18 Burst results for "Liman"

"liman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"liman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Liman when we're not telling people that liberty mutual customizes your car insurance so you only pay for what you need I've actually been moonlighting as a DJ check it only pay for what you need at liberty mutual dot com in London it's ten PM Wednesday in Singapore it's five AM Thursday ended San Francisco it's two PM Wednesday we call that ring central time time for your teams customers and partners to work as one no matter where they are ring central is the leading cloud communications and collaboration solution for today's mobile global workforce RingCentral integrator voice video online meetings Ganti messaging into one experience it's time to bring it all together and work as one for a free trial visit ring central dot com RingCentral empowering your team to work as one I am Eric DVD owner of window world to talk with loyal WBZ listeners you may be hearing commercials from other window companies with introductory office after you hear their offer I invite you to call seven eight one two two two thirty four forty six seven eight one two two two thirty four forty six to speak with our experienced team I went to world we offer great products at an everyday low price and we treat your home as if for our home there are no gimmicks or buy one get one just a promise of the best full less pricing we install custom made energy star windows in a day to save on your energy bill every season along with entry doors roofing and siding if home improvement is in your plans I'm Erik Peabody inviting you to call me today when the world seven eight one two two two thirty four forty six seven eight one two two two thirty four forty six seven eight one two two two thirty four forty six or visit window world of Boston dot com window world of Boston dot com welcome.

"liman" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"liman" Discussed on 710 WOR

"On the line how are you Bob Mike is though the line so Mike how are you hi how are you Doug Liman is a okay what's your question today one of my father's sixty four years old I know you don't like he he's got diagnosed with bladder cancer about a month ago last week they went in for a biopsy they ended up removing the tumor which they call superficial all right everything PSA we are very very low information from the doctor what we were told was he needs treatment called BCG aka my research they said they should be done within twenty four hours of finding the tumor they had that Davis waiting six weeks well number one let's just talk about bladder cancer so number one I don't know any of the details of the what you tell me which is always limiting to me so it's always best to see the patient but to say everything you say is true and he has a superficial bladder cancer so the bladder is more or less some muscle in a storage container and so there's a lining of the bladder which is transitional cells and there's a muscle that contracts the pushes the urine out and the soul for bladder cancer is often start superficially in that lining the transitional styles and often people know about it because of blood in the urine or pain or sometimes it's found for other reasons and often bladder cancers are found in people who are smokers are ex smokers so let's just say that yes it's a superficial cancer and the usual treatment for servers are cancer is a superficial treatment like B. C. G. which is an immunologic treatments treatment that puts so in the logic materials into the bladder and it's done over a series of usually about six treatments usually it's not done within twenty four hours of the diagnosis because it's just not done that way but usually it can be done very quickly if your wedding six weeks well if you come here you come in my office on Monday will get you seen by urologist and get you hooked up nearly immediately that's how we do things here if you come in please bring in the pathology and all the reports and whatever scans of been done and we take care of your father and a on a different time frames and apparently the delays which she's confronting his doctors with low yeah I didn't know if I know since they removed the tumor they I didn't know it was too late for you guys we well if it's superficial superficial tumors of the bladder should be true superficial another euro there's lots of things to talk about use your own biopsies are done the biopsy has to include some of that muscle I was talking about to make sure that the cancer hasn't penetrated into the muscle because once it goes into the muscle the treatment is totally different and often surgeons urologist like to remove the bladder and of course Asians who know better understand that removing the bladder is devastating it means that the person will never you urinate normally ever again I mean so you're at through a tube or some other system for men usually with the bladders removed the prostates removed without a that means the man's important afterwards no more reactions so surgery is devastating so on this on your dad we need to know about the path followed you would need to know if there is muscle scene there's lots of questions here and that's why we spend lots of time with our patients more than you can spend on a radio show so I don't know everything I'm just tell you some generalities of treatment for bladder cancer well I tell you like I said we find out if the doctor we amend with militants you for years my father worked for a big newspaper forty three years so they could do some connection with bladder cancer could get two grand or they're going to run away so we need armed cells are god bless you and god bless your your father and I was a se if you want to come in this week I'd be honored to see him and get him hooked up so doesn't have these long waits and and difficulties that is experiencing elsewhere thank you that's eleven all right god bless you and god bless your family farms under leader men and that was question about bladder cancer obviously you're welcome to call into it will give you more information about that just got a paper and pencil ready but I'm such a leader men will be back in a moment many people.

