17 Burst results for "Lincoln Institute"

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

09:08 min | Last month

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And WBUR I'm Scott Tong in Washington I'm Robin young in Boston it's here and now The COVID vaccines have been remarkable success according to the CDC more than 221 million people in the U.S. are fully vaccinated and serious adverse reactions are extremely rare For instance just 238 of the more than 15 million Americans who got the Johnson & Johnson shot came down with guillain Barre syndrome or GBS which tricks the immune system into attacking nerve cells Anthony Flint is one of the 238 who got GBS back in April but he hasn't talked about it till recently and the reason is thought provoking Anthony's with the nonprofit Lincoln institute of land policy they focus on sustainable land use Anthony welcome Thank you It's great to be here And let's just jump right in You do recommend the vaccines Yes even as I get around with a cane I still recommend that everyone get the COVID vaccine You write there's more risk from COVID but also more risk from getting in a car every day Then let's say having an adverse side effect Yes I really wrestled with telling my story but I think that the best outcome here is to just stand back and look at what the actual risks are of something bad happening Well and we want to do that I want to talk about GBS and what happened to you but this fact that you had an adverse side effect made it more difficult for you to talk about what happened to you with the vaccine because you do support the vaccines If I got that right Yes You know this is scary stuff I've learned more about GBS than I ever thought I would and it's pretty fascinating actually medically but it's been hard for me to talk about because I didn't see how it would fit into such a fraught dialog about vaccines and vaccine hesitation I'm normally a cereal social media poster but I held back because I was worried it would scare people away from the vaccines who were you know had genuine questions Also that it might be kind of like hijacked by anti vax disinformation campaigns Right You don't need a lumped in with people who think vaccines cause infertility they don't or that they have something to do with microchips they don't that was your fear Well obviously you think we should talk about it now What are we talking about Guillain Barre syndrome named after two French doctors who noticed kind of a paralysis in World War I soldiers it can be caused by virus by bacteria bad food other vaccines very small risk but what did it do to you What did you feel and when did you feel it Well the first pangs came after a mere 20 minute ride on a stationary bike at the gym and then I had trouble sleeping I had this funny feeling underneath my skin like champagne bubbles I went to the emergency room actually a couple of times before getting a spinal tap and having the diagnosis of GBS And what I was told is that something goes haywire our immune systems are amazing things but my antibodies confronted the spike protein represented by the J&J vaccine But then some of them started looking around and they decided that the coding on my nerves on my peripheral nervous system also kind of looked like that And they decided that they should go ahead and attack that as if it was an enemy So it was my body attacking my own peripheral nervous system I mean you describe it in an essay wrote for The Boston Globe magazine They went rogue and they took the hill you know only the hill was you And you're treated with fresh antibodies Those rogue antibodies those misinformed troops were sucked out through a tube in your neck It's a pretty tough case It's been quite a journey Three treatments Following up with steroids to sort of tamp down the lingering inflammation But the hard work really comes with rehab And for that I went to spaulding rehabilitation hospital and first of all I have to say I'm very grateful to I'm grateful for a lot of things One is to have health insurance and understanding employer But to be in the medical epicenter of Boston I was treated at Beth Israel deaconess medical center and then I went to spaulding rehabilitation Hospital And there I had to learn how to walk all over again and to use my hands and get on the path to recovery It's pretty brutal Yeah I was flat on my back easily fatigued at first I was getting around only with a walker also a wheelchair In July you say you were watching when the CDC announced the warning about guillain Barre syndrome tied to the Johnson Johnson shot And you wept why And you know this confirmed what my doctors had told me I felt bad for the other hundred people It was a hundred people at the time and it really just hit home that I just got so extremely unlucky And then that night I remember watching all the national news and seeing how the media treated the story the most pretty uniform and it was that here's this terrible thing that happened The FDA attached a warning but it's very rare and just about everybody said the things that we're saying which was that you know the risks of getting COVID are much greater And the vaccines are for the most part safe and effective Well you know you and I spoke we wrestled out How do we do this We want to make sure that the headline is that the vaccine is still working that this is rare but as I just did that again that kind of ignores what you went through I mean that must have made you feel really lonely and diminished I mean people were saying things like oh it's just a weakness Right yes I remember thinking you know I'll show you weakness I remember I had to go lie down after reading that I also felt like hey come on let's not gloss over anything either You know you can talk about the percentages but as my doctor once said you know this is 100% of me I was sort of wrestling with that feeling of wanting to be acknowledged about the hard thing that happened And just just having more reasonable conversation about it It's lonely Yeah I longed to talk about my rehab Sessions and the gym there it's welding But I held back because it was just two supercharged through social media in particular So it was isolating for you But you also worry about the message it sends Yeah ultimately that's what I decided was I should tell my story because we shouldn't try to hide any of this It'll look like the medical establishment is trying to hide something if they don't talk about adverse effects however rare Let's put all the cards on the table Yes something else haywire in the very small number of people and then you can move on to the overwhelming majority of cases where there are no such adverse effects But I think there are people out there who have genuine questions about the vaccines and how they work and what happens in their bodies or their kids bodies Well you say those people they can handle the truth and I'm thinking as well it allows you know the 200 or so of people like you who have GPS rare but they're not so isolated They can get more support maybe as well I sometimes wonder you know who those other people are I'd actually really like to get in touch with some of them One of the great things that Beth Israel did actually was connect me with another GPS patient who has since recovered and it was great to talk about is almost like a support group I think the greater good was really to confront side effects more honestly and openly for anyone who is hesitating although it also has the effect as you say of making us feel a little less alone Anthony Flint of Boston somebody who's had a side effect Yang Barre syndrome from the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine one of the very few who had that reaction And.

guillain Barre syndrome Scott Tong Robin young Anthony Flint Lincoln institute of land poli Anthony CDC The Boston Globe magazine spaulding rehabilitation hospi Boston Johnson & Johnson spaulding rehabilitation Hospi Barre syndrome paralysis Washington Beth Israel deaconess medical Johnson Johnson U.S. walker
"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Sounds like the Peach State is the place to be for all the political action here over the next couple of weeks, taking no break really, for the holiday season. One quick final point here, Scott, How important is it for Republicans in Georgia? To turn out to vote. I know there's been some rogue Republicans suggesting that they should not because of fraud. But the president had a very different message. So how important is turnout to this election? Well, I think it's the difference between socialism and capitalism and America and not just Georgia, and that's why it's important to Stave off unified government from Democrats in the House, Senate and White House because they will just change the rules and eliminate the filibuster. Pack. The courts do all these policies and also shift us toward a green new deal style economy where the progressive left is able to just fundamentally change the way that business is conducted in America. We have been talking with Scott Parkinson from the club for growth and as the weeks unfold here, heading up to that special election in Georgia will continue to check in with him to find out the latest activity. Scott tell us a bit about the club for growth. Yeah, The club for Growth is a membership organization and American Radio Journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research Incorporated. The Lincoln Institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals, corporations and philanthropic foundations, which underwrite the cost of this program. A man's and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln Institute or of this radio station, learn more about American radio Journal.

Scott Parkinson Georgia Lincoln Institute Lincoln Institute of Public Op American Radio Journal America fraud president White House Senate
"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Do we show up again and vote for candidates when we're not quite sure if that matters while the answer that is You definitely need to show up and vote because the difference between unified government and divided government is the difference between the fundamental freedoms our country was founded on and the way that our government runs, it would be systematically changed. And geared toward a socialist government. If Joe Biden and the Senate Democrats and Nancy Pelosi in the House Democrats all have unity in pushing together an agenda, they would've polished Legislative filibuster, they would pack the Supreme Court with liberal extremists, activists, judges And they would also enact agenda that is going to take away the individual freedoms and I think a lot of us are beginning to recognize our being infringed upon in the Corona virus Pandemic American Radio Journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research Incorporated. The Lincoln Institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals, corporations and philanthropic foundations, which underwrite the cost of this program. Romance and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln Institute or of this radio station, learn more about the program has been pre recorded for broadcast at this time. Thanks for tuning in to this week's show. I'm your host, Chris McKay and I'm really happy to have you along today. As we explore and discover.

