected to commit to more ambitious plans to reduce those emissions and avoid the scenario of these projections lay out Jeff Brady and Pierre news Stocks finished modestly higher on Wall Street this is NPR From W ABE E News in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim barres It's 5 32 The effort for Buckhead to break away from the city of Atlanta to form its own city has a controversial new supporter Georgia Republican congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene Lisa Hagan as more Green posted a photo of herself on Twitter Tuesday night smiling alongside the Buckhead city committee's CEO and chair Bill white The congresswoman is known for her staunch support of former president Donald Trump as well as her documented belief in the QAnon conspiracy theory She wrote that she was proud of her good friend white's mission to form a separate city shortly after an opinion column from the Atlanta journal constitution highlighted white support for the stop the steel movement contesting the 2020 election results White is a New York City transplant who threw a $5 million fundraiser for Trump's reelection campaign White says the Buckhead cityhood effort is nonpartisan Lisa Hagen W av E News Atlanta mayoral candidates recognized affordable housing as one of the biggest issues facing the city next to crime In a forum today most called for the city simply to act on its current policies Stephanie stokes has more The forum coverage gentrification homelessness and zoning Council member Andre Dickens said the city has a plan to follow from the public private group house ATL The.

Jeff Brady COVID Jeff zyg White House U.S. energy information admini NPR Pierre news Stocks Jim barres New York City Marjorie Taylor Greene Lisa Ha Atlanta Buckhead city committee Los Angeles Buckhead Atlanta journal Glasgow Bill white Donald Trump
TSA officers discover record-breaking number of guns at Atlanta airport

Midday on WNYC

00:42 sec | 5 years ago

TSA officers discover record-breaking number of guns at Atlanta airport

"For guns discovered at security checkpoints from member station w a b e in atlanta lisa hagen reports atlanta tsa officers say they found a record breaking thirty guns passenger carry ons last month the city's airport held the previous record from two thousand sixteen as well that was twenty seven guns and those are national records tsa officials say there's been a steady increase in the number of guns brought to check points in atlanta and across the country so far this year more than seventeen hundred have been discovered nationwide unloaded guns locked in a hard case and packed separately from ammunition are permitted in checked luggage for npr news i'm lisa hagan in atlanta from his waylon officials have.

Lisa Hagan Atlanta Lisa Hagen TSA NPR Waylon
Senate passes bill easing Dodd-Frank restrictions

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 5 years ago

Senate passes bill easing Dodd-Frank restrictions

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message come from REI. What is your? But that's the question REI co. Op is asking this season with gear classes, expert advice and adventure trips REI can help you overcome any excuses to find your way outside. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. The US Senate has voted sixty seven to thirty one to roll back some of the Wall Street reforms enacted in response to the two thousand eight financial crisis as NPR's, Kelsey, Snell reports supporters of the measure, say it will provide relief for many banks. The bills group of bipartisan cosponsors say would ease restrictions on small banks that are critical to small businesses and prevalent in many communities in rural America. Under the Bill banks with assets under two hundred fifty billion dollars would not be required to go through rigorous annual stress. Tests supporters say that will make it cheaper for small and medium size banks to keep issuing loans and doing business Senate critics like Democrats, Elizabeth Warren and Sherrod Brown. Say these changes opened the door for further banking deregulation. They want to ensure banks are monitored closely to avoid another financial crisis, like the two thousand eight meltdown that. Led to the passage of dodd-frank Kelsey Snell NPR news, the capital thousands of teenagers walked out of high schools across the nation today to protest school violence as W ABC's. Lisa Hagan reports from Atlanta. The response from school officials was mixed like many schools across the country. Some metro Atlanta school systems embraced the national walkout as a teachable moment for students, others threatened consequences. Cobb County is a mostly suburban area. Just north of Atlanta. It's school district did not endorse the walkout and told students and parents that demonstrators might face consequences. Knowing that student Shelby whitmire walked out of class at pope highschool in Cobb. I don't think it's her for us to be punished for sending up for something that could hurt us in the long run. Whitmire is bracing for suspension, though. Cobb County schools has not clarified how or if students will be punished for NPR news. I'm Lisa Hagen in Atlanta. President Trump is upbeat about the US economy Trump tilling and business. This round table in Saint Louis that the Republican tax Bill and his economic policies are driving the nation's lowest jobless rate, invest corporate earnings in years. We've never had a time when we've had companies at this level of readiness preparedness and and stability speaking at a Boeing factory that makes fighter jets Trump also said Congress working on a second tax package, but did not elaborate the top democrat in the Senate says, his party is not much interested in fixing errors in the new tax law, but would welcome bipartisan, rewrite toys, R us says it plans to sell or close all of its US stores, which employ around thirty three thousand people. The move follows a failed attempt to reorganize in a bankruptcy filing last fall. The New Jersey company, which also includes babies R S cited competition from online retailers and a shift from toys to electron IX. This is NPR news. A navy fighter jet has crashed off the coast of Key West Florida, killing the two crew members in a statement US, naval air forces, say the FAA eighteen F went down on final approach to Boca Chica field. During a training exercise, the cause of the crash is being investigated. The Federal Election Commission is giving tentative approval for some new rules on digital ads in politics. NPR's Peter Overby says the F E C is responding to the wave of ads from Russian trolls. During the two thousand sixteen presidential race. It small first step toward preventing anonymous ads like those pro-trump messages from Russia. If it filtered through Facebook and other social media, the proposal seeks to update the rules for disclaimers to paid for by tagline required for ads that expressly support or attack candidates. The current rules date back to two thousand six when websites and blogs for cutting edge in digital politicking to proposed rule will be up for sixty days of public comment. Followed by hearing in late June. There's still a lot the FCC hasn't dealt with or can't deal with. For instance, it doesn't regulate edge that focus strictly on issues. Many of the Russian ads did exactly that Peter Overby NPR news, Washington former Trump campaign manager. Paul Manafort is tried to have his federal case dismissed and of court motion filed Wednesday. Manafort says the special counsel exceeded his thority by charging him with crimes, not related to the Russia, probe Manafort has pleaded not guilty to fraud tax evasion money laundering and other counts stemming from his work. In Ukraine, if as his trial in July, I'm Shay Stevens NPR news in Washington.

NPR Atlanta America Cobb County Shelby Whitmire Kelsey Snell Shay Stevens Paul Manafort Senate President Trump Peter Overby Washington Us Senate Russia Cobb Federal Election Commission Lisa Hagan