4 Burst results for "Linda Royster"

"linda royster" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:27 min | 2 years ago

"linda royster" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Free enterprise, please put your hands together for our folks from the independent institute. Right. Thank you for coming everyone. My name is Ben wiltered Inc. I'm research fellow and the editor in chief of the catalyst website at the independent institute. And I'm going to be introducing are are wonderful speaker today. Dr David beta was a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. He received his PHD at the university of Wisconsin, and is the recipient of the Holly prize, professor Vado along with his wife. Linda, Linda, Royster Vado co authored the book TRM Howard, which we have a copy of up here. And we've got many more copies at the exhibit booth at the independent institute is well, doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer. Dr betas also the author of taxpayers in revolt tax resistance during the great depression, and the author of from mutual aid to the welfare state fraternal societies and social services from eighteen ninety to nineteen sixty seven so just to get things kicked off. Thanks for being with us here. Dr beta so the title of the session sort of gives away what we're going to be talking about a lot. But can you just let laying the groundwork? And describe how entrepreneurs and particularly black entre preneurs helped move forward in the civil rights movement was an element of civil rights history. That doesn't get a lot of coverage for reasons you might expect a key figure here is not the only key figure, but a key figures Booker T, Washington. And if any of you familiar with the debate between Washington do boys and Alex Todd forget it. There's a very good book that's been written on that by Jeff morale. It looks at that Washington is the enabler of the modern civil rights movement is not often depicted in that way. And that was precisely as plan the turn of the century. Washington said someday, we're probably going to have a black president. He said that one thousand nine hundred what is one of the worst times in American history for African Americans. So Washington's idea is he's fighting Jim crow. He is fighting. Disfranchised he's bringing multiple court suits secretly. But at the same time very publicly he is pushing for self-help property rights entrepreneurship, and it is in great part because Washington that we are able to build up a black middle class black business class, and they are able to provide a foundation for civil rights. We also coming out of that middle class. We have all these mutual aid organizations, they provide leadership skills to act later activists. So without Washington building that economic structure that ultimately, really. Manifests itself in a civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties and even earlier, I don't think we would have had a modern civil rights movement. And Keith figuring that movement or key example of this of somebody that was an enabler of civil rights, but a very successful entrepreneur was AG Gaston from Alabama born in poverty, he was very resourceful. Man, he worked in a coal. Mine was really at the bottom of the ladder economically. And he's able to come up with ways to sell lunches to people there who need lunches they need. Good lunches. He loans the is fellow miners money, and he saves something like two-thirds of his income during the great depression. He's doing this. He starts using this money to invest in. Funeral homes and banks. He eventually becomes one of the wealthiest black men in the country in the nineteen fifties. And one of his prize investments is a hotel called the AG Gaston hotel in Birmingham, which provides first class service to African American travelers you'd have people like Little Richard entertaining, their future secretary State, Colin Powell stays there is this sort of the high class place, but he also has a room there called the war room. And this is in Birmingham, Alabama. This is used by civil rights activists like Martin Luther King. He is crucial in helping the first black student at the university of Alabama authoring Lucy. This is in the nineteen fifties. A lot of people don't know about her. He provides her all sorts of financial support. But anyway, his hotel the facade is blown off his hotel nearly sixty because racist whites are so upset. Set about what he is doing when he is a follower of Booker T, Washington. He has a philosophy called green power. He carries around Washington's books with him. So we see examples like that. And again, the main focus of my recent work has been Dr TRM Howard. He comes out of the larger context. Well, that leads nicely into my next question. I think that the next slide here. Got a few pictures on there. So Tarum Howard is one that you've spent a long time researching and putting together for the book. So I'll just ask why why have what what drew you to to write the book on Dr Howard while I was writing about mutual aid, an African Americans, and I found this amazing hospital in all black town of Mumbai you call the in hospital, and they were providing through mutual aid thirty days of hospital care in the nineteen forties for seven dollars and fifty cents a year, which would be about one hundred dollars in today's money, and they were providing a full menu of services. This is a very successful hospital. Not a not a dime of government aid went to it. Most of the members of the fraternal organization, the mutual aid organization that runs this hospital are under the poverty line, by any standards, sharecroppers, etc. Yet they're able to provide hospital care at these low prices. Membership in this group gets up to fifty thousand in Mississippi. Anyway Howard is their chief surgeon bring him in. And I guide Mumbai all black down. He says you got to write about Dr Howard. He did all this interesting stuff. I looked him