Lincoln Institute Lincoln Institute of Public Op Chris McKay Joe Biden Nancy Pelosi Radio Journal Supreme Court
"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"T. U. S dot org's We are a university base research center. We do independent research. People do not commission us to do research. We all have Focus toward the virtues and uses of markets go the Mercatus start ord. And if you're particularly interested in health care, just get in there and type health in the search box and you'll get AH, a world of Interesting papers, some of which your mind and most of which are I have great boys from the Mercatus Center, Bob. Thank you for being here. Thanks, woman. Scott Parkinson at the club for growth has been with us all year talking about all the contested U s senate races. We still have a couple. Scott. Good to have you here. Great to be with you, Roman. Thanks for having me. We began this election cycle Scott, with Republicans having to defend over twice as many Senate seats as races have been called this past week. Where do we stand in terms of party control of the Senate? Well right now Republicans have 50 seats in the United States Senate and we've got two races down in Georgia that look like they're headed to a runoff. There's going to be a recount. Of ballots in Georgia, which could potentially swing that they between David Perdue and Jon Ossoff's, But all indications right now are that we're headed toe to Senate run offs in Georgia on January 5th. Republicans overall on election night performed really, really well in the United States Senate races. We've obviously been talking to your listeners about all these really close races that were worth watching on election night. And we knew that some of these races we're gonna be very difficult to win in Arizona. Martha McSally lost Mark Kelly and in Colorado, John Hickenlooper defeated Republican Cory Gardner. But when you look at the rest of these races Republicans ran the table. We want to close race in North Carolina, with Thom Tillis defeating Tell Cunningham. We want a big race in Maine, with Susan Collins defeating Sara Gideon. And up and down the country in Montana and Kansas. We just had a better turnout. Then a lot of the polling was showing and so Republicans are in a very, very good position here. We need to obviously win. One of these Georgia races to avoid unified government for the Democrats if Joe Biden ultimately is declared and certified the winner, But there's still a ways to go with that, and what we need to focus on now is Saving the Senate majority for the Republicans by winning these runoff races in Georgia. These two races in Georgia. We came to the runoff situation by very different routes. Both our incumbent, but the Kelly Leffler situation is a bit different. Yeah, Kelly less lira was appointed to The United States Senate by Governor Brian Kemp following the retirement of long time Georgia Senator Johnny Isakson and when she got that appointment, there was a pretty Brutal and big fight in the Republican circles between her and Doug Collins, who was a representative from the Ninth Congressional District in Georgia, and Congressman Collins fought hard for the nomination. He ultimately Finishing third place. But when you had two Republicans splitting the vote, and the way that this election was run, it was a jungle primary, meaning the top two vote getters would advance to a runoff. And so the Democrats Reverend Raphael Warnock is technically in the lead with Pie thirties, but you had to Republicans that went ahead and split the vote. But Kelly left there defeated. Collins in order to make one of those final two flats for the Georgia run off there in that seat, and then in the other race, David Perdue Just finish underneath 50% by on Lee a few votes, and so he looks like you say Seeing John off of both of these are going to be highly contested races. And come for growth and are super Pac Club for Growth action, actually joined with a bunch of other conservative outside groups and conservative senators. To launch the Save America Coalition this week, and that organization is ultimately gonna come down to Georgia and try toe do get out the vote efforts. Help Senator Leffler and Senator produce finish above 50% and these one offs. Tell us a little bit more about this Save America Coalition who's involved in We know the goal ultimately is to win these two elections. But what sort of strategies are you looking at? The other groups that are involved in this include heritage actions. FreedomWorks the Susan B. Anthony List Tea Party patriots, and then we've got about a dozen conservative senators like Ted Cruz. And Mike Leigh Sauce. Holly, Ron Johnson, Pat Toomey, Senator elect Tommy Tub, Erbil, Senator elect Cynthia Lummis, former United States senator and conservative pathology and demand. Marco Rubio and a couple others that are really joining together and thinking about ways to support Senator Leffler When it comes to really this get out the vote effort. We know that there's going to be $100 Million spent in this race when it comes to political advertisements on television through broadcasts and cable, and so what this coalition is going to be focusing on Is the tighter effort on getting out the vote, and we know that looking at the data following the election, overwhelming majority of Georgians believe that the election was stolen and there was not election integrity. And so what we need to do here is rebuilt that enthusiasm among Georgians that Really just have lost trust in the electoral system and make sure that they show up on January 5th or in early voting beginning in December. Toe cast a ballot and Democrats really have every reason to show up. If they can get unified government they can ran the Socialist agenda down the throats of the American people, and they can change the rules of the Senate. With the legislative filibuster, they can stack the stack and pack the Supreme Court. They can do anything that they want through a simple majority. If they have unified government now, a lot of people might ask. Well, Republicans had unified government in 2017 and 2018. Why didn't they do that? Well, Republicans Mostly adhere to the norms of our political institutions. And while we did advance tax reform through reconciliation in the United States Congress for the most part, I think that Republicans want toe Try toe enact policies that a majority and a super majority of the American people can agree with American Radio Journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research Incorporated. Lincoln Institute is completely funded.

Senate Georgia United States Senator Leffler Congressman Collins Mark Kelly Scott Parkinson Mercatus Center Senator Johnny Isakson senator Kelly Leffler David Perdue John Hickenlooper Bob Senator T. U. S Lincoln Institute Arizona Doug Collins Save America Coalition
"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Keeping a close eye on US Senate races around the country has control of the upper chamber is at play in this November's election. Scott. Good to have you here. Always great to be with you, Roman. Thanks for having me. First of all, remind our listeners. What is the current party balance in the U. S senate? Yeah, right now, the Republicans in the Senate hold a three seat majority. And there's a lot of seats that are in play for the 2020 election. Throughout our country. We've got real battleground race is heating up. In a lot of these states, where not only is President Trump and Joe Biden duking it out, but we've also got really competitive Senate races. Let's talk first of all about potential Republican pickups because therefore fewer of those than there are potential Democrat pickups. Alabama in Michigan. How are things looking in those two states? Yeah, Alabama is the really solid Republican pickup seat. I'd say that Republicans feel their best opportunity to flip the seat is against Senator Doug Jones and right now. Tommy Tuberville is in position to be victorious. Hopefully on election night, Tommy Tuberville should be perceived to be a favorite in that Alabama seat. And this again John James is taking on Senator Peters and this is a race where Republicans are really happy about the recruit that they've got running in the state. It's again one of those Really, really tight and highly contested presidential states. So the turnout the president Trump gets is undoubtedly Going to help somebody like John James. How many Democrats come out, given the fact that Biden is also focusing on that stage, and we're looking at a razor 10 races and Hopefully That's another pickup opportunity for the Senate Republicans. The South has become somewhat of a Senate battleground for us as well. And we have three states North and South Carolina as well as Georgia. What's happening in Dixie? Yeah, all three of those states. They've got pretty competitive Democrats running in South Carolina. We've got the Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham running against Jaime Harrison. And that's turned out to be a really competitive race because of the level of money that Harrison has brought into his campaign. He's set a record with $57 million in raised in the third quarter. And that's quite impressive whether you're Republican or Democrat. So Lindsey Graham's got a real range. Still feel confident that Lindsey Graham's gonna win re election there. In North Carolina. We have a toss up race between Cal Cunningham and Thom Tillis. A lot of money being spent in that state. And to be quite honest, we should expect Tom tell us to be in a dogfight there down to the end. Additionally, we've got races in Georgia. We've got The race involving Doug Collins, a congressman from Georgia, and he is running against the current son of their Kelly Leffler. Leslie was appointed by Brian Camp following The entire mint of Johnny Isakson. And so that's created another special election, with the incumbent appointed Senator Kelly Leffler, running in a primary against Collins. No one's going to go to a runoff election and they're not actually going to decide that until January. If you can believe it or not, So we've got a couple of races. There's also David Perdue running against Jon Ossoff's in the other Georgia race. And that one's also close because George's clothes also in the Midwest. We have several states of play. We have Colorado we have Iowa and even Montana. Yeah. In Iowa, you've got incumbent Republican Joni Ernst's. She is running for reelection and a really, really competitive race against Greenfield. I would expect this one to be probably five points either way. And we obviously have some incumbent advantage. I don't think that the people of Iowa think Joni Ernst is really doing a bad job. But it is a competitive race and Iowa's a competitive presidential battle is well. Additionally, Montana there's Ah ah, pretty good recruit that the Democrats have brought in. They've got the statewide governor. Steve Bullock. He's a former presidential candidate running against incumbent Republican Senator Steve Daines. The club for Growth pack and come for the action are supporting Steve Daines in that race. We've made endorsement. And in Colorado, John Hickenlooper is also a former presidential candidate and governor and he is running against Republican incumbent Cory Gardner. This is a race that Democrats have had their eyes on for a long time. Hickenlooper I think has been a sort of mediocre candidate or the Democrats and Cory Gardner. He's always had a really positive attitude about representing the people of Colorado and listening to them, and I think he's been Overall, a solid senator with that state and the people that he's fighting for here in D. C. So it's going to be a close race. I know the Democrats have drink that one high. And along with Arizona is their best pickup opportunities. And let's conclude by talking a bit about Arizona again. You've got a very strong recruits in Mark Kelly. Mark Kelly is the astronaut husband of Former congresswoman Gabby Giffords, and he is running against Martha MC Sally Sally was appointed to this seat following the retirement of Jon Kyl. Jon Kyl came back to fill the term. Of John McCain. And then he went ahead and retired after Martha McSally lost her previous ways to Kirsten Cinema American Radio Journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln Institute of Public Opinion Research Incorporated. The Lincoln Institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals, corporations and philanthropic foundations, which underwrite the cost of this program. Comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln Institute or of this radio station, learn more about American radio Journal and hear expanded versions of some interviews aired on this program. Please visit our website. American radio journal dot com..

