23 Burst results for "Lindsay People"

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. . I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. . Charles. . Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and , today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, , how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. . Get Two to one or two points here. . But but we want to do as much as we can, , and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. . So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, , Henrietta maybe we can start with you. . <hes> I, everyone , I'm Lena. . I am a direct up by way of saying <hes> have been in the fashion industry for. . About fifteen years now. . What can range of. . Brands. . DIFFERENCE CASS grades. . and. . So. . My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency <hes> inclusions I've asked. . My wife tens of mocks stories. . An image making and I would say, , miss recently I WANNA be. . confounds the cut initiative which <hes>. . Let's have a appoint <unk>. . Yucky. . Great. . Thank you brandis. . What about you? ? I am the. . Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, , connecting them with brands, , <hes> press, , and with consumers as well. . <hes> we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. . It were <hes> win couvert hit on the pandemic. . We started a nonprofit icon sixty, , which is basically a fine or designers of collar and <hes>. . We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars <hes> in donations for designers of. . Car. . It sandrine last but not least I am. . Sandrine. Charles . of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. . Now, , I own Sandrine Charles Salting, , which is a week. . Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. . In addition, , I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. . Thank you offer for sharing that so. . I think to start. . This is a really big question, , but obviously, , the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. . Very prominent in the news in the last month, , it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. . You know the fifteen percent pledge. . Protest every single day. . Brands are really saying I. . WanNa make a difference they're publicly. . Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, , etc, , etc. . Now, , a lot of their ex employees or or. . You know. . Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. . What what do you think? ? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? ? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. . Don't know if one of you wants to start. . I'll. . Brand half. . Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place <hes> it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. . think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. . So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. . Team and say, , you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, , there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. . The first thing that Branston do is say, , what is our commitment? ? What is our our firm commitment? ? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. . But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. . Year and I. . think that's Oliver Fear Rate. . But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, , this is what these are the numbers. . We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. . There's only one black. . CEO in the entire fashion industry. . So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? ? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. . I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, , all the problem. . I always come back to equity. . And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready <unk> Angry special in many ways, , is that the asking leadership to support us with? ? Of. . Traditional tax. . Supporting. . Mental. . Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. . Tearing structures, , things I. . think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the <unk> Cha I'm. . Deploying mechanisms to. . Erase. . Racism, , I I think it is about equity. . Entering do you have anything to add to that? ? Now I think this are. . Really great points. . I. . It's definitely. . A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. . What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. . There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. . So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. . Over time in for us, it's , a three to five year period <hes> with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. . To see where are in how they are evolving

Sandrine Charles Salting Lindsay People Black Fashion Council sandrine Board Sandrine Lindsay CEO founder Branston Aurora Jane
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | 2 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:38 min | 2 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal..

Sandrine Charles Salting Lindsay People Black Fashion Council sandrine Board Sandrine Lindsay CEO founder Branston Aurora Jane
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 2 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. . I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. . Charles. . Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and , today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, , how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. . Get Two to one or two points here. . But but we want to do as much as we can, , and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. . So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, , Henrietta maybe we can start with you. . <hes> I, everyone , I'm Lena. . I am a direct up by way of saying <hes> have been in the fashion industry for. . About fifteen years now. . What can range of. . Brands. . DIFFERENCE CASS grades. . and. . So. . My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency <hes> inclusions I've asked. . My wife tens of mocks stories. . An image making and I would say, , miss recently I WANNA be. . confounds the cut initiative which <hes>. . Let's have a appoint <unk>. . Yucky. . Great. . Thank you brandis. . What about you? ? I am the. . Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, , connecting them with brands, , <hes> press, , and with consumers as well. . <hes> we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. . It were <hes> win couvert hit on the pandemic. . We started a nonprofit icon sixty, , which is basically a fine or designers of collar and <hes>. . We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars <hes> in donations for designers of. . Car. . It sandrine last but not least I am. . Sandrine. Charles . of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. . Now, , I own Sandrine Charles Salting, , which is a week. . Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. . In addition, , I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. . Thank you offer for sharing that so. . I think to start. . This is a really big question, , but obviously, , the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. . Very prominent in the news in the last month, , it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. . You know the fifteen percent pledge. . Protest every single day. . Brands are really saying I. . WanNa make a difference they're publicly. . Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, , etc, , etc. . Now, , a lot of their ex employees or or. . You know. . Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. . What what do you think? ? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? ? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. . Don't know if one of you wants to start. . I'll. . Brand half. . Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place <hes> it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. . think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. . So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. . Team and say, , you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, , there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. . The first thing that Branston do is say, , what is our commitment? ? What is our our firm commitment? ? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. . But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. . Year and I. . think that's Oliver Fear Rate. . But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, , this is what these are the numbers. . We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. . There's only one black. . CEO in the entire fashion industry. . So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? ? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Sandrine Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Harlem founder Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Executive Editor Chairman US consultant
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 2 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Teen Vogue editor-in-chief Lindsay Peoples Wagner on 'long, sustainable change'

Digiday Podcast

05:01 min | 5 months ago

Teen Vogue editor-in-chief Lindsay Peoples Wagner on 'long, sustainable change'

"Week I'm joined by Linzie. People's Wagner Lindsay is yetter chief Teen Vogue see welcome. Thank you for having okay so teed vogue I feel like. Going back to the last election. Maybe it was beforehand, but it really came into focus that It was a teen vogue that other people didn't expect it. Was it was it was very attuned to social issues. Obviously this is a fraud time we've got economic crisis. We have a health crisis and we have a social crisis that is getting lot of overdue attention. So explain teen vogue sort of mission. I mean overall. My mission is to always make young people feel seen in heard in. That's really I think the model. That I walk with every single day, but I think they. The Lens in which we see, everything is inclusivity I think that that really has extended to all different ways. The talk about you know everything from pop culture to politics to style to beauty to wellness everything in between and I think the for us. Obviously, yes, you know the goal is for young people feel like they can be part of this community part of the conversation, but everything that we do is really culturally relevant I. Think you'll see that even if you go on our site today of things that know you don't have to be young person to be interested in and things that are really relevant to what's going on in the world. So how do you? How do you strike the balance? Because I think when when people see teen vogue, it's it's different from vogue and mature. Be Different. Yeah, yeah I think the A lot of that is really just my own experience in my own, you know desire to make things really a level playing field. I think a lot of my experienced before this job. I spent five years at your magazine. And I always felt like Those two publications really were thoughtful in the ways that they covered a lot of different issues going on in the world I think when I came to team vo What I was an intern assistant at Teen Vogue it was definitely all fashion, and then you know in the past couple years, and it was only politics, and I really felt like you know the to don't have to be mutually exclusive. You can really loves fashion you can really love to. You can really love all of these beautiful wonderful things, but also really deeply care about the world and want to see change and. Want there to be you know actual. Sustained change on a lot of these issues and so I think that approach in and of itself is really a testament. I think to my experience, but also really wear. Young people are in the world right now because I don't think they. Heard a lot of people say like I, WanNa. Get back to normal and our. We create a new normal, but yene people are really the one saying like. Let's just start to build something collectively new the better because we clearly haven't gotten a lot of these issues, right? Before and I think they that really that really is a powerful thing. That were were always trying to do devote. To explain why fashion and and these issues of inclusivity are. Intertwined because I think a lot of people from outside. Particularly the fashion industry with think they're kind of like totally different. No I mean I. Don't think it's different at all. I think like you know you can take my life as a specific example of someone who's always really loved fashion, but as a black woman in this face. I've never felt like people understood. My position understood my strengths or really made a point to make me feel seen heard in the industry and I think they it is really important to me to walk into every state as my soul, unapologetic black south, but also yeah I. I do love fashion I do love you know all of the things that encompassed style shoots, and covers all those things I love being creative, and I think they it really now is about taking to task all those brands, and all those publications that you love so much in saying I want your value so line with mine because I love you, I love all of these brands in everyone. That's you know saying that they want to hop onto. The black lives matter movement right now. What we really want to see is not just people being called out, but people really being. Called to rise to the occasion of making real changes that have systematically not been in favor of. I. Obviously a lot of people are scrambling right now. A lot of companies are scrambling right. Is that fair to say? Okay. And I think in fashion. It's an interesting dynamic because I think it's an acute issue. A lot of a lot of glamour industries have acute issues of. Knock giving opportunities to people of all backgrounds mean the truth I mean. There's a cliche right I mean it's a Cliche for a reason right? Yeah,

Teen Vogue Wagner Lindsay Fraud Intern Wanna
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:42 min | 5 months ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue, on Mentorship and Speaking Up

