13 Burst results for "Lisa Gabi"

"lisa gabi" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Show tomorrow for the state capital and I learned earlier today that joy joy it is the big gun rally pro gun rally to mark the state capital if you because I'm not anti gun I'm anti guns killing people other people or yourself I'm anti gun to a killing the innocent giant animals that can't defend themselves but I'm not just anti gun gun just for the sake of being anti gun all right I said that the today show is being brought to you by the number dose or to you if you don't speak Spanish your choice number two four two tunnels and two walls first the tunnel he didn't see this story I mean this is Cole while thick near San Diego from Tim Quanah over to San Diego the biggest and longest tunnel ever discovered seventy feet underground the soccer had train tracks had forced air ventilation and you know high voltage cables it had everything about fourteen football fields long discovered it yesterday longest smuggling tunnel ever found on the southwest border three quarters of a mile from industrial site in Tijuana to the San Diego area panel featured extends the rail card system forced air ventilation I'd cozy man high voltage electrical cables in panels an elevator to the tunnel entrance in a drainage system what more could you ask for there have been no arrests no drugs found or confiscated and no confirmed excipient on the San Diego side of the border the link more than fourteen football field lance and then why call name border patrol operations supervisor said this one blows past the second largest we've never really thought they had the moxie to go that far they continue to surprise me the tunnel exposures limitations of Donald trump's wall which stretches several feet underground in the area it's considered effective against small crudely built tunnels often called gopher hole this one seventy feet underground following the discovery not August Mexican law enforcement identify the entrance and you with that investigators map the tunnel that extend forty three hundred and nine feet the next longest tunnel in the US was discovered and and and San Diego where in twenty fourteen that was a measly a we easily a pitiful twenty nine hundred and sixty six feet this one coming in measuring at forty three hundred and nine feet so that's pretty hysterical even funnier though you may have seen the pictures of of the president for Nokia's wall blew over big a big chunk of a blue down will be blue over leaning against some trees the trees are holding up Donnie's wall his big beautiful wall the signature campaign the twenty sixteen and the comments about this event there's oops our fantastic a segment of present Nokia signature border wall fell in California in on to some trees on the Mexican side there are certain I don't there soon well yesterday amid high winds according to footage from K. Y. M. A. N. shared by CNN no one was injured the incident at Calexico California about one hundred miles east of San Diego luckily Mexican authorities responded quickly and we're able to divert traffic from the nearby street he said that this is Carlos been bonus of customs and border patrol he said the panels were nearly assuming newly installed wall panels were newly installed and the concrete anchoring it in place had not yet here a day earlier present but no hero had boasted about the strength of his wall one day earlier okay as saying and now we're building that beautiful wall this border is powerful border wall is going up at record speed so far most of the blue wall built including the segment that fell yesterday has replaced older Berrier segments but okay claim this week that about a hundred miles have been built so far by the way Mexico has not paid for it Tom's dire Canada for president Tom started tweeting quote I own buildings I'm a builder I know how to build nobody can bill like I can bill nobody the buildings in New York will tell you that I build the best product my favorite though my favorite response to the the Wall falling over yesterday with from the daily show this is the only thing that trump's name on it that couldn't Dodger draft the story says high winds took down a wall apparently near Calexico high winds I mean thirty nine miles an hour that's all once thirty nine miles an hour Lou this sucker now all right so there we have one wall story the other wall stories closer to home city council okay this plan wait a second strong story we get the right one here second wall story here is casual for pro Palestinian Meryl you know the wall up an old because trail city Santa Fe have granted an east side homeowner us Dave enforcement action regarding pro Palestinian murals there were installed earlier this month on a stucco wall outside his home got three Miller retired Landel physicist appeal a ruling by the city that he had removed the had to remove the photo like posters because their material and colors did not conform to historic district standards I guess for political posters in a letter dated the twenty eight the Lisa Gabi Oley Roach and historic preservation division manager in the city's land use department informed got three that a hearing will be set for his appeal about the murals which appeared outside his house on January the fifth and lily to come from the city's sane please bear in mind that this is the appeal to take these down fourth and re taken down is on a first amendment issue therefore we have to be careful and do our due diligence so gonna have a hearing on it so that's two walls and then the second panel story also approved last night the city council along with this new city manager and the sale of the former Santa Fe clay building in the railyard a year's all plan to build a pedestrian and bicycle underpass beneath saying Mike drive under the railyard rail trail move closer to reality yesterday Marilyn Weber in the city council approved a nearly two hundred eighty five thousand dollar funding agreement with New Mexico DOTD designed the underground tunnel which is meant to enhance safety and overall operations the one lone dissenting city counselor with city counselors Cygni Lindell and she said she didn't like it because nadie things are done in tunnel that's what she said he done like tunnels because people do not eat things internal I don't know he's speaking from experience or not we'll find out this week and we'll see her at the food depot Super Bowl on Saturday don't have your.

