25 Burst results for "Lindo"

"lindo" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

05:09 min | Last month

"lindo" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

"And then show what you could do to transform that history of pain and trauma into power and how it is that we do this not just on an individual level but part of it comes from finding community and working with other people in staying our collective strength and we start to see that those paints from our childhood are not ours individually to bear. The problem is really in the culture. If it's affected us as individual you are listening to made of human also known as the move pod a podcast hosted by sophie can who is a danish comedian. Aw aw i'm recording this intro on january thirty first just twelve days after i chatted to dr lindo bacon but despite it being only twelve days ago it feels like months january. Twenty twenty one has truly been the longest month since his entire pandemic stats. Some of the devoted listeners will know. I live with complex. Ptsd and i recently started recognizing a pattern that has been showing up throughout my entire life. I have days of heightened productivity followed by days of complete dissociation. One day. I will work from eight. Am to midnight. And the next thing. I can get out of it except to take care of hank. Mytalk a month ago i was super productive. I was booking guests for the podcast is conducting interviews and taking all the meetings i could at the moment. I am in my bathrobe. My head is heavy. This is the first time. I talk out loud in three days and my kitchen is a mess. The day i spoke to lindow bacon. Stay after a long wonderful time of productivity that assad to dissociate it's been twelve days now. I'm saying this not to get sympathy. Oh advice good. God no i have two very capable therapists and i'm better than ever happened before i promise i'm just saying it's convey two-points one. It's just on my mind a lot these days because i'm feeling increasingly guilty about the many email seta piling up and on side dishes and laundry and friends haven't replied to showers. I haven't taken and saying these things out loud sometimes helps maybe you listening to this will sigh and say oh god me too. That's what i like for this podcast to do to make you feel less alone with your witness. The second point is this chat with into bacon happened when it was moaning in the us and evening here in the uk. I had been able to get out of bed for the soom cole. I was dehydrated nervous but because my head was messy but also because it's lindo bacon duck. Linda bacon is nutritionist. Research and author that behind the most pumpkin of book about the movement health at every size at book has been endlessly quoted by most people that discuss fat activism. It's a book about the concept of fat not necessarily being unhealthy. It's essential reading bacon recently. Released a new book called radical belonging. How to survive and thrive in an unjust world while transforming it for the better which is also essential reading talking to lindow about gender. Filled me with gender euphoria and there were times during our conversation where. I almost started crying. I'm very excited for you to listen to it. This has been a long intro. So i will let you get right to it but i. I just quickly want to flag up that on saturday. The sixth of february twenty twenty one. I am doing that. Ted ex london women after show. It's going to be so much fun now. I've seen all the speakers and were hassles. And i can honestly say you have to watch the whole thing. It's so it's going to be so good. It's online of course so that means you can watch it from anywhere and there's at least three previous mo- pot guests that are doing talks and i'm beaming with pride so go look up ted ex london women and join me for the after show. 'cause i cannot wait but i now i would let you listen to my conversation with lindo.

saturday sophie can three days dr lindo bacon a month ago second point january Ted two-points first time twelve days ago Linda bacon danish lindo london uk sixth of february twenty twent One day ted twelve days
Man crashes vehicle into Andersonville, Chicago, storefront

John Williams

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Man crashes vehicle into Andersonville, Chicago, storefront

"A man drove his vehicle Lindo, a storefront Friday and Andersonville police say the 25 year old passed out at the wheel just before 8 P.m. in the 5200 black of North Clark Street. There's a video call jumped the curb crashed into a convenience store, causing damage to the building. No injuries reported no word on whether drugs and our alcohol were involved in that

Andersonville
"lindo" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"In. It's just nice that that helps me relax the next person i'm gonna flash on i imagine part of the reason i'm flashing on him because i just listened to him in conversation with you. Kfc a layman. Yes yeah and again. it's like so heavy. Was such a gorgeous and again like his experiences so completely different than mine but in his writing he like i could feel his humanity and i belong in that same world that he belongs in. That's beautiful i. I think that's part of the beauty of reading. And of course of writing is that you find these connections. These notions of belonging for people who didn't necessarily have you as the audience in mind or who you don't necessarily identify with in terms of identity alignment but who still create space. It holds space for these possibilities for me. I would says anything about heavy. But i'd say the same thing about judy blume a teenager. I'd say the same thing about david. Sedaris there are people across the board who have who have written in ways that made me feel more human more whole more safe invoked since belonging that i didn't have before and you evoke that that sense of belonging for people it the possibility that can spring from that are are are boundless. And that's the beauty of all of this and so I love those choices. And i'm so happy that you hung out with me today. How can people find you on social media. I'll into that question to. But i realized to that one did it. Didn't mention was just how powerful your most recent book was like devoured it this last week thank you. Wow it was amazing. And can i ask you a question before we end. You know this is one thing that i'm not really clear on from your book in that the power in the book for me in some ways had to do with the fact that i felt really hopeful at the end. But i can't put my finger on. Why what you did in that book that made that happen because honestly like i don't know that we should be hopeful in this world. I mean yeah the president's changing but you know it's more of the same old racism. It's not like we're we've just gotten rid of the more necessary. I'm just wondering like when is it that you feel like you did in that book. That somehow when i was reading it i got so fired up that i did feel hope and i particularly say this because you know like your black man in this world and i don't understand how you can't hope it's a great question in thank you for it. They you for reading book. It's called we still hear pandemic policing protests impossibility. I think part of it is i. I do what you do in your book. Is i say against the backdrop of all of this darkness. Right all this messiness all this pain trauma crisis their possibilities in front of us. You know martin. Luther king said only win it his darkest. Can we see the stars in your book. You talk about this. You say we've learned how to live more simply in the age of covid you talk about how the air got cleaner. Because the a global economy came to a screeching halt. We found money out of nowhere. You know so. Many things that we were taught were impossible suddenly became possible in our collective kind of public imagination. And for me. The traditions out of which i emerge the black freedom struggle. I think there's always been that sense of hope. Not optimism which is sort of naive belief that everything's gonna be okay but a hope that is bound up in the real limitations of the moment the the contradictions the challenges but to say that we can survive and that our work at all moments i work is at the very stopping the world from getting worse and at our best were making the world a little bit better than we found it and i guess over the last year i've seen that tradition and the fruit of that traditionally merge again as. I watched these young people in the streets dreaming of abolition dreaming of defunding dreaming of worlds at a more free and more fair and more humane and more inclusive. More just than we've ever seen before and that energizes me and it excites me and it. Lets me know that despite all the attempts to destroy our bodies to tell us. We don't belong to tell us that we're not human. We still here in knowing that for me. Our existence is our resistance. And i know we'll have a lot more to go and your book again. Affirm that for me remind me that that we're on the right track and made me believe that that we can be victorious even more certain in fact that we're gonna be victorious so this will thank you again for your work. Thank you for your beautiful book and thank you for hanging out with me. And if you want to catch up with leo on social media what's your What's your are you. You're on twitter and instagram. Yeah on on twitter and facebook. I'm linda bacon ex and on instagram. just lindo bacon. and i've got a website. Lingo dot com. Perfect will make sure we find you. There everybody grabbed all the books all the stuff and have a great week linda. Good you thank you for listening to coffee and books. Make sure to follow us on instagram. With the handle coffee and books show. That's coffee eight indie books show. Also you can buy all the books that i've been discussing here at bookshop dot org slash shop slash uncle. Bobby's or you can go straight to. Bobby's dot com. That's uncle b. o. B. b. i. e. s. dot com..

judy blume Kfc Sedaris david Luther king martin linda bacon lindo bacon twitter instagram facebook linda Bobby
"lindo" Discussed on Coffee and Books

Coffee and Books

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Coffee and Books

"Hey everybody. I'm marc lamont hill. Owner of uncle. Bobby's coffee and books. I am a professor a scholar and most importantly book nerd say buchner it because i love to read books. I'm the person who loves to read about the book. I love hearing all this talk about. How why they wrote the book. And i love talking to other book. It's about their favorite books. That's why i started coughing books. Podcast all about books every episode. I sit down over a cup of coffee with the world's biggest authors to discuss the most interesting controversial fund at important books. Sometimes we hang out with experts fans and other special guests to talk about some of the greatest books of all time and today we have a wonderful wonderful wonderful wonderful treat for you. I am joined by window bacon. Phd and author of a really extraordinary and interesting book called radical belonging how to survive and thrive in an unjust world while transforming it for the better lindo so good to see you mark. I'm so honored to be here. Delighted to meet you and yeah thanks. It just means a lot to me. The my book was so meaningful to you. Yeah sometimes i encounter books for the show because someone sent to me and they say hey. This is a great book you have to read. Sometimes i sit on the new york times list. Sometimes my friends or my social network have hit me to it. I literally bumped into your book. While just scanning bookshop dot org for new book interesting new titles and i saw the name of it and when i saw radical belonging something hit me. I didn't. i didn't even know what the book was going to be about. But the title. Just hit me right in my soul and i picked it up and i read the preface and the intro and then i was hooked and i said i have to have this person on my show but before we talk about the book awesome it. Is we gotta talk coffee. Just for a second every episode of asked you what they're drinking and i today em- actually drinking and i've been drinking very boring coffee choices lately but today i'm going equally boring i'm doing an americano and i like americanos because it gives me the feeling of coffee both a little more high octane. So it's a it's a. It's a cup largely comprised of course of water. But i got that double shot of espresso. Their of coloma espresso and it is incredibly tasty. It lasts longer than just throwing back. A shot of espresso and it allows me to have a long day of reading. Which is what. I've been doing all day today. Now you are a prolific writer and you travel the country speaking you keynote conferences. I guess now you travel zoom world. Speaking what do you do in terms of your caffeine intake. Well as much as i totally love coughing right now. I could not be drinking it. 'cause coffee is like speed for me and this would go awry. I am doing getting a little bit of a caffeine buzz. Though it did my muscle chided. I'm drinking right now. And he usually few myself with t to get through. All my writing tita right you know. I think tears is a great way to riots particular like a nice black t. You can get a lot of caffeine out of it. It's super tasty Lots of flavor if you get bored with coffee for me. it's all mental. It's all mental. I something about the idea of being a writer. I have this idea that. I have to sit in be irritated with a messy desk in a cup of coffee and then i feel like a real writer. Even if nothing's on the page it looks it makes me feel good about myself. I get that. So why radical belonging. I suppose the best answer is because i needed it so desperately and i think a lot. Well i know most people experienced this sense of feeling like they don't belong in our weather. It's because your skin color whether it's because of your weight turn you know whether it's because your gender identity like we all have these ways in which we feel like we're marked by society and people either aren't seeing us for who we are or aren't valuing who we are and that was my experience for me. It was mostly around gender identity. And i feel like i was on a lifelong search to find people who would see me for who i was. And it's that journey that i wanted to document to other people find because as we know there's another world that's possible we don't have to have a world. Bits based on so much inequity and unbe longing gins were only a few people have power in privilege in the world. So i wanted to document. What is it i needed to do to find a sense of belonging. And how do we create that sense of belonging for other people as well and that's where this book came from you know when people think about belonging there's lots of ways. Think about that for some. It's illegal question. You know like citizenship. Do i belong in this country for some. It's finding kind of social fits you know. Do i belong at this at this nightclub. Do i belong at this party. Is this the kind of restaurant is should be in his for me. Do i belong to this country club. I think what your book challenged me to do was to think about belonging through the prism of the body. Caputo belong to think about what it would mean for me to identify as a physical body in the world. And you said something that was so should be sort of axiomatic. Should be self evident right that that everyone has a body and that you can't exist without a body which is absolutely true but to think about the the bodies the primary way that we're sort of navigating the world and how the world experiences us in thinking about maybe some of the gaps between how we experience the world and how the world experiences us was incredibly. It shook me a little bit. I just hadn't considered some of it. And i think that that issue is really important because no matter how good we feel about ourselves noel how much we love ourselves. How confident we are. We're always going out in the world and then we're seeing for our bodies. People are automatically judging us and treating us based on whatever projections they have about that body so we can never leave our body behind. It is going to affect everything about how we are in the world so we not only have to reconcile to our own body but we have to figure out to how we can change the outside culture so that people can see us for how we want to be seen in not for all of their projections about what our body must mean. You've been a long time. Proponent advocate of body positivity can you. I sort of help us understand you a little bit what that means for those in the audience who may not know jerk and actually my language is changing a little bit around that same. Previously were yes. Right so body. Positivity is like it sounds the idea of being able to feel positive feel good about your body and historically. My work has been focused on issues of weight. That's where a lot of my training comes from and helping people to recognize how all those messages we have about body size or just not based on good science. They're not based on caring about people they're not based on social justice when we label fatter people as either unhealthy year on worthy of respect. All those things are just problematic so positively is learning to appreciate bodies of all kinds.

marc lamont hill buchner Bobby tita new york times Caputo noel
"lindo" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Food Psych

