18 Burst results for "Linda Lee"

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

04:20 min | Last week

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Because it's not even just in attracting talent like fascist step one. How do you retain talent. And i think that is where the repeat if you wanna use language right. The repeat comes from is do people feel connected and to where they are on the brand voice. Absolutely very tempting very tempting to who follow the headlines. Follow the trends answer difficult questions in a way that you know people want to hear it ultimately. I think you have to have to know who you are and you have to know where you are. I almost treat brands like humans. Elect people because i say you know people we constantly say we're all on that journey of south development self-awareness growth. I feel rants are the same. So yes you know. We want rans week. Ten in a us in quotes a little brands that have purpose in show up in that way or brands that are you know highly inclusive inclusive and reflect diversity brands that that have very strong points of view on social kind of topics. Were all very real very good. But you have to know where your brand is. At where consumers give you permission. And if you wanna go you know. What are you doing to an earn. Your way to credibly participate than In certain conversations like it's about the actions that add up that gives you that credibility because otherwise if you just one day shop doing something in it's a it's a it's a moment to capture a moment an opportunity it's not authentic and consumers are smart. They will pick that up and and so. I think my advice is a bit of like is. It'd be empathetic to wait like it's okay. If you're not all the way to bright understand where you are be true to that and then built you know build your way but always test yourself with are the actions consistent and do we have the permission i like. Their point about brands are also evolving..

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

03:52 min | Last week

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"So the this is probably. I'd say if. I took it to a lesson. I sometimes feel like when we're in large brands. We expect that one campaign that one year to to be sufficient of you know for gonna turner in even myself like. If i'm going to turn around a brand. I give myself eighteen months to turnaround brand and the reality is is there enough of purchase cycles. Is there enough routine. That's built in enough experiences. That have been truly. It's not just seen something multiple times but actually experiencing it many times before it starts to be part of your routine. So i feel like we had kind of a mass in mass learning fat. And then i'd say the third is is leaning in so when this was all happening a ton of uncertainty. We didn't know how long this would last that leaning into investment. What do you think has been the biggest change in marketing or brand building at campbell's over the last nineteen months. The biggest change has been agility. So you know at campbell. The way we were doing marketing was a that traditional annual planning and having everything lined up well thought through lined up and then it becomes an year executing verses and then at the end of that year you measure it and then you create your next year's plan and i think what we've learned in our during a great job of practicing is the agility and looking outside asking the questions like what's going on with consumers. Where do our products and brands have a right to be a part of and ideally be bringing ideas and solutions that are relevant so really adding value to consumers lives but not doing it at just a macro sense but in every day Sense in a great example would be last thanksgiving last thanksgiving You know that was not part of our plan right to. We had a traditional holiday plan. But we realized whoa in we ended up getting the data behind a two thirds of americans..

gonna turner campbell
"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

04:31 min | Last week

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"Crater problem-solver because i've sat in the different seeds in i in certainly innovation Having understanding of technical annotate abilities and realities that has definitely helped me able to challenge but also the part of the solution tended inspire the the problem solving in my first Brand manager job at png ida brand group of five people three of them were from other functions. Because i agree with you when you bring in someone from another function. They bring a very different perspective a sense of understanding they were all from technical functions so they had that scientific background that database curiosity. So i think it's it's pretty magical when you can create a team of that diversity. I mean amazing. Things can happen. Yeah net really is like. He's used lower perspective. I've said to marketers if you really think about it. We literally don't create anything ourselves. We rely on the technical functions to create the physical product. We rely on sales to be able to get it not the route to market get into the hands of our consumers we rely on our agencies to create the communications that are consumers. See or experience in. So when i think when you think of it in that way then you say well then what is my job. My job is to be clear. On what great looks like. Like where are we going. But then how do i inspire in debt. Had i get served there. There's an elm of servant leadership but what does then each person or function need to be able to do their job in that that really in my mind is what our job as marketers is. Had we unlock each function each individual so that they can ultimately get the products that we make or the communications our commercials that we put out there. They're the ones who are the actual makers. So is that how you describe your job to your parents and friends and siblings. And i'm not sure. They know what i.

