17 Burst results for "Lindsey Lazar"

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"And that's the issue critics of physical education class point to it's great if you already fit and good at whatever the clause is about, but not everyone starts out that way, he was Andrew Rohan, a high school senior at Moorestown friends school. I'm not the most athletic student of the bunch. And you've got these star basketball players who are actually on the varsity, high school basketball team. And then, like me and some of my friends who are like struggling to not get knocked over as people are dunking on the basket. And if pe- Kloss just reinforces existing differences, the F let kids get Besse, and everyone else is embarrassed or miserable role, but more the P teacher at constitution high school knows this. So sometimes he that's the students choose what they want as. As long as they fulfil, the goal of the class, sometimes we're doing our cardio day, we do steps, we do the steps up from the basement to the sixth floor up and down for fifteen minutes. Some kids could be walking doing stairs, cardio jumping rope. As long as you're doing something active. You get a for the day, and he's open to taking a back seat. And letting a student lead the class, I have a girl and one of my classes, she's really into yoga. She has all the stretches, and all the poses, and I let her kind of dictate and the rest of the class jumps in and that, you know, participating in trying their best and for Robin. That's the point of gym clothes, China, get them. More active as the idea ain't trying to get kids. Do lead an active lifestyle to find things that they continue to have fun doing into college and beyond P, E, teachers nationwide are trying to pull off this reinvention of gym class. Michelle Konta is a senior program manager at shape America professional group for health and PE teachers, she was a teacher herself. Six years. And she knows it will not be easy to change people's minds. I've made up with friends and we would do you know go out for dinner or happy hour at other young professionals in, we're sharing what do you do? And I would tell them that have a PE teacher. I think the most to common things that I did hear it was like, oh, I couldn't stand, P E, or they would ask my own. Do you still play dodgeball? She says, if you think about any high school, P E teacher in a TV show or movie, that's an example of what not to do. That's old school P that we are really trying really hard to change. There are new federally mandated stand this for P E clause. But Michaud says most states thought this tennis from Hoboken position or you something, that's very similar. Michelle says hoc groups once P teaches to design classes, socialists, can learn at their level, maybe the stop off school play is complete basket bowl, while the kids who need to learn simply how to pass and catch Abe. Apple can do that. She says the whole point is for students to learn skills running jumping throwing catching so they can find a fiscal activity that they like, and we'll do to stay active as adults also Michelle says shoot should not have to stress about getting picked for teams and where they stand in the social hierarchy find someone who is wearing the same color shirt as you or find someone whose birthday is in the same month. Find someone whose name starts with the same letter so into not friends trying to get with friends or people feeling left out, but it's something that's more random and allows for different people to work together. That story was reported by Alan, you. And here's one more bad, gym class memory, this one comes from Helen been. Yes. So I maybe twelve mad awkward with a crush on Stephen Martinez class heartthrob. The gym teacher calls, dodgeball where I struggled to get his attention. But not get tagged. Stephen Martinez, clocks me straight in the face, and my nose starts bleeding kids laugh, and I learned love hurts. That's our show for this week, the pulses of production off WHYY in Philadelphia. Our health and science reporters are Alan Ube list hung jets, Leyland, and Steph van Andrea's copes is our intern. We had production assistance from Julian Harris, Charlie. Kyler is our engineer Lindsey Lazar ski is our producer. I'm Mike and Scott. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health reporting on

Michelle Konta Moorestown friends school Stephen Martinez Alan Ube basketball constitution high school Andrew Rohan Kloss China Besse Robin Kyler Michaud Julian Harris senior program manager Apple WHYY Helen Hoboken intern
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"For women, like kickboxing, or cross fit or weightlifting, even just exercising in a public place would have been unthinkable. Not that long ago. Lindsey Lazar ski takes a look at the history of women's fitness picture. This it was the nineteen forties. And in new kind of salon, was popping up not for your hair, but for your body, and lowering and women across America. It seems that you helped to win the wall. You'll still have another hand things. The battle of the budget, and he had some of the mechanized units on maneuvers. Women who've. These places were called reducing salons and figure spas where contraptions whittled away women's waistlines for smoothed out those unsightly lumps dimples, their machines. And you see women standing in them in high heels. That's an Italian Melman Petrella. She's a self-described gym rat and historian at the new school in New York City look Look like like CNN. all the streamline and away. You go to health unhappiness cubs, you right tallies. Working on a new book about exercise culture in America. She says, at the time exercise was inextricably tied to beauty fitness was about how you look not about what you could do. They were predicated on the idea that what you wanted to do was, yes. Work on your body. So that's something we still have with us today. But the ads all said things like relaxing, luxurious comfort. No sweating whatsoever. And the idea was through technology that women could still be ladies and I'll be like grunting and sweating..