"I WanNa talk about the concept of mentor ship because it sounds like from your story and from what you've said in the past you didn't necessarily have it earlier in your career or you've talked about the lack of being able to see people and be like. Oh that's someone that looks like me or has the same background as me. How do you think about that? Now that you are in a position to obviously be a mentor. What do you think about the importance of it? I feel like when I learned about mentorship. It was like okay. They're going to take you out to lunch and then you're GonNa do this. And it was a very strict idea and euro idea. I think of what I thought it was going to be but I think over time now I realize it. It really is a two way street in has to be more of a relationship with somebody that really feels like they're also getting something out of it can't just be you asking this person for help recommendations all of those things even though that is very valid. I think it really has to be more of a two way street of that person. Feeling like okay. I'm investing in this for these reasons or this person really adds value. Or you know all those things I think it just it has to make sense and I think they I've been blessed to have really good bosses and those people have become mentors to me because I think the over time in working for them and understanding them them getting understanding of me. We were able to come to a place of okay. I can reach out to this person but I think it's hard like I wouldn't have had that relationship with them from blind emailing them or just damning them like there were reasons and there was a method to Hauer relationships. Developed over time. You obviously work for someone. That's a legend. Now in the business that you worked for Sela be before that you've worked for women that have had huge impacts in careers. You also talk about. How what you. WanNa do requires pushing boundaries? Change there's a certain sense of fearlessness. Just hearing you speak. Would you describe yourself that way? Everyone says that but I don't think of it that way. I just think that if I'm not doing this no one else will do if I don't do this work. Honestly I've looked and searched for other people in it's just not really insight and I think they a lot of people can get to positions like this and just be grateful and super comfortable and not push into see like I got the job or I got access to this network or I was able to make this amount of money. So I'm just GonNa sit here and enjoy it because I've worked hard but that's just not the way that my parents raised me. It's time to work even harder and so I don't really think is fearlessness. I think it's just the way it is

Sela Hauer
Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:27 min | 5 months ago

Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"So when you talked about in the beginning when you're talking about your love of cooking and sitting down for family dinners but as you said you know you have those family traditions. But it's not like fashion was necessarily the the big thing that was on people's minds. How did you go from being this creative kid? Who saw things that others didn't necessarily see in the same way to thinking about it as this is something? That's more than just a side hobby. I mean I think a lot of comes from my parents like a lot of the conversations that I had with them growing up was that you can do whatever you WanNa do. We're not going to you know just because we're in the mid West. We're not going to tell you like you need to sell insurance but you have to understand that this is bigger than you. You should not take life for granted and that people have literally died for you to be free and so you have to do something with his life and I think even always knowing that and feeling that and thinking about my own ancestors and what they had to go through a little bit like I need to figure it out and I need to figure out how I can have the biggest impact with his life. I don't think you know even my own grandparents would ever have dreamed I would be doing this kind of thing and I think they. That's really just a testament to my upbringing but also just trying to figure out a way to make it make all of this different and I think A conversation. I had with my mom that I think about a lot is when I really got into like watching girlfriends and sex and the city and seeing fashion and culture on television and a lot of that was really. You know trying to figure out like I love this stuff but why do I love it so much and I would just rip up all these magazines and put them on my wall and my mother would say like you know you can love all this stuff but none of these people look like you. They don't have this kind of life. They don't understand what regular normal people are doing day to day. And if you're going GONNA you know. Try to be in this world and make a difference. You're going to have to change things and it's going to be really hard and to really instilled this motto in me of like you're going to have to be what you needed when you were younger to really change things and so. I take that with me every day and I think that's really where the thought started. How'd you get your foot in the door? You talked about this internship. It's not like it's easy to get these internships so when you get it. I definitely know what it's like to feel the pressure of needing to parlay it into something to be able to even think about getting a time job in the field. Yeah I mean when I graduated. I didn't have a job and I remember looking around because I also went to school in the mid west and I remember everybody had a job and I was like what am I doing like crazy but I mean every incident that I had I was just like I don't come from wealthy family. I don't have the money to wear full look Chanel as an intern or as an assistant or even now but like I will work harder than everyone else here. I will if you want me to figure out where this came from. I'll do all the research I'll stay like if we can't find this glove that we need to return the designer al. Go through this whole closet and figure out where it is like and I think they When you want it bad enough and you know that you need that foot in the door you do what it takes so I mean a lot of it was also even when I moved here to New York and I was an assistant. I was only making nine dollars an hour so I was working two or three jobs in so I would be teen vogue during the day and then at night I would change the store. Mannequins at Dkny. And I would do that from like nine to midnight and then on the weekends I was waitressing at a restaurant and Tribeca because I was just like okay. I need to hustle. Like my salary isn't enough to have rent or anything like that but I'm GonNa make it work and I think food I mean that's just you do what you have to do. When you're on those kind of situations I appreciate talking to you about this. And I think it's a really important thing that not enough people starting off in the business. Really think about the realities. I started off in news very similar in that. You work long hours. You don't get paid a lot. Didn't have health insurance waitress to be able to afford my first job and a question. I always go back and forth on answering myself. I'm really curious to hear what you think is from people who are entry level. They're trying to get their foot in the door and they're looking at the job that can pay the bills but isn't the one that they're passionate about or taking the job that gets them the foot in the door but not knowing how to necessarily afford it. What would you say to people starting off? I mean I always tell people like if you want it bad enough you will do it even if it doesn't pay and I say that as someone who doesn't come for money so like I don't think it's worth going the route of taking a job that you don't want to then end up in a situation later on and you're having a crisis of who I am in my life and why did I go this route. Like I would rather just go after what I really want. It's a hustle constantly and still to this day but I wouldn't have it any other way when I tell people like I've had to do this and I've had to do that and I've had to freelance and all this other stuff. I also tell people like you know. The struggle really isn't for everyone and you have to realize what you're willing to do to get there because I'm not necessarily recommending it but I'm saying this is what is GonNa take. This is what it's like. Yeah and if you don't if you don't want to struggle and you're just like I really just want to go to Brunch with my friends. I don't WanNa have to waitress. That's a different life and that's okay but you have to choose so I wanNA talk about the expose everywhere and nowhere. You interviewed over one. Hundred people of color are in the fashion industry and had really interesting and emotional conversations about racism in the industry when you were publishing it. What did you think they impact was going to be? I mean honestly. I didn't know what people don't understand is they. You look at it now and you're like Oh my God. That's so cool. That's so amazing. But just wasn't the reality of it. I think that piece for a lot of people made them feel really liberated and more comfortable and you know so many things have happened in the world to make black people specifically feel like okay I regardless of people wanting my voice be silenced. I'm going to speak up but you know a lot of people in the industry who have come before me. That have been doing this a lot longer than me you know. They haven't felt that way until the last three years. They haven't felt like this was an open forum of you know what I can complain about somebody because I can't and it won't have any repercussions on me and I think they. It was scary for me because I mean I had so many legends who I adored respect. Just tell me like Lindsey. You're GONNA be blacklisted. This is not something that you should be doing like you have to let some things die because people don't WanNa hear US complain. They don't WanNa hear US talk about things that have happened to us and I understood that in I sat on it in prayed about it for a really long time but I felt like even if it was the last thing the last big piece that I had and if it was the last big thing that I was able to do fell worth it to me and I felt like okay like I was. I was really at peace with it so when it came out I actually. I was in Mexico with my husband and I wasn't actually even here and the next day when I turn my phone on I

United States Teen Vogue Dkny Chanel Lindsey New York Tribeca Intern Mexico
A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