"The whole time and it was just the four of us that were just alone just on this gorgeous stays learning all about ancient mayan traditions and traveling through this nature preserve and he was so open hearted in swe end. We were getting to know one another and we were in bathing suits in a way that it was really obvious that i didn't have breasts. And he was also not my partners a woman and we have a son and i think this was also confusing to him because he his culture was much more heterosexually based and he was having trouble understanding us as a family but he was also really quite open minded even if he didn't have so much experience around who i was and finally towards the end of our day. He just had this outburst where he recognized that linda just never felt right to him and he called me lindo instead and what he was doing was he was masculine icing the ending in his language and he explained to me that in his culture. The word lindo is a little bit different than linda. Because beauty takes a much broader term. So that it's not just about physical beauty but it's about kind of in essence of beauty and to me that felt just so wonderful and it just felt so perfect and right so the name stuck and over time i asked my friends and family to switch to it and changed my name legally and have some now. I hope that everybody will refer to me as lindo instead of linda. And this is the first book published as lindo too. So it's official and on your website and your book and everything exactly so releasing. This book is really exciting for me because it's really going a further step. Even though i've you know i've been operating under this gender identity for a long long time i think this is the first like actual were demanding from the world to see this shift and to see me as gender queer. I love that. It's so amazing. Thank you so much for sharing that story. I love the name. And how interesting given the work that you do to that you had a name. That meant physically beautiful. And then you've gone through this journey towards reclaiming the name as something that's that matches your gender identity so much better and also has this larger meaning of beauty as not just the physical. It's really fascinating with you know given that you do this. Work in body liberation to have a name that is able to transcend the physical beauty connotation of it. Yeah thanks and it also gives me a lot of like it. It helps me reconnect with my parents to my parents are both dead. Which is quite sad to me. you know they. They died young and my parents. They so loved me and wanted the best for me and they never got my gender identity and they always just wanted me to conform and be more of a girl. And i know that had they had more time that they would have grown to accept this for and i feel like i'm able to kind of take what they gave me and look into something that i know that they too would of grown to understand so i'm not rejected by history like i didn't choose a different name. I'm reclaiming the history. That i had in a way that just feels so empowering because i was never really linda my gender identity is not something that has ever changed over time. I'm not gender. Fluid like a lot of people. Are you know like this. Who i've been since a young age so lindo really just feels like a coming home for me. It's beautiful and ties in nicely with the idea of belonging to right of coming home to yourself right right I could talk to you forever. This is such a great conversation. I want to be mindful of our time though. And just ask that you share where the listeners can find you and learn more about your book by this book. It's amazing i give a blurb for it i'm obsessed with a thank. Everyone should read it for sure. So let us know where they can get it thanks. That's so sweet. Yeah it's a really exciting time for me. I'm just so exciting to be releasing this book out into the world and you can find it wherever you buy your books and you can also find out a lot more information about knee at lindow bacon dot com and know that you could find me on social media too. I'm active on facebook and twitter and just now getting active on instagram. Also yeah will put links to all those in the show notes so people can find you so that's our show. Thanks again so much to linda. Bacon for being my guest on this episode and to shelby..

lindo linda shelby facebook official twitter
"lindo" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Food Psych

"Author speaker and friend of the pod lindo bacon about their brand new book radical belonging which comes out this week. How their perspective on hayes has shifted since publishing their first book health. Every size reframing disordered eating as a coping mechanism for trauma how gender affirming surgery helped them find body acceptance and so much more. I can't wait to share a conversation with you in just a moment and by the way. I'm recording this before the election. So i don't know where we'll all be mentally by the time this episode airs right now. I'm feeling anxious and cautiously optimistic at the same time. But i know it's all still so uncertain. So here's my little prayer that by the time you hear this. We'll be celebrating a huge victory for democracy and that the response to that will be peaceful before we get into my great conversation with lindo. It's time for ask food psych. This week's co host for the segment is health at every size coach. Shelby gordon and our question is from a listener named erin and before i play. Shelby's answer just my standard disclaimer. That these answers and this podcast in general are for information on educational purposes only aren't a substitute for individual medical or mental health advice and don't constitute a provider patient relationship with me or my co hosts. Okay now here's shelby reading errands question. I am listening to the food psych podcast and delving deep into the resources. You're providing. I.

Shelby gordon lindo hayes erin
"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Great example of. My doing work that I'm really proud of. Interestingly I absolutely do not think of Mr Roses is a smaller part, very central and foundational part to that to the unfolding that story. But what I will tell you what I will say that Again all young actors, younger actors even though my work was I'm very proud of my work offscreen there were some. Dynamics between myself from the studio this was Mary, Miramax. That probably did not enamored. Harvey Weinstein to me. And it was very interesting. And again, I wasn't late to work. I wasn't doing drugs. was nothing to do with that it had to do with. Kissed small things that cumulatively can just make people say arm in our life is too short. You know for this guy with a mean what the fuck? And again, whereas maybe some other people would be given latitude I was not going to be given. A similar kind of latitude. and. So consequently. When the film is released and one of the very first reviews says. Delroy Lindo Oscar nomination and when one of the other produces at Miramax the other producers involved with the film calls my agent at the time and says, this is his Oscar year. A might Asian call me and say guess who I got it wasn't harvey by the way because somebody else. So the work spoke and I'm really proud of the work but I think that strategically I I don't think I know the strategically the studio made a decision. It was not going to be my year was going to be somebody else's year right right which was weird because only only because you know there's a certain sense in in this awards side of the business which cover that. You know it's somebody's turn or whatever. But the weird thing was Michael candidate already won I think two Oscars. So that happened to be the guy who they emphasized from cider house rules and or maybe that was number. Now I think he had already. Yeah. That may don't know two or three. One. Decision that was made that it was his years now I want to stress because I know this is not visual. I'm not recounting any of these stories with bitterness I swear to God. I'm not what I am attempting to do is to take a have to step back and look at how the industry functions. And look at the relationship between the business aspect of the business and its relationship to the creative sides. Exactly. What I that's exactly what we try to do on this so I really appreciate your. Willingness to engage in that way and and I guess your your story is so interesting because you have done things that others have not done. So you know the year after that, you're in a big hit movie gone in sixty seconds though the detective chasing you know these car thieves, it would appear to people watching that you know monitoring your career casually from the outside of the sky it's gotta be He's gotTa be thrilled with how things are going and yet my sense is that you know the fact that. The one of the most interesting things about you that I I've been wondering is how just three years after that in two thousand and three what was what was on your mind when you decide to under a pseudonym I, believe. In role at San Francisco State. University. And pursue a degree at a time. You know you're in your fifties you're having. A what on paper looks like a vibrant career and yet something about that to me suggests maybe you're thinking my best days are behind me I'd better plan for something else I wasn't thinking my best days were behind me. I absolutely was nothing that I I still I felt and I still feel that I have a lot to offer as an actor but I did feel that I needed renumbered things I did feel that I needed to broaden myself. You know broaden my footprint. So speak as said Because On the heels of doing a film like gone in sixty seconds. That's summer I did gone in sixty seconds. And I went up to Vancouver Canada to do a film called Rome's die and I saw in that time period for producers will do they will they will move heaven and earth when they want you. So I am at a place in my career where I know what it is to be wanted. By producers I I know that they will move heaven and earth when they want you. And I also know what it is when.

Harvey Weinstein Miramax Mr Roses Mary Oscar San Francisco State Vancouver Canada Michael Rome
"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Tweet laugh please do. I thought it was meritocracy meaning you know that. Good good work get more good work began mortgage. Now. Not Quite. Again, I have to. Stress, that it's nuanced but I think some of the behaviors that I demonstrated as a result of thinking that I was more important than I in fact was the fact that it is not amid the industry is not a meritocracy there are various. Elements that comprise that make up success and people's willingness to want to work with you right and so it's not. It's not just that one is a good actor now. So there's so there's that the two two things. The fact that it is non meritocracy. The fact that I was not. As important as maybe I thought it was not an ego driven thing it was not an ego driven thing. I've done this work and I've demonstrated that I'm good at. But no, that's not enough. And then the other thing. And, this is the other component. Or another component, and this is very, very critical at least was very critical in my journey in the industry, and that is that.

"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:25 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"What you can infuse the the the parts with now Western nit what I what I became aware of with west Indian Archie. Even though it was only a few minutes of screen time. Context of the fact that Malcolm X. is three hours long. I'm in the film for maybe ten minutes, twelve minutes but critically with west Indian archie, there was a beginning a middle and an end so that West. Indian. Archie. had very complete. Journey. And it was that filed seen that completed not only west Indian arches journey but his journey visa, the Malcolm Right, he's journey vis-a-vis the story as a whole. So by the time, we I was sitting in Brooklyn with the other actors in the read through I just felt a connection and connect head to that part. I didn't know it was going to do for me what it did but certainly as an actor, I felt very connected to that work and I'm GONNA. Give you the real short version west Indian archie almost didn't happen spike I went on I auditioned addition in in Los Angeles I spike was not there I then did a second audition in New York. This is pre cellphones I did the audition. I then had to get on a plane and fly to Los Angeles to do some re-shoots for something else when the plane landed in Los Angeles that was a call from my agent at the time saying you've got the part. But the money was not. To my liking, so I said. Yeah I want to do the part, but please give me some more money we went back and forth. For maybe a week or so and there was no moving on the money. I got a message saying from producer that spike wants to talk to you said, not I'm not talking to spike. Let let the agents do their thing and get the money. Give me some more money. Second cars bike really wants to talk to you I'm not having by man now you all. My Wife said talked spike I'm not talking to spike third time. Spy Really thought.

spike Los Angeles Malcolm Right Malcolm X. Brooklyn New York producer Archie.
"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

03:24 min | 4 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Period aspect of that work and everything to do with the content of the work, the efficacy of the work, the the ability of the work to speak to me as an audience and by extension audiences in general that was the point, and that continues to be the point right absolutely in in any work that one does. So you mentioned those early years as a theater actor in I guess the first real film credit. After graduating was in seventy nine, those more American graffiti. But then it was like Tan eleven years before the next one and those were the years that you were. I know primarily doing theater and I just WanNa know for listeners Broadway debut as a replacement in master Harold and the boys in nineteen eighty two I think that's with James Earl Jones, which must have been a very big deal for a young actor and then a Tony nomination just a few years later on Broadway for Joe Turner's come and gone in eighty eight what I what I want to ask you is where you you know I guess it's all about the perspective because on the one hand that sounds like you're. On paper looks like you're flourishing in the theater but were you content or were you somebody who was disappointed? There weren't more film credits at that over those years or just how were you regarding those years leading up to the early nineties when? I'll pick up from there. All right. So first of all yes it was a you know a kick as you say, a working with James Earl General Jones in in master how the boys however my debut. On Broadway. In mass to housing, the boys was even more special. For me for the following reason I was under studying. I was hired. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two as an understudy on Broadway production and it was. At the time, it was James Earl Jones had just come in to that production to replace an actor names aac smoke. And Zach's MCI was south. African. Actor who's no longer with us but who had won the Tony Award for his work in Master? How than the boys I was an understudy I was hired to understudy. So it was James Jones who was just Taking over who had just taken over for Zeke's and it was Danny Glover playing willy and James Earl had to go out to Los Angeles to do some voice work something for Darth vader. So he was going to miss a performance. So I got a call as the understudy. I got a call saying James is missing this. Performance so you will go aung. Tonight. And not only was it special that I was making my Broadway debut. But it was really special to me that I got to work with my good friend Danny. And I will never forget. So my my debut. On Broadway was was was filling in for.

James Earl General Jones Broadway Danny Glover James Earl Darth vader James Tony Award Joe Turner Tan Tony MCI Harold Zach Los Angeles Zeke willy
No One at Marvel Knew About Chadwick Boseman's Illness

On Shuffle

02:14 min | 6 months ago

No One at Marvel Knew About Chadwick Boseman's Illness

"This week we're talking about the late Black Panther Star Chadwick Bozeman who died a few days ago at age forty three after a four year battle with colon cancer. Chevy Bozeman was. Jackie Robinson he was James Brown. He was Thurgood Marshall he was Challah. You was minore. And now he's no longer with us We're just now learning about his colon cancer diagnosis in two thousand sixteen the same year that Black Panther went into production, which means that like he never spoke publicly about it and also like you're just. I think a refrain over the weekend like all of our across all channels social media was just like you never know what someone's going through then. Dog this is like an extreme case of that because it's not just he never spoke about it. It was the fact that he will multiple rounds of cheap like he was. I don't know you've watched five bloods. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'd like his. Spooky. So, Spooky. It's so spooky especially because those means character stormin norm is one of in Easy Company soldier of Fortune and the Vietnam War who Basically is the voice of reason from beyond the for all of this company base that like includes Isaiah with lock junior Delroy Lindo. etcetera etcetera etcetera. But anyway, he's just kind of like speaking from beyond the grave about how These people as black men are to conduct themselves. So that's just like very it's a lot to deal with like if you watch it again. Not, just as a spike Lee joint that came out during quarantine but like as a posthumous bozeman foam. Yeah and he walks to that movie with the Halo basically giving these these milestones about black pride and dignity and America and civil rights. And God is that there is no spookier performance. One could have either final performance before passing away age forty forty-three. Like totally undisclosed cancer

Thurgood Marshall Bozeman Chadwick Bozeman Colon Cancer Chevy Jackie Robinson Isaiah America Easy Company Fortune Delroy Lindo.
"lindo" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:22 min | 8 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"Had read it when it first came out a Lee read it. Immersed myself in. As many things Vietnam as I could get my hands on. And that was the the foundation of the preparation that I did because I knew obviously I knew that Prior, to this process. My understanding quote. Unquote was very broad. Are you an American citizen now? I am. Can you talk a little bit about growing up the with the Jamaican background, and then growing up in than than going to Canada what it does to you? What's in your head? Who Do you think of yourself now? What is your identity? That's a perfectly legitimate question and my debt. My identity is probably amorphous I sometimes firmness of as a Mongrel. You're an actor. It's really good to be. that. Yeah, yet exactly. That's a wonderful question and and I'm I'm a hodgepodge. I'm a hodgepodge me. That's that's that's the reality. That's my reality and I. WanNa believe as you said that it is indeed. A wonderful thing for an actor because I. WanNa believe that I that I can at least. Xiao's myself to go in various different directions depending on what the requirements of the material that I'm working on are. In terms of all the places you've lived and you've been one thing is changed the same issue race. So while you're growing up in ING. Are you experiencing a what we're experiencing in? The states is the UK. As strong or Murrelet in terms of its racism as the as America is, what do you think? Yes, yes, yes, yes, Now! It's nuanced. But. The resulting impact on people of color is very similar, if not. Every bit as bad every bit as virulent. Because one is dealing with in the United Kingdom Are the vestiges of. Colonialism. Empire and a deep deep. Seated belief. In not only quite superiority British superiority over all of their former colonial subjects. But. broadly. Any persons of color. And I would say that. Illinois in England, there are statistically not the same number of guns in the society therefore. Arguably one could say that the gun violence is not as. Site was psychological, emotional impact of how the racism manifest in England is every bit as variant and damaging. Was your first experience of it growing up. Two instances I can recall. So. I went to an all white elementary school. I was literally the only black kid in this all white elementary school. And kids would play and we would. We would all pretend to be superman. And that involve swapping out jackets tie you tie jacket sweater around the neck and you'd have a kate right. Around and you put your arms out. We all did this. Though kid that I. Had exchanged my garment with. All sub. Came running up to me with Terek in his eyes, and through whatever garment that he had had for me through that me and grabbed what his jacket or his sweater around my neck grow added and. was terrified and ran to a car that had just pulled up. This was my friend. Right you. Coming from and clearly what happened was his dad had said. There was a man was vaguely where the man in the car had said you get your Fang away from this this kid, but the Tara is what I is. What I recall in this kid is and he yanked. Away from me as one instance I can, I can recall. Second Instance? Came home from school one. Afternoon. And I was reciting. A little giddy that the kids. Saying in school during our playtime. any meaning mining Catch by the tote is Hollis. Then go any my and I came home great. Innocently, enjoy leave repeating this day that I had heard that everybody had been speaking the been saying all afternoon. and My gramma said. What are you saying? Do you know what that is? And I said I'm not just saying it any my catch by Tom. And I don't know that she specifically explain but what she said was. You don't say that you say eighty meaning money catch Tiber by the tow. Don't let me ever hear you say that again. An third. Instance I would say. Is that I in this neighborhood? Walk down the street, going to store and somebody that written on offense. A wood fence ingred print. delroy Lindo eat for breakfast. Just a nowhere. Evidently no I mean clearly somebody who didn't like me yet. But these these. Again. I don't know that that was. They were necessarily the first instances, but they were clearly because I can remember them so clearly. All these years added the fact they would clearly. They made an impression. I could tell even as you relate those stories that they're still there that certain things don't go away from you and yet. You made this amazing movie to five bloods about the history of racism, especially in America from slavery to hear because it Spike Lee movie and he's he's a history professor to you know he wants you to know that you characters bear the weight of this entire history. Bear away this time of Kobe nineteen where we have. A black people disproportionately again. suffering from this. And, we also live in a time where the protests give us a sense of hope, or at least they do to me. How do you feel about the protests? The end the feeling since George? George blood are murder. Are you optimistic for change. Cautiously be answered in a happy optimistic. I am compelled to be optimistic because a I, have a nineteen year old son, my wife and I have a nineteen year old son. African American Man Child. who goes out the door every morning. And a half to be quote, unquote optimistic because the alternative is. Not An alternative. Had he said bad, but I am optimistic in quotes. What time is demanding? Is A paradigm shift. Not. Cosmetic..