America Lindsey Lazar New York City CNN.
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"And she saw this allergy note, pop up on patients charts often then her son was diagnosed with a penicillin allergy. He had just like an ear, infection and was on amoxicillin so, like, well, analogy four I had a rash because I was taken pin as Silliman just a red bumpy rash all over his body. And as in most cases that's enough for the person to be told. Okay, you're allergic to penicillin, and that went right on his chart, too. But it turns out that neither of us is allergic defendant, Zilin. How did you find that out? So, I think as a so often, the case in parenthood, I was more invested in my son's long-term well-being than I was in my own. And I thought you know, I really don't want him to have this label on his chart. I don't want this world of potentially ex. Solent medications to not be available to him for the rest of his life. And so I took him to see an allergist shall I'll want to dump a nice woman and see tone me, like was going to happen. And he went through a pretty simple skin testing procedure. They gave him one pill of amoxicillin afterwards when he passed the skin test, and he didn't have a reaction. So that label was totally taken off of his chart. He is not allergic to penicillin Neta, went through the same skin test and got the same result. And as she dug into more research she found out this is really common. We've actually learned in medicine that ninety five percent of people who have a reported, penicillin allergy or not, allergic to penicillin. She said that reaction she had as a teenager that itchy rash could have been from anything also people sometimes outgrow, these allergies. So what should physicians? And I'm thinking it's probably most likely primary care physicians who should know about this. What should physicians do differently? I think one of the most important things is that when we see that penicillin allergy on a patient's chart to ask more questions about it. We often treat that allergy tab as, as if it's written in stone. Whereas other parts of the chart were constantly updating and things are coming off and being added on, we should view that allergy tab with that same fluidity. So ask more questions. What actually happened? How old were you in some cases? The reaction really is severe. They might have had their skin Slough off of their body, that's serious. And that warrants more of like a closer investigation, but if it was that they had hives when they were thirteen like me, then we could actually really think about sending them for testing and maybe taking that off of their chart and not having or being able in. Quotes to take those medications can have some pretty serious drawbacks. Right. Absolutely. There have actually been a number of studies that have shown that people with a reported penicillin allergy have a higher risk of really serious complications, like, for example, Mersa, that resistant, staff, infection, also C, diff or clustered him difficile colitis, which can make a person, incredibly sick people with penicillin allergy have a higher risk of those kinds of infections. And so it's not a harmless thing to just kind of linger in your history for years and years. And what's the reason for those bigger infections? Is that because they were treated with stronger antibiotics along the way? And that's exactly right. Yes. Not afraid is an internal medicine physician and host of the primary care reviews and perspectives podcast. That's our show for this week. The pulse is a production of WHYY in Philadelphia our health and science reporters are Allen, you Liz tongue jets Lehman and Steph yen, Andreas copes is our inter. We have production, the systems from Julian Harris, Charlie. Kyler is our engineer Lindsey Lazar ski is our producer. I'm Mike in Scott. Thank you for listening..

penicillin amoxicillin Neta Zilin Silliman Solent WHYY Kyler Julian Harris Scott producer Lehman Allen Philadelphia Steph yen Charlie Andreas ninety five percent
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"Let's keep rope for about three rounds just to warm up. And then I will try for four rounds. And then on kid the bag probably do six rounds at the regular heavy bags. And, and then I'll just do some cuts tiny like. Things like that, that are very known exciting but you kind of just have to do if you want. This hour long workout is the bare minimum for her daily routine if she has a fight coming up. She spends even more time training in sparring. She just came back from the Ted conference in Vancouver because she has an the fulltime job. She's an astrophysicist about cities that are always surprised which is intriguing because there are boxers all over the spectrum photographers performance artist writers, so I don't I'm not sure why astrophysicist would stick out, but it does. And then all the people are surprised she's willing to take a punch, and a lot of people that generally, when I talk to them, say like onto worried that you are gonna hurt your brain. Boxing, you know of the I really don't want to downplay the seriousness of brain injuries in impact sports. But also, I don't think that's a problem that only scientists have if you have a brain injury, and you reduce your mental capacity the. Is a problem that you have as scientists or as any other person that has any other job? I think in fact, she does she some similarities between boxing and astrophysics. I find that it's something to being in a male dominated sport or enemy dominate activity, the must speak to me because I do both physics and boxing, and they're both obviously very male dominated fields. I don't like being told that I cannot do things that I kind of want to react to that by showing that I can, I said once by doctor that he had troubles imagining somebody that looked like me doing something as difficult as Astro physics. He told her this while he was stitching her hands that she had caught while cooking on one hand, I didn't really want him to. Poke my hand through on the other end. I thought that was really an raging content. And then there are people in the boxing world who think women shouldn't be boxes. Federico says female boxers are paid nowhere near as well as the may counterparts. There are managers who just don't work with women women's boxing, thin. Become an Olympic sport until twenty twelve and in an awfully specific way. There are also scientists who think she shouldn't be fighting at all meaning that they, they think about boxing, a very violence for they may not see that as on the same ethical level as something as noble science. But most of her colleagues are supportive they generally appreciate the break in the stereotypes type of things that, you know, to show that scientists are not just lab. Rats, but also have lives and interests and all possible passions including combat sport. It's ridiculous. To say that they would think about science one hundred percent of the time. We'll make photo Vati bet scientist I think she says boxing, actually makes her a better scientist that both problem-solving problem solving Timothy's. When you're boxing, you really faced with a puzzle and skill is to not get overwhelmed and to see what the other person does wrong so that you can take advantage of that. That is a puzzle and so is science right? You're faced with the problem you had figure out, what is the right strategy to, to address it. I think the do multiple things. Improves your ability to think about a problem for multiple angles and so improves your creativity, ultimately, what thing that boxing really improved for me is myself confidence, my ability to withstand stress and to think about problems calmly, and lucidly 'cause that's really old. Boxing, is about. So as one in science, it increased my confidence increased myself esteem, and that is just priceless. Any of the sounds. Allen June reported that story. That's all show for this week. The post is a production of WHYY in Philadelphia our health and science. Reporters are Allen. You list tongue jets laymen and step in, we had production assistance from Julian Harris, Andreas cope is our intern Charlie Cairo is our engineer Lindsey Lazar ski is our producer. I'm Mike God. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health reporting.