Senate Georgia Iowa Colorado Senator Steve Daines Lindsey Graham Senator Kelly Leffler Alabama Tommy Tuberville John Hickenlooper Cory Gardner Joe Biden President Trump Jon Kyl John James Senator Doug Jones Lincoln Institute Joni Ernst Senate Judiciary South Carolina
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington at the U. S. Supreme Court today, Justice is carved out a major exception to the nation's fair employment laws. By a 7 to 2 vote, the court ruled that the country's civil rights laws barring discrimination on the job Do not apply to most teachers at religious elementary schools and potentially at middle and high schools as well. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports. The case is before the court involved to fifth grade teachers of Catholic schools in California who were fired from their jobs. One a veteran of 16 years of your school, claimed age discrimination. The other, said she was fired after telling her superior that she had breast cancer and would need some time off an allegation that, if true, would be a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The school's deny the charges but maintain that regardless, federal employment laws do not apply to their teachers because they are all required to teach religion 40 minutes a day, in addition to other academic subjects. Today, the Supreme Court agreed. Writing for the seven Justice Majority Justice Samuel Alito said state interference in religious education would violate the free exercise of religion guaranteed by the First Amendment. Therefore, federal courts are not allowed to settle employment disputes involving teachers at thes schools. The decision would appear to strip fair employment protections from some 149,000 teachers at religious elementary schools where religion is routinely taught along with other subjects. As to the nearly 200,000 teachers at religious, middle and high schools. It is not entirely clear what will happen. Stanford law professor Michael McConnell If there's a teacher that does not have Religious responsibilities. I think that teacher falls outside the exceptions of, for example, a physics teacher in high school would not be covered. But what if the physics teacher is also a home room teacher who leads the class in prayer or accompanies the class to mass? That's a fair question, and it's certainly an open question. After this opinion, University of Virginia law professor Douglas Laycock filed a brief siding with the religious schools in this case. And he can seize that there will be injustice is in some cases. We tolerate the occasional abuses because the cost of Judges and Juries. Second guessing every personnel decision cross of that are on the whole, much greater. Today's decision, leaving late teachers without anti discrimination protections, was one of three major decisions in recent weeks that seek to rebalance the law when it comes to the separation of church and state. In another decision today, the court upheld the Trump administration rule that allows employers with religious or moral objections to opt out of providing birth control coverage for their employees. And last week, the Supreme Court effectively invalidated state constitutional provision in most states that bar taxpayer funds from going to private religious schools. Stand for law professor Jeffrey Fisher, who represented the fired teachers. In today's case sees this trilogy of opinions as having major consequences. The court has issued three big decisions in favor of its view of religious liberty in a way that No makes this perhaps the most pro religion court in the history of our country For much of the 19 hundred's. The Supreme Court's legal opinion, stress the idea of separation between church and state. But as the court has grown more conservative in the last two decades, it has increasingly abandoned that notion and instead focused its opinions on protecting the free exercise of religion and greater accommodation between church and state. University of Chicago Law professor David Stress. I do think there is a tone In these opinions that religious groups are not being taken seriously enough. The tone that in our society today, religious groups and look down on they're not protected. In short, the religious groups are victims of discrimination. Justices, of course, are to some extent the product of their life experiences and education. Six of the nine were raised as Catholics and five of them were educated at parochial schools. In the teacher case, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who was educated at parochial schools, wrote the descent for herself and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Sotomayor appointed to specific provisions that Congress wrote into the nation's anti discrimination laws, so that places of worship could choose their own religious leaders in expanding those exceptions beyond their historic narrowness, she said. Court majority has leveled a constitutional broadside at hundreds of thousands of employees who work not just a religious schools, but also religious hospitals, charities and universities. The court did not address such expansive questions today. But if Sotomayor is right, millions of employees could find themselves excluded from the protections of the federal fair employment laws. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington The Emancipation Memorial in Washington, D C. Depicts Abraham Lincoln, standing over a freed slave on one knee with chain's broken, formerly enslaved people raised the money for the statue, but had no say in its design. People who wanted tort down, say the memorial fails to take into account the work African Americans did to push for their freedom. To historians and members of the Abraham Lincoln Institute took up the debate. I argued that statue should be kept in place. I think the statue is visually irredeemable. That's Scott Sandage from Carnegie Mellon University, calling for it to come down and John White from Christopher Newport University, saying it should stay as historians. They wondered what abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass thought about the statue. So Sandage dug into newspaper archives, where he found a long lost letter by Douglas about it. It was printed in 18 76 just days after the statue went up. He sent it immediately. Toe white. On the one hand, he calls it admirable, he says the sculptor Thomas Ball beautifully expresses the act of emancipation. On the other hand, Douglas shows very obvious misgivings about how the enslaved man was depicted, he said. The Negro here, the rising rising is still on his knees and nude. What I want to see before I die is a monument representing the Negro not who shot on his knees like a four footed animal but erect on his feet like a man. Unquote. And then he concluded the letter. There is room in Lincoln Park for another monument, and I throw out this suggestion at the end that it may be taken up in acted upon with Douglas's words in mind, Professor Sandage says he can see a way to preserve it. Recast it, so to speak with better pictures around it. If it were possible to save the gift that thousands of African American civil war soldiers and other new citizens of color Gave their money their first wages in freedom if it were possible to save that gift. I think it's worth talking about creating a whole new memorial that absorbs swallows. So to speak. The old one Failing that, though Professor Scott Sandage maintains the statue should come down. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. 10.