Spike Lee UK white elementary school America England George Canada Vietnam Illinois Xiao Terek kate murder Tiber Hollis Tom Kobe professor
"lindo" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:17 min | 8 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"And no better performance that you could see anywhere than the one given by guest Delroy Lindo in this spike Lee movie, So it's my pleasure to welcome Delroy Lindo to fish up. Thank, you, thank you Peter. Well I mean. What does it feel it? When a movie hits like this at a time where what the movie's about is so much in the conversation that it's a movie of its time so much and your performance which is getting Raves, it deserves to feel good. Feel fabulous feels extraordinary it's a little bit of a balancing act for me, personally just in terms of. Keeping. Grounded keep my feet on the ground. Yeah of the fundamental feeling is is. extraordinaire the people that do what I do as film critic or in this think what you did in this movie is just so extrordinary, so let the Oscar Buzz happen will make it happen. You should just stay a way from it is probably the best. Strategy, that is exactly the strategy having said. It does feel really good to get this much for the found and for myself to get this much. Positive attention. And, you're right, it's it's it seems to. It seems to hit. The zeitgeist as Zeitgeist. I'm also thrilled for Spike and for the. For, everybody associated with this work. And you inspite go back, go out. You haven't worked together for twenty five years, but you do go back. This all come around at NAP got a call from my reps sang fight was. Wanting to each down to me a few days later he in. He called me until me about the project. Send me the script, and as needed. Give him a call at red. Which I did and I was. Really excited about the prospect. And a call back in. You've probably heard by now that I had some. Reservations about the. POLITICAL ASPECT OF. Hall's. Character, but broadly of. Yeah I was GONNA had gets a lot of exposure in this movie I mean I can understand what your reservations are, but as an actor, you played a lot of different people. What was this specifically? That made you a little concern. On, because I am found Lee not a trump supporter. And I remember saying to spike. Man Parent I. Don't want my son. See me doing this. On quitting Reggie Specht while not bessette that was I. Remember specifically having that conversation. My reservations were twofold. The fact that that individuals politics are wildly divergent from my own. And also I had this thought in my head. Have I explain this to my son. Just turned nineteen he was. Seventeen going on eighteen. Anyhow that was the conversation lowering spike. I know sometimes you could have conversations with. where it might really be a little contentious, was that way when you saw not at all from from the time by called me? Alcohol physician was not contentious at all. It was very much to of created creative. Colleagues. Talking with a with a with a very reciprocal. Measure respect in regard but. I. Asked like if we could change bad aspects of the character, and he did not say no I can't watch is also really. Encouraging, he didn't, he said let me think. Let me think about. Give me a few days to think about this and he texted me perhaps. For four days later and said he really needed Paul cactus played Paul to be A. Tra- by. I then said. Okay, I, get it. I respect that. Give me a few I vincent. Give me a few days like to go back and we describes again, which is what did? So the third time that I've read the script that I read the script at the end of that third time was aware. Paul was part needed to play and I had in. My head rationalized the. Casting of that vote in two twenty sixteen once I got past that aspect of it. I called Spike and said I'm and I really want to do this. I need to do this. I mean I've heard this said and to me. It's very true of your performance in the movie, too. It's almost shakespearian. At times. It's especially toward the end in in that Manila, which is a loosening, Tori and yet it's all the ghosts in Paul's life coming back to haunt him. Or maybe to make peace with it. You know it's just that when you read that. Did you say yourself? One helluva apart. Wasn't is based on that mall. Even though that monologue has become very much talking point and I'm really grateful in a firm for that, but it was the whole the whole arc of this man, and you're right. I viewed it, as very will Sonian. As didn't Ottesen Very Shakespearean. Are Edge tragic character that from acting standpoint. I couldn't wait to jump any get started. It was very very very exciting. The prospect of engaging is where it was incredibly exciting. I WanNa ask you this about doing a movie. That's about the Vietnam War. Also about right now because. These four bloods are coming back basically to bury the fifth one who they left behind and for some other reason I don't WanNa get into too much era because people need to see this movie and still allow it to surprise them in the ways that it should. But Delroy, you're a Brit. You have Jamaican parents, and you lived a lot of your early years in England. So how close this did you feel I was going to ask you while Vietnam was going on. You probably too young to be involved in what it was, but what was going on in your mind and in your head. Vietnam was happening. Not much with regard to my awareness of the conflict and my sensitivity. To conflict. So that. Is directly connected. To the depth and the breadth of the preparation that idea because I knew that about you know. The I was uninformed I was relatively uninformed. About the specifics. And so I am mercilessly sell. My immersion included speaking with vets to on my cousins of women, the speaking with them about their Phnom Experiences, specifically speaking with them about ptsd about the condition of. As when additional events at an spoke with a retired major who is in Iraq? She spoke at length about her experiences and specifically the. Other film I read books I went back red book called bloods which. Is Phenomenal. It's accounts between fifteen and twenty african-american vets speaking about their experiences I.

Spike Paul cactus Delroy Lindo Lee Vietnam Oscar Peter Reggie Specht Manila Hall Iraq Delroy Sonian England Tori
'Da 5 Bloods' Movie Review

Roe Conn

00:27 sec | 9 months ago

'Da 5 Bloods' Movie Review

"We mentioned yesterday defied bloods four stars you gave that four stars and Spike Lee film about for Vietnam veterans all African Americans in present day go back to Vietnam to retrieve the remains of their fallen squad leader it's a great film I believe it will get multiple Oscar nominations Best Picture best screenplay probably a Best Actor nomination for Delroy Lindo and of course we've got the interview with Delroy Lindo was up on the website of U. G. N. right now great

Vietnam Delroy Lindo U. G. N. Spike Lee Oscar
Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

The Big Picture

04:04 min | 9 months ago

Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

"We've spent past two weeks in a collective state of horror and anger over George Floyd's killing at the hands of Minneapolis police, officer Dirk, Shaaban, just one thousand unjustly killed by police. It's hard to look at what happened. Floyd, and not think of Radio Raheem Bill. Nuns character from do the right thing. Or countries fucked up needs to change. No American filmmaker has had the foresight or insight about that need for change quite like spike has. Some directors interpret the past some capture the present spike does both and he sees the future. Spent some time in the past few weeks. Returning to some spikes movies in anticipation of his new film to five bloods, it's a staggering body of work as wide as it as deep as warm and inviting as provocative and laden with traps ever. Spike isn't the totality of the black filmmaking experience and I don't want to suggest that, but for forty years he's told stories about that experience that have been seen more widely and discussed more feverishly than anyone and they still haven't been seen enough. Of the conversations you've been having with loved ones this month about the problems that people are forced to look at more closely police brutality, systemic racism locally sanctioned violence gentrification, tribal loyalty, the failures of government, personal sacrifice versus public good hiring practices, power, art and money spike was ahead of most Americans for decades on these issues, but while the stories he tells are frequently polemical. His movies are quite nuanced. They rarely tell you exactly what to think. Instead foisting contradictions and crises, interviewers, laps and making them decide. He crafts extraordinary dilemma movies inspired by the new Orrin Westerns and social dramas that he studied at Nyu and even though he doesn't force a conclusion is movies are frequently an intelligence test over the years, critics and audiences have repeatedly shown their ass immediately upon exiting a spike movie. For person like me seeing his work at a young age me up, helped me see beyond my keyhole-size view of the world, but it's not like spike wasn't relatable. He was the Avatar of new. York Knicks FANDOM! He was a regular presence on TV and Jordan commercials. He was directing music videos and frequently according controversy in the movie world he consistently challenged fans and detractors to reexamine their beliefs, and he always destabilized our comfort at sixty three. He is still very much a vital filmmaker. Twenty eight teams Black Klansman was among his most honored films and marked his First Competitive Oscar win for best adapted screenplay. Spike is a hall of Famer on this show and his work accounts for some of my favorite movies ever made. This episode is dedicated to those movies and will include conversations with a couple of his key collaborators as well as a part of a conversation that was more than I had on the watchable last summer. About Lee's nineteen eighty-nine masterpiece. Do the right thing. That movie redefines the term remarkable. In it! You can see and hear the pain and conflict. We're talking about right now. Watch it again. If you haven't really later in the show, we'll have a conversation with jazz. Musician and film composer Terence Blanchard a longtime contributor of spikes. They've teamed up on fifteen films including two five bloods, and he is truly one of the great writers of music for movies. I also wanted to share a conversation I had with the film editor Barry Alexander Brown in February. Two Thousand Nineteen, after he received an Oscar nomination for his work on Black Klansman they've been together since spikes first movie. She's gotTa, have it? Like so many great filmmakers spike works with the same crew over and over again, not just Aronson Berry, but production designer when Thomas Costume. Designer Ruth Carter casting director Robby Reed, and that incredible troop you've seen over and over again in his movies Denzel Washington, of course, Johnsboro on Davis Samuel Jackson Roger One of Your Smith Arthur Nas. Kerala Delroy Lindo is Ahah whitlock junior Alleluia Debbie Masar Ruby Dee, the list goes on. Later this week will be back with a review of spikes, the five bloods, which will be available to watch on Netflix on Friday, it's the story of four black Vietnam veterans who return to the jungle for some unsettled business, its reunion of sorts of some of those actors, and for it's a kind of mission statement about missions. Lastly. We'd like to top five on this show. Spike is made more than thirty feature length films, many of which are indisputable classics to cover every style and format under the Sun. Drama Comedy Crime Films Romances Documentary Sports Movies farce satire musical. He's really done at all. I would recommend virtually every movie he's ever made, but before I share my five year a few places, you can watch his movies just in case you're trying to bone up on some of the ones you've missed. Overlook along the way.

Spike Black Klansman George Floyd Oscar LEE Raheem Bill Minneapolis Terence Blanchard Kerala Delroy Lindo Orrin Westerns Netflix Officer York Knicks Dirk NYU Debbie Masar Ruby Dee Ruth Carter Aronson Berry Shaaban Barry Alexander Brown
"lindo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:34 min | 9 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Of Delroy Lindo it probably would include Broadway a Tony Award nomination in films such as MalcolmX sold the gain the court get Shorty the cider house rules gone in sixty seconds and so much more that's not even mentioning his present work as the star of the CBS series the good fight and now star of the new Spike Lee movie the five bloods which is set to debut on Netflix June twelfth we're group before Vietnam vets returned to the country to retrieve the remains of their fifth brother and squad leader who was killed in action and end up finding along the way more than they expected upon their return joining me on the line right now is the incomparable Delroy Lindo Mr windows good to talk to you how are you doing Sir right the introduction immigrant thank you very much I'm doing okay I'm doing all right well all of that is true there is this impressive cast that you work with four of the five blood I'm talking about Chadwick Boseman Jon Renau Isiah Whitlock park Peters you guys were never at a loss for screen presence were you hello all you know not only immensely talented gifted actor but actors who have all had significant careers and since you mentioned you know Chadwick are they acquit law Clarke Peters norm Lewis Jonathan majors yeah the major than even though Johnson is you know a young blood so to speak you know he's very much an up and coming actor and what I've been telling people yeah and I didn't spend too much time around Jonathan before I realised either very real and serious actor so we all were working together as equal on this project and none of it despite the fact that we you know we're all coming we all have have had significant careers what was refreshing about this experience is that we were all very much all the time on the same page literally and figuratively committing ourselves doing this work and the bond that we created off screen and we did it we had one conversation about a wide range of topics and we would just sit together and chalk it up talk back and forth on the bond that was created in doing that then found its way into the chemistry that we were sharing in front of the camera I would be remiss if I didn't mention Mike Lee and the fact that spike brought it all together in this work to tell the story.