boxing scientist combat sport Vancouver Allen June WHYY Federico Mike God Charlie Cairo Julian Harris Philadelphia intern Timothy producer Andreas cope one hundred percent one hand
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"You were not permitted to do you would also be anxious and depressed. And from DNA standpoint. They are programmed to wake up hunt catch kill. And so this is what kept behaviors call the seeking circuit. It's this part of their brain, that drives them to hind and releases dopamine when they do is there any way to strike a balance so to give the cats this excitement, but also keep them save. Yes. So that's actually what Jackson teaches owners to do. And what he was trying to advise me to do is just play with your cat more so many ways that you can split the difference. And it is definitely a harder parenting choice to do the work, you know, as opposed to open the door. So Liz, what have you in Willie decided to do with a half now? She is still going outside. We are talking about it, but I have told you. Really that especially after hearing once again, all of the horrible things that can happen to cats when they go outside, did, I really do want to try and bring her in. So currently making plans to see about making that happen closed the door the door. Thanks. Liz, thanks, Megan. That's all show for this week. The pulse production of WHYY in Philadelphia our health and science. Reporters are Alan you list tongue jets, Lehman and Steph, yet, we have production assistance from Julian Harris, Andy copes is our intern Charlie. Kyler is our engineer Lindsey Lazar sqi is our producer. I'm Mike in Scott. Thank you for listening..

Liz dopamine Kyler WHYY intern Julian Harris Alan Jackson Willie Scott Lehman Charlie Steph Philadelphia producer Megan
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"But it felt like it was looking at me not just looking at me. But really seeing me, and I looked back at this creature with its Brown shell cracked skin and large dark eyes and thought to myself that it had come along at that moment for a reason, I'm not a spiritual person. But I had an pithy that one sea turtle helped set me on the path to feeling whole again. Diane, shade Smith edited and published her daughter Malary's memoir, it's called salt in my soul. An unfinished life. Didn't really matter whatever she was doing in the ocean. She was always at her happiest. That's our show for this week. The pulse is a production of WHYY in Philadelphia. Our health science reporters are Allen, you list, hung jets Lehman and Steph yet we had production assistance from Julian Harris, Charlie Kyler is our engineer Lindsey Lazar ski is our producer Tanya English is our editorial director, I'm Mike and Scott. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health.

Malary Lindsey Lazar WHYY Charlie Kyler Allen Julian Harris Tanya English editorial director Diane Lehman Steph engineer Philadelphia producer Mike Smith Scott
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"Only had three sterile C-section kids because of the experiences with Maria the experience was in grain into our psyche. And I say that we have like community DST now that we leave. No, just huricane, but the aftermath the. Complete disruption of the power greed. Everybody's concerned. And a now we know that we need to be ready for these. That story was reported by Irena genre. And it was made possible in part by the fund for environmental journalism of the society of environmental journalists. Our episode is about the impact of pregnancy and motherhood on women's health. And we asked all of you to share your thoughts on this topic. Here's another recording. We received. Hello. My name is Joanna footmen age thirty eight. Yes, I'm thirty eight. I'm a mom and a wife, but I am a mom of two. Sweet boys aged six and sixteen month old was my first one. I'm early thirties averages raring to go ahead energy. And then my husband, and I we waited a little bit longer until we had our second, son. Say hi. My youngest Jeremiah a high. Jeremiah was a difficult pregnancy. And he was harder. My body. He was also heavier than his brother, but I know after head Jeremiah, I think Tron adept having kids and keeping up with my six year old son and trying to be a mom to infant even though you have all the help in the world kids. Look, the mommy, and both my kids are very attached to their mother, which is a blessing and curse things such a blessing. Are you a blessing? Say yes. Plastic. So it's still taking me. I mean, he's almost two and I'm still trying to found. I'm having him almost two years ago. I had knee problems after I had him feet problems, and generally a healthy person. But it took my body a little bit longer to heal because with my boys. I keep them their motivations for me. My husband get up in the morning, even if they are the ones looking at us interface and standing on her head or screaming into monitor the point of it is. Yes, as if it hasn't affected me, of course. But there's a stop me no way because I am a mother, and that's what I'm here for. That's show for this week. The pulse is a production of WHYY in Philadelphia. Our health and science reporters are Alan you bliss tongue jets Lehman and Steph yet, Jillian Harris is our intern. Charlie higher is our engineer. Lindsey Lazar skis. Our producer, Tanya English is our editorial director, I Mike and Scott. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health reporting on the pulse is supported by the Thomas, scattered good behavioral health foundation, an organization that is committed.