Bob Mike Doug Liman
"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Know what the scenes about than I should know where the camera should go to cover the very thing that it's about so that the And that should I don't use. I don't carry many cameras on the show like even a second camera to me sometimes traumatic So that's the for me. The one at a time is actually more efficient. I'm if that answers any question as well. That's amazing I didn't have your film schoolteacher feature but When I was doing my first film swingers the only thing I story boarded where the transition transitional shots I last shot because I was like? How do I story board? What happens during the scene? Because I don't know what's going to happen during the scene. They're going to have to act and I'll figure it out but I was thinking I got a story board but the only thing I could actually intuitively figure out you could story. The board is the last shot of a scene in the first of the next. It's absolutely and with the things too fond would always say which I thought was so true. Was You know he felt the narrative film was trapped by continuity you. You have to make everything match and the light the match the people at the match and then it's so boring. He was an ninety year old Russian filmmaker but he thought that the transitional shot was also the the most creative because it was the one. That defied are normal seeing experiences. We we cannot in the blink of an eye be home. We cannot in the blink of an eye be ten years from now so the the magic of cinema is in the cut and the power of that cut in the juxtaposition of it which is partly why. Sometimes I get sad about the the fashion the the cut as ice when I teach young filmmakers and is trying to do everything in a one like as if the cut were some kind of concession When the cut is one of the most powerful powerful tools we have I mean wonder films are awesome and exciting too? But it's it's just the fashion of kind of feeling that the cut has become something people actually feel was a kind of like a crutch as opposed to a thing of beauty. So the question is Tracy Letts and casting of Tracy and well I I Have always been a fan. I mean I discovered Tracy I think for the first time through homeland where he plays the kind of diabolical a biological conniving CIA I think senator winds up taking over the Seattle remember. But he's great and that show and I felt like was mesmerizing arising in that show and I was like who is guy and then became conscious retroactively of him as a writer and When this role came up it just seemed like a home run to me? I can't tell you why or how I just felt like I'd be lucky to get him And and I was lucky enough to get him. And he's a great actor and I think what's fascinating about. This part was the idea again of of that that he didn't see himself as a type he saw himself as a legacy operating under the tremendous burden of inheriting accompany company in the family name. And what are you going to do with it. In sales are declining and And also a guy who's only lived in wealth and in a kind of bubble. I mean I think that's what's so lovely about his work in the senior mad takes for Dr is a tracy pulls you in. You're you're laughing at him for a moment and then you're suddenly suddenly. What makes the scene interesting? It doesn't end there. Suddenly he touches you when you realize he's a person and and he has pain and he's lonely he and he never gets to ride in a car and what a and suddenly he's a completely different human being to you you know and And Tracy took took that a country mile. It was beautiful but he did there. No we made those city How closely does the film hugh to to the actual events and that's my partner acids a reporter for CBS? The and the the the reality of the answer is that a- all our research and our researchers told us they do stuff like that to each other all the time in the pits and Carol was always screwing with the opposition and then I asked star researchers. How would they screw with the opposition? And they'd say well we could steal something. You could throw it not or Washer under the thing you could dump a little motor oil in the where the car just pulled pulled out when they're not looking good and all. This stuff was standard operating procedure. So I I'm being too coy and saying we just made it up. But that it was that he did it at that race ace. At that time I have no idea what was the other one lockinge. BB in the closet didn't happen but dragged shaking. Henry Ford for Dr did happen. Did he do it exactly like like Tracy did it. It is a reaction no but they took him for a drive in the car to to let him know because he was about about to cancel them or make another change and they needed to put him in the car to realize what they had come up with. Most everything in the broad strokes is based on reality. We just have to Obviously we're making a motion picture. Obviously thank you thank you.