up. I said this guy's amazing now for libertarians. What doesn't he have to offer? Really? I mean, the guy is born in poverty. He's gets a medical degree at Loma Linda university through various examples of kind of luck and pluck, I guess you could say and he becomes chief surgeon of this hospital. But then he becomes a very successful entrepreneur, Dr Howard establishes, a home construction company. He has an insurance company he has a thousand acre plantation in Mississippi the races hunting dogs and quail. He. Builds a small zoo. He's like, I call them the Pt Barnum of the civil rights movement. He's a snappy dresser. But then what he does in. You can see sort of people waiting in the middle there that top pitcher. That's a pitcher of people wavy patients to wait and see doctors at the debris in hospital in the middle down. There. You see where mound bayou is located. It is really in the heart of the Mississippi delta, and if any of, you know, anything about civil rights history. This is a battleground this is the belly of the beast of Jim crow. This is most hostile place, you can go if you're pressing for civil rights. Well, once Howard is a business success. He branches out starts his own civil rights movement. There you see him sitting in the middle bottom right of a board meeting of the regional council of negro leadership. And this group is pushing a message of self help self reliance savings thrift, but. But it's also pushing voting rights they're going out and registering people often forgotten very few people can blacks can vote Mississippi. You have an amazing increase from the very low level to still very low level in the early fifties that's largely because of Dr Howard, Dr Howard forms, this mass movement one of the people that he gives his start in civil rights to the people mega Evers gets his start working for Dr Howard selling insurance. Very successful becomes a key civil rights figure. Fannie Lou Hamer. Another key civil rights figure. It really comes is Howard is their mentor. Well, he warns us organization one of the first things they do. This is one thousand nine hundred fifty one is organize. A boycott of service stations that refuse to provide restrooms for African Americans. Very common Mississippi. Yeah, they'll let you buy gas. But you. They're not gonna let us the restroom. So they start putting these bumper stickers. They have fifty thousand of them. Howard distributes is organization. Don't buy gas where you can't use the restroom, and I people and they said, yeah, I used to go the have that bumper sticker. I'd go there to the service station, and they'd say to me I'd say I want to use the restroom here. He said, we don't have restroom for colored people. And I said just take that pomp right out. And I'm dry any drove they drove off. Well, it was a successful. Boycott by the time. It was over few months. Most service stations have are providing restrooms for African Americans. A lot of that has to do with the major suppliers started to put pressure. This is before Rosa Parks. A successful boycott in the worst place to run a boycott a violent place if you're an African American and I go on and on. But maybe more questions, I think clearly this is a good example of ways that that private organizations were able to come together in effect social change in in their individual in the community without without necessarily getting too involved in the political sphere there. But they Howard. Dr Howard was involved with some of the other civil rights leaders at the time as you mentioned a few of them. But we don't. There's not a lot of civil rights leaders that we had heard of that were more on the side. So can you talk a little bit about Dr house relationship with Rosa Parks, and how that sort of evolved? Very good question. I could do a whole whole talk on that. If you ain't heard of the Emmett till case, Dr Howard was a central player in this case of these young African American teenager who was brutally murdered when he was visiting the Mississippi delta stained with his uncle became a big national case. Dr Howard said there'll be hell to pay Mississippi unless Justice is done in this case, he saying this in the mid nineteen fifties he's saying inflammatory things. He's not afraid to do it. And he is crucial and finding witnesses and evidence in the Emmett till case at them shopping around a movie script at focuses on this. Anyway. Opportunities, and he is Emma Till's mother stays with Dr Howard when she comes to testify at the trial. So he's a very important figure in that case after Emmett till killers are acquitted Howard goes on a national speaking tour Baltimore, Pittsburgh is getting crowds. Like ten thousand people at these places one of the smaller. Stop was Montgomery, Alabama. November twenty seven thousand nine hundred fifty five his host was then nationally unknown minister named Martin Luther King. Junior's father was far better now. And in the audience was Rosa Parks. They got a sellout crowd at the Dexter avenue. Baptist church, or at least an overflow crowd and parks was in the audience listening to Howard park said this was the first event that they had had in Montgomery about the Emmett till case three days later, it was it four days later three or four days later. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on among Mery bus. When the story was very much, fresh stolen the local newspapers. And she said she was thinking of Emmett till when she refused to give up her seat. So why can't one hundred percent prove that Howard was the guy? But she was there. This was the big the big speech on Emmett till and he also did also. Sorts of other things like criticize strongly Jaeger Hoover head of the FBI which in the mid nineteen fifties. You didn't do if you wanted to stay out of trouble. Actually. Yeah. That's that's something that a lot of people. Don't know. Can you talk a little bit about the way that J? Edgar Hoover was involved in putting pressure on some of these leaders at the time and specifically Dr Howard well J. Edgar Hoover Howard's complaint was that there was a conspiracy. And it really was one in the Emmett till case that more than two people were involved, including some black employees of the two whites that were put on trial, and otherwise any press this, and he said, look, we have evidence to the sheriff is hiding witnesses hiding crucial witnesses we have all this evidence here, and he's going to the FBI. This is after the trial is over with and say you need to reopen. This case federal government needs to get involved in this case is more going on here. And he really makes a pest of himself and people with supporters like buttonholing Hoover and say, why aren't you taking action on this Hoover? So upset that he writes a letter to Howard. He dignifies him who didn't like doing that dignifying. Some critic that he releases to the press it is universally praised and white newspapers the who was letter and criticized in black newspapers, and he's saying Howard is responsible. You know, he's making things up. The FBI is doing this. Great job. Why is he criticizing us and Howard fires back again?.

J. Edgar Hoover Howard Mississippi Dr Howard Washington Alabama Tarum Howard Emmett Booker T university of Alabama Rosa Parks Dr David beta Martin Luther King Jim crow Mississippi delta AG Gaston
"linda royster" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"linda royster" Discussed on KGO 810

"John John Batchelor show August nineteen fifty five the time is endless because the crime the murder of Emmett till. A very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently, been, reopened by. The United. States government by the federal authorities new information and also this long long trail of feeling that Justice, was not done the murder of. Till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help. Me understand this, story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by, to- of TRM Howard, Dr entrepreneur, civil rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after, the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of Dr Howard and to understand the, scale, of his. Heroism we. Need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of a, young man good evening to you. David why did they reopen Well that's a little bit of. A mystery because there wasn't FBI investigation about twelve years ago that you know, that turned up some I think what why they reopened the case at this, time was a historian a lot of respect for named Timothy Tyson did. He, a book about the case interviewed Amatil or the. Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the. Case and she a according to Tyson. Basically admitted that she was involved in the crime now she's still alive well. Turns out that Tyson didn't have that on tape she said that to me, didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with her so I'm skeptical on, that revelation that this is actually gonna lead to anything now there were a, number of people involved in the murder, of Emmett till but, as. Far as I can Determine, all of them have passed away The reopening of the case though points us. All to, a time in America's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living, anywhere in the country Chicago to Mississippi but especially, for people who spoke up, about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were. Involved in, in the murder right away in fact they made the made jokes about it. About why it took him so long. 'cause they pause to drink, soda pop that was laughter. And Mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in Chicago. And Dr Howard faced? Up to it what did he do who was who was TRM Howard and how did? You, get involved in the till case well Dr Howard. Was probably the wealthiest person. In Mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of hospital, black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care thousands, of, people he branched out into civil Oh rights and hit it a very large group called the regional council of, negro leadership and they had thousands of, numbers and they would have annual rallies and Mississippi but. They get, ten thousand people to hear people like Thurgood Marshall and singers like Mahalia Jackson they did a successful boycott, of service stations refuse to provide restrooms for blacks, this was in nineteen fifty, two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was. On a, visit to Chicago at the time that Emmett till disappear kidnapping of Emmett till. Wasn't even knowing that it was a. Murderer yet and Howard said, if this boy is harmed. And it was a boy is fourteen years old if he is harmed. Bill be hell to? Pay Mississippi I got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these? Two, brothers half brothers who were who had kidnapped till. They claimed they'd let him. Go but the body turned up in the in the river and the Tallahassee river just, sort of a fluke dot cook got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured, and a charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable. Because usually white person killed the. Black person there weren't even charges and there was. A trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence. That not only, against the two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants were involved, in the crime and Emmett. Till mothers stayed with them and, he provided or an armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was a refuge for black reporters for witnesses and he. Conducted his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod them off and at the time. Was he He under constant threat were there because I've read about the period. After about ten years, later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened to. Dr Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they had a sheriff they had the, mayor and that's where tells mothers state to all black so if, you