Tony Award Lewis Jonathan Isiah Whitlock park Jon Renau Chadwick Boseman Delroy Lindo Mr Netflix Spike Lee CBS Delroy Lindo Mike Lee Johnson Clarke Peters Shorty MalcolmX Broadway
"lindo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:26 min | 11 months ago

"lindo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The phone lines we go we've got Kerry calling from the Lindo from from the land excuse Kerry will come out of the show are we doing this morning good thanks all right so my two main concerns is I want to convert my Florida room into an actual room it's got blocked it's about two it's a block house the blacks about two feet high and then it's just the kind of cheap windows they had plastic on the screen and I wouldn't mind blocking it up or or maybe breaking part of that up making some small windows in their mode by other concern is before I do that which I could probably do that but is my AC system gonna handle it I mean it's a pretty good AC system that I think it was it's a route that was manufactured in two thousand six and I mean it's pretty decent unit it's got R. twenty two in it now I know it my understanding on January first the refrigerant changed I'm wondering if there are twenty twos gonna it it you know they still have a R. twenty two and can I actually air conditioned that room which you know wouldn't be worth doing not room addition so to speak if I can air conditioner so it's kind of a two fold question your pro your brother you will go ahead in the and then the and start the tail and I'll help if I need to yes Sir I mean that how big is that room you say is more broad based out on the streets for free to holder three concerts I would say it's two three hundred because it's it's about a it's about twenty twenty four by sixteen okay maybe maybe fourteen are you always every time they see these the people trying to to do it alone condition and trying to open doesn't look another band in there they've never top there so you knew that when they were going to be popular you're not gonna be like Donald on this topic wondering a little bit wrong is wrong because the windows and everything Hey Tom solid you can search for a pool everybody can hear what you're looking for No Way I am looking for the tool the week remember we're right up there with your hands up so you're do you need it the windows on the great the cancellation is not correct and we can certainly sets two to three hundred square feet you require almost maybe to keeping that satisfy live with I know that the waters for one on the air conditioner so you'll most talented inside your college practice field or distribution of the practical discharge you're never going to be happy did you gonna put a little money trying to cover the news I always recommend in this case is to get the independent condition for this room that's the only mmhm yeah yeah this will for that thing is that the M. a dockless sixteen public calling mini splits system let me switch in management system I don't like and other brands I room I mean we didn't win many many of the older ones we always have problems we believe B. speeches that stronger on and then do you want to be copied into the day this kind of system can be there we're putting independent for that room now yeah he's the secret everybody listening to music frightened out of I want to hear the secret actor we want to prove this this accomplishment that wrong are we going to quote D. humidification system we don't want to call it their condition system widen because you want to do unified system you know one accord to run that's what I'm with comparison depends a walk on the moon this policy are you and because they require different energy efficiency so they say debate the municipality doesn't want you to have conditions that got us older requirements for keeping cool in the west and then the energy your courses on with the sentence bye invicto sorry they said eight you can do you may find a place to get printed humidity level really low and then that way you towards where you are and I got eyes when all this kind of decided that that's to get rusty and bombs you can do it in that way about halfway doesn't increase your taxes but that's the most points soon after that was great so we want to do that are in that work there so I would recommend you know get a doctor's assistant now what about like that is there a small unit that can be like a heat pump slash AC unit because I guess I got you know I gotta have heating to correct these units has even including a disentangle kind gestures between color in it and there are super high information on your policy or calls from your network finally Zacks might be under.

Kerry Lindo
"lindo" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"lindo" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Lindo to our environmental past you might look no further than the ground beneath our feet special if this claim there I'm Jim Metzner this is the pulse of the planet claim this our records of environmental change there are several different types of plays that form in the environment and if we can associate the types of clay in the types of environments we can make our way back into the geologic past then we can tell whether the environment was wet or dry and perhaps what types of organisms we're living in association with the clients of the time Paul Schroeder is a professor of geology at the university of Georgia geologists use clay's is key to the past if you were to look at a clay in a modern forming environment let's say a desert or in very wet tropical environment those clays are distinctly different and we can work our way back through the geologic record and use those clases indicators of a past environments this is how geologist reconstruct the climates of the geologic passed by looking at the types of clay minerals that are preserved what surprises us mostly is not so much how wet or how dryer how hot cold the earth is been through geologic time what surprises geologists is sometimes is how quickly those properties change on earth sometimes the transition from one place to the next can be a little more product than what we thought then that challenges us to go and ask questions what caused that condition to change so quickly the heads up yours truly has written a novel one more information check out our Facebook page pulse of the planet is made possible in part by the center for environmental nano technology and the National Science Foundation I'm Jim Metzner I had no tangible evidence that my dad killed anyone what April last year did have was a feeling let me ask you how many people do you know that of the murder yeah well everywhere I went people that we knew were so she with her being murdered I'm just in the last three years I've been following April trying to make sense of what her father did and what else he may have done we know for a fact that they're both here and they're both of their phone nearly identical in the call murders occur and he still had his arm raised Mikey never lowered the gun true crime stories it's also about our obsession with your crime in the mystic monsters we create that my dad was consumed with the zodiac but I can look you in the eye and tell you he did not kill Jon Benet I don't normally like that one the clearing the pineapple three media in association with Gimli the clearing is available now for free on the radio dot com out progressive percent inspiration to help you do insurance stuff Hey just gonna stand there let people not give you credit for being a good driver.

Lindo
De La Salle tops 2018 Chronicle Top 25 football rankings

San Francisco Chronicle Sports - Spoken Edition

05:14 min | 2 years ago

De La Salle tops 2018 Chronicle Top 25 football rankings

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Daily Sal tops two thousand eighteen chronicle top twenty five football rankings. Final two thousand eighteen chronicle. Top twenty five football rankings are KTM rec L W comment. One day LaSalle twelve to one one twenty seventh street NCIS title, just short at state to liberty thirteen one to know NCIS title, but state one champs three Menlo Atherton thirteen to eleven CCS d one and state three AA champions four Wilcox four one six state three eight chaps most wins and bay area five valley. Christian eleven to three seven C C S D two champions overachieved six Saint Francis. Eleven three three w Cal. Champs two tough losses to finish seven Clayton valley. Nine two four hung with liberty for a half. Eight Pittsburgh seven four five win healthy. Probably second best team nine Bishop O'Dowd eleven to nine NCIS division. Two champions ten cardinal Newman. Eleven one eight flip of Cohen, ends brilliant season eleven Palo Alto tend to ten one of bay. Area's most improved teams twelve mclennan's twelve to twenty elite company with third straight state title thirteen SR valley nine four twenty two NCIS D one title was programs third overall, fourteen Rancho Kotite eleven to two eleven untimely injury to QB Jared Stocker fifteen Campo Lindo there. Eighteen three nineteen thirty two TD passes from junior grant Harper sixteen freedom nine four eighteen loss. Twenty eight to twenty one two s RV an NCIS finals seventeen Merrin Catholic. Ten four and are one of Mazi moyenne ads. Best coaching jobs. Eighteen Sarah seven five thirteen dream two thousand seventeen season too hard to match nineteen Antioch. Seven four fourteen. Lost big lead in NCIS D one upset loss twenty less Lomas, twelve to one fifteen scored five hundred eighty six points, but none in NCIS semis. Twenty-one? Monte vista seven four sixteen grade season, but B to be losses to s RV twenty two California. Eight four seventeen thirty five to thirty four season ending loss to freedom. Twenty-three Sacred Heart prep eleven to twenty three v c o t win costs. SHP nor Cal bid twenty four Lincoln SF thirteen o twenty-five SF s and CIF state six eight champs twenty-five Burlingame eleven to two n r c c s d for champs won ten straight to finish five bay area. Football teams claimed CIF champion Saturday the most in the region's history. One of those teams was not day LaSalle, which for the twenty seventh street season claimed the top spot in the chronicles top twenty five final rankings daily, Sal ranked eighth nationally going in dropped thirty five to twenty one open division game to top ranked mater dei Santa Ana on December eighth. The rest of the state championships were delayed a week later because of northern California Air quality issues from the campfire viewed county in the first rankings by the chronicle since the end of the regular season. State champions mclennan's for a and Menlo Atherton three AA and north coast section d one champion San Ramon valley, moved up the most San Ramon valley moved from number twenty two to thirteen MC Clemens twenty to twelve an M a from eleven to three m won five straight games from the end of the regular season, including a thirty three to twenty eight central coast section division one comeback win over number four Wilcock Santa Clara, fourteen one which one St. three eight championship despite a forty two seven loss today, less Al and the NCIS open division championship. Liberty maintained a firm. Hold on. The number two ranking with a state won a championship. The regions fifty champion Lincoln not only romps to fifty three zero win over mission in the San Francisco section championship. But took the state six eight title with a twenty four to thirteen win over orange Glen Escondido at C C SF the Mustangs, finish thirteen. Oh. And moved up one. Spot to number twenty four in the final rankings.

Ncis Football San Francisco Chronicle San Ramon Valley California Clayton Valley KTM Menlo Atherton Cardinal Newman Pittsburgh Monte Vista Bishop O'dowd Lasalle Orange Glen Escondido San Francisco Mazi Saint Francis Campo Lindo
Hung Jury in Mesquite Officer Shooting Trial

The Ray Lucia Show

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Hung Jury in Mesquite Officer Shooting Trial

"The jury is undecided in the case of a former Dallas area police officer who's accused of shooting an unarmed black man last year quarter schooling to declare a mistrial in this case based on your inability to richer decision. The judge in the trial for Derek widely dismissed the jury after it deliberated for two days while he's accused of shooting Lindo Jones in two thousand seventeen he testified that he thought Jones was burglarizing a truck but the truck actually belong to Jones.

Lindo Jones Derek Officer Dallas Two Days
Royal baby boy: Duchess Kate and Prince William welcome No. 3

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:05 min | 3 years ago

Royal baby boy: Duchess Kate and Prince William welcome No. 3

"The world the newest addition to the british royal family royal baby number three has been born kate middleton wife of prince william has delivered their third child a son the baby born at saint mary's hospital in west london in the private lindo wing also delivered prince george and prince charlotte kensington palace says when kate went into labor earlier today the duke and duchess of cambridge as the couple are officially known drove from their home in kensington palace in central london to the hospital in west london again a royal baby boy has been born the third child of prince william and kate i'm mona rivera this has been a special report from abc news wbz news time eight thirty to a man involved in the twenty fifteen paris attacks sentenced to twenty years in prison for the gunfire which led to his arrest saw lomb was found guilty of attempted murder after he shot at officers pursuing him in belgium four months after the attacks in paris this lamas currently in jail in france where he is also due to face trial over the attacks which killed one hundred and thirty people wbz news.

Prince William London Kate Cambridge Kensington Palace Mona Rivera Lomb Belgium Paris France British Royal Family Kate Middleton Saint Mary's Hospital Kate I Twenty Years Four Months
Brendan discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast - Episode 858 - Lizzy Goodman / Dana Gould

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Brendan discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast - Episode 858 - Lizzy Goodman / Dana Gould