Tracy Letts Dr Henry Ford Seattle Washer CIA Carol writer senator hugh CBS partner reporter
"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

12:23 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"The kind kind of NASCAR idea of racing I had more about something much more beautiful and seeing someone like Enzo. For instance says such a interesting figure are in relation to what we do. which is that I saw? Like Ferrari was like Zoa trope. We'll hills like like FRA. Francis like it was like pursuing suing perfection or personal vision and going bankrupt but not caring until you have to find news financing and then Ford it was more like you know studios. We know which are making a product for people and And want to be cool. Wants some of the Ferrari cool we'll and and that is that he kind of tension between the company and the corporate side that is kind of playing it by the numbers and the person who's playing By romance all that is really deeply fascinating to me. I hope to someone else when they watch it again. And I don't want to hog all the questions so are are there questions in the audience. And then I'll I'll repeat it for everybody so the question. Is You know the obvious thing. Might Ferrari the villains but they were more humanized in the film and and what was the process of high net. There's two things I'd say one is I think credit has to go to jazz and John Henry First of all that they didn't write it that way to begin with. At least I see it that way but also you know part of the reason I like working with them and as a writer myself. I'd say I'm pretty strict in my own creative sphere about not letting anyone used the word villain or bad had guy And because I think it screws everyone up making the movie As if there is a person who wakes up and contemplates what evil they can do every day you know that the which is what the name implies like kind of just that that no matter at least is for the purpose of me making a movie no matter what Godforsaken Soul you would imagine me making a movie about. I would be trying to find the way that they actually think. Whether it's through an incredible Pretzel of psychology that they're doing good for the world or themselves or somebody and that so the first thing is I ah I examined and read everybody through their own personal sense of purpose and And and one one of the easy exercises you can make as a screenwriter as you could reconstitute a story like I could make Josh Josh Lucas character into a kind of heroic character with a couple book quick changes of Like A. He's trying to hold onto his job. which is prayer list with four? And he's there companies failing and the whole thing will go down and he's got a troubled marriage bridge and I could create a wholesome and then Ken Miles is soul narcissist who is committed threatens this meaning. It's all where you put the camera and where you where you right it. So that I really so having said all that I love for Ari like I would prefer his cars even to a GT forty. So and I'm the romantic in me. Loves what he's about which is in a sense Irrational idealism right. So if I could just ask them follow up to that. Ah such a fascinating answer if you were doing a film not Ford versus Ferrari but trump versus biden or Bloomberg or warriner owner. Pick Yours. Where would you be putting the camera to humanize trump? It would be. Wouldn't it be easy. I mean when in a busy really. It's like men wakes up obese. Corpulent can't let anyone see that. There's only three strands of head hair air on his head rushes to the bathroom with spray and shit has to kind of key can't even be seen by by by by the help before he's done a certain the amount of strapping and gluing together the level of fear and anxiety before he can even become public is so great and he's already been greeted by headlines And news the Ma- mock him that that so that you would deal with kind of terrified frightened troubled king who who is completely unworthy completely overwhelmed and and terrified of exposure on some. I mean you could that would to me. That's the only interesting story. The other story is just this this. It's the only one that makes sense to me in this world to be honest like I. If I make sense of this any other way I would. I wouldn't have any other way to understand it other than to try not to have pity on him but it's difference understanding him isn't saying `I absolve him or it's that that I actually go because I think the thing that that hurts us as a culture in movies and otherwise is when we say someone's bad we divorce ourselves from our culpability. Okay and how they came to be and we divorce ourselves from our culpability in it in our own lives because it's like Oh. I was bad I did that because as bad. No Oh you did because you were frightened of this or because you're weak or we take our mistakes and we turn them into simple Cartons anyway. It's a very interesting topic but in drama it's really fruitless To to do it otherwise on my mind question. I'm trying to figure out quickly. Summarize that question it's how how did we put it all together without having massive re-shoots or how how did we. Because you don't have a chance to do it again because of the scale of a movie like this that it's you gotta make acres decisions and trust and numbers so in project this project this large. How do you how do you keep your perspective and make sure that it's really good question and one? I mean essentially eventually. It's the struggle of. I'm sure it's a struggle for you as well. It's a struggle of our lives managing large things and trying to express yourself at the same time. You're managing something that is A multi headed Hydra of activity and many people their own feelings and contributions to make The simple thing I'd say is is to make sure you're enjoying