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Bombay talks. As Lisa says, you know, few tear gas bombs were fired. There were children around there. They were inhaling it. And she says it was just scary. It was burning their eyes and lungs, and that she was just couldn't believe it was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garnered public attention on their plight. Or did they really think they were gonna get in by trying to scale a fence? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with this speaking to them. Yeah. That that's what a lot of them said is, you know, we want people to see where here we want people to understand what we're going through especially with the long long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. Of course, a few of them did try to push into the us, but the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just nowhere to go. There's nowhere to get into the US here. So how long James does it take for a US asylum claim to get process? Well, here in Tijuana one thing that's happening is that there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request asylum just show up at the border and do it. You have to wait on this list for your number to be called 'em people. I've been speaking to recently are waiting more than a month to just begin an asylum claim, and that's before the Central American migrant caravan showed up here. So for those people in the caravan who requested asylum. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities and then for that claim to be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House is negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right when you apply for asylum, you're on US soil. You're kind of holding facility, but what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With us. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then soon after the incoming government of unrest Manuel Lopez over the president elect who takes power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen this plan, they're calling remain in Mexico. It would mean that people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is a minimum months, but for many people requesting asylum right now, that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay here in Mexico. I mean, the real question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live or even food to eat. Right. These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people were talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. There are thousands of people from Central America who would want to request the Silom in the US, but they would stay here in Mexico. It would be a huge burden for Mexican. Border cities. So what what does happen now? I mean, we said that the Boorda was shut down for a few hours three opened. But there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border. It. It's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US and Mexican authorities because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to to sort this out to give people a quicker solution. And part of it is the fact that we are in the middle of a government transition in Mexico right now. And so the new government takes power Saturday. There's a bit of a feeling here of it's just kind of a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in Tijuana who don't have anywhere to go. We'll have very little to eat. And and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you, Richard. Couple of weeks ago. I was touring the burned out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this happened. Houses look like probably trade. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe that was a huge tree weakened by the fire crashing down without any warning. And this is one of the many dangers as residents try to return to a place. Devastated by wildfire Montana. Public radio's Eric Whitney reports falling trees are one of the big reasons it can take so long for people to be let back into areas evacuated for fires. Scott mclean. A spokesman for the California Department of forestry and fire protection or Cal fire says checking for them is very time and labor intensive the firefighters going to out every street walking it making sure that trees polls, whatever may be are secure if they're not. We'll cut them down McLean says people will be let back in authority is determined. There's less danger. But Cal fire still advises keep your eyes your ears open look up look down and look around. There is no sure situation they need to make sure that they're safe as well and provide for. Their own safety hazard. Trees can be hard to identify McLean says some firefighters will knock on them kind of like supermarket shoppers due to watermelons if a tree sounds hollow. It could be bad news fire science, professor Scott Stevens, at UC Berkley says different kinds of trees pose different challenges, the pine and fir-trees around paradise often have high branches that fall off without warning. And then there are the oak trees, I would be very nervous about big oaks and potential for them to come down because he oaks a lot times have heart rot. They have rotten material inside the center and a lotta times a smoldering fire converted there for days and days and days. I've been around looks like that all of a sudden a week later, boom. It comes down the danger can persist a lot longer than a week. Stephen says as burn trees that are strong now continued to deteriorate I'll be by your four five they start to really get less structurally sound that. Of course, you get a wind event big storms, and they start coming down in earnest and by your ten they're coming down a great deal. Public safety agencies like Cal fire generally cut down hazard trees, immediately after a fire, then it's up to individual property owners to take care of trees that may be problematic longer term. Stevens says fire insurance policies often cover the expense of hiring professional crews to do the dangerous work. I would not advocate for anybody to do this work on their own. It's quite a skill quite an art form, frankly to get a big treat, a drop where you want it. Stephen says he's worried about how many people in round paradise have fire insurance. He says sometimes counties or other jurisdictions will pool resources to contract with professional tree followers to work at community scale timber mills can process a lot of fire killed trees into useful lumber. But timber companies are generally only interested in burned areas outside of town where they can salvage logs efficiently. Stevens says logistics make it unlikely that small property owners will be able to sell dead trees to offset the cost of cutting them down. Giddy machines in there to collect material having all burned debris cars road infrastructure down power lines. So it's very difficult for someone to come in. And they use that viable alternative like the campfire itself. Trees killed by the fire are at first dangerous and unpredictable and then become an expensive headache for years to come for NPR news. I'm Eric Whitney the geopolitical crisis in Ukraine is escalating on Sunday, the Russian coastguards stopped and seized three. Ukrainian naval vessels, passing off the coast of Crimea that intern triggered protests in Ukraine. The own Security Council is holding an emergency meeting about the situation today. And peers Lucian Kim reports from Moscow when Russia seized Crimea in twenty fourteen it took control over both sides of the Kirch straight a narrow bottleneck connecting the Black Sea to the much smaller. Sea of Azov in May, President Putin personally opened a bridge over the Kerch strait, connecting the Crimean peninsula to the Russian mainland. The. Twelve mile long Kirch bridge has become a symbol of Russia's claim to Crimea, which Ukraine practically every other country in the world refused to recognize. On Sunday Russia dispatched warplanes to patrol the area after the Ukrainian navy tried to send three vessels through the Kerch strait. Meaning they'd have to pass under Putin's Newbridge Russia. Rammed one of the boats opened fire on the other two and seized all three vessels along with their crews conflicting reports that three or six Ukrainian crew members sustained injuries during the clash. Spokesman. Russia's federal security service, the cranium vessels were violating Russian territorial waters and had to be stopped. Ukraine is already waging a low-level war against Kremlin-backed fighters in the eastern part of the country after the naval clash Ukrainian, president petro per shaneco called a late night meeting with top security officials in Kiev. The minor Schinkel said city would ask parliament to approve the imposition of martial law called open Russian aggression, martial law with allowing unpopular partial to postpone presidential elections in March Russian state television said per shaneco provoked the incident in the Kerch strait as a pretext to cancel the elections and possibly to scuttle an expected meeting between President Trump and Putin later this week in Argentina Lucian,.