Jeremiah Maria Lindsey Lazar Charlie higher WHYY Lehman Thomas engineer intern Tanya English editorial director producer Jillian Harris Philadelphia Tron Mike Alan Steph Scott sixteen month
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"Over the course of time, we've used the name Frankenstein, even though Frankenstein was not the actual Munster to denote some wrongdoing and science where some perceive wrongdoing and science Michael says, the mad scientist motive is in part, a creation of the writer's imagination. But it also reflects things that people were worried about at the time. If you look the island of Dr oh, for example, I believe is publishing the t nine is it relates to concerns about vivisection that's operating on live animals. You go back to the compound Dugway. And about Evelyn theory, which very new to the world particular time when Darwin's ideas were spreading beyond the scientific domain into the social domain. We see it later in the nineteen fifties and sixties reflecting fears about nuclear technology, and there's some fantastic movies from those times about. Killer ants that were exposed to atomic radiation, swirling, inferno of radioactive dust where things are so terrifying. So hideous carrier snow way to despite them. And of course, there's the whole canon of Michael Crichton from the Andromeda strain to Westworld and Jurassic Park. Michael Crichton made a career out of examining trust of science. He was constantly exploring. This idea of the mad scientist and the way in which at least in his calculation. Scientists would always push past the boundaries of what most society would think of as acceptable science. Whether it be bringing back, you know, satellite from outer space that contained a deadly pathogen or whether it be recreating dinosaurs. So how to scientists feel about this Trump real scientists get accused of being mad scientists all the time Craig Venter who was one of the genomic scientists to I sequence the human genome and later went on to create the first thank life-form has been accused of being a mad scientist. I think that's pretty ridiculous. But you can see where that comes from comes from fear and concern over what individuals were could potentially lead to. And Michael says, we have to be careful not to confuse mad science in movies with bad science in real light. It relates to bed study design it relates to the way in which scientists perceive of and treat their study subjects often unethically, and I think it relates to what scientists always bring to the table, but perhaps bring more of it to the table in the context of bad science, and that is. Nixing their own personal ideologies with the scientific methodology which isn't perfect on its own. But those two things together can create a real harm. Michael says there are lots of historic examples of bad science and science isn't perfect now, either sometimes scientists get it, right? And sometimes they get it wrong. And we do our best through ethics regulations to help them. Not get it wrong. But scientists are people too, and that's part of the practice volition of science. Tell my students that when we look at some of the agreed ethical examples from the history Pollock health history medicine over the course of the twentieth century that for sure century from now people look back and say, you know, we did certain things wrong, and we harmed people's and populations in variety of different ways. Michael you Dell is a historian of public health and an ethicist at Drexel University. That's our show for this week. The pulses a production of WHYY in Philadelphia. Our health and science reporters are Alan you, Liz tongue and jets Sulaiman Julian Harris is our intern. Charlie Kyler is our engineer and this week we had engineering help from Adam Stanishev chessy Lindsey Lazar scales. Our producer, Tanya English is our editorial director, I Mike and Scott. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health reporting.

Michael Crichton mad science scientist Frankenstein Munster Craig Venter Jurassic Park writer Charlie Kyler Philadelphia Drexel University Trump WHYY Sulaiman Julian Harris intern producer Tanya English editorial director
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on The Pulse

"High of sorts the chemicals that are released during fighter flight when are sympathetic nervous system is activated. They're the same that are released when we're excited or surprised or happy. That's Margie Kerr associates who studies fear, and she says our enjoyment of this emotion has a lot to do with context. It's all about how we interpret the rush of endorphins, you can even see it. When somebody's watching scary move. You're going through one hundred house they scream, but then within milliseconds there, smiling laughing, and it's you can see how they've you know, kind of remembered I'm gonna save place. I'm not really endanger and all of that energy all of that excitement that went into the. Cream is now going into the laughing. But sometimes fund scary turns into actually scary as in legitimately terrified. So I ask people on Facebook. What movie put you over the edge, the horror film that has left the most lasting impact on me his nightmare on elm street? The exorcist is the scariest movie I've ever seen. All eight away the entire terrified. My sister actually took our ouija board and throw it in the dumpster across the street from our house. I think I still may need some therapy to this day. I can't say freddy's full name. I can't look at pictures of him. I can't think about the movie in any detail for two months after I had to move a light into the corner that I could see for my bed or I wouldn't be able to sleep on frigging myself out right now who is going to be scarred by which movie depends on the person. But sociologists Margie curses kids are especially vulnerable for really young kids kids who haven't reached the stage of development where the understand what is fake, and what is real. So you know, they may see a person in a a witch costume and believe that they're really going to hurt them. So that's you know, two young at At the. that age too. We are remembering things that are scary. Really? Well, and that becomes the thing of huger nightmares. That kind of thing happened to listener Alex Schmidt. She had a really scary experience in a haunted. Maze. When she was a kid. She had a panic attack employees had to pull her out through an emergency exit. But as an adult she was able to get over that I decided to face my fears a couple years ago at an event called the great horror campout in Los Angeles where you camp out in tents overnight and monsters kind of common drag you out of your tent and do all these really scary things to you and believe it or not it actually worked after several hours of being in this situation. The monsters got kind of old, and I got used to them, and I had seen all of them multiple times. And I was like, I know you're deal. You're not scaring me anymore, and it actually kind of cured me. And now. I sort of like haunted houses, and I sort of like scary movies. So trying your fears. It actually might cure you probably to Alex. But I have to say when I was done going through that haunted house visited I could not wait to leave a never come back. Best noise ever. That's our show for this week the post production of WHYY in Philadelphia, you can find us on itunes, or whatever you get your podcast. Julian Harris is our intern our health and science reporters LSU list, hung and jets Lehman Charlie is our engineer. Lindsey Lazar ski producer, Alex turn the associate producer tiny English is our editorial director. I might can Scott. Thank you for the snake. Behavioral