"Y you know and i are you going to have your on tv show i'm going to be rich no not anymore still have to go out you ask me in minneapolis and do a weekend uh but on that but i am on executives over tv show yeah i know is no actually no but you should plug your the mc's comedy special goes he didn't get one earlier all you'll have a commie i have many of them you of another what what i found what must have you feel about this moment where like i did the comedy stars would netflixing was good i was glad that i got the opportunity sure yeah but then you hear about like you know sign fokker's rock and louis this is like the ah they just gave jerry seinfeld half a billion dollars thank god because we need who was learning it's not i'm not even jealous but it's sort of like give me like a maybe maybe like five percent yeah yeah i'm not complaining but if you're throwing money away yeah exactly i'll take a little no i was a you know i they were it was one of those things where i was going to tapered and then i was gonna do it with the company that i did my last russia with and then there were the dates were confused and then there were like well we can only do it on this date and i was getting ready to go into production on season two of the show and i you know you can feel the material right inning and reaching pugh tressens sure and you feel like dying yeah exactly and i was i was looking at some nick i was looking at a new products that list as they go i really wanted to get it down ago and i have a really great agent at william morris them silvio lund who's really a terrific guy and he goes let's just do novel and he called up this record company in damn nailed it and and get it in and i do find the audio lives longer than the video so people listened comedy on the radio they listen to comedy on their phone i it's rare that they will sit down and watch a special again that's true that's true i l walsh asif yeah yeah exactly but all listen to especially again all this shit you always in the comedy records i've heard before i listen to because because now uh you know you have that done than you're getting ready to go back on the road and yet you've got to frantically get new shit guinness shit yeah i mean i i'm not i don't believe it has to be one hundred percent new but it should be you really not believe that or you just tell you i really i know i really do but uh i'm i'm much lower than the percentage that it should be i think people want to hear one or two hundred families that you know like i i dunno i got the idaho 'cause i think you and are similar in that in that whoever's judging that whoever saying i this year from the record whoever saying that usually we make them up and you out now there are no there are a couple of those is ideal hit that twenty percent of the suv his new wave that why do we listen to that guy because he's the guy that hates us as much as we do he sees this is already just the way we are with a little disappointed with this was never the almost you'll has got it but not quite right but i i you know i probably saw george karlin i don't know a dozen times my life and i would always love it when there was a oh well he's going to do baseball and football great disease and you go this is great listen to this i sure i i listen i like hearing beats like he because this museum it is a form of music digitally form of music when you know like i hear who i can was due over and over again if it comes up in 'cause i got the shuffle gone on ma if schimmel comes up and mike because like the ear was such a master of this very specific type of timing kind of like morose jewish he you know who it's it's the disease descended joan roma jackie veronica yep that good good poll well he told me although yeah and you know who else was heavily influenced by jackie vernon let me guess who stephen wright sure that makes a lot of ads yeah i love jackie vern yeah jackie o'brien was amazing scr i saw he was the guy i saw my parents took museum when i was like eleven oh my god where that's what change to me because i saw him on tv do the slide show and then he came to albuquerque and i saw it in the paper at out in albuquerque was a lounge in the hilton hotel phantom my parents took me that's fist of it and that was what i was like that's when i knew it whenever you but what if he opened bush and soon turkomans should they would have been fine but what we were close enough just to see like you know he's a hold and he's like you saw all of it is in this and that it was not afraid i was like this is still good i have this conversation with somebody is really really interesting is talking about how much i love rickles yeah and i was talking to a a younger com we'll they're all younger and owes quoting some rousseau stuff and this goes help us us laura his own because he so unworkable because it has nothing to do with that yes all music i love the ud in the rhythm of the music and i remember seeing him sometimes he said things that didn't even make sense but because no i will give you a beautiful example i was with your friend and mine rob cohen at the desert in and they had just had a giant renovation of the desert in and it was sweltering in the show room when he goes out a forty milliondollar renovation they get a great airconditioning system two facts on the roof of the peace looseleaf paper glenn doesn't mean a gut dim thing he could have said tortoises zeroed onesyllable i tell you and could as a bear as you know i'm not laughing because i am straight and therefore i'm exerting my heterosexual privilege via in a derogatory way no eases thought of that of that part of that of that and that's what i have yet but the weird thing is we give you isn't something like schimmel who is usually the victim of his own joke yes in his life had the life of fucking job yeah and then the political whatever's politically incorrect about it itself offering a software threat and then i don't like he is the victim of every jew every joke has a victim and symbols act it was him yet in something somehow that can elevate ivan i agree i agree yeah i don't know if i have these discussions but like i for some reason i'm just able the separate i i don't know that you know revisionism is necessary just because times change in terms of what you you you feel personally attached to her what you like i don't i don't odds visa will difficult but but i can says it already owned for me i can still you know i don't do we delete all that stuff do we delete are emotional connection to right i i don't see how that's possible tackle and it's like when we damn my have hitler's paintings i have to separate you have that book on i have the coffee table excuse called raspberry lauda angles lot of hard angles not a lot of people but a lot of beautiful buildings oh i used to joke about that it's like well you know hitler was vegetarian but but yeah there's an i think i also in a lot of it is just being the soldier nostalgia for being too beating a kid a like watching rickles on the dean martin roast and every but it's a totally different school of show business than new and i grew up with golfway told me the story that when he worked with reckles rickles would would just roast him all day uh and then afterwards a poolside now you set a small lead money the eu is a very carrying well that lowvolume that's where my grandmother said she go see him in vegas and he has yet on everybody but he too she's she put it like this he apologizes very nicely renault but the only thing with bob did he couldn't understand is that that he wore jeans onstage right easily bob you can't you have to get the dress nice addressed and that's the general that's the thing that broke for that generation like these kids they they would do about those things that was karlin the kid he's talking gripe but what i'm saying is in that era in for us it's i think it's like we understand that he's seeking safe haggar he gets it whatever and it doesn't have any leasehold me we gotta shoulder that and if it's like a you can attack me for y'all still respecting somebody who is not of david his original like and that's in and that's and that's a that's a valid point that you do have to update in and he didn't he didn't need he i was watching him i went down it was yuri lewis rabbit telling when he died oh yeah and i was watching the jerry lewis rose from 1968 rickles was on it with the two things that but that it will rise rose that's not even the right the idea the one the first who the killer who's just like jerry i say this from the bottom of my heart jerry you're a jew his justly all right yeah but the other almost didn't he goes you know jerry's a clown and there are a lot of grey clowns emmett kelly that's about i will not give up the other baru hui was rose the is when the martin ones and j jim stewart was on the day is and he goes a jimmy i spoke to the family you're doing fine hosts one there was one where he was on it was his last appearance he was his last carson appearance because johnny was retiring on and then he may johnny lab zohar johnny got into a coughing fit careful john every time you cough lentils at home highfiving the life little good will and i love one and it's a real shit have you seen that one where they built him a club filled with just celebrities the martin there's a dean martin rose who was might have been the d martin show where they wanted to recreate alive rickles show i have that 'cause i signed up for the guide them the other demar the i never saw coming i had no idea there were so many but there was one that came it might have been the d martin show but they set up a club they mean on a sound stage and had people like pat boone in the audience all the celebrities kartal malta bar like he was probably nineteen seventy the early 70s mid70s yeah and and rickles just went up and did his club in insulted ever yeah it was great and as you sweating mid70s when the american flag had wide lapels warren ugly i go it's an interesting question though about because i had this moment where you know being a comic as long as we have you know you and i are old guys already yeah and and by the way just two i am fully aware before anybody jumps down my throat about don rickles and whatever i know i'm i'm i'm done i'm in i'm with this is not what is contemporary this is my view of it pete townsend was talking about the john entwistle used a bitch about wrap that he didn't get it yeah and he said it's not our job to get it it's our job to get out of the way and and i am aware of that yeah i get it i get it yeah well no i mean i you know i can it's becomes difficult with depending on what the transgression is here to stay supportive you'll have to be supporters somebody you can condemn somebody and you can you think somebody's awful but still say that second record though that sure you know and then you somebody said a really smart the genome our solar arguello should young new comic really really funny really funny and really martin somebody was bashing some on woke person new than apologize for it and she said you know you have to let people make their mistakes and grow in public he kinda led have to you have to let people grow catches white dot terrorise them into some sort of cultural siberia yeah the you know the my last special the one before this one um i had the whole thing at the end of boat the our word uh and how it's now relegated wizards see word and i tried to do on those bits ya ya and i wouldn't in i did i mean the bit was a boat the strictly the nomenclature of equating that word with the n word in this year oh it was actually addressing the that that whole thing it wasn't about like i don't use it that way no because then i did use it uh you know i know is that i would never do this and then i did i cheated all over the place and i you know i i said it and i said the n word in the sewer day and i say them now relish at home time mutter myself but whatever i would i would nothing happened but i wouldn't have done i wouldn't do it today i got i did a bit about it about defending you know the use of it in you know in a sense of like in a ended this style gic way um y yo how you know what i mean i grew up with that yeah right but then i guy the guy that igf someone i think it was an email the just said we you know i'm the parent and in and that was a you know i like i had a couple of swipes but in eventually i got a handle on it i i did it and then i met john mcginley lose of very on the forefront of of of all those issues and it becomes real via an and it's not about first amendment that's about though these people have feelings and their young their lives and you're okay i guess that's the thing hey how attached are you two that really need it have you read them of using that word it's not he's no one's censoring anybody yeah it's like you're hurting people's feelings and it's already hard for them yeah exactly brilliant yes i guess they have a rough enough time any and you can and that is truly you can say that will riggles talking about fragile new have enough to have enough they have enough trouble i my my feelings about that are like you say whatever you want the shoulder the uganda water take the take the burn yeah tell uber then handle it what the what's this new were the new season standard against evil what's it did you finish it's all done joey finished it premiers november first on ifc house a different uh it takes the story it takes us roy for the premise of the story is the whole idea of the shows was quite simple i love horror movies are my football so i just thought what if i did a horror movie but put a character in the middle of it that didn't belong here and it was basically what if my dad was an harm of has he wouldn't give it doesn't know just know does he does no he doesn't give fuck right and and we used to make that joke if you remember the indicating kong he's on the building in the planes are flying area my brothers and i used to joke did of our dad was in one of those planes that he would fly out of formation check the scoring the baseball game comeback shoot a little bit more go back and i just thought it would be interesting if like what if instead of buffy the vampire slayer it was just an old irish guy that didn't give a shit and and that was the the premise and i didn't i my mother is still alive but his wife who would have been my mother dies before the show starts and because i needed them to have a giant vulnerability or is just hassle oca them what john mcginley did with that was created this amazingly nuanced character is a good actor huh israel has been around for a long time ago he's not fuck in a row it doesn't seem age much either doesn't know he's he's good lives at the gym i mean is this arms are and i say this knowing he's listening to it his arms are terrifying um uh no easing these in crazy like an old irish boxer from like a poster for the he's like hundreds who was in the issue williams was like five over visas and wall street is a platoon he was in any given sunday but he's built like an old irish bar and how he's all upper body and but he created the he gave this character so much more than than i had give it it on the page and and i have to also give jet at foreign ego amazing kudos for the way she balances him the ballast that she and as such a strong actress the because john is done so much of this work that for the second season i had to right up to him so i developed a whole arc of a story line where there is a time travel element where he's going to try to go back and save his wife's life oh wow and as as always happens makes things much worse oh good and that's the arc this as the art the season and what's the name of the record that see the digital this is what did them i call it a record 'cause i don't know what else to call it how it looks it in a my doubt because my downloads sounds vaguely filthy ah mister funny men and this is what the kids on her the account how many you've done how many record seventy special uh i have the worst i proudly have the worst album titles fun houses fine yeah but it's an they keep up album and his version is albums much better uh let me put my thoughts in you i know what's wrong which was okay this is mr funding in screwed what i mean the bigger problem is really the art work generally yes like looking at what you can almost any comedy record in you know somebody who's like move was i think and yeah homeless every comedy record bullets every comedian gets to be a rockstar for that that one day we you get to look figure your album cover via i did all right like you know in retrospect i don't have any stupid once i ask you know the last don't try to be funny on your color exactly don't try to be funny on your cover that's it that's it iin the war here quad split headshot via the worst people from boston we both novaya the what were their different panels viking different hats and i can't say it on the air but i'll tell you what were probably sure have on those i remember seeing it becomes clear i like how there were different has i know they can play different jobs it would be a fireman and a chef who was a doubt i will good well it's good talk in the arabian sea all dana cooled the great dana gould so lizzy goodman who i'm going to be talking to next in just a second um she was very good friends remarks pits the lay mark spitz they david years ago and mark spitz was a a great writer in his own right of music writer and wrote a greg memoir and he was on the show and because he passed not too long ago that you can still listen to episode in the in the free feed if you'd like it was a great episode very personal very engaged and we missile marqui we miss him you know i think i'm a good cook when i make food at home but there's nothing worse than not having the right amount of an ingredient or leaving out a step or not cooking something for long enough i hate all those things but with hellofresh the recipes are simple and he get them on step by step instruction cards with pictures it helps with making things that i never thought i'd be able to cook on my own or that i would cook on my own in general you can scheduled deliveries when it works best for you and i'm really busy with my shooting schedule right now so that's a huge plus and if i need to pause my account for weeks of the time i can hellofresh offers a wide variety of shift curated recipes a change weekly including the classic plan the veggie plan and the family plan plus they offer kid tested recipes selections like a pena port noodle bowl with bell pepper and carrots over rice verma celli or the easy pz ravioli gratin on with spinach time and parmesan breadcrumbs look i like to cook so i'd be cooking at my house no matter what but hellofresh makes a convenient and simple and the quality is top notch so it's a no brainer for thirty bucks off your first week of hellofresh visit hellofresh dot com and enter the promo code wtf that's how of fresh dot com promo code wtf so lizzy goodman the writer is my guest and i met her when i met her with mark once but she put me in her book can we talked about it when she was writing then she sent me the galley and i didn't quite get to it then she sent me the real book and honestly i just skimmed it looked at my part but i have very little recollection i talk to her about this but whatever was happening in rock and roll from two thousand one to two thousand eleven i gotta tell you i think i miss most of it i don't know what i was doing i don't know where i was i mean the last time i knew i was really blocked in to root to rock and roll happening in real time was probably in the late eighties and then side some i just some i went away i don't know where i went but i wasn't i wasn't locked in i'll mocked back in but this the two thousand one to two thousand eleven i was just a struggling comic trying to figure it out i do i get sober like i guess was right after i got silver that might add something to do with it but i just wasn't keyed in to the new york music scene i was just keyed into the comedy scene there was some crossover we we hammered out lizzy and i hammered out and i talk a newer the book is called meet me in the bathroom rebirth rock and roll in new york city 2000 a one to two thousand eleven which apparently are my lost years but that's not true i did i did radio did air america away way i got divorced a guy they'll get married got married and divorced in those years that would have something to do with it so i was listening to music but it was like twelve to fifteen songs that i put on a fucking mix after my wife left me that letter of that a lot of those twelve to fifteen sok unita heartbreak mix i got one how how long you've in la i have a real problem here really i just i've been here for three days where he frazzled you not a dry did you drive i know you drive here i'm from new mexico i know how to write weaker of your friends with i keep i always forget that i wanted to go i'm going you i i think that's a great idea it's great there had to how long did you stay in new mexico till like 14 seconds after i graduated from high school which highschool albuquerque academy i don't i didn't tell me all this now probably not i don't know you went to the academy here how do you i'm two thirty seven twenty five i don't know i just had a birthday and i have been i realize that i've been telling people my old age for at least the last couple of weeks because i forgot the elderly seven i was born in 1980 what was your old age thirty six turns out are you've and you have a goto no no no i just i have this joke with my friend rob sheffield that might ages is 26 forever i have not really evolved pass that i may i'm moving i think i might move i have to me become hear a lot more now what's happened and so i'm thinking don't use drop that i will vote will that but at one of my biggest or i've been thinking about where i to live show alana's neon it seems to be happening fedronic yeah in what way but i will tell you but just my biggest concern is that i'm gonna miss winter and one of my friends his out mean half my friends that i hear one of my friends his lobbying been lobbying me for an ally move for a long time was just suggested to me recently and i never thought of this like you go to new mexico for winter go have winter new mexico's eventually just go have a mild winter well i mean it's cold it's not new york coal i live in upstate new yorkright now oh my god where high falls new york it's what are you doing up there i was finishing a book this book yeah that embassies different one who one of the one of avoiding talking about on your wedding efficient probably hate it which is fine this not hate is not the word disagree with no italian a disagreement thing i missed it of course i miss this if the it's called earth and rock and roll in new york city two thousand one or two thousand eleven i know none of the bans in the really would you like some help well that's why we're going to do but not down yeah yeah so yeah i like the idea spending the casual winter's in new mexico where he here in the higher or some parka whitesnow nodded loom area the luminary of i've in kerala's is awesome when you get your health through in the lights now no known does the candles anymore you can't go said i know they are good they one hundred percent you it's the real thing all right some people still do the rules of very traditional place kerala's new mexico we what we think about living here i'm not admitting that i'm thinking about overweight now i don't lie echo part will people i i don't like them i don't wanna be near them like i don't wherever the williamsburg of la is i don't want any williamsburg valet thank god is not because here it's like bloctobloc you know williamsburg maybe i don't know it's different i mean i want to live by the beach but every night if that he can't live vitamese because yield you know fall off well why show business quarter year because of the book a real yeah marks like oh that didn't even occur to me what an awful idea i have i have to tell you were important which can into serbia but do you know some people like it so is known and i i know it's people love it and i understand that not being yeah i'm very sure there's no i know you and i'm totally teasing you i this book is about a period where you could actually get most of the people to play themselves as their younger selves and it'd be pretty quiet pretty close he added in various no it's going to be there like documentary and and narrative at like fictional adaptation series ideas around that's great i'm excited about it i mean i want to do more of that stuff anyway and always have or have in the last few years and so it's like fund to think about how to make the i mean people i've just felt really gratified by the kinds of ideas that have been a you know because as skeptical that the whole hollywood here at it so far than the people that i think we're going to be working with are awesome well we're did you how'd you start out where'd you end up you went to the academy graduate you got brothers and sisters yeah i gotta younger brother take that's a good name yeah he's get he lives in nigeria really he's a foreign service officer he's a diplomat o good for him the state department and cut them loose yes no um now not yet that's good maybe maybe nigeria this sort of like what i stand ninety he got there he just got there and it's funny we're talking about luminaries he's going to have lumina or something he's having he's getting married in december in england here on dan and he's going to have all this new mexican stuff we've been talking a lot about the new bringing the new mexico to the new mexico christmas vibe to london thoughts nice yeah so what would you go to college after you can ran away to fill it i mean i wanted to be on the rules like right away it was all about new york as obsessed with new york and with the idea of lake eastern urban magic get the eu's when he grow up in a smart household in new mexico you i i want to go to where really happens i like all this cowboy cowboy intellectual shit i that's exactly how i felt i mean it is disturbing to be talking to you about this there there's basically no one who gets out of new mexico so those of us who do all have the same kind of like course spirit about that if you go back they go back oh hi tonnes tons yeah i mean you're going back now i've been thinking about it yeah it's drawing i think about it to the way on wife yeah my heejoo like i don't i like i i don't i'm done with new york i'm almost down with la whereas from argun go this is how i feel you say i'm too young to feel it this is literally the conversation i've been having while i'm here i'm like i will always feel like i