png ida
"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

The CMO Podcast

05:31 min | Last week

"linda lee" Discussed on The CMO Podcast

"About your career path. I wanna stay there for a few more moments. Because it's so interesting you know some choices you made in career and as i look at the companies you worked and your career are you took to. I would say unexpected turns in your career path going from general mills from png's not that unexpected people do that but you went to apsos. You know the global research company based in paris. You did that for about a year and you went also to adventure based startup chefs. Cut real jerky for about a year. And most of your experience had been with very large companies. And all of a sudden you go to a venture base startup. So those are two sort of funny left. Turns so. I'd like you to talk to us a bit about that. You know what. What was your thinking in joining each of those. Was it a new door that opened or was it something more intention or more deliberate than that. It was a little above and the funny used. The phrase left turns. Because that's how i described it to of the move to obsess. At that point. I had come back from. China was with mandalay's. I was very clear that i needed to run. It's one thing to start a business. It's another to run existing businesses and had truly managed the full top to bottom lines the pl and in i had done that role but every year it grew i started with ritz crackers to then all penna crackers and then integrating fully together north america so two years in china three years hit back in the us the five year incredible just journey and literally every year was a vertical ramp up and at that point in time launched good thins in the us has a way to continue growth on week fends turned around triscuit in developed a new campaign after a long standing campaign on ritz so i looked at my five years and i remember thinking what's next eighteen..

paris mandalay China ritz north america us
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

05:07 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"They did not register the vote. They're not human. We already know this. We know this was done more than once in so the one vote is. Is you know we could probably get over that. Put the hundreds upon thousands of votes that were done in the dirt that was done in the fraud that was perpetrated at the t. Cf center women not ballots. Were seventy one percent. Could not be recounted and the secretary of state knowing that we have an active and open a case a lawsuit against her. For which. I'm a plaintiff has decided to send a letter to the clerk's to destroy all of the electron ick evidence of the november third election. I i am baffled about that. But that is what's happening here in michigan and we're going to get to the bottom of it verified before you certify one hundred percent agree just like i said before so my great grandmother a cuban woman who emigrated immigrated to the united states in nineteen sixty one. She's one hundred and two years old. I took her to vote in this presidential election. State of florida is exemplary when it comes to voter fraud because so many people were like. Can we see your driver's license. We see it again. Can we look at it again. She as a legal immigrant here in the united states. Illegal citizen in the united states voted for donald j trump right because we put the effort in in the state of florida when sure that her vote accurate vote.

michigan united states florida donald j trump
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

04:38 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"The or chat. So first of all. I want to ask you. This is brand moore and he asked republican members of the michigan legislature. Not certified about. Will you encourage folks to do this. Not certified so. I personally have a question. I know that you're asking for an audit a forensic audit so beyond that. What is the relief that were asking. So he's asking are going to specify the vote. are we asking them to not certify. Vote and what is the relief that we're asking for because as we just stated one rodney boat dilutes all of our legal vote. Why are we knew about it. I i would argue that You should not certify what you cannot verify. We have significant evidence. I've shared that five hundred thousand Invalid votes an illegal votes invalid and illegal votes. that occurred as part of the lawsuit. That i'm plaintiff. Whip in front of the michigan supreme court right now. That is separate from the complaints that have been lodged with the michigan. Legislature should not certify what cannot be verified the fact that the wayne county board of canvassers certified knowing that seventy one percent of the absentee ballots could not be recounted. Should give pause knowing that the michigan state board of canvassers certified that knowing that wayne county had a significant challenges and seventy one percent of the absentee ballots could not be Fide and could not be considered a recounted and therefore had some problems in errors. If you've got seventy one percent of the largest city's largest vote the absentee votes seventy one percent errors. You have to ask yourself. Why would you certify that right to certify that you need to verify before you certify in. That's what i'm going to ask Our legislature and i have asked our legislature to do so. I'm hoping that they verify before. We certify i. I am not here to discuss. You know advocate for donald. J trump winning michigan. I want our votes to only every legal vote of every person who is alive not a martian. Not someone who does not exist. Not somebody's pet. Who voted not someone's dead parents. Who voted i want. Every legal vote to count. And i want the systems that were supposed to be in place to be placed in which brings up suspicion that something was being hidden in. So i i. We need to verify. Before we certify and i agree it seems so simple restaurant so i'm on my phone right now so i apologize if they look like. I'm on my phone but it's because we're preceding so many question. There's so many people who don't understand why their state legislators their federal legislators don't want to use the voice of the people while the voice of the people also you've got other people on the laughed. Who are talking about disenfranchising voters if you throw out these votes on your gun to disenfranchise voters especially people of color and no one wants to do that. Ranch is their vote themselves when they refuse to allow whole challenge to come in when they refused to hire republican precinct. Inspectors and workers when Ensure that a person who applied for the ballot Should have gotten a ballot and those who did not apply should not have gotten a ballot was done here in michigan. Those things and others occurred in so we need to look at. We need to do a forensic audit much more thorough audit of the electronic system of win. The votes were checked in what was done after the cutoff time. After eight o'clock who voters created. We've had people who are Because they could not identify that they were human made. Their birthday's january first. Nineteen hundred that was testified to that was occurring in the afc center. There's no way we can validate those people. There's no way they don't exist in the qualified voter file..