United States Mexico Tijuana Ukraine Scott mclean Central America Kerch strait Scott Stevens Lisa Gabi James Frederick Stephen President Putin Eric Whitney president Washington Post heroin Bombay Russia California Department of fores
"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Performers doers. I'm Helga Davis. I speak with artists like singer-songwriter salons and film director, Kenneth Lonergan. I'm curious a little newsy, and I want to know their paths from there to here. Doing me for a special week of surprising conversations were together. We'll find the stories and experiences that connect us all all this week at nine pm on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC it all began as a peaceful protest hundreds of migrants had a major border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico marched to protest the US slowdown in processing asylum claims they were met by Mexican police in riot gear and soon things spiraled out of control US border agents fired tear gas into the crowd images from the scene show women and young children running from plumes of gas the crossing then was closed for several hours. Reporter James Frederick is in Tijuana and joins us now James you're at the border yesterday. Just describe the scene. What did you see? So as you say, it started as a peaceful protest of people largely from the Central American migrant caravan. There were lots of Mexican federal police out trying to contain them. Eventually they got around Mexican federal police, and then they went down into the this kind of riverbank where there is not that giant steel fence that divides us and Mexico, but it's a chain link fence and barbed wire and things like that a group of them started pushing up against that fence. And then soon after that was when tear gas was first deployed by US authorities. And then it was you several times after that. It was a really scary scene. There were helicopters flying over the whole time. I spoke to this woman Leigh set a Honduran migrant right after tear gas was used. The bomb by Jason folks. So as Lisa says, you know, a few tear gas bombs were fired. There were children around there. They were inhaling it. And she says it was just scary. It was burning their eyes and lungs, and that she was just couldn't believe it was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garner public attention on their plight? Or did they really think they were going to get in by trying to scale a fence? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with this speaking to them. Yeah. That's what a lot of them said is, you know, we want people to see where here we want people to understand what we're going through especially with the long long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. Of course, a few of them did try to push into the us, but the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just no where to go there's nowhere to get into the US here. So how long James does it take for a US asylum? Claim to get processed. Well, here in Tijuana one thing that's happening is that there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request asylum just show up at the border and do it. You have to wait on this list for your number to be called people. I've been speaking to recently are waiting more than a month to just begin asylum claim, and that's before the Central American migrant caravan showed up here. So for those people in the caravan who want to request asylum. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities and then for that claim to be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House has negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right? When you apply for Silom, you're on US soil. You're in kind of a holding facility. But what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With this. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then soon after the incoming government of unrest Manuel Lopez over the president elect who takes power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen this plan, they're calling remain in Mexico. It would mean that people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is at a minimum months, but for many people requesting asylum right now, that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay here in Mexico. I mean, the real question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live or even food to eat. Right. These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people we're talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. There are thousands of people from Central America who would want to request asylum in the US, but they would stay here in Mexico. It would be a huge burden for Mexican. Border cities. So what what does happen now? I mean, we said that the border was shut down for a few hours it's reopened. But there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border. It's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US and Mexican authorities because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to to sort this out to give people a quicker solution. You know, and part of it is the fact that we are in the middle of a government transition in Mexico right now. And so the new government takes power Saturday. There's a bit of a feeling here of it's just kind of a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in wanna who don't have anywhere to go. We'll have very little to eat. And and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Couple of weeks ago. I was touring the burned out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this happened. Houses look like probably tree. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe that was a huge tree weakened by the fire crashing down without any warning. And this is one of the many dangers residents. Try to return to a place devastated by wildfire Montana. Public radio's Eric Whitney reports falling trees are one of the big reasons it can take so long for people to be let back into areas evacuated for fires. Scott mclean. A spokesman for the California Department of forestry and fire protection or Cal fire says checking for them is very time and labor intensive the firefighters have going throughout every street walking it making sure that trees polls, whatever may be are secure if they're not. We'll cut them down McLean says people will be let back in when thority is determined. There's less danger. But Cal fire still advises keep your eyes your ears open look up look down and look around. There is no sure situation they need to make sure that they are safe as well and provide for. Their own safety hazard. Trees can be hard to identify McLean says some firefighters will knock on them kind of like supermarket shoppers due to watermelons if a tree sounds hollow. It could be bad news fire science, professor Scott Stevens at UC Berkley says different kinds of trees. Pose different challenges, the pine trees around paradise often have high branches that fall off without warning. And then there are the oak trees, I would be very nervous about big oaks and potential for them to come down because he oaks a lot of times have heart rot. They have rotten material inside the center a lot of times a smoldering fire convert in there for days and days and days. I've been around looks like that at all of a sudden week later, boom, it comes down the danger can persist a lot longer than a week. Stephen says as burn trees that are strong now continue to deteriorate probably by your four five. They start to really get less structurally sound. And of course, you get a wind event big storms and they start coming down in earnest by your ten. They're coming down a great deal. Public safety agencies like Cal fire generally cut down hazard trees, immediately after a fire, then it's up to individual property owners to take care of trees that may be problematic longer term. Stevens says fire insurance policies often cover the expense of hiring professional crews to do the dangerous work. I would not advocate for anybody to do this work on their own. It's quite a skill quite an art form, frankly to get a big treat, a drop where you want it. Stephen says he's worried about how many people in and around paradise have fire insurance. He says sometimes counties or other jurisdictions will pool resources to contract with professional tree followers to work at community scale timber mills can process a lot of fire killed trees into useful lumber. But timber companies are generally only interested in burned areas outside of town where they can salvage logs efficiently. Stevens says logistics make it unlikely that small property owners will be able to sell dead trees to offset the cost of cutting them down. Giddy machines in there to collect these materials having all the burned debris cars road infrastructure down power lines. So it's very difficult for someone to come in and really use that as a viable alternative like the campfire itself. Trees killed by the fire are at first dangerous and unpredictable and then become an expensive headache for years to come for NPR news. I'm Eric Whitney the geopolitical crisis in Ukraine is escalating on Sunday, the Russian coastguards stopped and seized three. Ukrainian naval vessels, passing off the coast of Crimea that intern triggered protests in Ukraine. The own Security Council is holding an emergency meeting about the situation today. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow when Russia seized Crimea in twenty fourteen it took control over both sides of the Kirch straight a narrow bottleneck connecting the Black Sea to the much smaller. Sea of Azov in May, President Putin personally opened a bridge over the Kerch strait, connecting the Crimean peninsula to the Russian mainland. The twelve mile long Kirch bridge has become a symbol of Russia's claimed Crimea, which Ukraine practically every other country in the world refused to recognize. On Sunday Russia dispatched warplanes to patrol the area after the cranium navy tried to send three vessels through the Kerch strait. Meaning they'd have to pass under Putin's Newbridge Russia. Rammed one of the boats opened fire on the other two and seized all three vessels along with their crews. There are conflicting reports at three or six Ukrainian crew members sustained injuries during the clash. Only dash spokesman for FSP. Russia's federal security service said that Ukrainian vessels were violating Russia territorial waters and had to be stopped. Ukraine is already waging a low level war against Kremlin-backed fighters in the eastern part of the country after the naval clash Ukrainian, president petro per shaneco called a late night meeting with top security officials in Kiev. The minor Schinkel city would ask parliament to approve the imposition of martial law called open Russian aggression, martial law with allowing unpopular partial go to postpone presidential elections in March. Russian state television said Pershing co provoked the incident in the Kerch strait as a pretext to cancel the elections and possibly to scuttle an expected meeting between President Trump and Putin later this week in Argentina Lucian, Kim NPR news Moscow later this afternoon on all things considered hundreds of.