live in new york that i don't need to live there anymore and so therefore where do i feel good well that's only corral us exact cheese like me literally only corral starting to feel that it's the only play me for me is not quite corral but i always romanticise prowess but i'm a couple of miles away how you i think would i very close to corral but a all right so dan study what english and classics and your girl at the plan was only good was to be a writer now what a crazy idea what idiot would do that you can't be a writer what was the point of in new york and what just like hang out no the plan was to idea you know i was eighteen i didn't have i had a i had a homing instinct not a plan like i'm gonna come to college because you have to go to college like i'll go as close to new york as they can go and i was really good student and i cared about being gets you now i love school and great china japan but no the plan what it what happened was and this is the right call like i now understand this in a way that i can articulate and didn't at the time that i advocate for it it's like i had to put myself near stuff that would so i could be in a position to have what should happen next revealed to me brian what i mean later that's what new york is yet it's a no to be you know for me and and for others that that's kind of what the books it out here at sense of i don't know why i'm going here i'm just going here because it seems something's telling me to do that and i can't tell you why and i may not even know right away or for years but it's where my next myself is going to emerge on the oddly e know it's because the place it new york holds in the cultural unconscious yes for years since the 70s yeah specially if you're groovy artistic you know literary it it's like it it's grooms large yeah it means something to mean something it's an idea and hand but there but still to this day there's nothing like it i mean you you know you can i can't live anywhere unlike well but do you did you find always at like i was just in new york and for the first time in my life i went over to jazz at lincoln center as fiftythreeyearold and it's have always been there and i was there for for fifteen years on and off and i did nothing like oh yeah hey like all this stuff veiled me like people you go the museum of modern art i did once twice here but i am now like i feel like i'm ready to do that stuff in its fortunate because now i understand new york pretty fucking while i can get around and ought to do what other so if i go in for three days on my show again see let's do it but that's okay that is exactly why my i feel like my current relationship with new york is among the best that i've had which is like when you leave you are able to to be a kind of the it's almost like the first fifteen years are investing in understanding the place enough that you can become a named formed tourist when you go there so now i do that too like i go in from upstate you know every week or so every ten days and i do three days of city staff all my friends i gutted restaurants i do all these things that i had no energy to do because those so relentlessly overstimulated by the time i laughed at that i was like i can't even like i just want to hide and so now there's this the slate has been cleared and it's like new york it's fun again but that i don't ever feel when i was nineteen and started coming to the city from philly all the time i felt like mm i needed it too like kind of worked on me in order to help me figure out how to become myself and now i know how to be myself how did you go there were year ranked ninety eight i moved to philadelphia and i was in school my dad is a new yorker semi dagger opens in status in town via and my grandparents unawares there for a while a who's going to get that apartment come on you tell me about the survivors adel got your grandparents of art okay it's on has pink walls the who is getting that next ruth good men lives there she she's you know she's she's it's her place man here i mean no one's it's a rental it still like i know rentcontrolled renzo deeply rent controlled rental yeah your eyes are like glinting the cia is the new yorker area edge rooms juve everyday that have what's the kitchen like hallander yeah it's the last of the rent control listen everything you're thinking is true it's your fantasy come true it's like the per it's an it's walker they've this would be good always is when you've when i was there you like the idea of control was i i'd rent stabilize but that doesn't mean something i and stabilise to that that's like they're like it's not as brutal so really when you move to new york in earnest this is when this book starts yeah i mean i started coming to the exactly like i started coming to the city from philly to see show i love the story is it's in the introduction to the book it's basically like i i moved to new york the first summer that idea college says after freshman year i i moved to the city i lived in my grandparents apartment i worked at murray yeah and i got a job in a restaurant you worked at sesame street i had an internship at sesame productions or whatever that it was the production company that pretty sesame street that will you write in turn shed you're gone for showbusiness i was not go i was like this is the justification for me being here that's the one the ethics as all i i didn't pick it it was like available and we really i was like i need to go hang out in new york city trash camera oscar with no no they never let me near it wasn't a coup it was like i don't even remember what i did i wasn't near actual sesame street it was the production cut it was it you know is a midtown office building that was set not no would you how could you work for sesame street nakos he were seriously streets production company produces a lot of shows sesame street the crown jewel i was a lowly turn we love the you're acting like this is my choice yet one day they rolled in and they were like do you want to go to the sesame street sat and i was like nath no that's not out having no anxieties me i was i was i you didn't meet ernie organiser continued i wanted to meet rock voice mark i tend not grow her no grown all right grover and the guy with nights in serious who you're like all right yeah he taught me how to ride the subway right are you there you're working says mystery not going to not doing all of the things that i know i've disappointed you deeply and just i got a job in a restaurant 'cause i needed to make money because i wasn't in school and i had to lake support you know i had free rant that i had to lake right pete or whatever you run by close i guess whatever i cared about at that time records and so i got this job at this i got this job training to work at this restaurant crossstrait from grand central station said they were opening any day now and they are hiring up staff i got this job and we end of course it took much longer for them to open and they had anticipated citybased they had hired this staff of kids board hot city kids who went there every day for like four hours and got paid this lowly amount of money and did things like practiced waiting tables and learned the wine list and stuff like that and my coworker was nickel anc who was the guitar since strokes and he was in this band like hit with his friends called the strokes of now the portal opened and you're well no i mean no it was years that was nineteen that was the summer of ninety nine and it was i mean it was a couple of years before like albert the other guitarist had not joined the band yet they weren't they it was my friend nix like ban nick i was nick was like halfheartedly in college and they were just city kids and i was i mean the portal that opened that summer was not rock and roll it was new york like oh nicholas cool in in that he grew up in the city and understood how to sort of like wander wale and how to get into bars and how did you set just it was sort is it was what like i had been learning i it with training wheels in philadelphia that as a new mexico kid like how do you how do you orient yourself in urban life and let these places kind of lake you know wash over you and expose you two things you're supposed to be exposed to how to get the rhythm down and that like nick and i would just hang out after after pretending to wait tables and you know lake wander round office parks and smoke weed in office park teller fina behind off sparked pillars and sort of like just wander around midtown it wasn't and then sometimes i would go downtown to lake st mark's and sneak into bars and do stuff like that beazley it was like that was what was pal 99 summer here that must that summer was those were my marriage was falling apart that was the other big thing that is happening for every avatars you knew marc maertens mary and who's out more a yeah and then he got thrown out of that house in the other find to subway weighed down us instead it was way chiller than what you are dealing with try and dukan redo one man shows that was that are that is i was the best theater oh my god the west bath yeah that became significant for me later really yeah because all the artists where had their studios in there and still do it's still let me extra to yes rate on the west that the west village became later after i finally moved to the city in two thousand two became like my spot because i don't like coolness like i don't like i didn't like i do not want to be on the larry cider off that city will whites places for me when i when i moved there i guess was eighty nine the first time and then i went back in nine the four remember you saying that yeah but but you know and i talk a little bit in the book about the you know what happened then but it really wasn't the only put i was just a little weird historical artifact you put that this from the guys from the generation before radio exxon giuliani for two minutes well i needed that i've might do i thought i was well represented good you were i agree um so this is all just before nine eleven yeah and the you've you found your place on the west side where it's not hip with artists that are well no i mean i went back to philly for like that so what i'm saying is that the that's why it's this is an important about the book the s not bands like i wanted to be a lawyer or something i thought it was gonna be a lawyer i was a school kid but i was pulled towards this sense of magic and misery about new york city that is the idea that we are already just talking about and he hadn't yeah i loved writing but i didn't work from my school newspaper i didn't it wasn't like what what it was was it was like i'm i i i was being drawn to some expression of culture that was related to my generation that i that had not happened yet and i did not know that that's what i was being drawn to you that i during the next few years in the part the four nine eleven were all these bans interpol yesterday as strokes and in you know white stripes and other place like around the world there all the stories that converged in the book all of those people were feeling similar things like assent this basically the same age as i was and feeling a kind of like i wanna make something that i don't entirely know what it is and like the world is not really receptive for this kind of this kind of vibe it's not supposed to be about urban call right now it's not supposed to be about notions of near and what was it supposed to be about in a music industry is supposed to be about dance music erica in you know i i mean in england it definitely was about dance music or was about like postscript popstar th i mean and in my business it was like i mean in the writing what became my business it was like it wasn't that exciting to imagine yourself as a rock journalists because there wasn't a lot of cool rocked the end so that's right it was sort of submerged in jam jammed asked you for a little while they're right i didn't think oh i'm going to be a music journalists i thought there's something about the way it feels to wander around manhattan at four p m on a really hot day in the summer where everyone rich has left the at they're making me feel like i'm getting somewhere and i can't really tell you why and so i went back to college and i studied and an ice kept in touch with neck and a couple of other people that i owe you and he would come and play shows and then i would see in philly and i will go see him and i had friends in philadelphia who are starting to lake want to go to shows so it was like it was a thing to do that had enough in it for years it was a thing to do that had nothing to do with aspiration of any kind and that was really important and it was also like it was like traditional rocking aware coming back it was not necessarily art rock punk rock was sort of finished in a way and and i guess wakeham sort of 'cause like some of the bands in the book i was given like for some reason at that time when i was there in late 90s in then like i left by two thousand two yeah but i was given cds and stuff for iced up for some reason i have the jonathan fireeaters he shot up i do that's awesome yeah they were so amazing i listen to it and i was into it but like what you're with that have been have 90s yes okay so okay so that was that times out yeah yeah they were the yeah they were round is great ho right i have my buddy john daniel was involved with music so i was sort of up to speed on something yeah okay will and 90s wealth that's all right i mean but like like jazz it only o good if you were there i mean that theoretically lay the thing about looking at the book and reading through some of it is that like when i read please kill me that was the those were before me and i was when that was what everybody was going to new york to find was that that's what this is about no i get that with moscow eyes were going to find that for sure and you kind of right about that yes like that's we're all looking for that thing that was like just it was just the the remnants of it and the and the people that were involved with that you'll first wave of whatever made new york cool were just kinda droopy greyhaired dudes walk around in their weather payments that don't fit any more with somebody going like that guy used to be something yeah if that if they are even living there anymore but i i guess i just think that that's the continuum i mean it's not like every winning please kelme weren't weren't polling on i see the continuum of that notion of new york identity as much much 70s as going ponca much further i mean i think much scher further back that than just whole idea it's it's it's i mean this is later but it's fifty yeah and it's jazz it's it's fucking ellis island man it's like come to it's it's in the american identity of new york gonna come here and you're going to reinvent yourself and the culture all potency of that has is almost as old as you know as the city in some way and so but specifically in the world of the arts yes you know what what you know what came out of new york and and what sort of defined it is you had a wealthy people who were willing to kick in to make she had happened yes right yeah and a lot away sure to reject the of a lot of the factors but then i mean you know that for us because this is my taste in i i i think yours too like the punk the 70s punt seen in cb jesus just like i meaning please county was my total bible i'm obsessed with everybody and napa i love that music that's my stuff i came to that late you're now the earth your specialty is more material for the business card wait to the partly to the party on air safety and wrong kinda leadership skills doesn't look good for any of us march mirror merit love martin on but you know i mean obviously there's also the whole greenwich village like i mean dylan for most people dillon is the touchstone for this and it's so the idea that new york is this place that's constantly polling on a previous constantly kind of coopting and borrowing its own past self via to reinvent for a new group of young people essentially the a new for them version of the same thing how are they related to turn all right they can still find the space there if they can still kinda save their which is the question now but like for my for this book for young in the bathroom like i don't see it as a see it as just this sort of the the the chapter in the cannon at that new york cultural story it's just rose right into the bookshelf right there you know after police kelme and after madonna and light up before whatever comes next but it's just it's a stop it's a stop on the larger train i think that and what comes next is going to be a a prominent either chinese or russian trend do you have that i'm good authority seems like it that's the vets me speculating that summer noncash catastrophic start i have is not catastrophic at all as i say that so so when now way what starts to drive when did you meet the the the way great mark spitz i met the late great mark spitz pretty early i i assume he he served as some sort of guide to whatever the fuck happened to you while yeah i think he'd really like you putting it that way well what mark would say is that i thought he tommy everything i know of on so he would want me to say it that way i tell you this bright i've kid from new mexico through philly who's looking for a rock fantasy and that dini and blames outta some yes he's like i can help you out seles ruin your life and i was like great and say it's the glare sorry yeah he talks in his memoir about how i was wearing flipflops for spammy and he's like they're not shoes zia like he was very my new mexico vibe was pretty united wearing makeup i didn't like i was still kind of like fresh scrubbed girl that point and i think mark with space mark dea like you know bad bad asrat girls with lake peroxide blond hair and he was sort of like you are entirely to clean for me basically and i was like okay but you like me no no as a recipe for disaster who's gonna win well that's where it's later and he would say things to me like yes chased me you know and i was like hot can you do the thing amassing unity or what he writing for spin when you met him yes so the way i'm marklevinshow sara louissant who is also a great character in the book and one of my best friends was my roommate in new york when i first moved there so i graduated from college and by that time it was clear that like the city's music scene was happening and i felt i was like dare to it i was inspired by all of i was inspired i was inspired by and have sudden a there was something to write about nato i then was like i wanna be a writer who writes about this but i i taught secondgrade frontiers first 'cause like i can't be a writer thought that's nice i taught at an allboys private school on the upper east side uh glazer's no really has a double life for awhile we were real like fullon teacher major oh yeah misguided men secondgrade whether in how what how did that and why did that and it a two year and it's like your estate teacher and then you either maybe you kind of the carrying on of that would have been to go get a degree in education and like stay in school and would stop you from doing that oh you know i'm are on that cya now now he loved at he he would talk about how wake up in the middle of the night and i would go 'cause i had i talked to my sleep and here go boys get in line and you'd be like jesus who is this girl and is scary she's like yeah so now okay so now you're you're getting you're you're getting involved with the rock senior roommate is what is she says sarah was marks like little protege at spin so i met mark before i graduated from college actually at coachella the one of the first coach as i went out with sarah to see if we could live together we went to this rocked festival together to lake try it on here and on she introduced me to mark who is i mean it's it's in the book their their meeting is pretty awesome like he was he didn't understand instant messenger and because and he's mark air sarah i was like this sort of protec savvy little jewish girl in new jersey who is who liked his writing it's like high and i'm also girl he had like why is this window coming up and they can eventually she wore him down in the house and so she introduced me to him and we had you know a serious series of battles for about a year and a half that then got together and yeah i mean mark was my tour guide through he was writing for span he was a hot shit writer writing cover stories about all these bans and how'd you manage not to get all fucked up i don't know my i honestly i i think it's genetic i i really do i just i don't know may just have the thing i'd die went out and drank every night like everybody else and reich you know there is all kinds of drugs around in yet but i just didn't care that much about it for you but it's not good for me that makes it sound like something i get credit for and it's not like i get credit every not be compelled by that like the like to just a drink in smokes from we'd and just enjoy the music you don't have to go you know you i mean i like you don't have to divert alliance but it's it's it makes it sound like it's a matter of sort of will and it's not it that's why are saying connecticut's like i don't have i'm compulsive in other ways right now i get it i get it that's why i'm saying you're lucky unlucky yeah so that's how okay unlucky so let's talk about you know the the bands that define this thing and the ark of this book because yeah like i just i i think i got my first walkman album like six months ago okay i'm larry liking it so okay i think i got that guy so record i thought that was get those good singer yeah so the strokes you knew that you saw them become what they want us in then and then like the the white trips our guests were coming in from detroit occasional yeah but i didn't the white strips were not like sort of first generation in new york of that were like any who has that were the strokes interpol yay as an lcd soundsystem feel like the whole lcd soundsystem thing like people are like you got your view murphy guy got your mike i don't know what he did so i had to get quite catch up with dfa miyazu jonathan the guy over what is the aga he sent me all this shit yeah i like that the prince worn dance called record yes good first record i love okay maharidge starting went ahead to go find me that record like i said you have one of them around their way it not be you know we have one ring laying around here we were using as a as a as a like a a map for when you eat your time castle your way into this that's you will love james and y'all that's i listen to a no it's great it's great i watch the movie and i i actually narrated a short documentary five lcd thousands of heavier like who the fuck is this no anyway script evaluated out but like i know he something because he mental i too a lot of people like i can see how they met something that people can also see how they kind of like you know kind of like well there's a there's a gap pure that was once occupied by the talking heads yeah that we should climb in do totally the talking heads said that i mean that's what i got no problem that kinds of sending okay i am not jane so you're not to defend now i understand how music work tell me more i understand you tell me my understand that there is now out of new she it yes and that you just keep inventing the old shit i think i mean yeah all right sure i think the thing that all the judge the the period that the book covered with the book is about is not music it's about all the things we i talked at it's about it's about new york it's the central character it's about what it feels like for this group of people at that period of time under to do a thing that is eternal as we just described which is to be young and to feel on scene and to get together with certain friends serendipitous lay that you meet who unlock something in u n two in the shadow of lake at theoretical anonymity make something beautiful that makes you feel alive i mean it's pure that's like that's art that's young people that's new york city that's rock and roll that the but it's important for the book that the context is also from my generation are these people that we're talking about it's happening in in coincidence with all these other major global events like napster we just 2000 and nine eleven which is one hundred percent you know a huge part of this story obviously and it's about and then the reinvention of brooklyn and the commodification of brooklyn and the exporting of that via the internet the newlyborn internet to the world as this sort of notion of how to live like a lifestyle brand to be earth to by going to interview james he said i was trying to dip into that like the brooklyn idea in williamsburg and all this stuff in kenneth ease my way in he goes oh yeah that's all our fault like cool thanks scott and it's that's what so this story is about that but it's about that through the lens of paul banks and carreno and yes you know later jack white or the kingsley on guys or whatever and then off to england and off to the killers in vegas and around the world but that record we should nikola pile of what you did have it'll be about three hours them sti no than i i know i the jonathan firefighter that's a hall in allied it yeah that's a you know you get points for that that's a big crowd point the area the i like one thousand out is great i thought it was pretty good but those bans i mean to answer your questions such as it is it's like there's no like yeah there's nothing new under the sun and this is a retaliating of a generational story there will be i i believe that people make things new i i'm not one of those people that yadav a problem with appropriation i don't have a problem with with the of the evolution of music and he because like if you really look at rockets the people that really make something completely new or generally misunderstood and you may be years later people like i think i get it and somewhere they're like nato the other but there's a core group of fans that are sort of like worthy the only one said get it yet that bullshit any basically the story of the book too i mean if this is mark says this in the book i mean he's one of the greatest characters in it where he's basically like look i was 28 and writing for spain or whatever less was thirty something his thirty already and writing for span and like mark who had an encyclopedia harry say that pete accent encyclopedic thank you very much sandy pratt thing music and film knowledge and all that stuff of was sitting there in new york city loving york city's sort of but just board and that the thing that this that this that there's the sort of beginning of the