wayne county board of canvasse michigan state board of canvas michigan legislature michigan supreme court michigan rodney moore wayne county Legislature donald afc
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

02:40 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"Not everyone is removed and not. Everyone is removed by the police but a lot of them especially in detroit were removed. The role of the poll challenger is so important that we filed a lawsuit based on the kobe. Nineteen restrictions of six feet because we knew that the law should not be thwarted as a result of covid nineteen and the court here in michigan. Our court of appeals here in michigan agreed with us that there is no six feet rules for poll challengers. The michigan secretary of state signed a consent decree and said that she would adhere to what the court had ordered that she would make sure that poll challengers had free access within the boundaries of the law to look at every single ballot to be able to look at the poll books to be able to assess what is going on there. It did not happen in detroit and they continue to put out people. One of the training sessions in detroit was that i hope that the republicans have but not gillers so they can see how far they put them away from the ballots. That is against the law and that activity alone. The misdemeanor was used to in my opinion. cover up the felonies that were going on with voter fraud. Because why is it that you have to remove the people who are placed there by law to ensure integrity of the vote and because this is occurring in mostly urban areas especially they don't want white republicans their behalf continued to Intimidate and to threaten them and those were outlined in affidavits as well and testify to and these people were there doing duty that it was outlined in the law and it and and enough is enough to me that should be more compelling Evidence that we need to look at the ballots. Because what are you hiding. And why is it. That seventy one percent of the work that was done at the center cannot be recounted. Xactly so it's beyond that that as you have stated so many times. And he stated on. Lou dobbs stated in michigan estimating a single vote. It is fruit of the poisonous tree. And if you judge.

michigan detroit gillers kobe Lou dobbs
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"Is recounting boats that are illegal vote. You're recounting votes. That are legal Absolutely way we have systems in place checks and balances in the michigan law concerning the election. Actually the legislature is required by our constitution to ensure a secure and fair election. That is the job of the lawmakers. They have passed laws to ensure that to prevent a people who are handling. That's why it is a a misdemeanor for me to give my neighbor across the street my ballot and a felony cry neighbor to take it in for me. They do not want anyone who's not entitled to that ballot to touch it We know that that occurs is primarily in the urban areas in primarily in large quantities their ballot harvesting where they're going around two neighborhoods or or a nursing homes and they're picking up ballots and they're bringing them in. They may be getting paid to do so but that that type of activity has been complained about by the clerks in urban areas themselves especially in flint. And so that piece. Is there in michigan. You're supposed to have fifty percent republican in fifty percent democrat working as precinct and so that is what they're supposed to do. We have a michigan republican party and the detroit Clerk did not contact the michigan. Gop to ask to bring in hundreds of workers there instead. They decided to bring in their own. None of them which are republicans. And so in my opinion i i didn't see in. We did not hear that. Republicans were selected to work. They're supposed to have fifty. Fifty people are just wearing that. They are republican. We know that they are not so. That is another touch. Point that is a vulnerability that is abused in certain areas. Where you don't have a great. Recruitment of a balanced mix of political ideology another area that was placed into law. That is one of the most important areas is the paul challenger and the poll challengers role is outlined in mc l. Wants sixty eight point seven thirty three and the role of the poll challenges to be able to look at the process the entire process the poll challenges to look at how they're setting up. How the opening of the of the precinct went if there's any illegal activity going on with the ballots. How they're processing how they're handling it. How they're handling voters are. Is everyone coming in and bringing it in Properly they can challenge. The voter can challenge. Although they can't speak to the voter. They can challenge the voter. They can challenge the vote of the voter. They can challenge the precinct. Inspector they can challenge the precinct. Captain they can challenge how the setup is they can challenge whether or not there's a disability Instrument in there and make sure that they have it available. So that people with disabilities vote so they have great a allowed under the great Resource inability to challenge the law also says that these individuals are to be protected. And i and i made an emphasis on that because they are the election integrity at the time. They're supposed to be there with the ballots with the people and they are not to be removed. They're not to be intimidated. They're not to be removed and they're not to be threatened. That's what's that's in the law and to do so as a misdemeanor and we've known that In in almost every election at least one of our republicans are a removed by the police in primarily in pontiac michigan and other places at every election..