Skimm'd from The Couch

10:57 min | 5 months ago

A Chat with Lindsay Peoples Wagner, Editor-in-Chief of Teen Vogue

"We are very excited to have Lindsey People's Wagner. Lindsay is the editor in chief of Teen Vogue magazine and is the youngest editor in chief of Conde NAST publication. She's also the only black female editor in chief of A. Us Fashion magazine as a career journalist. Her work focuses on the intersecting world of style identity culture and politics. Lindsey thank you so much for coming on today. We're really excited for the conversation. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start out with our basic question. Skim your resume Flores. I started religious interning into. That's really how I figured out that I even want to publications and teen. Vogue was my first actual internship and my first big internship in general so after doing that in college. It became the first job that I actually got out of college and I worked in the closet basically schlepping and doing running errands. And all the not fun things that wasn't on the hills of for a couple of years and then from there. I went to style DOT COM which merged into vogue dot com eventually. And that's when I really wanted to get into more writing and more of the storytelling and more of the behind the scenes of like how all of these pieces come together to really make a feature. And then I went to New York magazine in the cut for awhile and I mean that was an incredible experience for me because I was able to be at a place where I think you learn so much about your own story and how that plays into everything that you write or edit or that you wanna cover and I think there I was able to really flex love the muscles of things that I wanted to do from styling and producing shoots to working on you know really long. Form pieces like black and fashion. It's been over a year and a half. I would say of being editor-in-chief Teen Vogue so it's been a fun full circle moment to be back now as editor in chief and I think we've really leaned into a lot of the core things what I loved about Teen Vogue but in a modern in fresh and inclusive way that I always wanted to make it. I always love talking to people in fashion when they talk about like. Oh I started off in the closet and it's this thing and for people that aren't in fashion. It's like way that it's an actual real job that requires a lot of organization. And it's how a lot of people start off but I always think that's such a funny face when people see you working in fashion in TV or films. It looks very glamorous and it looks like you're just around town shopping and everything's breezy and their champagne and it's not that at all for those of us who've actually had to work our way out so I think that's an interesting point because you actually have to do a lot to figure out even what it takes to make a magazine come together. What something that people can't find on your linked in or that is in Google about you that you want people to know the only thing you can't really do but it's not like a secret and it's something that I have on my social media how much I love to cook. I grew up in a family. We always had to be at the dinner table. There was no fast food allowed. I find it really just calming and reminds me of home and so that's something that I really enjoy and I think it's interesting because in fashion people tend to not want to talk about food or not food to be the center of any conversation. Because there's always these very stupid pressures and anxieties around body image and how much you consume and even in this time. I think it's been really disappointing for me to see so. Many people in the industry say really insensitive things about you know not wanting to gain weight during this time and it's incredibly insensitive but also just ignorant and I want the industry to move to this place of inclusivity in a real way. I'm so grateful for this body that I have and I'm grateful to be able to make food and to be able to. You know to live this life. And that's really all that I think. Cooking food conversation should be about. Yeah and it's it's especially a very relevant conversation right now as you said thinking about so. Many people that are experiencing unexpected turns poor health that thinking about food and how we think about our bodies and being thankful for it in this moment his very different on that note about covert. You are leading a team a team that is part of Conde nast which is like any major media company has had its its ups and downs. How are you leading through this with the balance of trying to keep people calm? I know from leading our own team that it's not like we have a magic eight ball of being able to see when this ends. How have you handled this environment from a leadership perspective to be honest? I think it's been really tough because it is so open ended. We don't really know what is going to happen in the future and you can make all these plans for life and then you know life happens and I think for me. It's been a lot of just having those conversations with people you know. Do you need a mental health? Day Do you not. Do you feel like you can't do this today. And that's fine and now take on that you know today if I can and I'll figure out a way that we can move forward. That feels good for everyone. I've been having so many conversations of bandwidth and what people can just emotionally and mentally handle right now as journalists in like someone who's always overly ambitious. There's so many ideas and things that I always WANNA do. But I've been very transparent with my staff of like this is a great idea and I think this would be cool but I'm not trying to pressure anyone in ad anyone's workload of this is a cool idea but like I can't emotionally handle anymore worker. I can't spend any more time on this right now and I think we all have to be understanding of that and you know so many people have had family issues and I had a family member pass away from Kovin so I'm so sorry I'm very sorry for your family. No it's okay. It's just it's emotional roller coaster for everyone. I think just trying to be understanding in that. Is You know an empathy is everything. Yeah speaking about empathy is studies and more information is coming out that shows Cova nineteen infecting and killing people of color at a disproportionately higher rates. I think that there's been a lot of conversation about how this can reveal inequalities and disparities in our society that sometimes people don't spend time or don't WanNa think about as someone that has written about the overlap between culture and politics. I'm just curious to talk about how you're thinking through this moment and the type of data that we're seeing it just sucks to see that people of color going to be affected even more in the situation because you know people have covered just disproportionately don't have access to healthcare. And I mean really what this. Kobe situation is put so much light on his problems with class. And how we treat certain people in how we give you know other people privileges and I think it's it's been really upsetting to see a lot of popular influencers. You know be able to get tested really quickly and be able to have access to be able to get any medical advice and to be able to just hop in their RV and go to some house and be able to just escape and this is a reality for a lot of people have colored. They can't get the help that they need and I think for us. It's a constant conversation that we're having of. How do we amplify the voices of people of Color this because it just spans to so many things like even in my hometown from Wisconsin and the Wisconsin primary was like Sony? My family members were saying people of color are going to be directly affected by this election. And they're not being you know comforted in this at all. The polling stations are actually safe. And there's no hand sanitizer. They're they're not able to wash their hands in the bathroom. But they're told you know you need to just wait in line here for three hours. It affects so many different things and I think the economics of it and you know this class war is just. It's crazy and I think the it makes me really upset because it's going to have such a lasting effects on people colors communities that won't even have the resources to make it better and I mean we're going to continue to figure out ways that we can help in ways that we can make those communities feel like we're at least here for them because there are a lot of people in situations that won't be able to get out of this speaking of how you grow up. You grew up in Wisconsin. Tell us a little bit about what your family was like. Oh I have a really loving family. it's weird interview. My family is the best people planet. And it's just been really hard for us but I think that I grew up in a family just has really strong faith and I think that that has been a big point in my life. My Dad is a pastor. My husband's status pastor. And I think in these times you really kind of on your faith to help you through this and so I'm regardless of you know nervous being sick and this just being a really crazy time. I think that's really stuck with me and I think that the older I've gotten the more that I'm grateful of the ways that my parents have grounded me. I'm not any of these things that people may think in fashion. That isn't really my identity and my identity is really who I am in the integrity that I have as a human being. I think that you know we are trying to just walk through this with as much grace in humility that. They've instilled in me that I can. Do you think your family than like looking back on who? You are would be surprised at what you've become today. Yes no I mean. I was always very opinionated on a lot of artistic things like my mom always jokes you know they like allowed my sister and I to pick out colors for our bedroom and my sisters chose really you know. Pale floral wallpaper very basic in my opinion and I was like this. None of this will work for me. I need a custom color and my mom was like. Who Do you think you are? Yeah I can see that being such a pain in the ass for a mob like just pick a fucking color. Your that was me. She saved like all of my art projects and she was. She's that mom and so she always has like we were really upset when the glitter spill and we. We always had to have talks with you about things. Aren't going to go your way and I mean I was always definitely into creative. Things of his incenting Lessons Piano Violin. I like to dry like those. Are I love to do all of those things but I think it? The fashion stuff didn't come 'til lot later for sure just because the nature of growing out in the Midwest. You don't know anybody really who works at a publication and so it took a while for me to figure out really how. I wanted to use all those creative

Editor In Chief Teen Vogue Lindsey People Wisconsin Conde Nast A. Us Fashion Magazine Midwest Lindsay Google Kovin New York Cova Kobe Sony
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

03:55 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Out of that place of doubt right. I feel like I have this new level of confidence and sense of south that frankly I've never had before my life. So that is opening up a new way of thought of like well then how do I achieve manned mission in my goals with that? And what does it look like having this conversation? Just so inspiring for me. Because I'm like I want to actually sit with all of these thoughts. What's your word of the week so that we can go home and do this worker girl. 'cause I'm still. I'm still sitting here like digesting everything name said. I'm in the same way. I'm very much in my head post conversation and I'm thinking about a lot of things I'm just going to just have several words of just things that Lindsay said that I wrote down that it's just going to just throw them out and these will be like my words of the week. Which is you know she said. I'm here because I'm smart and I'm no what I'm doing. There's a fire in me that I need to keep burning. Life is meant to be lived and I want to thrive. What is the point of doing it? If I'm not doing in my own way if I can make people feel seen and heard I can change the world. Yeah those are things that are really standing out to me. Like if I'm not doing it my own way. What's the point and there's a fire inside of me that. I need to keep burning and life is meant to be I. Just all of them are just really speaking to me right now and I like had to sit with this conversation. I I'm thinking more like a phrase which is kind of just like I'm trying to like word the phrase that I'm thinking the word of the week is which has become the phrase of the week. Frankly is I guess. Go bigger go home. Yeah like if you're going to be there be there if you get if you're blessed enough to be in a position don't take it for granted by being afraid to be yourself which is truly things that I have done. You know. I've been too afraid to be myself in certain points and everyone loses out most of all me. Same Girl Yeah. This episode has been a gift. It's felt important for me personally for where I am in my life in just like watching this woman really come in and I don't like to say necessarily fearless. Because I feel like that you know dismisses the real fear that they're that they're to be someone who's out in the world and just being fully themselves and speaking up about what they think the world should be like. That's something that's so hard to do. It's the thing of wielding your voice and your talent and your gifts and taking full use an opportunity of all those things to make the world the way that you want to see it and I think that that it's not fearlessness. Bravery bravery it's bravery and it's also walking in your purpose and I think that so often when we have guests come in and we're like there's this sense about them of like self certainty and assurance and all of those people all of the. They're walking in their purpose. And you can sense that and I got. I think the word of the week for me then is brave brave. I think it's B it's bravery It's be brave. And and what that really looks like the vulnerability that that requires bravery. Yeah and it hits in so many facets the bravery to be yourself is the bravery to speak out is the bravery to set boundaries. And make them a ends. You know what again? Thank you guys so much for listening. We are to go home journal. And just billy Graham says and we will see you next week by the secret. Lives of black woman is a production of.