US Mexico James Frederick Tijuana Ukraine NPR Rachel Martin Scott mclean California WNYC Reporter Stephen Kerch strait Scott Stevens David Greene Kenneth Lonergan Eric Whitney Helga Davis Lisa Gabi
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The bomb by toxic. As Lisa says, a few tear-gas bombs were fired. There were children around there. They were inhaling it. And she says it was just scary. It was burning eyes and lungs, and that she was just couldn't believe it was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garner public attention on their plight? Or did they really think they were gonna get in by trying to scale effects? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with their speaking to them. Yeah. That's what a lot of them said is, you know, we want people to see where here we want people to understand what we're going through especially with the long long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. You know, of course, a few of them did try to push into the us, but the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just nowhere to go. There's nowhere to get into the US here. So how long James does it take for a US asylum? Claim to get processed. We'll here in Tijuana. One thing that's happening is that there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request asylum just show up at the border and do it. You have to wait on this list for your number to be called in people. I've been speaking to recently are waiting more than a month to just begin an asylum claim, and that's before the Central American migrant caravan showed up here. So for those people in the caravan who wanna requested asylum. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities and then for that claim to be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House has negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right? When you apply for Silom, you're on US soil. You're and kind of a holding facility, but what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With this. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then soon after the incoming government of unrest Manuel Lopez over the president elect who takes power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen this plan, they're calling remain in Mexico. It would mean that people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is a minimum months, but for many people requesting asylum right now, that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay here in Mexico. I mean, the real question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live or even food to eat. Right. These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people were talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. There are thousands of people from Central America who would want to request asylum in the US, but they would stay here in Mexico. It would be a huge burden for Mexican. Border cities. So what what does happen? I mean, we said that the border was shut down for a few hours it's opened, but there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border, it it's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US Mexican authorities. Because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to to sort this out to give people a quicker solution. And part of it is the fact that we're in the middle of a government transition in Mexico right now until the new government takes power Saturday. There's a bit of a feeling here of it's just kind of a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in Tijuana who don't have anywhere to go who have very little to eat. And and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you, Richard. A couple of weeks ago. I was torturing the burned out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this happened. Houses look like probably tree. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just came from not safe. That was a huge tree weakened by the fire crashing down without any warning. And this is one of the many dangers as residents try to return to a place. Devastated by wildfire Montana. Public radio's Eric Whitney reports falling trees are one of the big reasons it can take so long for people to be let back into areas evacuated for fires. Scott mclean. A spokesman for the California Department of forestry and fire protection or Cal fire says checking for them is very time and labor intensive the firefighters have going throughout every street walking it making sure that trees polls, whatever may be are secure if they're not. We'll cut them down McLean says people will be led back in when thority is determined. There's less danger. But Cal fire still advises keep your eyes your ears open look up the down and look around. There is no sure situation they need to make sure that they are safe as well and provide for. Their own safety hazard. Trees can be hard to identify McLean says some firefighters will knock on them kind of like supermarket shoppers due to watermelons if a tree sounds hollow. It could be bad news fire science, professor Scott Stevens at UC Berkley says different kinds of trees. Pose different challenges, the pine trees around paradise often have high branches that fall off without warning. And then there are the oak trees, I would be very nervous about big oaks and potential pretend to come down because he oaks a lot of times have heart rot. They have rotten material inside the center a lot of times a smoldering fire convert in there for days and days and days. I've been around looks like that at all of a sudden week later, boom, it comes down the danger can persist a lot longer than a week. Stephen says as burn trees that are strong now continue to deteriorate probably by your four five. They start to really get less structurally sound that. Of course, you get a wind event big storms, and they start coming down at Ernest and by your ten they're coming down a great deal. Public safety agencies like Cal fire generally cut down hazard trees, immediately after a fire, then it's up to individual property owners to take care of trees that may be problematic longer term. Stevens says fire insurance policies often cover the expense of hiring professional crews to do the dangerous work. I would not advocate for anybody to do this work on their own. It's quite a skill quite an art form frankly to get a big tree to drop where you want. It. Stephen says he's worried about how many people in and around paradise have fire insurance. He says sometimes counties or other jurisdictions will pool resources to contract with professional tree followers to work at community scale timber mills can process a lot of fire killed trees into useful lumber. But timber companies are generally only interested in burned areas outside of town where they can salvage logs efficiently. Stevens says logistics make it unlikely that small property owners will be able to sell dead trees to offset the cost of cutting them down. Giddy machines in there to collect these materials having all burned debris cars road infrastructure down power lines. So it's very difficult for someone to come in and really use that as a viable alternative like the campfire itself. Trees killed by the fire are at first dangerous and unpredictable and then become an expensive headache for years to come for NPR news. I'm Eric Whitney the geo political crisis in Ukraine is escalating on Sunday, the Russian coastguards stopped and seized three. Ukrainian naval vessels, passing off the coast of Crimea that intern triggered protests in Ukraine. The UN Security Council is holding an emergency meeting about the situation today. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow when Russia's seize Crimea in twenty fourteen it took control over both sides of the Kirch straight a narrow bottleneck connecting the Black Sea to the much smaller. Sea of Azov in May, President Putin personally opened a bridge over Kerch strait, connecting the Crimean peninsula to the Russian mainland. The twelve my long Kirch bridge has become a symbol of Russia's claim to Crimea, which Ukraine practically every other country in the world refused to recognize. On Sunday Russia dispatched warplanes to patrol the area after the Ukrainian navy tried to send three vessels through the Kerch strait. Meaning they'd have to pass under Putin's Newbridge Russia. Rammed one of the boats opened fire on the other two and seized all three vessels along with their crews. There are conflicting reports at three or six Ukrainian crew members sustained injuries during the clash. Deja spokesman for Russia's federal security service to the Ukrainian vessels were violating Russian territorial waters and had to be stopped Ukraine is already waging a low-level war against Kremlin-backed fighters in the eastern part of the country after the naval clash Ukrainian, president petro. Pershing called a late night meeting with top security officials in Kiev. The men that the city would ask parliament to approve the imposition of martial law called open Russian aggression, martial law with allow an unpopular partial to postpone presidential elections in March Russian state television said per shaneco provoked the incident in the Kerch strait as a pretext cancel the elections and possibly to scuttle an expected meeting between President Trump and Putin later this week in Argentina.