Alex Schmidt Margie Kerr freddy sympathetic nervous system Facebook ouija Los Angeles WHYY Lindsey Lazar Julian Harris Scott Lehman Charlie editorial director Philadelphia producer engineer two months
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Now as Lindsay pointed out earlier, it really then might matter whether we have a democratic or Republican governor at the time, a governor could. Veto the map, send it back to the legislature to have it redrawn, but but it looks like it looks like there's going to be no legislative change in how the districts are redrawn by going to an independent commission running out of time here. But there's one more question when ask you in particular Terry. So we do have these new congressional maps for this this race. Are you seeing just even if it's just for this year, sort of politics being changed in terms of who's running and the kinds of racist were seeing in Pennsylvania's? Well, first of all, we have a record number of of women running. Twenty-three women ninety four people actually filed for the eighteen congressional districts twenty three of them. Women ran eight survived the primaries. Seven of them Democrats were likely to have. It looks like conceivably put it that way for women could go into a delegation. That doesn't have a single woman. We haven't had one since two thousand and four. Eighteen when congresswoman Allyson Schwartz ran for governor. The bottom line here is that we're going to see a big change in the Pennsylvania delegation. The Democrats could pick up between five and eight seats, Pennsylvania will we'd be one of the three or four states that determine whether the Democrats get twenty three seats and take control of the of the federal house. So that might happen this year, but we still have that persistent question about whether you know, fair districts can be a permanent part of Pennsylvania politics. So we're gonna come back to this probably next year Lisi Lazar ski, multimedia journalist for WHYY and keystone crossroads immediate nonprofit focused on the state's political challenges. It's been so great to have in reporting has been so thorough on this. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you and Terry, Madonna professor of public affairs director of the center for politics and public affairs at Franklin and Marshall college. Thank you as well are pushing. And by the way I want. Want folks to know that all this weekend. We went to the Lehigh valley. We've been here in Philadelphia, and we've got reporting on what we saw and the voters we talked to. It's all at on point, radio dot, Oregon. On our Facebook page, we've got photos of voters and candidates and organizers and the Lehigh valley that's at on point radio on Facebook, check it out, and I want to give a special thanks to the staff at WHYY for hosting us today, including Adams. Stanton, chef ski, Joyce Lieberman, new Maistre Obin shangen tab. Julian Hirschfeld. Lindsey, Lazar ski, and dick polman today. You guys have been tremendous host. Thank you so much. WHYY on point is produced by Annabelle mande Brian Hartson ski Eileen a modest funnel cuts, Sonus Hillary mcquilken Ellison, poli James Ross, Alex rotor, Tanya rally, kyri Thompson, and Miriam Wasser. Karen Shiffman is our executive producer. I'm gonna chocolate bardy. This is on point.

WHYY Pennsylvania Lehigh valley Lisi Lazar Terry Facebook Allyson Schwartz Lindsay Karen Shiffman Julian Hirschfeld Sonus Hillary keystone crossroads Marshall college Oregon Brian Hartson Maistre Obin executive producer Joyce Lieberman Philadelphia Miriam Wasser
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"If each date you know that govern game exactly and the actual process itself. So the two thousand and ten election was used not just in terms of the bringing the tea party to power, the ideological conservatism, that it represents go headlines. Yeah, just to piggyback on that. Just one thing that I think we saw with Pennsylvania's, you know, you know, one of the most agree GIS gerrymandered maps in the country. We see one party control, right? We see that the Republicans controlled the house, the Senate, the governor's office, and you know, they made the laws. They made the rules and there was no really check combined. Democrats would do. That's being nonpartisan ab- now you're not being partisan, but the Democrats have done that. So already pointed out, there's a district in Maryland. Yeah. So this is not partisan both parties. We'll do this. Well, that's exactly the point I wanted to go to because if regardless of party, if the party has the power, it seems very natural. In terms of American politics try to consolidate that power, but but you know, when Republicans do it and there have they have done here in Pennsylvania. Democrats have done it elsewhere. People keep talking to me about Maryland, California, back in the eighties and nineties. But the point is, is that is there a way to come up with a fair system that does mostly remove politics from the equation? And and here let me just let me just do some limit. Let me play for you a little bit of tape here. This is again Valentino degeorge. Oh, he's the GOP chairman of Pennsylvania, and he basically just takes. He takes issue with that entire question because he says it's perfectly fine. With legislators, creating districts, and he really opposes the idea of any other systems, specifically, an independent citizens commission, which we'll talk about here in a second. He poses other systems to draw future congressional maps, and here's what he said. So legislators are in the best position to draw lines and look the end of the day, heaven forbid, politics should enter into a piece of legislation that draws part, you know, political maps stunned over the country. Democrats join maps to their favors in other states, look Marilyn. So you know, this is nonsense. This was part of a Barack Obama, Eric Holder, fair districting plan. They called it to take back congressional seats and they've done it here in Pennsylvania. That's fell to Georgia, Pennsylvania GOP chair. So Lindsey, Lazar ski. He's he basically says, we know the state the best we should draw the maps. But there is this other idea about an independence, it isn't commission. What would that look like in Pennsylvania? I just have to say, I love that operatic music behind veils. And it was. It was a Columbus Day festival in Philadelphia. Taking me there to south Philly. So you know a group in Pennsylvania, fair district's PA for a number of years now they've been trying to. Change the Pennsylvania constitution and to implement an independent citizens commission that would actually draw the lines and they've modeled this after California, and this is really a grassroots organization. You see them at street fairs. You see them at avent's canvassing and you know they, they're asking the legislators to basically vote against their interests to form this commission. As you pointed out it, there is a such a commission in California made up of appointed independent citizens. And I think some several other couple other states in the west have similar similar commission. So do they work though? Have they created fairer districts if you talk to the people on the commission? Yes. If you talked to voters. Yes. I think a key difference between Pennsylvania and California is that in Pennsylvania, there's no referendum. So basically to get that process in place, the state legislature would have to. Pass a constitutional amendment, and then it would go to the voters in a referendum, and there's no guarantee. There's no guarantee that an independent commission itself would be truly independent. By somebody that that that's or hold positions by virtue get on get on the commission by virtue of a position they already hold or you could have state lawmaker leaders appoint a few. You could have different groups. Yeah, it it can get. It can get complicated, but here's what's fascinating until Baker versus car supreme court decision..