U. S. Supreme Court Professor Scott Sandage professor Douglas Laycock Justice Sonia Sotomayor Majority Justice Samuel Alito Nina Totenberg Washington NPR California Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mary Louise Kelly Abraham Lincoln Institute Elsa Chang Los Angeles Lincoln Park University of Chicago Law
"lincoln institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington at the U. S. Supreme Court today, Justice is carved out a major exception to the nation's fair employment laws. By a 7 to 2 vote, the court ruled that the country's civil rights laws barring discrimination on the job Do not apply to most teachers at religious elementary schools and potentially at middle and high schools as well. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports. The case is before the court involved to fifth grade teachers of Catholic schools in California who were fired from their jobs. One a veteran of 16 years of your school, claimed age discrimination. The other, said she was fired after telling her superior that she had breast cancer and would need some time off an allegation that, if true, would be a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The school's deny the charges, but maintained that regardless, federal employment laws do not apply to their teachers because they are all required to teach religion 40 minutes a day, in addition to other academic subjects. Today, the Supreme Court agreed. Writing for the seven Justice Majority Justice Samuel Alito said state interference in religious education would violate the free exercise of religion guaranteed by the First Amendment. Therefore, federal courts are not allowed to settle employment disputes involving teachers at thes schools. The decision would appear to strip fair employment protections from some 149,000 teachers at religious elementary schools where religion is routinely taught along with other subjects. As to the nearly 200,000 teachers at religious, middle and high schools. It is not entirely clear what will happen. Stanford law professor Michael McConnell If there's a teacher that does not have Not religious responsibilities. I think that teacher falls outside the exception. So, for example, a physics teacher in high school would not be covered. But what if the physics teacher is also a home room teacher who leads the class in prayer or accompanies the class to mass? That's a fair question, and it's certainly an open question After this. University of Virginia law professor Douglas Laycock filed a brief siding with the religious schools in this case, and he can seize that there will be injustice is in some cases. We tolerate the occasional abuses because the cost of Judges and Juries. Second guessing Every personnel decision cross of that are on the whole, much greater today's decision, leaving late teachers without anti discrimination protections. Was one of three major decisions in recent weeks that seek to re balance the law when it comes to the separation of church and state. In another decision today, the court upheld a Trump administration rule that allows employers with religious or moral objections to opt out of providing birth control coverage for their employees. And last week, the Supreme Court effectively invalidated State constitutional provision in most states that bar taxpayer funds from going to private religious schools. Stanford law professor Jeffrey Fisher, who represented the fired teachers, in today's case, sees this trilogy of opinions as having major consequences. The court has issued three big decisions in favor of its view of religious liberty in a way that No makes this perhaps the most pro religion court in the history of our country For much of the 19 hundred's. The Supreme Court's legal opinion, stress the idea of separation between church and state. But as the court has grown more conservative in the last two decades, it has increasingly abandoned that notion and instead focused its opinions on protecting the free exercise of religion and greater accommodation between church and state. University of Chicago law professor David Strauss. I do think there is a tone In these opinions. That religious groups are not being taken seriously enough. The tone that in our society today, religious groups and look down on they're not protected. In short, the religious groups are victims of discrimination. Justices, of course, are to some extent the product of their life experiences and education. Six of the nine were raised as Catholics and five of them were educated at parochial schools. In the teacher case, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who was educated at parochial schools, wrote the descent for herself and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Sotomayor appointed to specific provisions that Congress wrote into the nation's anti discrimination laws so that places of worship could choose their own religious leaders. In expanding those exceptions beyond their historic narrowness, she said. The court majority has leveled a constitutional broadside at hundreds of thousands of employees who work not just at religious schools, but also religious hospitals, charities and universities. The court did not address such expansive questions today. But if Sotomayor is right, millions of employees could find themselves excluded from the protections of the federal fair employment laws. Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington The Emancipation Memorial in Washington, D C. Depicts Abraham Lincoln, standing over a freed slave on one knee with chain's broken, formerly enslaved people raised the money for the statue, but had no say in its design. People who wanted tort down, say the memorial fails to take into account the work African Americans did to push for their freedom. To historians and members of the Abraham Lincoln Institute took up the debate. I argued that the stats you should be kept in place. I think the statue is visually irredeemable. That Scott Sandage from Carnegie Mellon University, calling for it to come down and John White from Christopher Newport University, saying it should stay as historians. They wondered what abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass thought about the statue. So Sandage dug into newspaper archives, where he found a long lost letter by Douglas about it. It was printed in 18 76. Just days after the statue went up. He sent it immediately. Toe white. On the one hand, he calls it admirable, he says the sculptor Thomas Ball beautifully expresses the act of emancipation. On the other hand, Douglas shows very obvious misgivings about how the enslaved man was depicted, he said. The Negro here, right rising is still on his knees and nude. What I want to see before I die is a monument representing the Negro not who shot on his knees like a four footed animal but erect on his feet like a man. Unquote. And then he concluded the letter. There is room in Lincoln Park for another monument, and I throw out this suggestion at the end that it may be taken up in acted upon with Douglas's words in mind, Professor Sandage says he can see a way to preserve it. Recast it, so to speak with better pictures around it. If it were possible to save the gift that thousands of African American civil war soldiers and other new citizens of color Gave their money their first wages in freedom if it were possible to save that gift. I think it's worth talking about creating a whole new memorial that absorbs swallows. So to speak. The old one Failing that, though Professor Scott Sandage maintains the statue should come down..

U. S. Supreme Court Professor Scott Sandage professor Douglas Laycock Justice Sonia Sotomayor Majority Justice Samuel Alito Nina Totenberg Stanford Washington NPR California Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mary Louise Kelly Abraham Lincoln Institute Elsa Chang Los Angeles Lincoln Park University of Virginia
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"The house Majority back you've got to be able to net seats and there's some very very solid Republican districts that in twenty eighteen elected Democrats and one of is south Carolina's first congressional district that was the race that mark Sanford previously held the seat and Katie hearing ten it up beating him in a primary and then she lost the general election to Jo Cunningham in that race there have have been sort of multiple strong candidates that have thought about running and taken a pass and what's resulted is two women that are really duking it out in the Republican primary Nancy mace is a state representative and she's I think the clear front runner she's had ability to really raise significant funding for her race and they put on a pole in South Carolina recently and she was leaving the field significant margins and her biggest competitor is a woman named Kathy landing Kathy is financial planner who's had a business for a long time and has really been disgusted with the way that Washington operates American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research incorporated the Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrites the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the gas I do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute.

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"Do is when they when they do these loans. They're financing deals that can facilitate the export of Boeing planes. So you remember the seven thirty seven max eight crashes at happened in Indonesia and eat, THEO Pia. Well, we don't know exactly if Boeing financed those. Loans to Indonesia and Ethiopia through the Export Import Bank, but they definitely have finance loans related to seven thirty seven maxes there, just three different models. And we're unsure exactly which models were sold to Indonesia and Ethiopia. But I can tell you this, if the financing hit existed over the past thousand as like it does today. Now, those loans, most certainly would have occurred involving the seven thirty seven max eight what we wanna do. Here is bring about new education, a members of congress on. Why reauthorization of the Export Import Bank is unnecessary. The reauthorization will come back up later this year in September. We will strongly oppose that, but I want to tell you, it's, it's an uphill battle as we just saw them fill the core on the board of directors American radio journal is heard on public affairs. Bonded radio stations all across the country, including our newest affiliates. W. N. C. D. FM. W. A. K Z FM, and w m. Mm x y FM in Youngstown, Ohio. Welcome to our new listeners in the Buckeye state. American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research, Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations, which underwrite the cost of this program comments, and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute, or of this radio station..

Indonesia Export Import Bank Boeing Lincoln institute Ethiopia Lincoln institute of public THEO Pia Youngstown congress Ohio W. N. C. W. A. K
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"And it also gives you access to all previous editions of the reports you can see not only where states rank in two thousand nineteen but all of the last eleven editions of the report Jonathan Williams who is co author of rich dates poor states. Also chief? Economist and vice president of the center for state fiscal reform at Alec Jonathan. Thank you for being with us, always great to be with you, my friend. And now we go to the offices of the club for growth where Scott Parkinson has been watching all the activity on Capitol Hill, and it has been a busy time. Scott good to have you here. Thanks for having me. Let's talk about something that happened over the last week or so and is going to become a major issue through the spring and into the summer, and this has to do with the size of the federal debt and the debt limit. What was the big milestone for the first time in US history? The national debt officially past twenty two trillion dollars, and that's historic because if you look back to when President Bush was leaving office the debt limit had barely past ten trillion. So since the beginning of the two thousand nine we've added twelve trillion dollars to the national debt, and we're right back in the middle of. Another trillion dollar deficit for this fiscal year as we head into March. And then later this summer explain for our listeners, Scott, why this whole debt limit issue is not only important, but we sort of are going to be at a critical juncture once again, are we not? Yeah. We are what happens in March is the debt limit suspension is officially expired, and we will see the US treasury department go through what is called extraordinary measures where they can sell off assets. And find ways to make sure that there's no default on the national debt the period of extraordinary measures can normally lasts several months. So we're expecting the debt. Limit fight to really become a big issue in June and July this summer what I think you'll see is the democrat house of representatives passed a budget resolution that will include a version of what's known as. Has to get rule and that allows the debt limit to be increased by the amount of the deficit that the budget provides for all that would be necessary after passage of the budget resolution would be for the Senate to take that up and tack it onto some hidden legislation, and what's known as a budget teamer and pass the debt limit that fashion. So what we're concerned about here is that there's really no focus on the spending here in Washington, we've been really irresponsible with the tax payers money, and we need to have a real serious discussion about what the future of our economy looks like if we keep stacking on trillions and trillions of dollars to the national debt. Speaking of tacking on those trillions and trillions of dollars. Scott this exponential increase in the federal debt, and the acceleration of it at what point do we simply run out of the ability to borrow money in those quantities. He's somewhere. There's got to be a finite number of dollars available. Certainly the credit agencies are paying attention to the amount of revenue that the treasury department. Annually collects we're at historic levels of revenue. So that's a good thing. If you're concerned about how much we're bringing in and the growth of the economy, but on the other side, we continue to spend way more than we actually have. So there needs to be fiscal restraint and a refocus on the spending side of the budget ledger. I think that we're nearing a point where the credit agencies could warn about another credit downgrade like we saw in two thousand eleven we had a triple a rating that had been downgraded for the first time in US history about eight years ago, and we're certainly back in a similar situation here where I think everybody should be concerned American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country, including our newest affiliate. K H I FM in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Welcome to our new listeners in the land of enchantment American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of.