michigan michigan republican party legislature Gop detroit pontiac
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

05:40 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"And so from that information we've asked the legislature to move to secure those balance to bring them in and to make sure that we're able to put our optics on it look do forensic audit and to prove those individuals who have testified who have sworn affidavit under perjury of law that what they have seen and heard as direct witnesses. Not circumstantial evidence. Direct witnesses was indeed true. We have whistle blowers people who are participated in this and there were several violations at various points in the law. And so we're we're confident. I'm confident that the lord will prevail and that the law The rule of law will be applied and our arguments before the court and before the lawmakers is compelling enough to bring those ballots and to show the state and the nation the abuses that took place in michigan that has already duplicated itself and other urban areas across the nation. Well i mean dr tarver i gotta be honest. I am on your side. I'm completely biased..

legislature dr tarver michigan
"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

RIGHT NOW Podcast

05:04 min | 8 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on RIGHT NOW Podcast

"Experience at the michigan secretary of state as former voter integrity liaison allowed her to speak with true path. The team trump's michigan hearing this week. Tell us a little bit more about yourself now. Dr linda lead harbor. We know that you are the liaison voter integrity in michigan. How are we fighting to ensure that out vote. As american citizens is not dating. Looted here in all of america and the state of michigan. While i'm so delighted and honored to be with you christi. It is such a pleasure. And i am grateful to god to take part in this I am a retired state employees. I retired after thirty. Four years of service to the state of michigan. I retired last year and seven years. I served as community affairs director and election. Integrity liaison for secretary state with johnson. In during that time of twenty nine years with the michigan department of state. I was very engaged even politically as a republican in the voting process and understanding that process. Politics was a hobby to me. Until i realized that that hobby had real life consequences and it mattered. Who was elected it mattered. Who was our leader. And all of that matter me and i was trying to put the ballot together i was really voting any meeting mighty mo initially until i met my entire ballot i met both the democrats and the republicans on the ballot Firmed in my heart of with the platform of the republican party really caught my heart my values and it was something that i could line on as a christian. I realized that jesus would never be on my ballots. I didn't have to vote for a savior. i already had one. I was going to vote for someone who is going to be imperfect but i was hoping that justness rules the nation in those a good people with godly principles who love our country. Love the people And worst conservative would be a better choice than those. Who weren't so. I went to a hearing this past tuesday in michigan. I was really there as a request. One of my friends gina johnson. He's part of the michigan capital house of prayer. We call it mishap..

michigan Dr linda michigan department of state america johnson republican party jesus gina johnson
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
"linda lee" Discussed on Business of Printing in the Age of Technology with Gautham Pai

Business of Printing in the Age of Technology with Gautham Pai

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"linda lee" Discussed on Business of Printing in the Age of Technology with Gautham Pai