Lindsay billy Graham
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Making an impact and thank you so much. Thank you guys. Have me appreciate it? Thank you so Linzie. People's Wagner's just left the studio and I'm still kind of like decompressing because it was one of the best conversations we've ever had same. I'm feeling very introspective and inspired about the work that I do when like my personal life mission in relation to my work that I really WanNa like go home an journal Journal Journal and just think about it and just feel free reinforcement engaged and like and live in because I mean. I think that's the work that we do hard. It's just good to see someone who's just like still pushing through. I don't know if this is true across the board but the people that I've met in like the higher levels like the the more powerful people that I've met I've noticed something about them that they all tend to be really grounded and they all seem to have the same kind of language. They're talking about the same kind of things like they Have Boundaries with people that they separate work from personal time that they have a mission you know that they value their time and the position that they're in and they wanna make an impact a real one and it's okay if they ruffle feathers they're not trying to please everybody. There's a sense of self possession and I know myself I know where I'm from. I have a family life. I have people who support me. And I don't need the validation of the status quo and the reason why I'm so shook by CONDO is like learn. Well you and I have talked about this before but like I'm in a place right now where I'm really thinking deeply about what I wanna do in the space that I'm in as far as like work you know because like last year I was overworked and ultimately it made me very unhappy and dissatisfied but at the same time so I've talked about this on the show before like you know like I'm Haitian I'm an immigrant. I'm first generation like I feel like everything I do. I carry literally the weight of my whole family like I carry like. It's not just that I need to be successful but like I feel like every move I make either increases our fortunes dooms us and I realized that at the beginning of last year that I can't function in this way but I find myself in the same kind of mindset where I'm just like saying Yes to things and I'm just doing things because I feel like I can't say no or I can't. I can't not be successful or whatever that means and I'm really trying to break these patterns. I'm really trying to break this inner dialogue. That's telling me that I have to do whatever the fuck like I need to like. I'm really trying to get on my why am I here? What is the question? What is the point of this? If I'm going to be here in like what she was like what Lindsay was saying about. Like if we're going to do it less do it. You know so I'm just like what is it exactly that I'm trying to do girl. How do I do it? I'm in the same space because it's like I feel like they have last year as like okay. I feel like I have my mission right and it's just like the reason I'm here. I'm doing the work that I do because it is so important to me. That black people black women in particular see themselves reflected back in media and film but now in this place of like how what is the fun. What is the actual way that I achieved this mission I feel like seeing Lindsey and I think you have to of the sense of this very secure sense of self yes and like sense of like. I know who I am. I know I deserve to be here. And I'm going to like operate from this place of strain and I think she clearly is someone who knows she belongs. She's not questioning because that questioning takes up too much energy and it redirects your focus. She's focused. She knows she belongs where she is and she knows what she's doing and it's like. I'm finally stepping.

Journal Journal Wagner Lindsay Lindsey
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

11:33 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"From all over the world were looking for venture in Italy but they all ended up in a trap. I saw him pouring white powder that I still drink tea. I was like tipping into the wall and I remember thinking dimly like something is horribly wrong. I'm knew that he was a police officer with access to guns so I thought the safest thing is to get out. No one wanted to believe their stories. Except for group of Italian reporters in ancient times people were killed by the Gods and sent to the worst kind of health for betraying the trust of a guest. Now they're all in a mission to stop a Predator. Okay now it's time to take care of this business because cannot and like that clinched. The woman the wrong women. I'm Natasha del Toro. And this is verified. Verified is out. Now listen stitcher apple podcasts spotify or wherever Rica your podcasts and we're back with Lindsay People's Wagner in the studio lizzy. Why do you like your soul convicted in your mission to use fashion to make these statements a? Why do you think it's a good vehicle to do this? I think it just because fashion really is you know the biggest avenue that culturally uses to express a lot of views and opinions at the world adopts. I think that a lot of it is really rooted in this idea that you know if I can make people feel seen and heard I can change things right and there's so many. There's so many branches to that trees that extended fashion because I can use Chico for example that we put on the cover in December. I wanted to put our cover. Yeah she's amazing because she's you know. Incredible Rapper Black Women Queer. You're doing amazing things in space right. Most people don't want to put that kind of person on the cover. So that's one thing second thing They don't WanNa put somebody in the cover. Who's not sample size? They don't WanNa mess with it. But then the third tier I had her in conversation with Kirby who runs a pyre Moss and they talked about you know different situations. They've had with business of fashion and How they are navigating bean artists in music fashion being black and all those things and quite frankly struggling trying to trying to figure it out and I think they all of those things combined with the fact that you know occurred you made like a custom. Look for her made sure. She looked how she really wanted to. Look an elevated. My biggest pet peeve a lot of times when people shoot a lot of people of color but specifically people who sample size they just put them in a body suit or something stretchy. They found in the back of the closet. It's being intentional about all of those things and I think that when a young person sees that they're like oh man that's dope and that's really. Why continue to use fashion as the avenue to change things because I think that when people see that when pr people see that when agents one agency that when people see it on social media to young people it changes lives and they think about it in a different way. Absolutely right yeah well it creates this world of possibility right that you know like. I was the same when I was a kid and having like magazines on your walls and you're just like but so few people look like you so when you get to be. That's why I work in film because it's like when you get to be in that space and you get to change the narrative of what your mindset. You have to be who you need it. Yeah and that's a lot of pressure. Yes Oh how do you outside of like therapy? How do you navigate that intense sense of pressure of having this huge mission on your shoulders because I know sometimes for me it becomes so stressful and overwhelming? And I'm just like I'm not doing enough right. Not Why am I I could pathways? No I don't know a lot of it is getting into routines. Set my mind to be better so I mean I have. I have a lot of quiet time in the morning. Do a guided prayer meditation. I have boundaries as people on like. Look when I'm I don't hang out with people on the weekends. I'm literally at home with my husband. If you my best friend got married this past weekend so I was out for that but like I really stay in the House on the weekend. I don't want a I just don't really WanNa like socialized people on the weekends because I feel like I need to preserve my energy just like sit do nothing or read something or watch law and order just like brain off kind of activities I Cook a lot. 'cause I just find it soothing You know I forced myself to work out because good stress reliever and and I should to be healthy I just do. It's a lot of different things that I do is to try to calm my mind 'cause it's constantly constantly going and the way the my anxiety works is when. I really WanNa do something and I'm really focused on things. I'm worried about things even if I'm watching. Tv or watching it. My mind will just be on thinking of all the things I have no idea what this episode of Law and order even about is like the most annoying thing so I do In those instances my husband is like. Let's just go for a walk like do something different and I try. It's hard. It's really hard but I try to. I'm trying to not be a crazy person. You've mentioned your husband ally and I want to know first. How did you me? And you'd think having that par having partner and having someone to like go home and decompress with is a big part of you being able to continue this work. Oh Yeah I mean. He's the best thing that I marry. Him is the best thing I ever did. I think that I mean we met in college like broke up got together. Brcko got back together had our whole saga. It's very interesting and could be a movie day but wait on that No I mean I think that it is having a partner that really understands you and Who you really feel like you can be your full selfless I've been to we. Were we started dating when I was seventeen? So it's been a long time it's been over a decade And I think that we've been on this journey of like trying to you. Know create space and and make things different in our own Respective Industries and. I think that it helps. Like he's in a creative industry that's adjacent but similar. We don't do the same things but like we understand politics of what each other is going on and he understands like the specifics of what. I'm talking about if I'm complaining about somebody I think it helps. Because he's just a really kind person and I think that A lot of what I do came really just feel like people are really aggressive or just like mean spirited or whatever and I think you need that balance of somebody being like look. You're doing the good work. Calm down let these people talk their Shit. Focus on you like. You're you're doing it and he does that for me every single day. So thank you. That's like it. It seems really grounding and I think when we were talking at the beginning of the calm before we before we got on the four hundred ing and it was. We were talking about being a kind person and being a genuine person and how that's taken for granted or seen as sort of a negative and I want to know. How do you maintain in the face of just like the stress and the the backs I mean I'm saying backstabbing because it's like double ell? There is honestly. It's like staying focused on what I'm trying to do right like a lot of it is. I can give it my energy and I can be upset about this and I will be upset like I'm not saying I'm not that person 'cause I will literally like tech texts. My best friend like eight text messages. Being like can't believe this bitch like I cannot not deal But then I tried to just center and it's always just trying to come back to that and I don't want to dwell on things that don't really mean anything and don't matter and that's really hard to do when I have the best of intentions And I know that but I guess some crazy like just crazy emails like people say crazy sesame and it is. It's just really it never gets easier I I don't know why I thought it would as I got older. I feel like parents tell us that. Like an it's like that's not true But American fuses. Who's being a bitch to achieve a lot of people honestly it really like it is one of the things that I think that I also get because of my age I see I think I get it because I'm black people like they can just like jokingly but actually meeting in this series way say things but I think also because people know how old I am and they know that I just turned twenty nine so when I started this job I was twenty seven and so they know like oh well. She's young. Maybe she's doing that 'cause she's young and whatever and it's like no actually meant what I said. I said yesterday meeting as it. I'm not going to beat myself anymore. I said what happened and and I don't and I literally said in that tone because I think that people sometimes also think the because I'm young they can kind of convinced me of like. Oh maybe there's another way to do this or do we have to you know. Do we have to go this far? We've put it this way in. It's annoying but honestly I'm I'm now I think because I've been in this job a year at that point where as I said yesterday. I said I'm just thinking to myself so I mean are a lot of the people that you're talking to older than you. Yes we're yeah but also also my age and younger and I think that also makes it difficult because if people are close in age to me they feel like maybe they could talk to me similar and I mean it's it's not that it's both I feel like you're giving us a course in how to be an executive how well and how to demand respect for like if you're the sole black person in your young in a room. There's this expectancy that you're going to be like awesome so thankful to be here. What can I do to stay here instead of being like? No I'm going to lake do my job and stand up for myself and you will respect me right you know. Yeah I mean I just. It's also. I think being intentional on the fact that I knew that when I when I interviewed for this job I talked to a few people quietly. Just you know I should I wear what should I say what should I do? This is going to be so nerve racking and prayed about it and house. I I'm just GonNa do what I wanted to like..