Scott Parkinson US Lincoln institute vice president Lincoln institute of public Jonathan Williams Alec Jonathan President Bush Alamogordo Senate American radio journal New Mexico treasury department Washington research Inc twenty two trillion dollars twelve trillion dollars trillion dollar
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"Of American radio journal the threat posed by the Democrats, socialist agenda is real and could have a devastating effect on the US economy. So says Colonel Frank Ryan USMC retired on this American radio journal commentary. Newly elected Representative Alexandria or Cossio Cortez suggested. A tax rate of perhaps seventy percent to fund her green new deal. The congressperson acknowledged that it was an ambitious goal and would require a great deal of change rapidly. There Democrats socialist to believe that income redistribution is the panacea for the world and the solution to most of our problems such perspectives are gaining ground in the United States. And we would be naive to not acknowledge it. I would encourage all of us to take this debate seriously and to not engage in smear tactics. Ridiculing the person making the statement argument Hominum. Distract from the core issue, for instance, attacking congressperson or Cossio Cortez, owner couch dance video to attempt to discredit hers counterproductive attack, the idea not the person we may find that. There are more people in this country who believed such tax rates and tax into wealthy makes sense. Even Bernie Sanders a recent presidential contender advocated for higher taxes on the wealthy and he did fairly. Well, his plans included higher tax rates. Closing loopholes and changing, your state tax implications to society such tax rates or catastrophic. This debate centers on the very foundation and fabric of our society, and the consequences of losing this battle, which are profound concurrently. There's been a great deal of discussion about wealth inequality in United States. The fallacy of attempting to solve a wealthy inequity problems to income redistribution of higher tax rates is due to the sheer complexity of the tax code, which makes the discussion for the average person mind numbing at best confusing income with wealth is one of the. Cornerstone to the logic of the Democrats socialist movement. It's just inaccurate because of the complexity of the tax code United States. All of us must understand that no political body or government passed the laws of supply and demand natural law. Supersede any political initiative and attempts to interfere with the free movement of capital goods is always disastrous in one thousand nine hundred sixty s when the tax rates at that time were much higher democrat socialist today compared those tech rates then with what they are proposing today, Democrats socialists, do not seem to recall what was happening in the early nineteen sixties, president Kennedy reduced tax rates with congress. Because of the stifling affect those tax rates were having the nation. The president was trying to get the nation moving again, and he succeeded in the nineteen seventies. There was a massive inflation during the Carter administration to council and wage and price stability called kelps was created to curb inflation drastic efforts were perceived to be needed to be done in this economic. Attempting interfering with the market was undertaken shortly. After this effort, the economy entered into a fairly major recession other efforts such as changing minimum wage guaranteed. Incomes unrestrained growth of social programs without looking at the economic implication. To those proposals is forty when I first saw the increase in tax proposals. From Bernie Sanders. I was somewhat surprised by the number of extremely wealthy. People who seemed to be supporting the effort initially founded strange, extremely wealthy people seem to favor tax policies, encouraging wealth redistribution, it seemed a logical that the super rich would favor wealth redistribution since it would adversely affect them. But then natural laws and a perspective of self interest comes to play almost immediately in reality. Taxing income has little affect on the wealthy sits income would be taxed and not wealth. Self interest of the wealthy reinforces to fallacy of attempting to interfere with markets other than creating the rule of law for which people and organizations. Can operate the difficulty with all of this analysis that is complicated. It's easier to explain to people that it is income that is creating the problem of inequity versus wealth as a result of this difficulty. The super wealthy are extraordinarily willing to jump on the income redistribution bandwagon and do use Democrats socialists to do it because quite candidly. It doesn't affect them. The Democrats socialist agenda must be taken very seriously because of the consequences of ignoring it or fatal efforts interfere with markets always caused people to find their self interest to survive. It is natural that people do that efforts to increase tax rates without considering the consequences of doing it may have the exact opposite effect as to what people expect my time in the Marine Corps. I've seen nations collapsed in eastern Europe and into Caribbean as well as in the Middle East interfere with an economic market at your own peril. Take the Democrats, social agenda, seriously and defend our system of commerce and our way of life. If we fail. This battle. The consequences will be felt for decades to come for the American radio journal. This is Frank Ryan American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country. They include our newest affiliate W W F A FM in Florence Alabama. Lock them to our new listeners in the Yellowhammer state American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program. Comments Endo pinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of.

United States American radio journal Cossio Cortez Bernie Sanders Colonel Frank Ryan USMC Lincoln institute Lincoln institute of public Florence Alabama Representative Frank Ryan Alexandria president Europe Carter administration congress Middle East kelps
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"So Pat Roberts is retiring after a long long career in Washington. I think it was approaching forty years. Maybe I think he started in eighty sometime. This is a perfect example of what we're talking about. Pat roberts. Get very little to contribute to reducing the size of government on his way out. He recently just bragged about how he was able to pass a bloated ugly looking farm Bill, and he bragged about that. And now granted you may think that that's what Kansas wants. But I would reject that premise, I think that cans want of responsible limited government now to your point. We now have an opportunity to elect a straw, conservative in Kansas, and frankly, Kansas isn't very well known to elect strong conservatives that this is the state of Bob Dole. Nancy, Landon Kassebaum and ironically, Arlen Specter specter was in the Senate from Pennsylvania, but he was born and raised in Kansas. So the Kansas does have sort of a moderate straight. But my hope is that we can't find a conservative. There are a few names popping around the the big one the big obvious. One would be the secretary of. Mike Pompeo who enjoys incredible success dealing with the president. And I think the president would love to have him in the Senate if he weren't already the secretary of state, so I don't know if Pompeo would make that decision, but he would obviously be the runaway favourite. There are other names being popped up. A lot of local members crisco Bach. Who recently ran for governor. He might run nother intriguing candidate is the current Federal Communications Commission, chairman aged tie. That's not a familiar name to a lot of people that he is a Kansas native and like Pompeo he enjoys some success in the Trump administration. So I think we've got a good opportunity here. We just got to capitalize on it. American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country, including K C N W A M in Kansas City, Missouri. W W N L A M in Pittsburgh pencil. Vania along with W B R, I A M in Indianapolis, Indiana. American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal and hearing expanded versions of some interviews aired on our program, please visit our website American.

Kansas Mike Pompeo Pat Roberts American radio journal Lincoln institute Senate Kansas City Lincoln institute of public president Arlen Specter Washington Bob Dole crisco Bach secretary Federal Communications Commiss Indianapolis Indiana Pennsylvania research Inc
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"So as we look at this, Andy as you've just. Outlined the Republican agenda pretty much grinds to a halt. And the Democrats are taking power in the house with an agenda their own, but Republicans increased their majority in the US Senate, and you still have President Trump sitting out there with a veto pen. So practically speaking are the Democrats going to be able to enact any of their agenda anymore than Republicans can enact there's no they won't be. And that's a good observation. What's going to happen? Is that Democrats know this too? So they're doing merely for theater, they want all voters equally their voters to know. Exactly what they stand for what they're striving to do. So that in the twenty twenty election, including the presidential election. They have something to campaign on saying that they did this that and the other. But you're correct whatever the House Democrats pass it's not gonna pass the Republican controlled Senate. That's the good news. The bad news is is that when it comes to the budget when it comes to spending as. As we've seen in the past the way that they'll resolve things is probably just spend more money on both parties priorities. So that the taxpayers is the ultimate loser. My hope is that that's not the case, but past is prologue. So we'll just have to see what happens as we look at this. Then as you've mentioned, the Democrats are pretty much just gonna put on a show. However, they're going to go up against the master showman who is Donald Trump. And are they really going to be able to out signed Donald Trump in that arena? He seems to be able to command whatever attention whenever he wants. Well, I think the shutdown fight is a great example of that. It's unclear given that we've been in holiday FOX for the last couple of weeks. It's unclear what the effect is shutdown is going to have on popular opinion, or on public opinion. And so it's not quite understood who's winning the shutdown fight. The Democrats are gonna. Offer up a shutdown proposal. It's going to get countered by Trump. And ultimately, I think we'll get out of it. It's just who's going to win. And who's gonna get the blame? American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country. They include our newest affiliates. KFI RC FM K S L E FM and K W S H A M in shawnee. Oklahoma. Welcome to our new listeners in the sooner state American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program. Comments Endo pinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal. And here expanded versions of interviews. Aired on our program, please. Visit our website.