herself and and and that you have a chance for all the preparation preparation that obviously you have to do to make a movie like this story boarding planning matchbox cars on maps pre-bus. Whatever that you have the mental all and physical space to change your mind and revise? I can only tell you that on my second movie cop land. I was shooting in New Jersey Out here Twenty years ago and in the first week of production I looked at My dailies and was coming home from dailies and I looked at. They gave me these contact sheets with deals. Guide shot that week on the set and I looked at what the stills guy was getting on my shoot and I thought it looked better than shooting and I realized it was because as I was doing what I planned and I wasn't watching what was there. And that's the danger in the larger movies and I think what we see often in larger movies is is kind of pre-bus shot. It's just you can. I always can tell because previous is always never stops with the arm like the guys in previous little apps can is never stop you and we'll make it in one and why make a cut because we're in previous we and so the the the to me it's being open to what is happening in front of you with your eyes like guy was when I was twelve or thirteen with a super eight camera and that you don't get and that's another thing about surrounding yourself with good people like I've really realized over the years that there could be qualified people who are who have some kind of toxic energy who just closed the envelope for you of the ability to think and that can't you can't have them around you no matter what scale it. Is You know that that that little bit of space where you can kind of go. Let's try this on the day and that the crew can manage that in fact because it's or that I see or hear something from my actors or my ep or or someone comes up with something else that just reveals the scene and you have to take advantage of that. Is that at all answer. Your question could but they're so. The question was a racing boot camp at the beginning for Madden Christian to to learn how to drive a race car basically not for Matt who didn't really do much driving in the movie other than the one. The one scene with Henry Ford in the opening but the But for Christian he took he took a few days and went to Arizona and it actually raced with Boban durant on on track I believe in Arizona and but both of them were pretty experienced drivers in movies and have done a load load of that kind of stuff and And so they also didn't do and be the first admit a lot of the driving meaning that the they're they're in the cars moving at high speed and they'll pull in and pull out and but they have family Anson we WANNA THEY WANNA go home to them and But we didn't do a lot of green screen either when we did predominantly was was put them in in cars. They were driven by. Sarah drivers are stunting called it. The biscuit it was this kind of device driver was on the roof of the car or offset to one of the sides. So that I've used these before on movies in different rigs for motorcycle scenes beans or whatever we you know. If you can't text and drive you certainly shouldn't be acting and driving and you certainly shouldn't be acting and driving at over one hundred miles an hour so the Ark of the driving sequences that play out like a sporting events where your you kind of know when you're losing your winning that all mapped out or did you find find that it was pretty I mean pretty mapped out. I mean either in the writing or in the boarding or the planning of it all. I mean there's a lot our editors found different rhythms. And you know it's it's I always feel like there's always this this kind of I've never satisfied with either answer to this this question which is to say We knew it all advance or we discovered it all on the fly because the answer is always both on the answer I always try my own processes. I try and Kennedy to collecting seashells. I know the legos or legos. I know the legos. I need for the scene. I know usually the ways I'm gonNA try IDA. I had a great teacher at Columbia University. Mentors goes to fund sharf. Who have this thing that he thought the only cut that was interesting in narrative? Film was the transitional cut and so he was like if you don't I don't know anything else at least plan your transitional cuts and that and so usually if I know nothing else I know what my outgoing in every time. I change location or advanced time. The outgoing and the incoming shot is planned so that it's a beautiful Gr- in my opinion or effort to make a beautiful graphic cut. You know the composition is weighted. Did so what will the cut across the neck seen will look good will feel good. Um We'll have a kind of Push forward narrative but within the bids I don't I don't know every time I'm cutting to the speedometer or the gear pedal or some of that depends on what Christian does or the way the light falls in the cars is one is overtaking another on the track et Cetera. But what you try and do ovoid at least is what I think at some folks in for me in trouble making action movies is just the hose it down like the the that where I I felt like I've gotten in trouble when I'm overwhelmed as you just kind of just shoot a bunch of figure it out later kind of thing is dangerous. I mean it it's essentially to me an abdication of of knowing what you're seeing is about in the moment and figuring it out later which for some may be an excellent process for me. I feel awful. If I've done that I feel like the only thing I should know. I don't have to know where every shot is going our home using it but I should know what the scenes about and if I know what the scenes about than I should know where the camera should go to cover the very thing that it's about so that the And that should I don't use..