United States Mexico Tijuana Scott Stevens Scott mclean Washington Post Russia Kerch strait Central America Lisa Gabi James Frederick Stephen President Putin Ukraine Eric Whitney president heroin UN Security Council NPR Ukrainian navy
"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lisa says, you know, if you tear gas bombs were fired there were children around there. They were inhaling it. And she says it was just scary. It was burning their eyes and lunch, and she was just couldn't believe what was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garner public attention on their plight? Or did they really think they were gonna get in by trying to scale a fence? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with this king to them. Yeah. That that's what a lot of you know, we want people to see where we want people to understand what we're going through especially with no long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. Of course, a few of them did try to push ups, but the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just nowhere to go nowhere to get into the US here. So how long James does it take for a US asylum? Claim to get processed. Well, here in Tijuana one thing that's happening is it there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request asylum just show up at the border, and do it you have to wait on this list number to be called and people. I've been speaking to recently are waiting more than a month to just begin an asylum claim, and that's before the Central American migrants caravan showed up here. So for those people in their caravan who went to question silence. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities and in for that. Claim to be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House has negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right? When you apply for Silom, you're on US soil. You're in kind of a holding facility. But what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With this. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then seen after the incoming government of Lopez orcas over the president elect take power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen there's plan. They're calling remain in Mexico. It would mean people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is at a minimum months, but for many people requesting asylum right now, that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay in Mexico. I mean, the question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live, right? These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people were talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. The thousands of people from Central America who want to request asylum in US, but they would stay in Mexico. It would be a huge curtain for Mexican border cities. So. What what does happen now? I mean, we said that the border was shut down for a few hours. It's reopened. But there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border. It. It's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US and Mexican authorities because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to sort this out to give people a quicker solution. You know, and and part of it. It's the fact that we are in the middle of the government transition in Mexico right now until the new government takes power. There's a bit of a feeling here of it's just kind of a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in wanna who don't have anywhere to go very little each. And and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Couple of weeks ago. I was touring the burned out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this happened. Houses. Look like probably. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe that was a huge tree weakened by the fire crashing down without any warning. And this is one of the many dangers as residents try to return to a place. Devastated by wildfire Montana. Public radio's Eric Whitney reports falling trees are one of the big reasons it can take so long for people to be let back into areas evacuated for fires. Scott mclean. A spokesman for the California Department of forestry and fire protection or Cal fire says checking for them is very time and labor intensive the firefighters going throughout every street walking it making sure that trees polls, whatever may be are secure if they're not. We'll cut them down McLean says people will be let back in when thority is determined. There's less danger. But Cal fire still advises keep your eyes your ears open look up look down and look around. There is no sure situation they need to make sure that they are safe as well and provide for their own. Safety hazard. Trees can be hard to identify McLean says some firefighters will knock on them kind of like supermarket shoppers due to watermelons if a tree sounds hollow. It could be bad news fire science, professor Scott Stevens, at UC Berkley says different kinds of trees pose different challenges, the pine and fir-trees around paradise often have high branches that fall off without warning. And then there are the oak trees, I would be very nervous about big oaks and potential for them to come down because he oaks times have heart rot. They have rotten material inside the center a lot of times a smoldering fire convert in there for days and days and days. I've been around looks like that all of a sudden week later, boom, it comes down the danger can persist a lot longer than a week Stephen says as burn trees that are strong now continue to deteriorate probably about your four five start to really get less structurally found that. Of course, you get a wind event big storms, and they start coming down in earnest and by year ten they're coming down a great deal. Public safety agencies like Cal fire generally cut down hazard trees, immediately after a fire, then it's up to individual property owners to take care of trees that may be problematic. Longer-term Stevens says fire insurance policies often cover the expense of hiring professional crews to do the dangerous work. I would not advocate for anybody. Could do this work on their own? It's quite a skill quite an art form frankly to get a big tree to drop where you want. It. Stephen says he's worried about how many people in and around paradise have fire insurance. He says sometimes counties or other jurisdictions will pool resources to contract with professional tree followers to work at community scale timber mills can process a lot of fire killed trees into useful lumber. But timber companies are generally only interested in burned areas outside of town where they can salvage efficiently. Stevens says logistics. Make it unlikely that small property owners will be able to sell dead trees to offset the cost of cutting them down. Did he machines in there to collect these materials having all burned debris cars road infrastructure down power lines? So it's very difficult for someone to come in and really use that as a viable alternative like the campfire itself. Trees killed by the fire are at first dangerous and unpredictable and then become an expensive headache for years to come for NPR news. I'm Eric Whitney the geopolitical crisis in Ukraine is escalating on Sunday, the Russian coastguards stopped and seized three. Ukrainian naval vessels, passing off the coast of Crimea that intern triggered protests in Ukraine. The UN Security Council is holding an emergency meeting about the situation today. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow when Russia seized Crimea in twenty fourteen it took control over both sides of the Kirch straight a narrow bottleneck connecting the Black Sea to the much smaller. Sea of Azov in May, President Putin personally opened a bridge over the Kerch strait, connecting the Crimean peninsula to the Russian mainland. The twelve mile long Kirch bridge has become a symbol of Russia's claim to Crimea, which Ukraine practically every other country in the world refuse to recognize. On Sunday Russia dispatched warplanes to patrol the area after the Ukrainian navy tried to send three vessels through the Kerch strait. Meaning they'd have to pass under Putin's Newbridge Russia. Rammed one of the boats opened fire on the other two and seized all three vessels along with their crews. There are conflicting reports that three or six Ukrainian crew members sustained injuries during a clash only you're supposed spokesman for FSP. Russia's federal security service said that Ukrainian vessels were violating Russian territorial waters and had to be stopped Ukraine is already waging a low-level war against Kremlin-backed fighters in the eastern part of the country after the naval clash Ukrainian, president petro. Pershing called a late night meeting with top security officials in Kiev. We didn't even the minor said he would ask parliament to approve the imposition of martial law called open Russian aggression, martial law with allowing unpopular partial to postpone presidential elections in March. Russian state television said Pershing co provoked the incident in the Kerch strait as a pretext to cancel the elections and possibly to scuttle an expected meeting between President Trump and Putin later this week in Argentina Lucian, Kim NPR news Moscow later this afternoon on all things considered hundreds of Americans.