Donald Trump American radio journal US Senate Lincoln institute Lincoln institute of public Andy FOX President Oklahoma FM K S L E shawnee research Inc
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"So as we look at this, and the as you've just outlined, the Republican agenda pretty much grinds to a halt. And the Democrats are taking power in the house with an agenda their own, but Republicans increased their majority in the US Senate, and you still have President Trump sitting out there with a veto pen. So practically speaking are the Democrats going to be able to enact any of their agenda anymore than Republicans can enact there's no they won't be. And and that's a good observation. What's going to happen? Is that Democrats know this too? So they're doing it merely for the theater, they want all voters, particularly their voters to know. Exactly what they stand for what they're striving to do. So that in twenty twenty election, including the presidential election. They have something to campaign on saying that they did this that and the other, but you're correct. Whatever the House Democrats passed it's not gonna pass the Republican controlled Senate. That's the good news. The bad news is is that when it comes to the budget when it comes to spending as we've seen in the past the way that they'll resolve things is probably just spend more money on both parties priorities. So that the tax payers the is the ultimate loser. My hope is that that's not the case, but past is prologue. So we'll just have to see what happens as we look at this. Then as you've mentioned, the Democrats are pretty much just gonna put on a show. However, they're going to go up against the master showman who is Donald Trump. And are they really going to be able to outshine Donald Trump in that arena? He seems to be able to command whatever attention whenever he wants. Well, I think the shutdown fight is a great example of that. It's unclear given that we've been in holiday FOX for the last couple of weeks. It's unclear what the effect is. Shutdown is going to have on popular opinion, or on public opinion. And so it's not quite understood who's winning the shutdown site. The Democrats are going to offer up a shutdown proposal. It's going to get countered by Trump. And ultimately, I think we'll get out of it. It's just who's going to win and who's going to get the blame. American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country. They include our newest affiliates. K I RC FM K S L E FM and K W S H A M in shawnee. Oklahoma. Welcome to our new listeners in the sooner state American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program. Comments Endo pinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal and here expanded versions of interviews. Aired on our program, please visit our website.

Donald Trump US Senate American radio journal Lincoln institute Lincoln institute of public President FOX Oklahoma research Inc shawnee
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"Of context guileless in a way that certainly does not describe Bush or any of the people he chose to speak it as fair. Well, the service was replete with praise for the forty first president that could with just the slightest nudge of interpretation be heard as implied rebuke of the forty fifth president, but only implied never explicit. This. Unlike almost everything else in American politics today was not about Donald Trump. And yet it very much was many of the speakers listed, personal qualities are forty first president that they thought were central to the character of that respected leader similarly commentators in print radio and television delineated some of these traits. Here's a list of some of the adjectives that writers and opinionated served up in his honour decent. Gracious kind courteous, civil gentle, good, thoughtful, polite. Honorable policy self deprecating the nouns, we're in the same vein. Honesty, integrity, humility. So let's do a little wordplay experiment pudding. John F harasses hypothesis to the test that the memorials for the forty first president also served as a rebuke of the forty fifth experiment is simple. I'll go through that list again. But I'll pause at each one and invite you to ask yourself this question to what extent does each word of presidential description fit, the current occupant of the White House decent. Gracious. Kind. Courteous. Civil. Gentle. Good. Thoughtful. Polite. Honorable. Tallest self deprecating. Honesty. Integrity. Humility. Not all or total misfits. But most are when we elect presidents. We elect them for a combination of two sets of variables. The first set contains policies ideas, initiatives and philosophy. The second set contains elements have character, charm personality, behaviors, and charisma I voted for Donald Trump based on the first set. I am almost daily repulsed by how he exhibits the second set, the vast majority of his policies are quite similar to those their president, George H W Bush, but his personal qualities are close to the opposite of President Bush's. This week has caused me to ask a question. I now put to you. Can I do it again? This has been Colin of let freedom ring for American radio journal. Visit us on the web at let freedom ring USA dot com. American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country, including W, I W AM and FM in Topeka Kansas w why GM FM in Rockwood Tennessee, along with K O R Q FM in Abilene, Texas. American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal and here expanded version. Of some interviews..

president American radio journal President Bush Donald Trump George H W Bush Lincoln institute Lincoln institute of public GM FM White House Abilene Rockwood Tennessee John F Texas Topeka Kansas research Inc forty fifth
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