were white you showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and White person wanted to make trouble there would have, to get in close 'cause they'd stick out and they and and and people. There were more than ready to fire back and we're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out he had a heavy heavy armed protection but certainly his, life was threatened. People see used to. Say the shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the time. This is the Eisenhower administration, nineteen fifty five and coming up. To the the second term was there a. Nationalization, of this story did the did the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the Eisenhower administration at at this point Dr Howard is on the verge of, becoming a, Republican, 'cause if anything the Democrats far far less willing to get involved in. Civil rights issues at that at that time so he was. Trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal of the defendant saying what door other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that that. That line it was nationalized in that sense because, after the acquittal defendants Howard went on, a national speaking tour would get. Crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in Los Angeles and. Focused on the case in other unsolved cases in the manner that j. Edgar Hoover getting. Involved he said look you can solve? A crime based. On wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about Why can't you ever seem to solve. A crime where. A black man or a black. Person is killed and eat hammered on so it was, nationalized. And one of the places he spoke was November. Twenty seven nineteen, fifty five in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than a nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks. Was in the audience hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa. Parks when she refused to give up her seat said that she was thinking. Of Emmett till when she refused to go up or see the, book is TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his off and as the author with Linda Royster Bida as a new, book about a very brave man lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening from heaven right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder, the hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor.

TRM Howard murder Emmett Mississippi Chicago Dr Howard John John Batchelor TRM Howard Dr David Biteau David Justice Timothy Tyson Justice department FBI Linda Royster Montgomery Mississippi Caroline Dunham Bryant Rosa Parks
"linda royster" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"linda royster" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John Batchelor show August, nineteen fifty. Five the time is endless because the, crime the murder of Emmett till a very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently been reopened by the United States government by the federal, authorities new, information and also this, long long trail of feeling that Justice was not done the murder of till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help me understand the. Story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by to- of TRM Howard doctor on Trump for Noor civil. Rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of. Judd Dr Howard and to understand the scale of. His heroism we need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of, a young man good evening to. You David why did they reopen Well that's, a little bit of a mystery because, there wasn't an FBI, investigation. About twelve years ago That you know that, turned up some material I think what why. They reopened the case at this time was a historian a lot, of respect for named, Timothy Tyson did a a book about the case interviewed? Amatil, or the the the Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the case and she According to, Tyson basically mid that, she was involved in the crime now she's, still alive Well turns out that Tyson. Didn't have that on tape she had. Said that to me didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with. Her so I'm skeptical on that revelation that this is actually going to lead, to anything now there were a number, of people involved in the murder of Emmett till, but, as far as I can determine all of. Them have passed away the reopening of the case though points us all to a time in america's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living anywhere in the country chicago to mississippi but especially for people who spoke up about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were involved in the in the murder right away in fact they made they made jokes about it about why it took him so long 'cause they pause to drink soda pop that was laughter in mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in chicago and dr howard faced up to it what did he do who was who is t._r._m. howard and how did you get involved in the till case well dr howard was probably the wealthiest person in mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of a hospital black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care to thousands of people he branched out into civil rights and headed a very large group called the regional council of negro leadership and they add thousands of embers and they would have annual rallies and mississippi but they get ten thousand people to hear people like thurgood marshall and singers like mahalia jackson they did a successful boycott of service stations that refused to provide restrooms for blacks this was nineteen fifty two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was on a visit to chicago at the time that emmett till disappear kidnapping of emmett till wasn't even knowing that it was a murderer yet and howard said this boy is harmed and he was a boy sporting years old it's us harm they'll be held to pay mississippi i got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these two brothers