Pennsylvania Eric Holder California GOP Maryland Valentino degeorge Senate Barack Obama Lazar ski Marilyn Baker Columbus avent Lindsey Philly Philadelphia Georgia
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point Meghna Chalker birdie. We're broadcasting today from the studios of WHYY in Philadelphia, and we're here in Pennsylvania because we wanted to take a close look at the states adventures in redistricting and gerrymandering and what effect it's having on Pennsylvania politics and national politics as well. I'm joined today by Lindsey, Lazar ski. She's a multimedia journals for h. y. y. who's been covering this issue for quite a long time and by Terry Madonna, he's professor of public affairs and director of the center for politics and public affairs at Franklin and Marshall college, and our callers have been so patient here. So let me let me do them some Justice and get them on the line. Here, Jason is calling from fawn grove, Pennsylvania, Jason, you're on the air. Taking my call. I, I'm from eleventh district in Pennsylvania. Just king is running, and I also helped. I also did some volunteer work for George Scott in the tenth district, and I was happy to see that these two districts are now dependent is especially the the district, but. I'd really like to see Pennsylvania move further in this direction, making more fair. And I really wonder, why shouldn't this be more of a mathematical. My procedure rather than a political procedure, you know, starting to starting to top left of the state and sort of mathematically work your way through the population and the counties and g boundaries. And it's a good question Jason. I mean, Lindsey, Lazar ski, even falling this issue for a long time. What do you think? Yeah, I think you've got a great point there and under the Pennsylvania supreme court ruling, you know, they, they kind of borrowed from the state legislature, the state legislative district rules that you know congressional districts need to be compact. They need to be contiguous. They need to split as few counties municipalities as possible, and that partisan consideration cannot supersede those neutral criteria. So I think that you know going forward the ruling does say that there are these neutral criteria that need to be considered before partisan concern. But you know, the quick didn't go so far and say that here's where you. You can, you know, draw the line as far as when drawing districts becomes too partisan. So there's it's vague, but there there are some guidelines that that the legislature can use going forward, but Terry, Madonna to to the point that the caller was making about, you know, are there al-gharib amac ways to get fairness out of out of district maps or politics always going to be a part of this process? I don't think you can. I don't think you can remove politics. Democrats and Republicans will both try to advance themselves actually because of the algorithms and these and these models that they now have. They can be more skillful at it. They're actually can be better at gerrymandering because of the nature of they. They can literally get down to the precinct level you what I just said, not the district or the word level the precinct level and divide and divide up the electorate in a way that benefits one party or the other to set the rules for the algorithm is what I was thinking. We. Computers can do it better. Let's take another call here. Jim is calling from Akron, Ohio, Jim, you're on the air. Thank you for taking my call. I live in northern some account. That's the Akron, Ohio area. And we, of course, have a Republican governor and a Republican congress, and they three years ago they came over and took no the northern some county, which was a democratic area, and we now have a Republican, congressman re Rene see, and it was all gerrymander. That's how they got us and we lost our our democratic congressman. May I may go ahead. Tell you wanna make a point about this elections have consequences, and what happened in two thousand and ten in the tea party election was not just that the. Republicans picked up sixty three house seats or put it another way. The Democrats lost sixty three house seats, but that they took over state legislatures. I think the number now and I may be off is thirty six state legislatures in which the Republicans control the state legislatures. Both houses and you can see what that means in states. Not every state does has it done by law, but when you get all these Republican governors and Republican state lawmakers in state after state after state, that has a huge difference on writing the laws..

Pennsylvania Terry Madonna Lindsey Lazar ski Jason Franklin Meghna Chalker WHYY Akron Marshall college congressman fawn grove Ohio George Scott Philadelphia director Jim congress Rene three years
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So to campaign events to political parties, the very same day just fifteen miles apart showing that even in one of Pennsylvania's most politically balanced districts neighbors in the Lehigh valley may still be living across an unbridgeable, divide. Those are some voices that we heard just this weekend in Pennsylvania's brand new seventh district, and this is a district that is very, very evenly divided now between Republicans and Democrats. So Terry, Madonna, tell me, I mean, what is the problem that redistricting is supposed to solve? If we still have these deep political divides even amongst neighbors living across the street from each other? Well, the problem is that we are in hyper partisan hyper polarization the likes of which we've probably have not seen in anyone's lifetime. If not earlier. The fact of the matter is that part of the polarization does come from gerrymandering over the course of time. The Democrats are now becoming an have become the party of urban America with a very different constituency base than than Republicans. The Republican party is the party of small town and rural America, so think and. A battle over the fight over the suburbs. So think about the nature of the constituencies in small town and rural America versus urban America. The demographics of the people, the issues that concern them take just cultural issues, rural and small town America, culturally conservative, right? Go to urban America. What do you find culturally very liberal and those differences do get played out and so urban America sends Liberal Democrats. What is small town in rural America said conservative Republicans. So you're onto something, but it's deeper than that, but you're onto something. So Lindsey, Lazar ski the lemme ask you. I mean, I think Pennsylvania's new. Seventh district is so fascinating because you know everything, Terry, Madonna said is true, but I'm just wondering the, is it a pie in the sky idea to think that if you have a very politically balanced district, that by default candidates would. To run closer to the centre or or not, I mean, is this, is that what we're seeing? Possibly. I mean, I think that this election, these midterms were kind of on uncharted territory here, and we'll see what happens with the the new map in the redistricting. I think that you know. Throwing out the old map is not going to change the divide in America, but the elections will be fair. The elections will be that's the idea that the elections that voters will have a fair shot at choosing the candidate that that that the majority wants to choose. Every vote will have to be earned right. If we go back to a district special election held her or in a year that was nationally observed in Pennsylvania in the eighteenth congressional district, Connor lamb a democrat running in a district one, but one by Donald Trump by twenty points. You know what he said, oh, I'm not going to vote for Nancy Pelosi for speaker when then candidate than when candidate and then President Trump, what did he talk about? He talked about iron and coal and steel. We talked about getting rid of NAFTA and getting rid of Trans-Pacific Partnership. You know, who put his hand and agreed with him a guy named CONNER lamb. So there are districts in which it certainly has affected, but Lindsay's, right in and of itself. I don't think it's going to change the polarization that is deeply rooted in the ideological predilections of these of the candidates..