15:34 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"Has been laid to rest at his presidential library in Texas and Americans from across the land have spent the last week remembering and paying tribute to the former chief executive here to share his slots on President Bush is John dizzy, John is the White House correspondent for Newsmax and previously for decades wrote for the conservative publication human events. John welcome back to American radio journal, John you have been covering presidents in Washington seen since nineteen Seventy-nine starting at events. Now, of course with Newsmax, and you've met and interviewed all the president's tell us first of all do you recall? The first time you met and talked with former president George H W Bush in what your impressions were of him at that time. I actually met him before. He was vice president or even a candidate for president. I was living in Texas in nineteen seventy eight and I went to an event where I met, George and Barbara Bush. That's when Barbara revealed to me that all the positions are husband held the one. She most cloud was that of US on voi- to China. And she in fact, traveled around and spoke to groups and showed slide just from pictures taken during your time together in Beijing. And I talked to briefly telling him I was from Connecticut, and how my parents voted for his father at least once when he was running for his two terms in the US Senate. It was pleasant conversation both Georgian Barbara Bush were perfect, ladies and gentlemen, which had a feeling he was not yet done with public life. And he was going to do something soon. And that of course was his bid for the presidency in the navy talk a little bit. If you will John about that nineteen eighty campaign, of course, that was the year in which he lost Ronald Reagan, but all ended well as he became Ronald Reagan's running mate. And of course, the rest is history. But how was that campaign and the two ended up together? But it wasn't always an easy path. Was it? No it wasn't. And remember Reagan and always been the hero of conservatives the natural heir to Barry Goldwater. Someone like George H W Bush from Connecticut, albeit then spending his adult years in Texas was considered a moderate Republican or establishment Republican everything about him. Reach of the Republican establishment is education at Yale. He's being the son of a. Connecticut US Senator his position in government. He served two terms in the house failed in two bids for the Senate and had all other positions from being UN ambassador to being director of the Central Intelligence Agency through appointments by Republican presidents, conservative activists, trusted dot of this. He fought against Reagan under the slogan president you won't have to train saying that his resume would take him someone superior to Jimmy Carter purview. Outsider for Reagan at first it appeared as so we had a good chance. He won the Maine caucuses and forced out then Senator Howard Baker another potential rival for moderate votes. He beat Reagan in the Iowa caucuses a stunning upset and one in win which led governor Reagan to shake up. Campaign. Reagan one New Hampshire as Bush said he clobbered me Bush went onto fight through the primaries as the only candidate left against Reagan in the state of Michigan. He won sixty five percent of the vote in part because that was a state where scrupulously challenge the favorite son, president Gerald Ford, and many Republicans didn't like it. It was also because he had a tremendous campaign run by a young and up and coming politician state Representative Colleen house thanked her for the campaign, and by the way, and by way of disclosure. Today, you my wife, I thought you would get that in there in the end he went to the convention made a good speech and Reagan turned him in much the same way, Jack Kennedy turned rival Lyndon Johnson. And so George H W Bush became vice president, then he became president of the United States, and John let's in a little bit of time. We have left talk about how he was as president of the United States. Of course by this time, he had become more conservative. He had served under Ronald Reagan. A lot of people viewed it as sort of a Reagan third term because George H W Bush had been part of all of that talk just for a minute or two about his term as president. And what type of a leader he was for America and using his phrase? It was a kinder gentler time very different from what we have today. So tell people a bit about the essence of what George H W. Bush was like as a man as president of the United States. He was a perfect gentleman. Everything you are reading about and seeing on television even people who disagreed with him. He spent time wins. He put Jack Kemp a former rival in his cabinet any named Elizabeth Dole whites another rival Senator Bob Dole as secretary of labor. He embraced conservative positions. And the view that is election was Reagan search term over the last eight years his position on abortion had changed from personally opposed strongly. Pro lice terrible loose one said that you can sum up the accomplishments of any president in one sentence. I will sum that up an attempt to do. So he defeated the tyrant in the desert and he began the building of a new Europe. After the fall of communism. Those are pretty substantial accomplishments the defeat of Saddam Hussein and rescuing Kuwait and finally dealing with something no world leader anticipated, the fall of the Soviet Union. He saw oversaw a transformation without too much tumbled into a democratic system in Europe. He also broke his pledge not to raise taxes in the US which was near fatal for him. He embraced greeter regulation including the Americans with disabilities. Act and a much tougher Environmental Protection Agency, coupled with a lot of factors including rising inflation he lost. He went on his Jimmy Carter did to become a beloved X, president doing much release thousand points of light foundation, embracing old enemies such as Bill Clinton and just becoming America's grandfather. I like to think of emotion. As a perfect gentleman. Something I strive to be and we all would like our children be he was America's first gentleman. And I think today we can learn a lot from the manner in which he conducted himself and very as you put it a very gentlemanly approach in. We might be well put to move a little more toward that direction. We have again been talking with John Jesse who is the White House. Correspondent for news. Max, John where can folks go? If they wanna read your writings and also follow the news on Newsmax, WWW dot news, banks, and it will pop right up or Newsmax dot com and look for John busy on politics. You'll see what I looked like. And I would advise everyone to follow John on Newsmax. Always inciteful always interesting, John. Thank you for being with us. Thanks for having me lawmen Andy Roth at the club for growth is keeping an eye on congress. Because now that the campaigns are all over. The Democrats are in the majority in the house. They have an agenda of their own Andy good to have you here. Thanks for having me Lohman. Well, let's talk about what the new democrat majority in the United States house of representatives might do. They have a laundry list of things let's start out with an area where there may be some bipartisan agreement for better or worse. And that's the infrastructure Bill. It's something the president has talked about it's been on the back burner. Will that change? Let me back up just a little bit. Once congress convenes in early January. They're gonna vote for speaker. And right now Pelosi is presumed to be the speaker elect, I guess what you would call it. I strongly believe she currently does not have the votes for it right now. But I believe that ultimately she will. So once she is sworn into office they immediately vote on a rules package in that package, basically dictates how the house will run for the next two years. There may be some things in there. Like earmarks are now. Permitted. So that's gonna be something to watch Republicans. There are a lot of them who want earmarks as well. But they're not gonna put their hands on it. They're going to let the Democrats touch that. She I and if it's radioactive, and they're gonna say, they're they're still with an earmark band. But if they want to get their grubby hands on it, then they'll start accepting earmarks two. But after that, the Democrats are going to pivot obviously to attacking Trump on all sorts of things like the Muller investigation trying to get him to release his tax returns. But once you get past all of that theater. Then you have to look at what the Democrats actual legislative agenda is going to be and the one that comes up the first most likely is an infrastructure Bill. We haven't had a highway Bill that was bipartisan and agreed to for quite a while Trump made at one of his campaign promises. He said he wanted a one trillion dollar investment. In our country's infrastructure, and Democrats are certainly happy to spend more money. What will be interesting though, is what the democrat proposal is going to be compared to what the Senate Republican proposals going to be. And then how do those two things mashed together to go to Trump's desk for signature, the Democrats are already stating that they want a gas tax increase. I think as high as twenty five cents. It's currently at eighteen the gas tax is very regressive it hits people in their pocket book, and it hits low income and middle income people more than does high income people. I think that's a bad idea. Plus with all of the innovations that are current with ridesharing and Uber and on Thomas vehicles. I think we're gonna see a dramatic shift in the way transportation occurs in this country, and the gas tax is a very unreliable way of doing that funding that so I hope that. Conservatives maybe Republicans at large will reject gas tax increase. Its Democrats are going to bring up that. Of course will be one of the major items that will be pushed now another area of interest here. And and it does play a role in their roller coaster ride that we've seen in the equity markets in the last couple of months, and that happens to be these free trade agreements, and specifically NAFTA the North American Free trade agreement the president has signed a new agreement with Mexico and Canada. But that's not official yet. Is it? No the way the process works is that the president notifies congress that he's going to negotiate a new free trade deal. And he did that a long time ago. They then commenced the talks and Trump made an agreement with Mexico first. And then he brought the Canadians to the table, and then they signed an agreement which basically said the three respective countries agree on a framework, the next step is that. Trump's submits that agreement to congress and congress turns it into legislative texts they take what the agreement says turn it into implementing language, and they vote on it. And there is a very specific timetable for how that process works. Once Trump submits it to the house, then they have forty five days to consider it. And then it goes to the Senate the Senate has I believe forty five days, and then it goes to Trump's desk now with trade agreements, you cannot amend them. There's a limited amount of debate. And you cannot add amendments or strip language out. It's either an upper down vote. What's remarkably troubling about all of this is that Trump has publicly stated that he is terminating the original NAFTA agreement there are a lot of people that don't think that the president can unilaterally do that. And you may see a bipartisan fight. Right to restrict him from doing that. But what Trump is trying to do is force congress to pass the new agreement the NAFTA two point. Oh, because if he terminates NAFTA one point, oh, they will have no choice, but to pass NAFTA two point, oh or go back to the pre NAFTA tariff rates from like nineteen ninety one. And that would be a mistake on of with orders of magnitude. And it's one reason why the the markets are getting roiled up right now. But but Trump is playing this game of chicken. And I suspect that that congress could fight him on that. There are some Democrats like Sherrod Brown of Ohio who would love nothing more than to go back to the pre NAFTA tariff rates, but in this day and age with globalization that will absolutely harm America's future. So when it comes to trade, we're going to get into a very hot and heavy debate. The markets are going to remain volatile. The economy at large could remain volatile. So we're in for a rocky road. American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country, including W W AM and FM in Topeka Kansas w why FM in Rockwood Tennessee, along with K O R Q FM in Abilene taxes. American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal and here expanded versions of some interviews. Aired on this program. Please. Visit our website American radio journal dot com..

vice president John US Ronald Reagan Trump George H W Bush congress US Senate president Reagan George H W. Bush America Texas Connecticut American radio journal Jimmy Carter Barbara Bush Beijing navy
"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