half brothers who were who would kidnap till they claimed they let him go but the body turned up in the in the river and the tallahassee river just sort of a fluke got got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured and a, charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable because usually a. White person killed the black. Person that weren't even charges and there was a. Trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence not. Only against the, two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants, were involved in the crime and. Emmett till mothers stayed with them, and he provided or armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was refuge for black reporters for. Witnesses and he conducted, his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod the mob and at the. Time was he Under constant threat were there because I've read about the period after about ten years. Later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened Dr. Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they added sheriff they had the mayor, and that's where Mattel's mothers St Paul black so if you, were white new showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and A white person wanted to make trouble there would have to, get in close because they'd stick out and they and and people there were. More than ready to fire back and? We're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out yet heavy heavy armed protection it certainly is life was threatened, people see is to say the. Shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the. Time this. Is the Eisenhower administration nineteen fifty five and coming up to, the the second term was there a nationalization. Of, this story did the key to the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the. Eisenhower administration at this point Dr Howard is on the verge. Of becoming, a, Republican because if anything the Democrats were far far less willing to get. Involved in civil rights issues at that at that time so he. Was trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal the defendant saying look or other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that. That that line it was nationalized in that sense because after the acquittal defendants. Howard went on a national speaking. Tour would get crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in. Los Angeles and focused on the case and other unsolved cases demanded the chair or Hoover. Get involved he said look you can? Solve a crime based on wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about That why can't you ever seem to solve a crime where. A black man. Or a black person is killed. And eat hammered on so it was national launch. And. One of the places he spoke was twenty seven nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks was in the audience. He hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa Parks when she. Refused to give up her seat said that, she was thinking of Emmett. Till when she refused to go up, or see the book is, TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his an as the author with Linda Royster Baido as a new book about a, very brave man who lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening for heaven. Right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder. The hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor show.

Dr. Howard murder Emmett mississippi TRM Howard TRM Howard Dr dr howard David Biteau David John Batchelor Justice Chicago Timothy Tyson Justice department howard FBI Rosa Parks Linda Royster United States Sumner Mississippi
"linda royster" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"linda royster" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Eight six six five zero jimbo is our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six as we have is our guest tonight professor of history at the university of alabama dr david beethoven who with his wife linda royster beethoven has written t r m howard it is a remarkable tale one that i had not heard before it's published by independent institute and we'll learn more when we come back in just a moment homes aren't onesizefitsall so why should your home insurance be any different farmers home insurance packages offer coverage options you can tailor to fit you discover straightforward home coverage options and more at farmers dot com we are if you have unpaid tax debt to the irs that you can't pay please hear this special notice specially approved irs relief programs designed to aid delinquent tax payers are now in effect that can significantly improve your financial situation depending on your circumstances you may qualify to have your tax problem resolved in your favor and may even have your back taxes reduced by thousands or eliminated entirely a relief hotline has been established by community tax for you to call and see if you qualify at eight hundred four six three forty two ninety five if you owe the irs back taxes that you can't afford to pay don't let the irs trick you into thinking you have no way out our highly accredited tax professionals will let you know what you qualify for and how much you can save we may be able to stop all liens garnishments levies and save you thousands call and see if you qualify for this taxpayer relief at eight hundred four six three forty two ninety five eight hundred four six three forty two ninety five that's eight hundred four six three forty ninety ninetyfive community tax who who's your tax guy fuming as more than just a fuel card it's a complete fuel management system powered by mastercard humans accepted over one hundred seventy five thousand locations nationwide and it saves you up to six cents per gallon while giving you the ability to track and manage few smith fuel business runs on fuel man visit www dot dot com or call one eight hundred.

jimbo linda royster beethoven irs professor of history university of alabama dr david beethoven