Ferrari Ford NASCAR Josh Josh Lucas Ken Miles Francis writer John Henry anxiety New Jersey Columbia University Ari Arizona Henry Ford Sarah biden Kennedy Bloomberg Boban durant
"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Conversation. Aw James Doug that stock I'd love to take credit for this movie but well It's it's really a extraordinary accomplishment. Thank you the you know how gripping the the action is an learn how strong the emotion is in many ways. That was the. I'm not a motor sports guy. You know so my attraction to the to the story when I I kind of encountered it into the script was not Like I gotTa make a race car movie as much as the idea. I mean I guess the puzzle you and face a lot in what we do is how do we make intelligent larger scale movies that are aimed at someone of thirteen year. Worlds right so you're always looking for something that is grabbing you on the basis of character but also has some kind of muscular because we have to do compete with television. We have to get you. We have to get grownups. GROWNUPS actually to be one of the four movies. They leave their home to see a year so there has to be some aspect of it that is dynamic But also for me something that is Interesting or else I just can't sustain My own interests over the years. I'm GONNA be working. So what was it because this is a a script was written by friends John Henry. Butterworth Jez Butterworth. What was it in the script that The DRITA the story. Sorry the I mean. What was the moment in the script? You're like. Oh this is why I gotTa make this my loved reading it when I first read it was clearly. I could see why it hadn't gotten made which is is it kind of seemed uncalled. It seemed to be. I mean one of the things the Jazz John and I worked on once I came on was trying the reason the movie hadn't been made and banging around for a decade and a half was essentially that it no one could justify spending an excess of one hundred million dollars on an adult oriented movie. You know that really didn't seem to have an angle or a presale character per se And so what Jazz. I what I loved. It's a good question is is I love the world I I love. You know what I'm always looking for. It has a language its own of its own. You know I'm like a weird way. I believe people say they'll talk about director sometimes go oh. He's a world builder. She's a world builder. You know like we can make a sci-fi movie or I think every movie is a world building effort meaning every movie you want to have a language and a world At a map and a unique set of locations on that one kind of world is unique and special and regular world. Movies are just a bunch of overs in in living rooms and so the the for me that it had his own language that it had a a a kind of vernacular. The visuals seemed beautiful. Beautiful seem to capture a time. But what grab me were these characters The way that I related to them as a filmmaker you know the battle to get a car made the the kind of Is Not different than the battle to get a movie made but also what I was looking for was terrified as I was reading the draft. Cause I didn't know the true life story was I was terrified. There was just going to be a simple they win. And and and that that the story unwound the way it did that can ends up slowing going down and tying and then losing and then dying months later and then the way it unwound was profoundly interesting to me as a challenge to try to work my way toward your to prepare for this. I I reached out to Because because we have people we've worked with uncommon. The screenwriters worked with Ozzy Matt Damon. So I asked for a few questions to ask you from which you guys from from Madden Jazz. John Henry and one of the questions because you talked about the ending was the jazz and John Henry feel like the best scene in the film was written by you and meanwhile they're getting the credit as screenwriters which is the last scene of the movie. And how did the film originally end in. What was the process as a filmmaker to sort of hone in on that? You just talk about how you arrived. At that end. I felt among many there. Were many things suggestion John Henry and I worked on on an one of them. Was this idea that was chasing that I'd I don't I'm trying to put my finger on it. I felt felt that the F.. It's a character film that it doesn't end with the race because the race doesn't determine their character arcs at per se any in in neither case. That's so I work very carefully with them on how to construct what was kind of laying pipe going in starting with with with Carroll Shelby's Onset of heart disease were asked to stop giving you a taste of Lemond and then stopping but what I was after in the end was a kind. Ah I felt that I got to attached to Ken son and his wife and the world of Shelby American to just end at a race and then tell you that either tell your let your discover that can died a month later or but also I felt like neither what was so interesting going to me. formats character and with. What I felt was still missing from the script was some sense? Like it's so simple but for me. The two characters were really simply carols. Compensation for his heart disease was to become a kind of adrenaline junkie salesman. He became like a kind of a nonstop unstop salesperson and he was brilliant at it. But then if that's his compensation enact one what is his what is his turn in the end of the movie and And that was the puzzle that I still thought that we had an answered yet in the script read and similarly although was more of the pipe was more laid there can is a Christian character is a guy who never compromises is kind of a perfectionist. See