book that everyone had in common energized boredom energy everyone was bored james murphy was bored he did not know carreno carreno was bored she did not know julian julian was bored gillian didn't know paul paul uh the interpol paul was bored and it was like in their own independent corners of this town at that period of time they all did something about that board and then mark spitz or sara or any of the other sort of non musicians but journalists future bloggers a and our people like all the different sort of um i don't know contestants in this in this like road show here all had in common that sense of what we have here right now is really not enough and we need to like build something cooler and no one else is doing it so we're gonna do it so when spits heard like i mean he says this hilariously in the book where he's just like you know when i heard the white straits it took me a minute to figure out that i was being saved because it was my job to write about mark mcgrath every day and like there it was boring it oh yeah loaded orient and that's the story idea like i get it i get it it's like well boredom mikey to classify all those artis as board i understand that but i think that if you in the history of of what happened with punk rock in the sort of like you know kind of strange angry apathetic posturing that happened is that what it comes down to though anybody who surfaces with any consistency may be board but their workers oh right well that oh totally i mean and that's also new york city like everyone in that town has to labour via the i got a want it yeah and you've got to keep pushing two two to sort of break away from the pack of garbage because in any city especially that size you know for every one may be original band there's going to be like twenty guys just tooling through rehash especially in an era where i mean it's hard to in it's hard to overstate this and it is crazy now but i mean it really seems crazy now that like being in a rock band i loved the guys and dumped than fired or talk about this and later the walkman they talk about how like telling your friends that you were in a band was like now i take us that late yeah it was like really didn't elettronica music kills janjaweed could do we have to go through this aid rallies yes on thursday is at sad than you know like you're gonna make us do that you'll biased drinks rate i mean it was like the least possible cool thing to do and and it was like lame and and kind of an opposition on your friends to ask them to conceive lesser so this whole the it's hysterical because relatively quickly people would be dressing across the country and around the world like they had just been thrift in on the lowery side but not when these bans formed but that's interesting because that whole thing you know that thrifty thing has reinvented itself with every generation of people yeah it's like the now like their thrift in 1980's clothing and i'm like no i know i now i'm feeling that to it's weird like his when i was in high school we were thrift in shark skin yeah not a better yeah yeah and then i had ended at kinda the whole for you know that rockabilly kind of boos like whatever the fuck it was going after the suits in any time we speak to someone about this like can we address this with the culture in general that we just nominate certain erez as as as take as as out of the loop of of going to be rediscovered some ambitious ivan around anymore like fortunately for now everything is made so badly can i know that will never happen you'll never never be thrifty 2017 they should is not going to hold up maybe we've inadvertently solve the problem rallying stealing the fascists that were previously thrift it yeah this is not even making shit that will hold up to be so maybe we just need a generation a cycle through that in like twenty years people will actually have to create new stuff because it will literally going at all disintegrate and have to create outfits said will withstand the heat of there i'm sorry i've taken me right out of there i did it i'm sorry for him you're not enclosed outfits with of'short new mexico's supposed to fair relatively well i mean waters going to be a problem but waters going to be a problem but we have the mountains we aquifers dory right on an akko yeah we give a lot of as i understand it no no eight i think we give a lot of water to california so mother fugger's he had one of the california's thirsty mansour okay so like i know owner free burger this one again with a list of names like oh i show you read all your quotes first come on of course yes okay then you looked at the list through an area in and i kinda poked around it like you know the chapter headings ps but a vote like i don't know grizzly bear the national i came much really lay to and i understand why they're good but i i don't know that i go back to the records up much tv on the radio maize i listen to their first and second record i'm like holy shit this is the media their incredible yet the a as the first couple of records i listened to her i had him the hives i had that record i remember liking so what is your problem nothing we're just get vampire weaken don't think i've ever heard him all right we'll interpol i think i got a recent record with like their back in a mike i missed it the first time pretty good we've routines just gotta whoever teens rokaya feeling about pretty good yeah kind of punky right yeah yeah i hope we will come on something and you'll be like you really have to go and do that is that what you're looking for ya well i buy a records i'm i'm mike i mean i mean a renaissance had music appreciation i'll send you a list i need i don't know like i have your book i know yet we'll you do though actually 'cause you can't start gone mouldy reaches yeah amazing did you play who's got the crowd i don't have it all right we'll play who's got the crap by the multi pages is just one song well that song in particular is your gateway drug for them dave across comedian i know him with his worse are you hold steady i like that guy greg gregory great right yeah he's a good talkers if thinker is good the killers i like that okay kingsley on first who records and crime what happened well y but okay that that's another alternate title for this book sure is where's the staying power while they're all still making albums and touring and dura al like literally all of these people yeah so like you okay let's talk about them what happened what did have well it's up first talk about like the whole that you know a nine eleven left in the world in that like in terms of near all over that chapter see that's another place right you would you but compounding the board white whatever that boredom was was that horrendous existential to terror sadness grieving like i think i talked to spits about that a bit did he ah but a lot of this came out of that well it didn't come out of that it riot it was positioned as gross that word is under the circumstances to be heard in a different way and buy more people as a result of it so lake nino none of these important records the first as record the first strokes record the first interpol record early dfa staff none of that had been was written post nine a lead and it was not a response to that ren before but it was about you know it was about all these themes that we are just talking about yet culture considered obsolete like sadness and anxiety and loud guitars as the solution to that as an expression of that is a response to being alive right it was like oh that's old news and then you know the towers came down and new york city is under attack and america is under attack and it makes you kind of return to the the sort of lake core aesthetics of rebellion and that's rock and roll so what are you want to hear you on here jack fucking white playing guitar you wanna hear the urgency of the first strokes record he wanna you want a kind of a manic toughness the that and i think so these bans who it's not like if nine eleven hadn't happened the strokes wouldn't have broken an englanda had already broken in england and kind of ignited this industrywide like doubletake towards new york before nine eleven happened there album was supposed to come out like the week after nine eleven the first one in the states so it was already kicking off but what nine eleven did is a couple of things i thank and this is argued in the book it it it animated it it increase the number of people who were immediately feeling the need for that kind of sound and it also turned the world's attention to new york city culturally in a way that it had not been it had not had the attention of of sort of like global cool hounds in that way in sense i dunno i also like it they were it was also the guy seventy hanshin for perseverance yes i mean ranked sympathy yeah you know you're bruce springsteen how to go to werleigh hurst tracy and got them back call tied to hit it and yeah and i think i mean all these bans talk about touring in the wake of that and being it off doing comedy in the wake of sure i and the but being cast is kind of emissaries for new york and again for this idea of what new york is about that the entire world on some level was either either loving your heating at that point in new ways it was it was interesting time because if you were new yorker and you did live there yeah you're like we're we're gonna fight yes totally and we're thinking about that now and and it and the other thing that it did i think for the purposes if this seen such as it is and tune day from tv on the radio talks about this in the book i think he when he when he said this to me it really kind of it was a turning point behind her standing as he talks about how the szekely he thinks nine eleven put a kind of pause button on the jansher vacation race there has already happening i mean the the sort of post the giuliani into bloomberg cleaning up of everything sure that would eventually result in the new york the slick anodyne near erni lives there no one does it's it's saudi billionaire's who have apartments for their homes yet they're summer homes that they like might go to it's me the ranch russian it's all yeah and it is it's well chinese i don't know what an honor i it's it's just feel like you've done it feels like it doesn't have a a cultural identity has architectural and the identity right now is money money has a bleaching a fact eventually on culture i think in right now new york feels to me like burnt out literate like whited out like nine i'm not saying that race i'll have her hands out in the way that it was burnt out was bankrupt brought down in the way back right that that like acid has been porn on it and it's it's blake bleached out like i don't know i mean i keep seeing you know i don't know what causes this but when a create is her your it has deadened yeah by capitalism yet money on and by people that don't that day they don't like it will be interesting to do really explore what is rooting there you know in the sense that you know it is completely antithetical that to what it used to be when it was i think the big difference was there was a time were always money there but the people that worked there could live this and now that central and what's funny and not ha ha funny but of course like the it's all connected to this era because that's way jane saying it's our fault is funny the in an again brooklyn brooklyn because it's all those people the new york became the kind of place where you would invest in that kind of apartment because of all of the culture that that re in live in debt and made it interesting and sort of buzz he and brand rival in that way and now all these people who bought their on some level whether they know it or not as a result of this this latest ingretation of that new york thing i live in a place where none of those people can be but this is also like in a way so boring because it's like no shit that's called the cycle of art madda called lake art versus commerce 101 i mean it's going to just play its that and held out over how they all moved out of the city like the that generation of their artist once they got money they all live here they orly or here or they live in new jersey or connecticut or are you not a lot of them keep sort of like i love this i understand this instinct i feel this instinct they keep places in new york like a little apartment on near the barrier rodal whatever lay in just to kind of be like no no i still guide of me i still have a place wrestle like this so this the the ark of this book front yo two thousand eleven sort of the ends in brooklyn beat becoming the like the the the wealth center of hipsters totally and the but also just that that did it ever have any integrity other than for sure but i also just think it's yes it did i'll answer that but also that the idea that that would have one of the things that's hard to see from now because it's so obvious that that is what took place is how unlikely that seemed that that would at the time if you had been sitting there in two thousand two and and sort of prognosticating that in twenty in ten years or whatever like williamsburg a place you could not get cabs to take you was going to be the default locus of cool for the globe for but it's weird because there was some would have been laughed out of that conversation what's really like i lived in the story i had an apartment in the story from 95 five hill like two thousand and two whenever they might sub wetter was just informed by the new known of the building that he now add the lease uh quick note with note under the door there were people like louis had a place in williamsburg there were people moving into long island city yeah and likes her was sort of happening but that was because you could get space fits dole rahab winning is that it's just like everyone move to williamsburg because it was cheap brand because in this to return to it ten days saying i mean it was like you could get free he indeed siddig met each other because they lived in the same converted loft and they were passing each other's rooms enough and seeing that the same shit basically was on the floor at each other's rooms and it was sort of like i guess we should probably talk you know you've got a same weird stuff in there and like loss and in that's not like it's so easy to be like wow that must have been so cool and it's like it's it's only romantic later at the time it's like i need to live somewhere and and and be able to paint place with that right but that's that's the story of the amine ripe but that context or that that framework of life has repeated itself yes generations generation totally though the yeah the law thathat's another title that we here but the thing about nine eleven that tunisia was saying that's important is that whole justification we're talking about in the money in the bleaching out or however you want a phrase it these are they his theory and i by this now is that that was coming much sooner and nine eleven pause debt because there was a sense i mean people thought no one would travel there anymore no one wanted to get on planes it was like leaving for a second it was like is new york's economy going to die this the is this really like are things you can get cheap they were rally are things are things going to you know plummet here is it gonna be russ 70s new york thing again because no one will tourism will dinro wanna live here and all that stuff is they're going to be because it was it was terrifying and it was like you know every plane that flew overhead it was i mean people there were a couple of years where and so what that created for the purposes of this book is this weird a period of uncertainty that was really a gift to these bans because there was a couple of years and this is my my hay day really of lake going out in seeing shows during that time it was two thousand to two thousand three maybe into two thousand four but fair li where it was like it was just wild everyone was like are we gonna die but hey let's party en route druggie and it got dirty and it wasn't that expensive yet rent wasn't going up really of sort of just like the whole the whole apparatus was trying to figure out how this was going to shake out and it was like kohl let's play the you know you should read boca for answer some of those questions behind the scenes what did you ever read that book securing the city on my god who wrote i like i like i recommend this book to so many people i did you secretly right it no oh could cover ominous yes it's a bow it looks like the beginning of every law and order old school lunch or episode is by christopher dickey who i believe is james dickey's son in the i still see him as a you you shows up on shows on cnn and stuff but it's really about how how new york had to create its own count yes i should read that it is to the injury yes 'cause it was like we had we're our own city and we ourselves yeah because federal government and the cia and the fbi were not talking real yeah there was in the federal government was not really stepping up so these guys know what was going yeah and it was it was with giuliani still who was like we've got to make our own counterterrorism force and we've got to have international alley yet ray kelly yeah food and this guy cohen associated irate ocala read this like and then i'll be like i should have talked to him for the buck this is my life like i wake up still at night is damage extradition don't even choke of add that why never writing another oral history ever again or only organized oh it made me move state to a cabin in the woods by myself because they had an emotional breakdown like it's so hard that organization is really a nightmare well you did it and people like it yeah and you know it seems to be all in their uae dill per is let's check it out they clear talk of what do you want from me i i think it is hilarious eiriksson i let my favorite people around the book art like that one of my favorite pieces written about the book was by my friend dan aasi who hates who does not like any of this music basically he's in the book talking about conner over since he loves turnovers but he basically doesn't he's a music nerd anna anna a rock critic and this it he's just like all his hand suck basically i mean not literally but it's not his stuff but the thing is like i have i like i i'm not a connor overspent but i have him in here handsome my best interviews with people who are mike i will that is why and say like i'm at that's basically i think i i enjoy the fact that this isn't your world i think that's more fun lagging learn the creator of service project to talk to someone like that then someone who's like julian casablanca's this my favorite rock star of all time you're like well you're gonna love this yet boy do i have a book free like the this is writing i take this this part of journalism seriously like it's not my job to write a press release for one of these fans its job to convince those who aren't naturally inclined to take this as interesting that there's something there well here's what i have to say i'm happy you kids had your okay are you gonna try to say that that was not condescending he has had a knock out of it is out of all right it's a joke it was it was it was a sarcastic coffin ha ha ha pa let's shift gears demar serious yet um you know i and then the private police state fire juliana of just personal stuff i mean like i i've and talk to you really since markelle passed away a eulogized him on this show thank you for doing and you know because i like the guy and i literally your text to them like would like a week before it happened here do you talk about what happened can you talk about it or not i can totally i talk about i liked talking that i think people are a little afraid understandably to ask me about him because it's france you romantically involved on and off your best friends he was on the up and up again it seemed yes 100 percent it's really tragic i mean the answer to what happened which is what i guess is like not known i suppose i mean i don't really know i don't know anything other than he died and then i i texted you too to say sorry but then i got no information and then you know you just sit there and go igor would have and what that you it's not he's one of those guys ruettgers bound to happen but he didn't seem like it was going to happen that way well a lot of people you feel like it's bound to happen and then it doesn't i mean mark was had a history obviously of drug use and i think most people assume that he died of an overdose and that's not what happens i mean he didn't he we don't know for sure because there was not an autopsy performed huh so there's no leisure a cause of death that attack i mean cause of death unknown as far as i know you ea yes so this is what you're not afraid to talk about we have no information kind of accept i mean they i guess they just think like i so i was here and you know we shared custody of our dogs for six so mark or seven an hour years together in from my 20s and then we broke up like 10 years ago and but we stayed incredibly close friends and he was my creative partner basically like that mark this book would not exist without mark he is the person on the other end of the line consistently throughout frame iin merrier well like naughty i mean sometimes like sometimes is needed grady stuff but more just all writers need like the the i'll people i guess that create the the sort of like hootie who is on the red phone was on it was like i don't know and this isn't working in what do i do and like help and also i just need to that it's like that was the dark we are really really tight creatively and he would do the same we would talk to each other about writing every day and our dogs and so i was out here and he had been in a period of incredibly badge oppression for a couple of years on i mean probably his whole life it had been really bad and um i was helping him in his his family was helping him you know try to get the right mental health care never quite came together for him and eventually and so eventually after a couple of years lake road than the month before he died he was better than i've ever seen and he may have told you that india he was like like running a little bit yeah he was taking better care lindo visit no no one he hadn't dan i mean i think i know that mark lied to me about drugs or the years he wasn't like here's what happened the night that he died he went to a bar on the night that i think he died he went to a bar because he i mean we don't know exactly when he died he went to of our on february second and he had a couple of drinks drink and a half with a friend and at six thirty something like that and he came home and he walked the dogs with this friend and he was inside his house with the chain on the door and the locks on the door and a bowl of pasta on his on his like coffee table they found him and i couldn't hear i didn't hear from him the next day and i was worried and i didn't hear for him the next morning and we he didn't do that with that i mean he the dog think mark loved dogs er that anything in the world and wouldn't fuck around if their howarth and knew i was all the way out in california i mean he was like mortar arctic about the doksan i am pia and that's how they a his eventually i woke up a bunch of people up in his super went into his apartment and he found him just slumped over on his couch with dinner on the table so like as i have never done heroin but my understanding is you get big bell right and also there was no drug paraphernalia in his house and no drugs oregon went yeah i mean it's an aneurysm or a heart attack or or what any he i mean the dogs were fine they were in that house with him for thirty six hours and they were thirsty and in america pasta here at left that here too viking luggage joni it in like pardon me asshole i'm hungry and like their sausage in that layer she's too short can get up to that just short short leg's well you know it's it's it's nice to know that it it probably wasn't some eur grisly relapse no i mean if fit you know i don't know enough about you tell me can you like have secretly donovan of heroin fight hours before and then go home and make dinner and then die from doing that i mean a dozen quite at up but i you know but it seems to me that he put himself and his body through and you not up to him you know you know and if you don't know what you're like i don't know one is less physical was i mean you could only had one he high made him go and get one with wh what was the informality all systems go but you don't i mean this is what the there's i mean i'm going to be dealing with moves it out over that out of my life by not heart stuff that well i mean right like this is if you have a blake blood clot if you've an an aneurysm is undetectable i mean you can't like you can show people and this we don't have any control over any of this in the illusion is that lake via if you take care of yourself and you get physical zinni's sort of like drink your green juice that there is a sense of of control over warding off death in it's just not like that and like mark abuse the shit out of his body but that's also no guarantee that he was going to die in that way and you can take really gets care of yourself and you can get hit by a but i mean you know or diet something undiagnosed it's just what happens and it's horrible it's horrible but the one thing we do know was quick yeah and he was there with the two people in the world that he loved the most which are those two dogs no good swear to god i i'm sorry for your loss and congratulations on the book and it was nice of you to dedicated to him of guel i my friend imran told a a really potentially off color but actually amazing joke about this on this happened because imran loved mark in knew him very well a lesbian he goes so that's what it took to get together because there was dedicated to my parents and they got for this is the only thing mark could have done and i mean you know you knew him quite well and you guys have a shared sense of real black humor and so do i and mark i mean i can hear and sometimes it's being like the biggest promised that book was there is not enough amee nso i had to be something that will yeah you've got to have the dark your mercy you don't you know so the bottom doesn't fall out was nice talkin united sock india that was fun those good those promotional in some ways don't forget if you're in now way you can join me and brendan for our only l a book event and signing this sunday october twenty nine th at seven pm go to live talks la dot org for the tour page of wto of pod dot com i can't play ktar tired and a little depressed boomer lives uh uh uh