partner Lindsay People Natasha del Toro Gods Italy officer spotify Chico Kirby executive Brcko Respective Industries Rica Wagner
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"I know who I am in that and I try not to judge other people in that I think also I get a Lotta this from my husband because he gives Zero Fox And he's always the same in the art world. She's always very like look like I know what I'm doing I know I'm the Shit I know. I'm dope I don't need the validation of white people or black people like I know what I'm doing and like I think that we too often depend on all of these things to make us feel like we're doing something but at the beginning and end of the day all it's about is making great work. That's all I care about and so I think that Just think that I want to actually move it forward and I think that part of moving that conversation forward is having really transparent hard. Conversations sometimes is saying look like you're not doing enough you're not helping us And that sucks but I do think that it has to happen. Ooh Yeah can. It is a process. I think of like decolonizing your mind. How do you also respond people who are like? Why are we even existing within this industry like this instead of being like focus seat at the table leg? Let's build own. And what does that look like? I've had this conversation a lot with Dapper Dan He is very pro. Build your own table build your own staircase. If they're not going to let you up you do your own thing. And he's definitely done his own thing. Right I don't know I've prayed about it. A lot of thought about it a lot. I think that it's a mix of both And I really tried to make decisions and and my thinking the as level headed as possible and what comes to mind honestly is that I think they a lot of people. Don't stay in endure being in fashion because it is taxing right like it is so hard it was emotionally draining. But if I don't stay I don't think that realistically there will be another person. That will push as much as I'm pushing and it is a line because a lot of I mean. I go to therapy every week and I'm like look I'm trying for Lord yet right there's a line and I. It is a sacrifice. It is a constant battle constantly like I don't WanNa lose myself in this. I want to change this. I want this to be a better place when I leave it But you feel like a layer of skin is kind of burning off of you at the same time as you get closer to the sun. Right and I don't know it's hard but I just feel I really just feel like is what I have to do right now. I don't know how I feel in five years ten years but T feel like you're fighting alone or do you have a network or support that are also in this struggle with you whether it's friends or community and fashion or people who work and other industries because like listen to you talk about fashion. We both work in film. And I'm like I'm having the same conversation. Eighty lane the same way I mean the funny thing that they don't tell you about these kind of jobs is that there are so few people you can trust It is And he's not even like I have crazy seeker like it's it's it's just the fact that there are so few people that I feel like are actually interested in the real me and actually what I'm trying to do and there are a lot of people who are just interested in being aligned for you. Know whatever reasons that they have in their life I've no interested in being famous or anything like that. Like it really is rooted in wanting to make it work and I think that a lot of people don't really understand that when they get to know me they're like oh you got invited to this thing you don't. WanNa go no because I want to work on my staff and I think that It's hard to make friends and fashion because so many people get caught up in the glitz glamour and all of the Shiny things and all the wonderful things right in those things are wonderful. I love everybody loves to get gifts and get invited to things and I'm not belittling that but I am saying that it doesn't sustain you. It doesn't Keep you grounded as a person and I think that the C- friends that I do have people that have not gotten lost in that and and the you know Ken check me and be like no. You need to come back to what what this is really all about. And it's been hard but it got aggressively harder when I got this job to to find a circle network of people. I think we need to take a break but when we come back I WANNA ask you. Why do you think fashion.

Ken Lord
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

10:23 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Who did not work as hard to not have as many clients but she dressed the part and whenever it was time for like something or needing to put some showcases like oh well you must be Lauren. 'cause you're the person and it was like no that's not mean. It was the first time that I was like. Oh it's not just hard work. No light looks also place and it was so disheartening to me. I worked in Senator Gillibrand Office. The first year I lived in New York. Yeah did politics. Before I transitioned to comedy writing yeah and I had the same like Silk Zara. Skirt war every week. You're just so conscious like even though you only get paid like thirty thousand dollars. Nobody in that office is making above one hundred K. Probably even at the top. And it's like even though I'm like the lowest on the totem pole. I'm still expected to wear the kind of close that all these people are wearing. Even though you know they're big have just their wealthier throughout the year. And you just have to like. Look the part because we're going to all of these like events and we're meeting all these and all this stuff and I'm like Oh my God I looked crazy and the politics and it's like what the Hell I'm tired because I'm working harder than this person. Time to look like she's going to the club not at work till two in the morning. Exactly you know Are you conscious of that now? Being in charge of leg from going to be the person that's like man. This is too heavy to now being conscious of Lake. There are other interns here who may be in the same position as me and creating a space for them. No yeah absolutely. I mean I've hired only women of color since I started and I think that Everything I want to do has been you know based in being really intentional about what? I'm doing what I'm spending my time on and who I'm in investing my time in and I think the A lot of that is giving people chances. And and knowing that like other people wouldn't take those chances And I think that that thinking no span so a lot of things that I do. That's like who I put on covers. And that's you know what I think about in who feature I think a lot of it is based in me being really intentional but also taking those chances and showing people that this can be done in a way that is still elevated still excellent and and that is still brilliant and nature would think Frankly like gives you the balls to do so because I mean you're in this position that not a lot of black women have held. I imagine that there's a lot of fear that comes with the expectations. And it's just like I feel like a lot of people in your role. There would be scared to challenge some of these things that have always been done and go in these different directions particularly with the kind of climate. That's in editorial editorial business right now. You know like shrinking. So it's like we'll give the balls I've had so many moments where I really felt like it was actually other people of color making it harder for me And not helping that. I think it fueled me to be the person that is going to help and is going to change and it's going to stay on the ground so one of the biggest things. I think that helped me shift to. My course was When I was working on the black and fashion piece so many people were scared to talk. But the real kicker was like so many people told me like. You're going to be blacklisted. You're never going to get a job. I don't know why you're doing this. You know you don't need to continue to talk about race anymore like we're done with this conversation and it was so discouraging to me because I had spent most of my career being like hand like i WanNa do is like run essence like that's literally all I want to do and they would never hire me. Which is hilarious. But I really just felt strongly that it was something that I needed to do and I remember thinking like if this is all that I can do and this is the last thing that I can do in fashion. I'll be happy and I can go do something else like. I won't be pressed about it and this feels right to me and I think that Obviously when it came out you know those people were wrong in in and it has been incredible and changed my life forever but I think that There's been so many black people in the industry who I was just. I'm just quite frankly so tired of doing the tap dance and shuffling in and out of their blackness and not actually standing up whether it'd be on social media or in these meetings and I'm just over You know I'm over the the use of the hashtags in that actually like pretending like that actually means anything and out very much. I'm about my shit I really am. And I think that That's what fuels because I think that a lot of people can see people on instagram and say like. Oh they're doing this and doing that and and I'm these I'm at the shows and I'm doing this and I'm like no they're not they're not And so that's I guess in my mind what really continues to feel me. Because if I'm not doing it who will do you think that you know there's such a a scarcity mindset especially when you are a black person and a predominantly white industry like. I feel like I face this but sometimes that people in film there like there can only be one. Oh yeah that mindset instead of being like no you need to create this base for more people you know. Crabs mentality is is still very real. I never have had a black boss and I've never had a black mentor in Fashion So it's it's funny because like literally every woman that has helped me as not black. I mean I used to cry all the time like I used to just like rollover in the bed and like I don't understand like what Taverny it'd be really upset about it But I think the I don't know I think that a lot of it for me is maybe also generational divide but also just a I'm confident in what I'm in my lane and like you can do what you do in your lane. That's great and I just have that perspective Yeah I mean it's disappointing. The I think the black women aren't the best that like passing the torch in helping other black woman But I also think it's the we try to play this game of like. Yeah like let's all together but that's not really what it. Yeah do you think. Yeah do you think it's competition or sometimes I've I feel like I've experienced generational and not just with like black women. People being like what I had to struggle to get here and there's a little bit of jealousy for this for a new generation or younger people have like they don't feel that you've been in the struggle as much so you have to go through it instead of just helping pave the way right I think is a lot of different things I mean. I think me personally People from what I've heard other people say and you know take it obviously with the growing the cell 'cause like who cares what people say but people find me to be too radical. The joke the joke is that I like talk like Malcolm X. in fashion which I will totally take and yes I think people get worried with me because they know that I will say something and I don't call people out often but when I do. I literally erase. You is literally like I will lay your shit out there because if I'm doing I'm really doing it for a good reason and I think that's where a lot of people get scared with me. 'cause they won't they'll do like a cute little like oh like this shouldn't have happened but like I will literally bring out the receipts and be like you did this and you did X. and you did why and you see. And here's why I'm not going to support your business but I don't do. I don't ever like call people out in a malicious way. It's honestly usually has to be something that I'm like. Well nobody else is. GonNa say something and this is really terrible so I'll just do it because like I have to And people are just too scared and people are too concerned with having this persona and like being likeable and all the things that don't actually matter. Yeah that's really other than that you're doing is you're calling out other black people. I know I know. I truly like the revolutionary shape that I'm I know but we have to do you do and no one does it. Scare disciple don't talk about the black person. Well I mean I want. I want somebody to hire me. Because they think that intelligent and like I'm bringing to the table that no one else will and I happen to be black and I love being black and I would never change that and I had that I was on like panel like the first two weeks I started and had told Anna I was like please diversity things are you more inclusivity. Like I don't WanNa hear the word ever seen what she did. Thank you and I was on. I was saying to her illness panel. I was like look like I'm here because I'm smart and I note. I'm doing a happen to be black. I love being black. Being Black is best thing on the planet. But I don't want to. I don't WanNa be trapped in this corner of like year the token black person. So you're going to act in this kind of way like if somebody is doing something that I feel like is detrimental to this industry or helping other people including other black people and their black person. I'm going to say something And so I think that a lot of it is just it feels radical to other people. Because I'm not your token yeah shocking. Jive black purse not invoke info. So what do you say to people who say you know where we are as black people that our position is still very precarious? And you know and that's where I feel like all of this protection and silence is coming from as far as like criticizing other people who aren't doing a great job. What do you say to those people who are like we have to do this until we whatever you know? Get to a certain point. I mean I do often say that I try not to judge other people in their journey of blackness. Right like I. I'm on my journey..