will that is clear what that could be that Momeni slows down which is actually in. Its own way even though it's all giving up of the race it's actually an expansion of his character in that moment meaning. He's doing something he had never ever done before which was layoff That was beyond his capability in that. And so this is my theory of both characters and and a lot of the research suggests and John Henry told me about even with Carol and a lot of the written research told me that Carroll Shelby regretted telling Ken Miles to slow down all his life and that it seemed to me than there needed to be some kind of the noma where where where Carol was dealing with. The fact said he couldn't talk his way around this. I mean it's literally something we wrote in the end. I mean it's very kind of say I wrote but the The I mean I did. The last scene was was an effort to try. Nail something that we haven't quite gotten and the But for me it was just strictly the idea that Matt spent the home movie. Smoothing is way out of problems and in this last scene with a boy it. Just be with with cans boy it just becomes a scene in which just being present hasn't is all this required and he should shut up and that and that it's and that's what that scene directly before that I scratched out with with you know. Are you telling me I'm some kind of salesman you tell me. I'm about like my magic words. Meaning it's all trying to set up this idea that Carol essentially been gliding through life on the kind of ability to dance and that for once in the movie is going to be still and that was that thing was it was that indescribable kind. The thing that I was chasing that didn't know what it was and sometimes I tried after I have to try to scratch it out myself because I don't know what it is until I found it kind of painting thing. As opposed to a plotting thing and this is a world that is is not a world that you were drawn to before reading the scrapped as you weren't like a race car fan in fact I'm I'm the opposite. I love sports but I found into into a car race. I I did a commercial for some NASCAR. I don't remember what it was for something years ago we went to North Carolina. went all these trucks but it has is no I mean. It's so no I mean there's there's a- The culture around it was the process of hardening about it's you could then then share it with us. Well it was. It was second guessing myself. I mean first of all the NASCAR culture is kind of gross to me so there was just a level where wire it's become. I'm in America. But there's something fascinating to me if you go back the the kind of the just the car's covered with stickers and people screaming and just the music and the whole. That's not interesting to me when I tune it in the race itself doesn't interest me because of an this led me to thinking about how to cover the movie. The racist don't interest me because I don't know who uh-huh why is the yellow car ahead of the blue car and why is the red one pulling into the pit and why is the blue and now getting out of the yellow on and everyone's just sitting speculating in essense. It's a sport. We're we're locked out of everything interesting because it's buried beneath a helmet and then inside a car so that all the secrets of what's going on are inside that vehicle all and you're completely you're not privy to any of the juicy stuff so that gave me in a sense my answer of how to shoot it however obvious it is which is is just get to follow the characters into the race to be with every decision to understand why they're downshifting or pulling into the pit to kind of let you live moment to moment in the tactical did you. I mean I actually have not also a person. I LOVE NASCAR race but my life so I didn't even as Lon- still go on. Lamont is still there but looks nothing like this so we we were both. Oh I was I did fall in love with the look. Did you actually go to a Lemoyne's race. We went there was none I could. There's only one day year it is and by the time we knew we were going. The one at passed in the next one would be while we're shooting so the the But we did go lemond and we toured the track and and of course the track looks again. Seeing a current Lamont race would be nothing like seeing what was then. It is now a full blown blown manicured track with graded roads and rails and it looks more like the meadowlands than it does. the grandstand. We have here. All the charm is essentially gone or as it is an all places overrun with scale in. Did you the town is still beautiful in this one. Because I don't want to rat anyone out again from from one of our friends The question was that they found themselves working on the film occasionally occasionally driving their own car a little bit too hot and did you ever find yourself maybe pushing your own cars you were it makes you think about driving. I mean the the the I think the one thing. That's true for all of us is that the car is incredible. Metaphor in our lives A really powerful metaphor certainly in cinema has been but for all of us and yes. I mean it doesn't have me driving crazy but it has to be thinking about the road more. You're much more aware of of I got captured making the film by the beauty of the philosophies of these guys and how they saw the car car as an extension of themselves or mask or a kind of an and I responded to the gear the way I do connect gear on are doing doing what we do. You know the the gear making films gear cameras and cranes and Dolly track and lenses and animal versus Datta digital all that becomes comes into that gear. I saw. That's what they're in love with. Is there because it suddenly became less about. You know.