15:35 min | 3 years ago

"lincoln institute" Discussed on KTOK

"H W Bush has been laid to rest at his presidential library in Texas and Americans from across the land have spent the last week remembering and paying tribute to the former chief executive here to share his thoughts on President Bush is John dizzy, John is the White House correspondent for Newsmax and previously for decades wrote for the conservative publication human events. John welcome back to American radio journal, John you have been covering presidents in Washington seen since nineteen Seventy-nine starting at human events. Now, of course with Newsmax, and you've met and interviewed all the president's tell us first of all do you recall? The first time you met and talked with former president George H W Bush, and what your impressions were of him at that time. I actually met him before. He was vice president or even a candidate for president. I was living in Texas in nineteen seventy eight and I went to an event where I met, George and Barbara Bush. That's when Barbara revealed to me that all the positions. Her husband held the one. She most loud was that of US on boy to China, and she in fact, traveled around and spoke to groups and showed slide just from pictures taken during your time together in Beijing. And I talked to him recently telling him, I was from Connecticut, and how my parents voted for his father at least once when he was running for his two terms in the US Senate. It was pleasant conversation. Both George and Barbara Bush were perfect, ladies and gentlemen, which we had a feeling he was not yet done with public life. And he was going to do something soon. And that of course was his bid for the presidency in nineteen navy talk a little bit. If you will John about that nineteen eighty campaign, of course, that was the year in which he lost Ronald Reagan, but all ended well as he became Ronald Reagan's running mate. And of course, the rest is history. But how was that campaign in the two ended up together? But it wasn't always an easy path. Was it? No it wasn't. And remember Reagan and always been the hero of conservatives the natural heir to Barry Goldwater. Someone like George H W Bush from Connecticut, albeit then spending his adult years in Texas was considered a moderate Republican or establishment Republican everything about him. Reach of the Republican establishment is education. At Yale us being the son of a. Connecticut US Senator is positions in government. He served two terms in the house failed in two bids for the Senate and had all other positions from being UN ambassador to being director of the Central Intelligence Agency through appointments by Republican presidents, conservative activists, trusted dot of this. He fought against Reagan onto the slogan up president, you won't have to train saying that his resume would make him someone superior to Jimmy Carter proverbial outsider or Reagan at first it appeared as so we had a good chance. He won the Maine caucuses and forced out then Senator Howard Baker another potential rival for moderate votes. He beat Reagan in the Iowa caucuses a stunning upset and one in win which led governor Reagan to shake up his. Skimping Reagan one New Hampshire as Bush said he clobbered me Bush went onto fight through the primaries as the only candidate left against Reagan in the state of Michigan. He won sixty five percent of the vote in part because that was a state where previously challenge the favorite son, president Gerald Ford, and many Republicans didn't like it. It was also because he had a commend this campaign run by a young up and coming politician state Representative Colleen house thanked her for the campaign, and by the way, and by way of disclosure. Today, you my wife, I thought you would get that in there. And he went to the convention made a good speech and Reagan turned him in much the same way, Jack Kennedy turned rival Lyndon Johnson. And so George H W Bush became vice president, then he became president of the United States, and John let's in the little bit of time. We have left talk about how he was as president of the United States. Of course by this time, he had become more conservative. He had served under Ronald Reagan. A lot of people viewed it as sort of a Reagan third term because George H W Bush had been part of all of that talk just for a minute or two about his term as president. And what type of a leader he was for America and using his phrase? It was a kinder gentler time very different from what we have today. So tell people a bit about the essence of what George H W. Bush was like as a man as president of the United States. He was a perfect gentleman. Everything you are reading about and seeing on television even people who disagreed with him. He spent time wins. He put Jack Kemp a former rival in his cabinet, and he named Elizabeth Dole white something other rival Senator Bob Dole as secretary of labor. He embraced conservative positions. Hints view that is election was Reagan search term over the last eight years his position on abortion had changed from personally opposed strongly. Pro lice terrible loose once said that you can sum up the accomplishments of any president in one sentence. I will sum that up an attempt to do. So he defeated the tyrant in the desert and he began the building of a new Europe. After the fall of communism. Those are pretty substantial accomplishments the defeat of Saddam Hussein and rescuing Kuwait and finally dealing with something no world leader anticipated, the fall of the Soviet Union. He saw oversaw a transformation without too much Donald into a democratic system in Europe. He also broke his pledge not to raise taxes in the US which was near fatal for him. He embraced greater regulation. Incuding the Americans with Disabilities Act, and they much tougher Environmental Protection Agency, coupled with a lot of factors including rising inflation he lost. He went on his Jimmy Carter did to become a beloved X, president doing much release thousand points of light foundation, embracing old enemies such as Bill Clinton and just becoming America's grandfather. I like to think of emotion. Most as a perfect gentleman something I strive to be and we all would like our children be he was America's first gentleman. And I think today we can learn a lot from the manner in which he conducted himself and very as you put it a very gentlemanly approach in. We might be well put to move a little more toward that direction. We have again been talking with John Jesse who is the White House correspondent for Newsmax, John where can folks go if they wanna read your writings and also follow the news on Newsmax, WWW dot news, banks, and it will pop right up or Newsmax dot com and look for John gizine politics. You'll see what I look like. And I would advise everyone to follow John on Newsmax. Always inciteful always interesting, John. Thank you for being with us. Thanks for having me lawmen Andy Roth at the club for growth is keeping an eye on congress. Because now that the campaigns are all over. The Democrats are in the majority in the house. They have an agenda of their own abbey. Good to have you here. Thanks for having me lemon. Well, let's talk about what the new democrat majority in the United States house of representatives might do. They have a laundry list of things let's start out with an area where there may. In fact, be some bipartisan agreement for better or worse. And that's the infrastructure Bill at something. The president has talked about it's been on the back burner will that change? Let me back up just a little bit once congress convenes in early January. They're going to vote for speaker. And right now Pelosi is presumed to be the speaker elect, I guess what you would call it. I strongly believe she currently does not have the votes for it right now. But I believe that ultimately she will. So once she's sworn into office they immediately vote on a rules package in that package, basically dictates how the house will run for the next two years. There may be some things in there. Like earmarks are now. Permitted. So that's gonna be something to watch Republicans. There are a lot of them who want earmarks as well. But they're not gonna put their hands on it. They're gonna let the Democrats touch that. As she I and if it's radioactive then they're gonna say, they're they're still with an earmark band. But if they want to get their grubby hands on it, then they'll start accepting earmarks two. But after that, the Democrats are going to pivot obviously to attacking Trump on all sorts of things like the Muller investigation trying to get him to release his tax returns. But once you get past all of that theater. Then you have to look at what the Democrats actual legislative agenda is going to be and the one that comes up the first most likely is an infrastructure Bill. We haven't had a highway Bill that was bipartisan and agreed to for quite a while Trump made at one of his campaign promises. He said he wanted a one trillion dollar investment. In our country's infrastructure, and Democrats are certainly happy to spend more money. What will be interesting, though, is what the democrat proposal is going to be compared to what the Senate Republican proposals going to be then how do those two things mashed together to go to Trump's desk for signature, the Democrats are already stating that they want a gas tax increase. I think as high as twenty five cents. It's currently at eighteen the gas tax is very regressive it hits people in their pocket book, and it hits low income and middle income people more than does high income people. I think that's a bad idea. Plus with all of the innovations that are current with ridesharing and Uber and on Thomas vehicles. I think we're gonna see a dramatic shift in the way transportation occurs in this country, and the gas tax is a very unreliable way of doing that of funding that so I hope that. Conservatives and maybe Republicans at large will reject the gas tax increase. Its Democrats are going to bring up that. Of course will be one of the major items that will be pushed now another area of interest here and a and it does play a role in their roller coaster ride that we've seen in the equity markets in the last couple of months, and that happens to be these free trade agreements, and specifically NAFTA the North American Free trade agreement the president has signed a new agreement with Mexico and Canada. But that's not official yet. Is it? No the way the process works is that the president notifies congress that he's going to negotiate a new free trade deal. And he did that a long time ago. They then commenced the talks and Trump made an agreement with Mexico first. And then he brought the Canadians to the table. And then they sign an agreement which basically said the three respective countries agree on a framework, the next step is that. Trump's submits that agreement to congress and congress turns it into legislative texts they take what the agreement says turn into implementing language, and then they vote on it. And there is a very specific timetable for how that process works. Once Trump submits it to the house, then they have forty five days to consider it. And then it goes to the Senate the Senate has I believe forty five days, and then it goes to Trump's desk now with trade agreements, you cannot amend them. There's a limited amount of debate. And you cannot add amendments or strip language out. It's either an upper down vote. What's remarkably troubling about all of this is that Trump has publicly stated that he is terminating the original NAFTA agreement there are a lot of people that don't think that the president can unilaterally do that. And you may see a bipartisan fight. Right to restrict him from doing that. But what Trump is trying to do is force congress to pass the new agreement the NAFTA two point. Oh, because if he terminates NAFTA one point how they will have no choice, but to pass NAFTA two point zero or go back to the pre NAFTA tariff rates from like nineteen ninety one. And that would be a mistake on of with orders of magnitude. And it's one reason why the markets are getting roiled up right now. But but Trump is playing this game of chicken. And I suspect that that congress could fight him on that. There are some Democrats like Sherrod Brown of Ohio who would love nothing more than to go back to the pre NAFTA tariff rates, but in this day and age with globalization that will absolutely harm America's future. So when it comes to trade, we're gonna get into a very hot and heavy debate. The markets are gonna remain volatile. The. The economy at large could remain volatile. So we're in for a rocky road. American radio journal is heard on public affairs minded radio stations all across the country, including W I, B W AM and FM in Topeka Kansas w y h AM FM in Rockwood, Tennessee, along with K O R Q FM in Abilene, Texas. American radio journal is produced weekly by the Lincoln institute of public opinion research Inc. The Lincoln institute is completely funded through the generosity of individuals corporations and philanthropic foundations which underwrite the cost of this program comments and opinions expressed on this program are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Lincoln institute or of this radio station. Learn more about American radio journal and here expanded versions of some interviews. Aired on this program. Please. Visit our website American radio journal dot com..

vice president Trump congress US George H W Bush Ronald Reagan John US Senate Texas Reagan George H W. Bush president America Connecticut American radio journal Newsmax Barbara Bush White House correspondent Jimmy Carter