Senator Gillibrand Silk Zara New York Lauren Lake Anna I Taverny Malcolm X.
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

08:06 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"In such a high level in such a public public like position. Let's let's get into so many questions so many things talk about. Let's do it so we're here with Wednesay People's Wagner editor in chief. The chief is just the truly lay alot. The Chief C. N. G. The ESE. Of Teen. Vogue Lindsey. How did you get started in fashion? First of all yeah I mean I'm very transparent with people about how I started because fashion really thrives on a exclusivity and so I'm very transparent about the fact that I grew up in the Midwest in Wisconsin My family does nothing in fashion. Entertainment Culture they all work regular normal jobs And I mean I always loved fashion but I never really knew what I wanted to do in that until I got much older I think a lot of it just felt like it was not attainable I really loved reading Teen Vogue. Growing out My bedroom is still the same When I go home and I purposely kept it that way because it's a good way to reflect but I ended up actually doing The last piece that I did when I was at the cut Everywhere no matter what. It's like to be black and fashioned. The collage Ford is modeled. After my bedroom and I always used to have all these you know pages of different people in fashion and I would about pages from Teen Vogue and Ebony and essence and I always just loved imagery but I didn't really know what I was going to do with it Because my highest aspirations honestly when growing up I was like maybe one day. I'll own a boutique in Wisconsin like that that would be super cool and so I remember only really two pivotal moments In High School and the start of that really being like the hills and I loved just like seeing like fashion on television. I just thought that was so cool. Like I can't believe you get to do this for a job I guess to actually would be. I remember I started sketching out and I started being like do. I want to be a designer My ex-boyfriend boyfriend at the time I remember him being like. Why do you WanNa do this? Like you're never going to be able to do this shadow him and then I remember my mom sitting down and having a really serious conversation with me Because a lot of people in fashion to this day but also specifically at that time. We're just white people and so her having a conversation with me. You know and being very frank of you know if you do this you do realize it's going to be really hard to not hard in the sense of you know this is going to be just a challenging job that you're going to have to face things emotionally that you haven't had to do and you wouldn't maybe have to face in the intensity if you stay here in. Wisconsin and It's always really stuck with me. That she told me I would have to change things and she was very vocal about telling me That I would have to be what I needed when I was younger. And that's really inclusively And so from there I mean I went to college I went to a small liberal arts school in Iowa because I still wasn't really ready and it was actually one of my professors who came up to meals like founded about this internship. I think you should just try it. Try to go And my first internship at a magazine was at Teen Vogue so I just literally closet like it wasn't anything special or But I was just happy to be there. I was schlepping steaming organizing shoes but I was like I love this. I want to do this for us in my life And I just kept coming back and so I did. A lot of different internships obviously unpaid. So I was always like wait. You're saying you're always like doing many things And then I got one of my former bosses at teen vogue. Once I graduated I was like I don't have a job. This sucks and everybody you know when you when you like work like in a counting or whatever like quote unquote normal jobs. You get like an offer when you're like leaving school and I was just like Oh. This is not cute but I don't know what I'M GONNA DO INSIDE. Kinda just waited around in the summer And then I finally got an email towards the end of the summer. That teen vogue had a fashion assistant like just working in a closet position open and so then. I started working at teen vogue straight out of school so ever read an article. You mentioned in the New York Times article about crying in that closet about like going through difficult time. Yeah working at T. Mobile was that because you were the only black person there. Because you're the only because you were living in New York by yourself Well actually no I mean I had My now husband Dre. We were dating at the time so he's always been a huge support for me But I was just more so the being the only black person and also being the only person who isn't wealthy in a situation that really thrives on you having money to do all the things and I think that people just never really understand the depth of that when you're starting out specifically in fashion so many specific experiences that come to mind. It's not just You know being able to afford like a nice apartment and not living with roommates like it's not that it's literally the you have to be able to you know. Look the part so it's you know how you get your hair done. You know how you're able to dress Are you able to afford a full product? Look you know to wear until like impress. Your bosses a lot of times. I would just get really discouraged because I would have really ideas and I would do all the research and they'd be like Oh we're working on some shoot and then you know another girl who was a who was you know using her dad's credit card for everything just had better. Alfredsson me and so she would get. She would get noticed and she would be the person that's like. Oh like bring her to set. She wore that cute products. Like she knows what we're talking about etc And I would miss out a lot of opportunities solely on that which was really discouraging. Or you know a lot of like networking things It takes money to network in fashion like I think a lot of other people in other industries do have you know maybe like meet ups and other things like that but all the fashion things are strictly like Nice. Diverse like trash and people aren't going to go to some random everybody can go to meet up because they're snaps right like everything is at some like Nice restaurant you know. You don't know you go into a situation sometimes in maybe you're paying or maybe you want to take somebody out for drinks because you want to you know hear from them in Understand where their path is in fashion. But that's also money and I remember a lot of times. People will get invited to like. Galas are like Oh. There's this fundraiser. And it's like good networking and oh the tickets. Only like five or ten thousand dollars and I'd be like what Hill it's like. It was just a constant Frustration and on top of the fact that I was working all the time during the day Every day weekdays. I worked at Teen Vogue At night I would go to the store and Change Mannequin so like I would go from like ten to twelve midnight. And on the weekends I was waitressing a Jewish restaurant in tribeca on Saturday and Sunday So I was I was also just like over it because I had to do all these things and was still feeling like like what is the point of this. Yeah it's that first realization. Like one of my big fancy jobs in New York. I worked so hard. I worked hard working person departments date late and I had a colleague.

Teen Vogue Wisconsin Vogue Lindsey New York editor in chief Chief C. N. G. Midwest Wagner In High School New York Times Iowa Ford tribeca Hill Change Mannequin Alfredsson T. Mobile Dre
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Is the secret lives of black woman. I'm Lauren I'm SHARLA and welcome season. Three three women say we know you missed us. We missed you too. And we are starting off our third season with third. Time's a charm and we're starting with the bang. We're talking black women in fashion at subject that we both are very into talking about. I can't wait. I can't wait. Ever since Delaware's product is just like fashion is a game is I mean an I mean I just love close if I afford to shop all day long? A would words. But we're also talking about not just the the glamorous side of shopping today but the real the realness of what it means to be a black woman in power behind the scenes in a white industry that is very looks obsessed and how to navigate that world and we have truly truly truly the best person on the planet a gem of a gym of a person an icon. A legend a legend ended inspiration a boss about Yup yeah. Lindsay People's Wagner is in the studio today so excited Lindsay is currently the editor in chief of Teen Vogue. Choose the youngest person to become an editor in chief at Teen Vogue Parent Company. Conde Nast at Twenty Eight. She I worked at Teen Vogue as a closet. Intern then took on a series fashion journalism. Gigs AT STYLE DOT Com in New York magazine's women focused outlet the cut before big expose she wrote on what is like to be black in the industry got her on the radar of in a winter and a host of others in the fashion world. Lindsay is a boss. I mean I feel like we've talked about working in an all white space but this is like very you. We weren't bosses. I WanNa to know what it's like to be black executive at that age.