United States Mexico Scott Stevens Scott mclean Washington Post Central America Tijuana Kerch strait Ukraine Russia James Frederick Lisa Gabi Stephen President Putin Eric Whitney president heroin NPR UN Security Council
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In Houston, toxic. So as Lisa says, you know, if you tear gas bombs were fine there were children around there. They were inhaling it. And she says it was just scary. It was burning their eyes and lunch. And and that she was just couldn't believe it was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garner public attention on their plight? Or did they really think they were gonna get in by trying to scale a fence? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with their came to them. Yeah. That's what a lot of them. You know, we want people to see where here we want people to understand what we're going through especially with the long long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. You know, of course, a few of them did try to push you have put the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just nowhere to go nowhere to get into the US here. So how long James does it take for a US asylum? Claim to get processed. Well, here in Tijuana one thing that's happening is that there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request asylum just show up at the border, and do it you have to wait on this list number to be called and people. I've been speaking to recently are waiting more than a month to just begin an asylum claim, and that's before the Central American migrant caravan showed up here. So for those people in the caravan who went over questions. Silence. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities and incidental claim to be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House has negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right? When you apply for Silom, you're on US soil. You're kind of a holding facility, but what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With this. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then soon after the incoming government of Lopez over the president elect you takes power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen this plan, they're calling remain in Mexico. It would mean that people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is at a minimum, but for many people requesting asylum right now that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay in Mexico. I mean, the real question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live, right? These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people were talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. The thousands of people from Central America who wants to request asylum in US, but they would stay in Mexico. It would be a huge burden for Mexican border cities. So. What what does happen now? I mean, we said that the border was shut down for a few hours. It's reopened. But there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border. It. It's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US Mexican authorities. Because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to to sort out to give people a quicker solution. You know, and and part of it. It's the fact that we are in the middle of their government transition in Mexico right now in the new government takes power Saturday. There's a bit of a feeling of it's just kind of a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in Tijuana don't have anywhere to go. We'll have very little to each and and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Couple of weeks ago. I was touring the burned out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this happened. Houses look like probably trade. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe that was a huge tree weakened by the fire crashing down without any warning. And this is one of the many dangers as residents try to return to a place. Devastated by wildfire Montana. Public radio's Eric Whitney reports falling trees are one of the big reasons it can take so long for people to be let back into areas evacuated for fires. Scott mclean. A spokesman for the California Department of forestry and fire protection or Cal fire says checking for them is very time and labor intensive the firefighters going throughout every street walking it making sure that trees polls, whatever may be are secure if they're not. We'll cut them down McLean says people will be let back in when thority is determined. There's less danger. But Cal fire still advises keep your eyes your ears open look up look down and look around. There is no sure situation they need to make sure that they are safe as well and provide. Died for their own safety hazard. Trees can be hard to identify McLean says some firefighters will knock on them kind of like supermarket shoppers due to watermelons if a tree sounds hollow. It could be bad news fire science, professor Scott Stevens at UC Berkley says different kinds of trees. Pose different challenges, the pine trees around paradise often have high branches that fall off without warning. And then there are the oak trees, I would be very nervous about big oaks and potential for them to come down because he oaks a lot of times have heart. They have rotten material inside the center and a lotta times smoldering fire convert in there for days and days and days, I've been around looks like that at all of a sudden week later, boom, it comes down the danger can persist a lot longer than a week Stephen says as burn trees that are strong now continue to deteriorate probably about your four five. They start to really get less structurally sound. Then. Of course, you get a wind event big storms, and they start coming down at earnest and by your ten they're coming down a great. Deal public safety agencies like Cal fire generally cut down hazard trees, immediately after a fire, then it's up to individual property owners to take care of trees that may be problematic longer term. Stevens says fire insurance policies often cover the expense of hiring professional crews to do the dangerous work. I would not advocate for anybody to do this work on their own. It's quite a skill quite an art form frankly to get a big tree to drop where you want. It. Stephen says he's worried about how many people in and around paradise have fire insurance. He says sometimes counties or other jurisdictions will pool resources to contract with professional tree followers to work at community scale timber mills can process a lot of fire killed trees into useful lumber. But timber companies are generally only interested in burned areas outside of town where they can salvage logs efficiently. Stevens says logistics make it unlikely that small property owners will be able to sell dead trees to offset the cost of cutting them down. Did he machines and there to collect these materials having all the burned debris cars road infrastructure down power lines? So it's very difficult for someone to come in and really use that as a viable alternative like the campfire itself. Trees killed by the fire are at first dangerous and unpredictable and then become an expensive headache for years to come for NPR news. I'm Eric Whitney the geopolitical crisis in Ukraine is escalating on Sunday, the Russian coastguards stopped and seized three. Ukrainian naval vessels, passing off the coast of Crimea that intern triggered protests in Ukraine. The own Security Council is holding an emergency meeting about the situation today. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow when Russia seized Crimea in twenty fourteen it took control over both sides of the Kerch strait a narrow bottleneck connecting the Black Sea to the much smaller. Sea of Azov in May, President Putin personally opened a bridge over the Kerch strait, connecting the Crimean peninsula to the Russian mainland. The twelve mile long Kirch bridge has become a symbol of Russia's claim to Crimea, which Ukraine practically every other country in the world refused to recognize. On Sunday Russia dispatched warplanes to patrol the area after the cranium navy tried to send three vessels through the Kerch strait. Meaning they'd have to pass under Putin's Newbridge Russia. Rammed one of the boats opened fire on the other two and seized all three vessels along with their crews. There are conflicting reports that three or six Ukrainian crew members sustained injuries during the clash. Spokesman FSP Russia's federal security service said that Ukrainian vessels were violating Russian territorial waters and had to be stopped. Ukraine is already waging a low level war against Kremlin-backed fighters in the eastern part of the country after the naval clash Ukrainian, president petro. Pershing co called a late night meeting with top security officials in Kiev. The minor Schinkel city would ask parliament to approve the imposition of martial law called open, Russian aggression. Martial law would allow an unpopular partial to postpone presidential elections in March. Russian state television said Pershing co provoked the incident in the Kurt straight as a pretext to cancel the elections and possibly to scuttle an expected meeting between President Trump and Putin later this week in Argentina Lucian,.