"To you by the German for this new. I am cloudy skies and both for the session. My guest today is Linda Lee a true expert on Fox. Let me quickly into snapping. Lee is the former VP of Western would studios the largest producer and distributor of audio visual materials based on children's literature. She then was the EP and publisher of Scholastic Audio The award winning publisher of unabridged audiobooks for children and young adults. She served on various Industry Board of Directors House, and since two thousand, nine, hundred nineteen has been working as an independent consultant in the field of children's media apart from that, she is the author of the White Paper on audio books. It's called taking the world by storm, which is available for free on Frankford website. So very excited to hear that. Thank you so much for taking the time on. Thanks for having me. I think it's a really really interesting subject and your white papers very very sought to lots of information I really enjoyed reading it so I can recommend to any everyone. Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about it and the audio books altogether. So my first question would be what Pique, your interest in audio books and to write this white paper. So actually the paper was commissioned by the Frankfurt Book Fair in conjunction with the company, a Zebra Lucien, which is a digital media distribution company that specializes in audio nee have an incredible analytics tool that enables them to gather listening act. Of course, there are large international base of audio listeners. Last year, they presented some of these listening Frankford audio summit, and it was so well received. They decided to do it again, but then they suggested. To for a white paper to be commissioned to me more completely frame their findings and dummy. You're own relationship or your own inches than audiobooks Leonard that start. Happen. Actually been in audio publishing for thirty years over thirty years. When I was first at Westwood? Studios. We always did does the books that we adapted we did read alongs for children and then when I joined scholastic as we said. It became the head of squad Gaudio as well. I also served on the board of Directors for the Audio Publishers Association, which is a great association that all the meagre audio major end smaller audio publishers in the US belong to. So I served on that board for six years and was hesitant for five years so I've been involved in audio. Longtime. Yeah. Really. Just coming back to the paper. How long did it take given? The data's not freely available? Absolutely it's just like people do a major..

Linda Lee Audio Publishers Association publisher Frankford Frankfurt Book Fair Pique Gaudio VP Westwood Leonard US producer independent consultant
"linda lee" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"linda lee" Discussed on Words on Water