America Pennsylvania President Trump Republican party Madonna Terry Lehigh valley NAFTA Trans-Pacific Partnership Connor lamb CONNER lamb Nancy Pelosi Lindsey Lindsay Lazar
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point and Meghna trucker. Bardy. We're broadcasting today from the studios of WHYY in Pennsylvania because we're talking about gerrymandering and Pennsylvania's adventures in redistricting and really what effort or what impact that's had on Pennsylvania politics on representation here in the keystone state and what impact it could have as the discussion about gerrymandering and redistricting is taken to the national level. I'm joined here today by Lindy Lazar ski. She's a multimedia journalist for WHYY and also for keystone crosswords immediate nonprofit. That's really focused on the state's political challenges. We're also joined by Terry Madonna, he's a professor of public affairs and the director of the center for politics and public affairs at Franklin and Marshall college as well. Now, Lindsay and Terry, I just wanna play a little bit of tape for you because we were talking about at the very beginning of the conversation how Pennsylvania's gerrymandered districts were struck down in January of this year by the state supreme court. And this weekend we actually caught up with Valentino degeorge oh, he's the chairman of the Republican party for the state of Pennsylvania and he's previously called in. I've seen this in your reporting. Lindsay heath call. He called the January twenty eighteen ruling a hyper partisan decision by an activist judicial bench, and he followed that up with us this weekend. And here's what he said. There's nothing in the Pennsylvania constitution, which says the maps have to be fair, whatever fair means to these judges took upon themselves to say, fairness means, you know what we think it means and they drew in the process. What was what one analyst called the Democrats dream map. So it was. It was just that a. It was just take an unconstitutional taking a power by the supreme court. This Valentino degeorge. Oh, the chairman of the Pennsylvania GOP. No, Lindsey, Lazar ski. Let me just get some impressions here from you because first of all, when did Georgia talks about this new map that the state supreme court drew? They didn't necessarily want to have to do that. They want. They sent it back to the legislature to draw a new map, but that didn't work out. Yes. So the time line here was it was pretty much a crunch so around January. Well, on January twenty. Second, the decision came down that the two thousand eleven map deprived Pennsylvania voters of the right to free and equal elections and basically gave Republicans and unfair advantage and deluded. The Democrats votes, and basically they gave about a month in between that time to come up with a new map, so they kicked it back to the legislatures said, okay, guys, you know, give us your best shot that didn't happen. And we saw these. These contingencies of different groups handing in maps and just to those Republican controlled legislature, but Pennsylvania has democratic governor. Now they were supposed to agree on a new map, the couldn't, yes. The governor was supposed to approve the math that the legislature came up with. It didn't happen. Didn't happen the first of all the legislature didn't do it. The legislative leaders did it. It was never passed by the general assembly in the form of a law which is what is required and the supreme court. In all fairness to both sides is supreme court, did not give the legislature. I think adequate time they come up with a map even if the legislature could have come up with a map when when and they went back to this clause in the constitution known as free and equal, which had never been applied in that way before I'm not suggesting what the court did was wrong, a merely suggesting that they went back into the eighteenth century for the original. The constitution defined it there. You both about that because you know we've course had other cases that have worked their way through the federal system to the United States Supreme court, but Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvanians who brought this case deliberately chose not to do that because they saw the Pennsylvania state constitution has having stronger voter protections that even the US constitution, but but tears indicating here that, but this was a novel read Olympic constitution. Well, I think you also have to look at the makeup of the Pennsylvania supreme court. There are five Democrats on the court and to Republicans on the court. So we also see this change in the makeup of the Pennsylvania supreme court..

Pennsylvania supreme court Pennsylvania chairman United States Supreme court WHYY Valentino degeorge Lindsay heath Lindy Lazar Meghna Terry Madonna Lazar ski Republican party Lindsey Marshall college analyst US GOP Franklin director
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Else that was fascinating. The map was done in two thousand eleven. The first case that was taken into the federal courts was not until state and federal courts was not until the summer of two thousand seventeen. So think about that. So we had at least two or three democrat democratic work through Jemma critic organizations did not go into court. Just by the fact that they were heavily disadvantaged by this and remember in Pennsylvania congressional boundary lines. Are drawn by the state legislature in the form of a Bill, which that's exactly right, and goes to the governor for his signature or not. And that's typically the way it's done. I was actually stunned that we'd go through two thousand twelve fourteen sixteen no court case. Now, the league of women voters and and another organ, you know, filed suit. Eventually, maybe they just wanted to see the results. Maybe they just wanted to see a bad. It really Lindsay. We've got a minute to go here before the break. When we come back when I played t play, you voice from leadership in the Pennsylvania Republican party because we're to say they don't see a problem with this and they've really resisted the the court case that was brought here in Pennsylvania. But I mean, just give me a sense of what what you think in over the course of reporting is the fundamental problem that people were most concerned about with these very strangely drawn districts. We heard rich Rafferty. Before saying that he happens to be happens to be Republican told me even though fair district is not a partisan. He told me he just didn't like the fact that so many people were running unopposed in just felt that those anti-democratic again, I think there is a real problem with the competitiveness of elections. We heard I heard time and time again, just going out and talking to real people. My vote doesn't count, and I think that was the core of it that people felt like even if they go out and vote, the election was predetermined. That's all changed now. Well, we'll talk more about that when we come back, but we are talking about Pennsylvania's adventures in redistricting and what that might have on politics here in the keystone state. And also since we're heading into those midterm elections, what effect that might have on national politics as well? I'm joined by Lindsey, Lazar ski. She's a journalist for WHYY Terry. Madonna's also with us. He's a professor at Franklin and Marshall college, and we'll be back. I Magnin chocolate party. This is on point..