Teen Vogue Conde Nast Lindsay People Teen Vogue Parent Company editor in chief Lindsay Delaware Intern executive New York Wagner
"lindsay people" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"Stock up a baby fund. Or if it's okay to move forward into the baby step Oh okay all right. So did you finish baby. Step three yet yes we are now. Okay you're done with it okay. And so when you do young lady I development director for the boys and Girls Club and my husband the operation supervisor for American Medical Response Gajah and win. Is this next baby. Due in May in May okay. You said this and I'm curious you I said. Do we not go into baby step for and save up a baby. What is the baby fund? Four I would assume just you know God forbid you know medical expenses if we we need to spend more time there and I would assume that what the emergency fund would do But I just wanted to make sure I covered all our bases and you know if the baby and you know hopefully we don't have to use it we would put it towards baby step five okay. And here's the my mindset with that and again I'm just curious because I think you and your husband talking to you guys. Being an agreement is the most important thing But but I would also say this you know you look at this and you can think about yet. You've got the Emergency Fund and and people. I'm amazed that people that have it but then they don't Wanna use it right so because you've worked really hard to get there so I would say it you know in this. I'M GONNA go ahead and move forward with baby step four investing fifteen percent Now if you say hey do we want to boost up the emergency emergency fund Another two or three or four grand before you start that that's fine But my fear is that most of the time Lindsay people will do that and then they never get around to it right they never get around to starting at and in reality that money. You're putting into the four one K.. Is the money that you're going to have so you don't become a burden to these kids. You love so much right putting into retirement since he was eighteen so when we had to stop for babysit three that was hard for him. Hold hold on a second. He's been investing since he was eighteen. Years Old Who who was that e F Hutton? Like how'd he starts. Early is the site for so my husband has been at financial peace.

Emergency Fund F Hutton American Medical Response Gaja supervisor Lindsay director Girls Club
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Critical Path

The Critical Path

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Critical Path

"But that that's that's one of the things when you live in more than one place is to realize just how celebration and and holidays are different the next place. We're gonna live in Spain. And think that there's a whole different set of holidays. They had some good ones for the record my happy in midsummer cards were sent to to your place in Spain. So I'm sure they'll I'm sure they'll turn up now. One of the reasons why we are super excited about having Henry here with us today because he knows literally everything about history in we're going to go back a few centuries to talk about innovation that led to profound change lindsays. People started wearing glasses in the fourteenth century in it actually actually need to correct you because I've also done my research, the very first the very first we're actually twelve hundred or so so 'bout thirteenth century. Or is is that right? No. Yeah. Yeah. So. So just the beginning of the thirteenth over I cited as reading lenses or reading stones even that you could you could imagine a magnifying type class. So yeah, the stones have been around for like over. But okay, so say it's twelve hundred in Italy yet, I think the talian began to make them around then. And so it took a while for them to become popular as as as corrective lenses, but I think some select people did have them earlier than than than that. But what what's interesting is how. How long it took before that lines got used for something else, which I think is even more interesting, which is the the telescope and later the microscope. So so the sequence was reading glasses than corrective glasses things you might wear for you know, long distances while short distance, and then we had the telescope in about sixteen hundred and in about microscope. I think another fifty to one hundred years something like that. Wait to the telescope only came around in about sixteen hundred. Yes, yes. To Columbus in g in Cortes in all all the great explorers. Did it without tell correct, correct. That's that's right. So sixteen hundred is very late. But it's interesting. How what I wanted to point out. This is what the show is about is done the stand the impact of mediocre or Monday is the right word Monday technologies. And and these are things that we depend on for a lot of the scientific discoveries. We've had and particular Galileo with a telescope the big the big thing that happened right around sixteen hundred sixteen twenty was that he was able to prove that the earth was not the middle or the center of the universe. And the we did that was that. He observed that there were moons around Jupiter, and that was one thing you could not do the naked eye. You could observe all the planets you could observe their eccentric, motions in the sky. And they were thought to be wondering stars. But to realize that they were planets first of all and then to realize that they had phases, and that they had moons and the moons orbited the planet, it meant that you know, we had was not the center of the of the universe. What's interesting about that though is. What that did to the balance of power in the world. The the the hypothesis, obviously, you know, you can empower individuals with lenses, and people were would be more likely to to read you didn't need to drive. So seeing far wasn't as important certainly though the young who had good is would be employed as sailors or lookouts or whatnot. How accessible was this in most people? You were reading. So they didn't need glasses to read or the I think the people really needed them was where people who read which were minority. Small minority of people who were were actually scholars or monks or or those who were employed by even the church as scribes. So this is this is after by the way after the printing press the printing press was fourteen fifty so right in the middle. You have the printing press, which we of course, we celebrate of hugely empowering technology. But what about what about lenses what about glasses? And this is this is one of these things that I don't think we've quite explored. How it might affect the world have affected the world. And I think the obvious one. Okay. Yes, telescopes whatever else would change or fair will in the form of you know, naval negative while you could see the enemy bit further out..

Spain Henry Columbus Italy one hundred years
"lindsay people" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Bring the mood down while we talk about celebrities behaving badly. We call them. Presenting road and lady of the day. So that was short lived. Bringing the mood back. Actually, I think you'll find this to be delightful. Stop me. If you've already heard this one Lindsey Lowe hand, did you talk about this yesterday at all or at all this week, Lindsey Lowe hands representatives are scraping the bottom of the barrel. Lindsay Lohan is so desperate for cash that her raps have gone to Facebook. What do you mean they've gone to Facebook posting on Facebook looking for clients for Lindsey to rally? Dear client people's. Yeah. We need money for Lindsay Lohan. Okay. So here's what they did. They went onto a Facebook group for Publix for publicists and marketers this week asking for interested parties to quote reach out, if you rep a brand that is interested in endorsement opportunities with Lindsay Lohan. Wow. So similar to like, I don't know if you are on any like Facebook groups were they like people sell things like used for Kleiner's or groups. Are you all like, you know, Facebook selling sites, that's the thing? Sure. Absolutely. Like, marketplace states. Yeah. Totally. Like that kind of a site that kind of a group. Yeah. But for you know, ramps and marketers they were Lindsay's people went on there. And they were like, hey, if you've got a brand that might be interested in being endorsed by Lindsey lo Han, here's what we're looking for. Here's what Lindsay is looking for acceptable brands include fashion beauty car lifestyle. CPG anyone CPG, fitness, food, and drinks, entertainment media tech and must have a substantial budget CPG's fast, moving consumer goods. Thank you things moving consumer good packages packaged goods. Oh, wow. Okay. So these are the those are the acceptable things that Lindsay would happily enjoy. Now, you might be wondering did did people respond to lindsays request for things to endorse Lindsay's people's response to things. Okay. Did people respond three three the her reps? Got three response. Like was it packaged goods? What was that? One was alerting New York Post reporter to the gauche cash grab. Okay. So that was one one person who belong to the group saying, hey, New York Post reporter, check this out. Okay. Gwyneth Paltrow's website gauche cash grab. But sure, okay. So that was one of them and then to were from the industry types that were asking for a quote ballpark, unquote. What substantial means and F Y I substantial would would refer to the budget of whatever the category. Whatever money they had to spend like high six figures what they're looking. They want her to be paid. Oh, sure of cold because that's what Lindsay is. Yes. Well, guess what? If she was worth that should be getting it, and she wouldn't have to go into. I mean that to me is a sign of desperation doesn't have real people though. Can we just be honest about that? I'm sure her people consist of hangers on and other wanna be. Z listers who are currently in Mykonos thinking like smoking probably a lot of pot thinking that they've got it all figured out and her Ohio friend. That's true. Oh, yes. What was his name? Again. I've already forgotten that I don't know. I can't even remember manager. Manager. But if you say, well, if Holly puts it in the know, he'll he'll get we do that. What was his name again? How do you? Remember, didn't you slide into your DM's? Yeah. He did to tell me about my. Okay. So for those of you who are just tuning in. And wondering what are they talking in double speak about a few weeks ago? We were laughing about a story that talked about Lindsay's, Ohio friends being worried about her, and we did some research to try to figure out who were Ohio friends were her Ohio friend is some guy hunter Frederick hunter, Frederick whose some PR guy thing person who did not take kindly to the facts that we did not know who he was who took the time out of his very busy schedule to slide into Bradley's Twitter DM's Intel Bradley all about himself, also hiring. Oh, yes. Hunter frederick. Celebrity party, clown hunter, Frederick he also wants a think that's like a what is that superhero? Iron man. Like an iron man costume made out of Louis. Vitton weather. I'm sorry. Why he's looking for one. Yeah. Yeah. That's iron, man. I don't know what's up with him. Okay. Anyway. So. He's the one who put who posted that on Facebook. Yes. Okay. And we got a lot done. Okay. Well, we could probably just go on and talk about him for the rest of the segment. However, I do want to give you wanna use this moment to give us a China's update. We'll fight all just make the my D bag, and then we can talk about the story. Okay. Because we have a development in their March to the aisle. Oh, wonderful. Otherwise known as a cat. What? Did you call? It goes cash grab. Yes. I think that's just what we're gonna call goes. We have a segment from now on called gauche cash cash. Grab grab that gauche so-called gag. Yes. All right. Gag me. With the story about Nick Jonas and Priyanka Chopra shown us they are one step closer to saying. I do should you think? This was all fake, which we do do. You know, how we know? How do we know this because they have reportedly obtained a marriage license? Okay. So.