"So I'm very happy to be joined by Dr Linda Lee from Purdue University who knows an awful lot about This topic and also about bio via solids which is an area of interest when it comes to p Fas- lived. How're you doing today? Good Travis thank you. Yeah so just to just to set the stage a little bit. Could you talk about your academic background and kind of the current focus of your work Sure I did my undergraduate it. Actually I did all my degrees at University of Florida because a family situation But I did my undergraduate in Chemistry and that I did my masters in Environmental Engineering I and my PhD in so chemistry contaminant hydrology. So I kind of moved around to the three colleges on the same campus and I did my masters and PhD. I always tell people while I was doing post talk. Because I was working fulltime as analytical chemist in a fate and Transport Lo que and ran Dan. Why did you start studying this fast family of compounds actually I have a interesting response to that? So about two thousand five or a little bit before. That dupont actually approached me and asked if they could come visit me. Some people from the Polymer Division that I didn't really know and and that was because some people in the division and in the people that do environmental fate they knew about me and my lab and my work so I said Okay and so they became and they presented their story about P. Fast for the chemicals that they produced and what they knew about him and then they asked me if I would be interested in working on that compound class and I had said that that because of my work with antibiotics and some mother compounds that are a little harder to deal with analytically than your standard legacy compounds for lack of a simpler term. Sure I said Yeah I would be interested and I said what is it that you want that you're interested in and they said well we just want to get some academic groups developing the science to study these these compounds because we think there's going to be a lot of work on them and so they actually gave me a gift some funds that actually launched our research in that and allowed me to bind the instrumentation that I had to have to even do the research After that you know they didn't have anything to do with what I was doing. Except if I needed standards words that were available yet might come up later on our podcast. Eight provided no and if they had some insight on analytical because at that time not a Lotta people had insight except for the actual companies like three M. and dupont that were producing them. When was this that was in? I would say the two thousand for two thousand five timeframe okay years ago then yes and they. I think they knew that there was going to need to be the science needed to be developed and I had to be credible science and as you know. oftentimes people have a lack of trust. Sometimes for good reason sometimes not on what industry industry might provide and so they wanted to see academics. Come up with the science and I think at that time a lot of them didn't really we realize that we might not come up with the best results but that didn't matter so that you are aware that they were kind of Approaching other researchers at other universities to come to to Do Science as well do research. I wasn't really aware of who they were talking to to. They just said that their goal was to get more people doing the science and they were going to labs that they trusted to do the science to start developing the tools and and be able to understand how these compounds behave in the environment. Even how analyze them. I mean they're a rough lunch. Yeah so what What If particular shakier were they interested in you Studying or or if they didn't kind of have a particular interest what what did you study and start doing science on okay. They just wanted me to develop the science and start doing research on them. They didn't ask me to focus on anything specific. They just showed me what they had so far and got to go from there then after that you know. Obviously submitted grants Had A national science foundation grant to look at These compounds in initially we were interested. In how the different substitutes that are in a p fast compound and how it's associated with other parts of that larger molecule. How that would change how they degrade so initially we were really interested in basically degradation pathways? And you know what's the end result and interesting now. We all hear the term precursors and thus because he fast as they can degrade through a very You know several pathways but they degrade to just more passes and everything in in between are more fasces so all the intermediate surpasses so you go from A to Z. And there's they're both be fastest and everything in between our passes. This is part of that Nicknamed forever chemicals exactly because while a lot of them do breakdown they break down to the the ones don't don't go any further. We call him terminal products from a microbial degradation and the ones that people are most familiar with fifty four and p Foss they are both in the original production lines to make other passes and they're also the end product of One of the end products of the fast degradation pathway to those are those two are really kind of at pardon me. I'm not a scientist. But those are kind of the foundational building blocks them before on the P.. Fos they're they're they're in that initial building block stream of synthesis and it can be other You now you know you might ask me this later but now that the longer which means are being phased out and that has to do with the length of the chain of house how big the molecule is I guess is a simple way to say and now you know when they're phasing those out. They are trying into work with shorter. Chain so smaller fasts and the goal there is that they don't accumulate in the body as much and then the hope is that they're also you have less potential adverse effects and it does seem like it seems like that they can't they have a lower potential for adverse effect act at at a given concentration. They still can. It's all about you know chemical load so they can still have similar impacts but maybe they have to be at higher your concentration up in the body as as much then that makes them be more favorable. There's still forever chemicals. They're more favorable. I guess sure on GAC comparatively right sure is it this is how tough P fasces to degrade and the part of it. Just kinda stays together. Is that what makes us a particularly challenging aging family of chemicals when it comes to public health and environmental concerns. Yeah that's one part that they event you know that they are forever chemicals ripples and the second thing is there's so many of them. There's you know we talk about P. Fast as this one big family which it is is but within it at several sub families and in that just test slightly different chemistries and in the end. There's you know right now. We're approaching close to five thousand that we say have been produced. Probably only half that might be You know actually being used a lot in production so potentially Our environment but as we phase out some that we've already talked about new ones are being made and they're they're alternatives but they're still P. S. So in most cases alternatives do not mean not fast they just mean other kinds of per fluorinated or polychlorinated chemicals that have less likelihood to bio accumulate our body require much higher concentrations to be toxic because in reality everything can be toxic. Roxette even if you have too much too fast okay. So that's one challenge Well that's two challenges the number or of them the fact that they that even the ones that degrade degrade to passes that don't degrade They require advanced instrumentation into quantifies. which not not that many labs have that capability although that's growing and then there's only standards for you know Forty forty five and there's several thousand so you can't actually quantify a lot of you can't find them in even the traditional advanced instrumentation so that requires you having even more advanced instrumentation. That only a few labs actually have love in the United States Really globally on a on a percent scale allows you to look for things that we don't have standards for at least know. What do we have even if we don't know the concentration so those are all things that make them hard to make them difficult they also don't seem to interact with so they're persistent like the PCB's that most people are familiar with PCB's? We didn't find him in water that often because they're highly highly served and they are also bio-accumulative meaning highly soared to soil in particle so they don't travel with watery fast however these passes whereas persistent as PCB's but they're also very water soluble on a relative scale so You know the larger P fasces might not be in water owner but then as they degrade to all these other ones that we normally look for those are gonNA show up and water and they also appear to be unique and how they how they move through soil profiles. Because it's not just about what's happening in the water and in the soil it also has to do with interfaces in zone where you you would grow crops him you know we know there has to be air. Their crops aren't going to be healthy. There fled it. Well he passes do weird things at the air water interfaces Said said actually in a good way they don't transport we don't think as far as you know they will transport as fast as we would have thought based on traditional approaches approaches. Could be good but it also means they're gonNA be hanging out there for a long time one of the reasons. I I guess the reason I tracked you down for this podcast. 'cause you published some research of yours was published in the Water Environment Research Journal that the wife puts kind of related to bio solids solids and so forth so let's kind of move in that direction before bio solids are produced at you know as part of the water treatment process. What do we know what do you know bovine what happens to p Fas- in the wastewater treatment process you know? Obviously all these houses are coming into the treatment process from our use in our product. Use So from just residential consumers and the industry and then we know from landfills and from Use of a quiz film forming foams which still currently contain fast for putting hydrocarbon fires effectively the plant the plant's seaver of all these things and then through that normal process that tries to get rid of certain things that are regulated as far as getting discharged in the applicant. You have you know you end up. Having a water stream and a solid stream to put it simple right and the same as fast as we already said they. Some of them can breakdown. They break down the things that don't break down so really what's going to happen too fast when it comes into the plant is pretty much primarily two things maybe a little bit of a third thing. It's going to end up end the sludge. You.