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Republican party rich Rafferty Lindsey professor Madonna Lindsay Marshall college Lazar ski Franklin
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Shay Stevens longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen has admitted that he broke campaign finance. Laws. My arranging hush, money payments or candidate shortly before the two thousand sixteen election and wild Cohen never named the candidate NPR's Peter Overby says it's clear that Cohen was. Referring to President Trump Cohen said in court that, he'd been acting quote at the direction. Of a candidate for federal office but as he got into the hush many payments. He arranged and his intent to influence the election was easy to see which campaign. In which candidate he was talking about Cohen says he arranged payments for two women claiming they had passed affairs with Trump. The president denies his accusers claims saying that the payments were made to protect the Trump family from former. Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort has, been convicted of eight counts stemming from his Bank fraud and tax evasion case in Virginia The judge declared a mistrial on ten other counts and gave prosecutors until August twenty. Nine to decide, that they want. To retry those charges Manafort is facing a second trial in Washington DC next mop President Trump largely ignored the Michael Cohen and Paul Manafort cases during a West Virginia rally. Late. Tuesday Carol often, reports that Trump focused instead on campaign Staples like immigration Trump said voting for any democrat would result in eliminating immigration enforcement if a democrat is elected. He predicts they'll throw open our borders and set, loose vicious breaders and violent criminals to. The sound of foods Trump is the example of the murder of I o student. Molly Tibbets to back up his claim to disappeared on a run a month ago. And was later found dead the suspect a Mexican immigrant in the country illegally the immigration laws are such a disgrace we're. Getting him change but we have to get more Republicans we have to get the only reference to per Personal controversy was to point the finger yet again at what Trump calls. Fake news and the Russian witch hunt for NPR. News I'm, Carol often in Charleston West Virginia Pennsylvania prosecutors have charged freeze with indecent assault WHYY's Lindsey, Lazaro ski, reports that the case is unrelated to a recent grand jury report district, attorney Jim Martin says Kevin Lonner gin a thirty year old. Priest had inappropriate sexual contact, with a seventeen year old girl Lonner can allegedly exchange, sexual text messages with the team including nude photos it's also alleged that he groped the girl at church the DA made it clear that the allegations are not connected to the previously reported grand jury investigation has been prohibited for, me exercise of public ministry since June seven of. This year the Allentown diocese says it. Wanted to go public, with Lonner gins removal but they were. Advised by the to wait Lindsey Lazar skiing reporting You're, listening, to NPR news The state of Wyoming and Alaska. Held primaries on Tuesday businessman Gary trawler ran unopposed in the democratic primary for a seat and a Wyoming US Senate race to challenge Republican incumbent, John Barrasso in November Wyoming has not sent a democrat to the US Senate since nineteen seventy seven in Alaska, primary, for, US, house seat independent Elise Galvin and democrat Dmitri shine are competing for the Democratic Party nomination, to try to unseat Republican congressman Don. Young Hollywood and Broadway actress bomber Harris. Has died of lung cancer she, was, eighty three years old Jeff London has more with vulnerable charm alluring. Appeal and impeccable comic timing the Illinois born actress was a founding member, of Chicago's famed second city improv troupe, where she, performed with actors Ellen Arken and Paul sills who she. Married Harris starred on Broadway, in on a clear day you can, see forever.

Trump Michael Cohen president Paul Manafort NPR Washington DC Carol Kevin Lonner bomber Harris Peter Overby Shay Stevens US Young Hollywood Lindsey Lazar Molly Tibbets West Virginia US Senate
"lindsey lazar" Discussed on Cosby Unraveled

Cosby Unraveled

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"lindsey lazar" Discussed on Cosby Unraveled

"But now with me to in the testimony of five additional witnesses will the weight of it change i have always asked how many women is it going to take before one woman is believed over the denial of a rich powerful famous man kospi's case is one of the first celebrity and criminal trials to play out in this moment it's almost like a test case of the influence of metoo the consequences are serious if the eighty year old is found guilty he could be locked up for what might be the rest of his life and if he is acquitted many women's advocates fear a chilling affect for victims of sexual violence again rebecca trae stor i think there would be a revolt if he were declared innocent i but but who knows that's why this trial in this moment is groundbreaking people say well where's this going i don't know where it's going but i like where it is next time on cosby unravel we hear from a new cosby accuser it was just the two of us in a mmediately i felt that something was wrong subscribe wherever you get your podcast special thanks to musicians tony trove and mike beavis to diana martinez in adam stan chefs key for engineering help sandra clark is vice president of news and civic dialogue cosby unravel was produced by lindsey lazar sqi and ginette woods i'm annette john hall.

sandra clark vice president annette john hall kospi cosby mike beavis diana martinez adam stan lindsey lazar eighty year