Mexico United States Ukraine Tijuana Washington Post Central America Kerch strait Scott Stevens NPR James Frederick Lisa Gabi Stephen President Putin Eric Whitney president Scott mclean heroin Houston
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KCRW

"Bomb by toxic. So as Lisa says, you know, a few tear-gas bomb for fire. There were children around there. They learn Haley hit and she says, it was just scary. It was burning their eyes and lunch, and she was just couldn't believe what was happening. I mean, obviously a heroin scene. But when you talk to these migrants, did they did they do this just to garner public attention on their plight? Or did they really think they were gonna get in by trying to scale a fence? You know, I it's hard to know exactly what they were hoping to achieve with king to them. Yeah. That that's what a lot of know, we want people to see where here we want people to understand what we're going through especially with the long long process for those who want to request asylum in the United States. You know, of course, a few of them did try to push you. But the border is so reinforced around this area that there's just nowhere together. Nowhere to get into the US year. So how long James does it take for a US asylum? Claim to get processed. Well, here in Tijuana one thing that's happening is that there is a list of asylum seeker, so US authorities are not letting everyone who wants to request them just show up at the border, and do it you have to wait on this list number to be called and people. I've been speaking to recently or waiting more than a month to just begin an asylum claim, and that's the four is the Central American migrant caravan showed up here. So for those people in the caravan who wanted to question silence. They're looking at months to even be heard I by US authorities. To be processed can take months or even years. So let's talk about where they are physically when these claims are being processed because over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that the White House has negotiated a plan with Mexico requiring that anyone who's applying for asylum. Stay on the Mexican side of the border. That hasn't always been the case, right? When you apply for Silom, you're on US soil. You're kind of a holding facility. But what more can you tell us about this deal is Mexico? Okay. With this. That's unclear right now. So the Washington Post reported that and then seen after the incoming government of Andres Manuel Lopez over the president elect you takes power this Saturday. They said a deal has not yet been reached to agree to this. But if this does happen this plan, they're calling remain Mexico. It would mean that people would do their entire asylum process here in Mexico. So as I said, I mean that is at a minimum, but for many people requesting asylum right now that's a process that takes more than a year, and they would stay in Mexico. I mean, the real question with that is what Mexico is going to do with this with people who may not be able to work may not have somewhere to live, right? These are not necessarily Mexicans. I mean, the people were talking about right now right now are fleeing violence in Central America. Exactly. There are thousands of people from Central America who would want to request asylum in US, but they would stay here in Mexico. It would be a huge curtain for Mexican border cities. So. What what does happen now? I mean, we said that the border was shut down for a few hours. It's reopened. But there are more people on their way from Central America moving towards the US Mexican border. It. It's it's certainly an issue that needs to be sorted out by US and Mexican authorities because right now, it seems like neither side is doing much to to sort this out to give people a quicker solution. You know, and and part of it is the fact that we are in the middle of their government transition in Mexico right now. So the new government takes power Saturday. There's a bit of a feeling here of it's just a wait until the new government comes in. But you know, that there's a lot of people here in Tijuana who don't have anywhere to go very little to each and and they're in limbo. And they don't know what's going to happen next. Okay. Reporter James Frederick at the border in Tijuana. Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Couple of weeks ago. I was touring the burned-out town of paradise California with residents James and Lisa Gabi. When this.

United States Mexico Tijuana Lisa Gabi Central America Washington Post James Frederick heroin Haley California Andres Manuel Lopez Rachel Reporter White House president
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bit with a young couple James and Lisa Gabi lettuce in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the road. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left basically, just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have. I'm so sorry knew it was coming. I mean, everybody's been saying, you know, for years when this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in full-time with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. I had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street. Now is new you know, who who was out, and you know, what? Houses look like probably tree. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't definitely not safe. It was right over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that you know, everybody that is in our family was able to get out in time. I realize not everybody had.

Lisa Gabi James Sacramento two months
"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington, and I'm David Greene in Chico, California. I don't know if anything could have prepared me for what I saw yesterday about fifteen miles from here in the town of paradise much of the community was incinerated by the camp fire here in northern California. Which is now the deadliest wildfire in state history. There are fifty six people confirmed dead, but more than a hundred are still unaccounted for we spent the day in paradise. And I just want to warn you what you're about to hear could disturb you. We were driving around a bit with a young couple, James and Lisa Gabi. They let us in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the roads. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left basically, just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have I'm so sorry, Wisconsin. I mean, everybody's been saying, you know, for years when this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in full time with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. You know, I had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street. Now is new you know, who who was out, and you know, what? Houses look like probably tree. Yeah. Looks like the route. We're just came not safe. It was right over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that you know, everybody that is in our family was able to get out in time. I realize not everybody had that chance agency.

Lisa Gabi James David Greene Steve Inskeep California NPR Chico Washington Wisconsin Sacramento two months
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A young couple James and Lisa Gabi lettuce in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the roads. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left basically, just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have. I'm so sorry when it Wisconsin. I mean, everybody's been saying for years in this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in time with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. You know, I had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street and always knew you know, who who was out, and you know, what? The houses. Look like probably. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe. It was right over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that you know, everybody that is in our family was able to get out in time. I realize not everybody had that chance.

Lisa Gabi James Wisconsin Sacramento two months
"lisa gabi" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything. You know? I don't know if anything could have prepared me for what I saw yesterday about fifteen miles from here in the town of paradise much of the community was incinerated by the camp fire here in northern California. Which is now the deadliest wildfire in state history. There fifty six people confirmed dead, but more than a hundred are still unaccounted for we spent the day in paradise. And I just want to warn you what you're about to hear could disturb you. We were driving around a bit with a young couple, James and Lisa Gabi. They let us in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the roads. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left. Basically just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have I'm so sorry. When it was coming. I mean, everybody's been saying, you know, for years when this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in fulltime with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. You know and had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street. And I always knew you know, who who was out, and you know, what the? Houses. Look like probably. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just came not safe. It was read over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that you know, everybody that is in our family was able to get out in time. You know, I realize not everybody had that chance. Group will be. We miss county blessed canine, there's an interim ritual each day here. Now search and rescue teams gather in the parking lot of the tall. Pines bowling alley. Which is somehow still standing there California army national guard. They're police officers from around the state volunteers cadaver dog units anthropologist, who specialize in human remains. They were about to go house to house yesterday. Many of them were already suited up in white has meant gear and facemasks. They were told that once they got two houses, they should look near certain objects that may have survived like bid springs springs bathtubs. The primaries. Wanna look looking for a dentist? We're not looking for the little stuff similar doing this sweeps. We were standing right near a search team who came to volunteer from sin Yoma county. Mark Aldridge is the deputy sheriff there and he seen this before. It was just last year that fire in his county killed at least twenty two people the job here in paradise right now, he said is to look for signs of people who didn't survive and also look for anything that could be dangerous for crews who come in later. Well, think about when you're looking for your keys, honestly, you're looking for something that catches your. You're looking something that doesn't look like a belongs. So if we know we're going into a house that it was an elderly person who is bedridden we're going to go straight to where we think the bedroom is and find a bed frame and look there right now, we're just looking for obvious stuff, whether it be guns or a gun safe or. Yeah. Yeah. That we can tell them take them back and get these guns. If we find somebody deceased, we called the Buchanan sheriffs, and they're gonna come over and handle it as gets more refined. We go on with sifter boxes and look for bone fragments. Anything else for anybody? The order. All right, guys. Go far. He followed team cinema and some other teams into these eerily, quiet neighborhoods.