P. Fast dupont Do Science Purdue University Water Environment Research Jou Travis Dr Linda Lee Fas University of Florida Environmental Engineering United States Polymer Division Dan scientist
"linda lee" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"linda lee" Discussed on KTOK

"Been taxed for month after month year after year just like a jet engine. They can just go. And just stop. So instead of having high cortisol you have low cortisol, and the effect is can't get out of bed. Can't get going. No amount of caffeine really makes a difference. You're dragging all the time. You never really are able to get up and all of the things that used to help you do that don't really work anymore and what the normal recommendation for adrenal fatigue is. Yes, there are some supplements. But most of the time what you have to do is you just have to rest it off. Well, that's hard to do. If you have a job if you have a family, there's a ton of homeschool moms that I've talked to who have adrenal fatigue diagnosed by Dr Frank Linda Lee or somebody out there, and it is one of those things where the way to get out of it typically is impossible for most people because they have lives that they have to live, and they can't. Just stay in bed all day. Even though that's what they want to do even though. That's actually what they need to do. Here comes hemp though him according to an art. I should have brought the article I didn't bring it today. But according to the article that I was reading this no THC him is they're finding that all of the Canaveral aids in this. No THC hemp is actually restoring adrenal health. That means that people are going about their day. They're still working. They're still doing what they do. But meanwhile, the adrenal glands are actually being restored with all of the connections and turpentine Turpin are the part that taste and smell a certain way. When you smell an orange the smell is from Turpin when you taste an orange. This the taste is mostly from Turpin 's. And so the same way with essential oils and the same way with him. There are terp. Pains in the in the the hemp plant and these do more than just provide flavor and aroma. They actually provide physiologic effects Mercier is something that you smell when you smell lavender. It's also in him. It's the part that makes you sleepy you wanna go to bed. Limiting is the thing that you smell in lemons limiting turbine that actually bright brightens up it provides uplift. It actually provides an energizing effect all without taxing the adrenal glands. And in fact, actually restores the adrenal glands and the net result. I'm gonna let you talk. Josh. We're about to take a break. And so I promised we're we're gonna have an actual conversation. Didn't mean the monologue this. But what I'm telling you that I've been consuming different hemp products over the past months..

Dr Frank Linda Lee Turpin cortisol Pains caffeine Josh Mercier
"linda lee" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"linda lee" Discussed on KTOK

"The show is super health. Kyle drew meat eating tofu hating nutritionist. I like those classic ones. Josh. I know. That's what I love. I'm sorry. I do DNA the other night. I was I was I was up late not shockingly because I'm such an if you're the only guy I know that I can text at twelve thirty midnight one in the morning, and it's like, hey. Hi, Linda Lee would be pulling her I make everybody pull their hair out. But she would it would drive her crazy when I would send her an Email, and it would say three AM, and you know, understandably, but the whole family, I have a family of night owls, and so we were up late the other night. And there was something on T A. And it was this big choir. And they were seeing stuff and they started with joy to the world. What Mike just played and it was fan. Stick. And then it went into all of these stupid stupid song. I've never heard of these songs, and it was just what are you doing? And then finally they circled back around. Hark, the herald angels say I am just a and so do you know what I did that night? I grew up in the Baptist church, and I have the old Baptist hymnals. Now, you go to churches these days, it's rare when you hear hymns, and it I lament that I must tell you. I lament the fact that everything is what is now called praise and worship. And I just happened. Not to like most of that. Sorry, everybody. But I just love the hymns. And so I pulled out the old Baptist hymnal. And I'm thumbing through it to get to the Christmas hymns, and I'm just gonna start hominem and singing. But when I went through that book, I went from the from the back to the front. And it turns out all the Christmas teams are in the front. And so I was thumbing through them who on crisis solid rock. I stand all other ground is sinking sand, and I was going through him. I was in tears. Well, it's been a long time since I've just gone one by one by one by one through all.