Brendan
"lindo" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

This Week In Marvel

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"lindo" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

"It's on it's deep it like it makes you kind of uncomfortable like oh my god what if like what's real what's not exactly very trip it's like sadly see her like they could she's like legit going insane like she think she's like should i be goto dr like a season wrong but she's she keeps going she's like something's outright i'd like doesn't feel right and she sitting on the subway now at all said she reaches over and touches her comic borders your panel borders and she's like no it's their she's like she's like i know i'm right so she keeps going officially keeps testing are limits incessantly and testing the text box and there's a awesome seen bullets at also in her bedroom where she's like all right let me see like i'm just gonna go only a rambling thought can't reach the tax make it bigger she says more word and or kinks mortals words yet and he keeps go keeps going ahead pushes her out of her window out just cracks itchy shattered falls out hits the ground very injured wakes up in a hospital and its dislike were gets even worse because our parents in there and like the doctor trying to only she might be suicidal think she jumped out the window threw herself and lindo so that regrets it gets worse and worse message time she's like i gotta figure does that her brother comes he obviously know another psalm yeah he's very fishy he saying some weird things that like don't add up she's like wait what do you mean and it's like kisses very much a brothersister relationship in the vein of the logo.

lindo
"lindo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"lindo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Lindo university children's hospital they are doing the work of angel i mean yeah we're i didn't hear from you know that about time gonna want you use we've got the or built brady girl we can all good you know green didn't it will be heard maybe with the ball going to training hey down i prayed you're living in this match injury yeah no call all agree are ran for scratch your it in that all anyway thing you want that crazy rain like brady trainer rob going you're an outing what a knee injury wait a minute you know yeah he can get be appropriate to take whatever mind is that you know property i mean no you know i think that out of it critical it structure we're kind of money to be better and tom made beaten orbital we're a little bit one thank you are leaving here methods playing hang out goodbye then is it too if i am six forty four i mean talk yeah we'll careful about down it's who they don't have rapsheet you throw on an opinion in which there is a back and no come on guys this is realize and i love that when people are you that you should you should do research right i do for hours a day of radio and and every time i say something i do research okay like sapped right here is recharge roll number one don't right here crutches and dwight me that's bad number two care about on their deep ball when you talk to them no bank you teddy can get consideration veron viewpoint why price would help you out bill handle week he mornings in six.

tom Lindo university brady dwight
"lindo" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"lindo" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"To the public eye does knew they were last max happening right like i did how does bar where there hardy everybody's their lines up and i don't know how it was and is on but you know who dat this last year yeah right so so lindo is is her story is like it starts went to the child and she knows that she is about to be set up you know on a i mean and now the said free or dane i mean i inning and it's uphill your dana it's oh yeah and two assists this weird were ceremony that happen but what was so confusing to me about it was the ceremony happens and she us aware of they'll like a read but a read bail that's he can't see through yeah for the whole ceremony and i'm assuming that her husband it at the ceremony as well right due to see but i was just thinking how come and see if he plays another so she's the post the consummate them ever but they have also won more nowhere love and i don't mean we're that before that she during the now races he's like after was your last the her mob was just wishes that she just grooming her for someone else where i was a very out was of rating of like oh man your thought process at this point is like pitcher mom i was he is able to talk a me like she's like given a portions of food a stuff in a flashbacks and.

lindo