James Lisa Gabi Mark Aldridge Comcast Buchanan sheriffs California California army national guard Pines bowling alley Yoma county Sacramento two months
"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM H NPR news and the New York conversation. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Eight more bodies have been found in northern California where the death toll from the campfire is now at fifty six the latest victims were discovered in paradise the town north of Sacramento where many people were killed by the flames more than one hundred others are still listed as missing most in their sixties or older Ted Goldberg with member station. K Q E D says like other wildfires in California prison inmates are helping to battle this fire to inmates were among five firefighters who suffered serious injuries in the first twenty four hours of the campfire burning in Butte county, both were hospitalized and released while state prison officials say injuries to inmate firefighters are rare three California prison firefighters were killed on the job in the last eighteen months. The campfire is the deadliest in state history. It's still not contained President Trump says he supports legislation designed to reduce prison sentences for some drug offenders. Here's NPR's. I rosco. Some top Senate Republicans really wanted to address sentencing in the criminal Justice Bill, but there have been concerns there might not be enough support with Trump coming out in favor of changing sentencing laws supporters are hoping they may be able to get this legislation passed during the lame duck session of congress. Come January Democrats will control the house for the first time in eight years. Republicans retained control of the Senate in this month's midterm elections. This is NPR news from Washington, and this is WNYC in New York at six thirty one. Good morning. I'm Kerry Nolan hate crimes across the US rose in two thousand seventeen marking a rise for the third straight year. WNYC's Matt Katz reports locally New Jersey saw a seventy six percent increase in incidence mostly involving race ethnicity and ancestry in New York state. The plurality of incidents in two thousand seventeen involved bias against religion, and the total number dropped slightly to five hundred and fifty to New York City recorded most of those incidents. Nationally hate crimes increased seventeen percent with a dramatic spike in the targeting of Jews and Latinos, the FBI information those incomplete many jurisdictions like Newark did not submit data. New Jersey has one Republican congressman left in the house. Democrat Andy Kim is defeated Representative Tomek. Arthur the Associated Press called the race yesterday Kim is a former national security aide to Barack Obama and becomes the state's first Asian American elected to congress. It's been a decade since the third district in the southern part of the state has elected a democrat. Now, just one of the state's twelve representatives will be a Republican that's down from five who are currently in office. A new report shows that black and Latino students in the Bronx and Brooklyn have a harder time repaying their student loans. New York City's department of consumer affairs found that black students default at three times the rate that white students do and Latinos at twice the rate. Laura lie solace. The head of the department says that's in part because they're more likely to attack. Attend for profit colleges with bad lending practices. Her agency is suing one school on behalf of students students that we found are part of our complaint. In court are people who are first integration. College students who maybe they didn't have a family support system to guide them their blog Latino there people with low incomes solace says the report will help her agency direct services, like financial coaching too vulnerable students and the number of cases of measles continues to rise narrow area. Health officials have confirmed five new cases in ocean county, New Jersey, bringing the total number of cases in the state to eleven in New York. There are now twenty four confirmed measles cases in Brooklyn and sixty eight and Rockland county. Those cases have mostly affected orthodox Jewish residents and originated with travelers from Israel Israel is currently experiencing. A large measles outbreak with fifteen hundred confirmed cases and one child's death. Snow? This morning will give way to a mixture of rain. Snow this afternoon. Highs around thirty seven degrees right now. Thirty two degrees and fair New York support for NPR comes from member stations and from PGM PGM, the global investment management business of prudential is for investors seeking alpha across private and public markets. Learn more at PG IM dot com and net flicks with the Kamensky method once famous actor and his agent navigate their later years and lives curve balls starring Michael Douglas and Alan Arkin from Chuck Laurie of the big bang theory on Netflix tomorrow. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington and unveiled green in Chico, California. I don't know if anything could have prepared me for what I saw yesterday about fifteen miles from here in the town of paradise much of the community was incinerated by the camp fire here in northern California. Which is now the deadliest wildfire in state history. There fifty six people confirmed dead, but more than one hundred are still unaccounted for we spent the day in paradise. And I just want to warn you what you're about to hear could disturb you. We were driving around bit with a young couple, James and Lisa Gabi. The us in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the road. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left basically, just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have I'm so sorry. When it was coming. I mean, everybody's been saying for years when this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in time with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. You know, I had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street. And I always knew you know, who who was out, and you know, what? Houses. Look like probably. Yeah. It looks like the route were just can't. Not safe. It was right over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that you know, everybody that is in our family was able to get out in time. You know, I realize not everybody had that chance..

New York City New York California NPR James Washington New Jersey WNYC President Trump Lisa Gabi Sacramento congress Brooklyn Senate measles Dave Mattingly Butte county
"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"lisa gabi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A bit with a young couple James and Lisa Gabi the lettuce in their pickup truck. There were power lines strewn across the roads. There were trees that had tumbled into the ash. They got out and they were looking at what used to be their home Clara lane. Nothing left basically, just a bunch of rebel and metal everywhere. Cars wasted. I mean personal belongings completely gone. I basically got out with the clothes on my back and my pickup. That's all. I have I'm so sorry, Wisconsin. I mean, everybody's been saying, you know, for years in this town goes up it's going up, and it went up James and Lisa had just gotten married about two months ago. And Lisa was ready to give up her place in Sacramento and move in time with James, she loved the quiet small town sense of community here in paradise. You know, I had my normal route like route that I would come and come up the street. Now is new you know, who who was out, and you know, what? Houses look like probably trade. Yeah. It looks like the route. We just can't not safe. It was right over there. Yeah. This town still isn't safe enough for even residents to return. And the only reason this couple was here is because James works for the city. I'm just glad that everybody. That is in our family was able to get out in time. I realize not everybody had that chance.

Lisa Gabi James Wisconsin Sacramento two months