Lindsay Lohan Facebook Hunter frederick Lindsey Lowe Ohio Lindsey lo Han Lindsey New York Post Gwyneth Paltrow reporter Nick Jonas Mykonos Kleiner Publix China Frederick hunter Priyanka Chopra Holly Louis
"lindsay people" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"So I wanna give to add Breton Karnataka BI incarnated who said, I can't believe us in turn Tyler Perry into an adverb. That really warmed my heart. So thank you for that. How was amazing. I'm trying to tell I'm told you and then to tweets to tweets. The first one I wanted to quote is from at libra green with an e. l. e. e. b. r. u. h. green with an e who said crying at how fast Mariah was in a company. The tweet with a photo. There was a screen shot from beyond say's Instagram, which apparently she had posted a picture. Literally one minute ago and Mariah Carey is one of the first names you see on the. And it was just funny that somebody was petty and caught. 'cause you know variety. That was funny, and then I wanna give us out to Philip Picardy at PF Picardy who was the editor in chief of teen vol. He's now leaving. He's gonna be the editor in chief of out magazine. He's a really nice person to fill it, but he tweeted, your new editor in chief at teen vogue is Lindsay people's Wagner who is will be black young lady. She looked back at least so you know, whatever, it's another black person can editor and chief. So. L. people's way at team Vokes. He's the new editor in chief and Philip said, Lindsay and started as a systems together at teen vogue, and it's an honor to bring her back as the brand new and fearless leader. Congratulations to her into the whole team, so works out to her. Women continuing to set the trends. Those really cool seeing lean away. All magazine covers fell doves us because you saying how she felt the need to cut her hair issue realized she was like holding onto it to to kinda perform feminity that people would be comfortable being around. And now that she cut it off as like. Now, this is really what it is in the fact that now you if feels like she's getting even bigger and being more herself just a testament, I love. I love seeing her everywhere. Now God Emmys and a woman at the crew. When nobody says your jet. And I was like, okay, Lee magazine covers tho- dove and all the shows. I like every week. There's a new leaner way. Show twenties. I think it's called obviously the one would our brother fury. She has the boomerang remake, I mean, every week in new one so outs new as a whole. We're leaning Lena, got lean. I love that. But you already jump into this week's episode tripling. So we are very tired. It's been a very long year number one. At least van long month. So we thought, you know, we've couple heavy episode episodes. You hear the accent is that we've had, you know, Ari and styles. It's been great. So we wanted to have fun. We're going to do an off the cuff episode. We've. Senator couple. We did a couple of weeks ago a couple of months ago and you guys loved it was random, nothing plan. We kinda just talked about whatever came to mind. So I don't know if any of you wanna start your show here to the dough. Okay. I don't have nothing to talk about off the cuff and because yourself the Cup, I thought about Furby on blackout piece when she said off the Richter and it's like, oh, the rector off the rector..

Lindsay editor in chief Philip Picardy Mariah Carey teen vogue Breton Karnataka BI Tyler Perry PF Picardy Instagram editor e. l. e. e. b. r. u. h. green Vokes Lee magazine Senator Lena Ari Wagner one minute
"lindsay people" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

Yes, Girl!

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

"Also respect our buying power. Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. I, I was. I think it was in one of the other interviews I was talking about like are one of the major department stores that I love like you think about, you know, the major ones, Bloomingdale's, the sax, and we spend money there. You shop there, but wouldn't it be great if I can go in there? And one of the options that I have to buy was you know a fee Noel, you know, count or Kimberly, golsen suit, not just because it's a black woman that made it, but because it's dope and it happens to be a black women who black women who made it like, that's that that that pulls at our heartstrings. Like, you know, we have. We have crazy buying power, give us those options where we, we're, we're shopping ready, you know? And I'm happy that this conversation is being handled by if I feel like, you know, you have a lot of women who maybe don't follow the fashion district closely, you know the shop at these. They just shop. They were thinking that the lack of inclusivity in the industry was just about the models, and this is really. What you guys are experiencing in the business of fashion, and I'm happy the vet conversation, the timing right now with this and the articles that are out and people just speaking out about what's happening with designers and behind the scenes isn't so important and the way that that has in line with the launch of the shoe. I've heard it was as if God God. He was the entire time I was watching it. It was almost unfolding like the perfect movie like. It was like, oh, this article logic, hey, y'all see that number like July. Then there like an article that release in August, and then there was like, you know, and it was. It was as if. Could have scripted this better or at the right time. This is happening like in the middle of this perfect storm. And I know Charlie, we walked into interview like fashion girls fashioned go, but I'm gonna tell you something. I learned a lot about fashion in. I'm shot out the cut and writer Lindsay people's Wagner. She wrote a story. She doesn't tons of interviews with everywhere and nowhere what is really liked to be black and work in fashion. Even our own Julie. Wilson was our fashion and beauty directors quoted. There was so much real nece. Sometimes I get a peek of it because I sit across from Julia. So I hear the frustrations, but it's such a powerful thing to be here with you. Three lady, four ladies who are here doing it and working and it's there, and it's vailable to be bought. So spend your money people not an asset way, but it's been Joe money where it matters of. No, like unless you have a friend. I mean, we're in New York's you probably have a friend. I would just like, you know where we are, but black women, a lot of them just didn't know to see them jumping into these conversations because of the the fight you guys are fighting. Yeah. The first thing I tell women is take inventory of your own closet, like go through your own closet. You're spending money anyway. And yes, it is going to cost you a little bit more to buy from a designer of color because they are producing domestically and they don't have all the resources, but you're spending that money on drinks in movies and any all kind of craziness anyway. So go look at your closet and just say like, okay, you know what I'm gonna commit for the next year that ten percent of my closet is going to be from designers of caller, go to Harlan's fashion road website, shout out to our website where these three ladies can be found all three of their websites and shop their collections. You know, because that's one easy thing that we can all do like literally take because we can sit around here talking. But if all of our closets, Joe have one or two or ten piece. Is in it that are that represents us and our culture. What are we doing. No, I think that's the thing we have to stop making excuses. And I had to say we can be guilty of it. Like when they're controversy came out about the nail shop..

Lindsay people Charlie Noel Joe Kimberly Julie writer Julia Harlan Wilson New York Wagner ten percent
"lindsay people" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on WWL

"And we do have a a big each answered and revenues grub the of the goes on the economy than they may feel they want to make component are a new just downright politically they say we cannot let these things go back up we will keep ongoing forever never uh lack of possibility but i think at some point they'll have to come to deal with the if it does not generate revenue but has to deal with the idea of okay how do we deal with the deficits coming down the line and i only go with the debt at that point they'll have to say well we can't afford the tax cut eight monk but i know a lot of people are talking about it just a tax cut of mainly for businesses in and large corporations but uh what they're saying is it's bringing those tax incentives in line with uh what they're seeing in other countries is that correct you you know look at our statutory reagan marginal tax rate the high when they threat 35 percent britain most of the country's jets hot yet you look at our average tax rate it's not chat high at all it's it's it's slow because you have deductions and things of that nature now again for certain industries i think probably you find in movies of retail industry day they're going to see a break uh or should keep a break on this uh other industries depending on the different types of attack advantages they had built in the other system it closed continue but they'll get a bit break too but i think the real what what what the it'll take them several years corporation several your credit figure okay how how utterances binion but i think on the most part yep most companies will get a bright but like i said depends on what exemption for cut out and change which may have an impact for example on the on certain renewable energies industries eight renewable energy they'll be a a uh maybe a little uh they have so intentions are not be there any longer so it depends on all these little detail all night five hundred nineteen pages upper order i think i had about what what amounts to ride and and that's what i've done it's lindsay people are asking will can you as a wooded will be for someone who makes this or someone who makes.

britain renewable energy reagan retail industry binion renewable energies 35 percent
"lindsay people" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

Women Inspiring Women

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"lindsay people" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

"Can i health three people started rate hit their initial goals and benchmarks in their business i raised my own bar i don't wait for the company or my success partner or a friend or my husband is day hey mel i think you can do a little bit more i see that i raised my own standard i say to myself i need elevate myself and raised that bar and i go out there and do it so don't wait for somebody else to town which you should be doing wager on own bar especially if you're just had a during the average average will never make you extraordinary average you'll blended for the rest of your life the extraordinary do something over and above stand out be bold rise up ends dave yourself how can i level off in raised that are our at number five influence building a business online as we all are currently doing requires you not to be popular i don't care how many like you get i don't care how many friends you have on social media if you are not engaging with your audience if you are influencing people in a positive way if you are inspiring people to make a change dan you are simply just out there digging social media post you're just another person that lenzi your job your main objective a building a highly successful business is to be a person of influence argue influencing people to practice yoga every day and be mindful of their body are you influencing people to learn cleaneating argue is lindsay people to build a successful business or deger social media is it just don't either style and green jobs at your through and look at me look what i'm doing look how awesome i am or are you giving back in adding value to that other people are genuinely coming to europe page because they find you somebody ah influence.

partner social media dave europe