Linda Lee Hark Baptist church Kyle Josh Mike
"linda lee" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"linda lee" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"I made sure soup that had little meatballs that were supposed to look like meteors okay well she did say remember those yes she didn't say like when i catch you off guard i'm like reading bids sentence st to say something that was weird she said so what about that comment on the post about sneaking into your room in the middle of the night i didn't know what that was either and they didn't show it and he's like god social media such a bitch so that was pretty much sad but i'm curious now what the comment was so if anybody knows please feel free to tell us on instagram facebook etc i also wondered exactly how mad she really was because part of me kind of felt like she was making having argument with him just have a scene because she was smiling you know she didn't seem like there was something that felt a little authentic about this whole thing had this fight like twenty times but now candidate he that's probably what it was yeah hell i will recreate it but it will not be with bowls of soup please stand here in the shadow of the dream catcher okay now eat those noodles awkwardly look like an idiot on yeah enjoy your ufo that comes with no broth 'cause i poured out the soup part it's just a ufo on a plate little pasta ufo sue cameron is now being shep is calling cameron while he recovers on the couch and he spells her name wrong on the phone and people online are like oh my god what maybe which i mean that's kind of true but considering yesterday we were talking about had to rent a has lou and seem as linda lee.

sue cameron linda lee instagram shep lou
"linda lee" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"linda lee" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Berman and michael riedel in the morning tomorrow from six 'til ten on seven ten w o r tuesday everybody will lynn linda lee we're talking about the gay wedding cake so i've called you and lynn some people hammed berman was working when i was working in ohio people thought my name is lillian like swan of the pittsburgh steelers yes you'll get lennon lynn i dunno where we got some of our listeners fired up over this cake issue let's hear what mike in bethpage on line one has a subject agrees with me right mike and mike gordon guys i love the show i love you you're so consistently wrong it's remark why get high grades for that get an eight forever so consistent this guy who's owns a bakery doesn't want to make a case i think he has every right but if you're flipping burgers at mcdonalds and you don't want to serve somebody who's gay you have no right you're working for mcdonalds and i don't think they have a policy they should serve everyone mike it's the wrong because if you work for chickfila they're closed on sundays i think and if you say well i don't want i want to work on sundays go work somewhere how i was making mcelwain about arts i you know the michael riedel thinks this is all about art and i was saying well who determines what art is that's why i was making the the showing both ends of the spectrum that's all that's baker should have a right to do what he wants really visit the supreme court ruled now but that's not what the supreme court ruled the supreme court the supreme court did not rule on that issue the supreme court ruled that the the civil rights commission in indiana was discriminatory and anti religion that's what they ruled but they did not rule on that issue so i'm curious to find out if they ever do rule on these kind of cases will continue they'll have to be a broader ruling at some point but mike you got it mike you have to admire my consistency you do hey mike thanks for the call pal take care bye.

steelers bethpage mcdonalds michael riedel baker indiana lynn linda lee hammed berman ohio pittsburgh mike gordon seven ten w
"linda lee" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"linda lee" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"I don't know why people asking me feel comfortable i do the first time you saw bruce lee he was a superhero yes when you find that he was married to linda lee you jesus christ not the best looking woman in the fucking world linda lee rocked his world she controlled him he is laying view interviewed people during the dragon they said what is this shit linda lee walk in the room all his troubles went away you know it's amazing what you're attracted something like what you like you like which day you bunker down have kids in love like there's no predicting the looks to colored this all the things you thought if you if you go for somebody you go for somebody because all the looks and all the bullshit and everything dan today that everybody gets old the jokes get old the fuck and bits get old the ask it's all the dick gets old you got to it's got to be a friend yeah right yeah it's gonna be a thing i think that i think that my wife enjoys i mean look at me nick you're looking at me close magin waking up to this imagine me having a wake up to you screaming about reggie jackson and you sleep imagine waking up to fuck and joey coco da's god when a sleep apnea mascot the sleep apnea mask onto boot you ever look at their faces when this leaping i like to look at the expression.

bruce lee linda lee reggie jackson