John Henry NASCAR Ozzy Matt Damon Carroll Shelby Carol salesman Lemond Jez Butterworth James Doug Lamont Madden Jazz director Ken son North Carolina. Dolly America Datta digital Lemoyne Ken Miles
"liman" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Doug Liman I love how we're always looking out for each other kind of like a liberty mutual looks out for you by customizing your home insurance so you only pay for what you get. why don't you tell me about young covered manhole I was literally just leave. you could swim. only pay for what you need at liberty mutual dot com I'm Jonathan green cut the CEO of plaques adorn and people often ask me a for product really works to cosmetically shrink under eye bags and wrinkles from you in minutes I can't blame you for being skeptical it was hard for me to believe until I saw my brother in law's under eye bags because medically shrink from view in minutes I was a little skeptical I am not going to lie because I saw people online within like yeah right that can possibly work I am telling you it really works once supplied your skin tightens in firms rapidly reducing the appearance of under eye bags and wrinkles in minutes so if under eye bags wrinkles or crow's feet make you look tired in older than your solution is plex a German get up to fifty percent off the normal retail price plus get free shipping visit plucks a derm dot com that's plexus germ dot com or call one eight hundred seven three one fifty nine ninety eight that's one eight hundred seven three one fifty nine ninety eight. business news now twenty two past CNBC's Jessica Edinger begins with another Downer from Wall Street good morning John the Dow dropped nearly nine hundred points over the last two days five hundred alone yesterday on fears of an economic slowdown all of the gains from the third quarter way gone the US got the green light slap seven billion dollars in new terrace on goods coming in from the European Union including Airbus aircraft in AG products like French wine as retaliation for illegal subsidies that you gave to plane maker Airbus as a competitor to Boeing Microsoft has unveiled laptops to compete with apple and other surface devices like surface your buns the best selling pickup truck in the US in the third quarter again was the Ford F. one fifty but there's a new number two fiat Chrysler Dodge ram the GM Chevy Silverado is now number three on today's watchlist investors.

Airbus GM Chrysler fiat Boeing Jonathan green Silverado Dodge apple Microsoft Doug Liman European Union US Jessica Edinger CNBC CEO
"liman" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Liman there's a woman threatening to sign for generic car insurance let's go sign these papers right here right now ma'am dropped the pan liberty mutual customizes your car insurance so you only pay for what you need thanks Liane only Moondog don't thank us think liberty mutual but also think us every day that only pay for what you need at liberty mutual dot com by the beach which our company affiliated housing interstate laws apply it goes without saying practice makes perfect hi Tom more here owner of northwest exteriors at northwest we but installing windows for over twenty three years and I've honed our skills in to be the best in California our window technicians are factory trained and certified making northwest the only five star platinum elite dealer for and win assistance in California this gives us the leverage to have the best pricing in the area our mission is to provide the best customer service most competitive pricing and the highest quality expert install in California were so serious about this it will put our money where our mouth is that's right I'm so confident that our pricing is the most competitive in the area that we will meet or beat any offer or pay you one thousand dollars so if you have a bid from another window company give us a call for a second opinion will save you money or will be sorry one thousand dollars and sorry not only are we simply the best we guarantee our prices to call today to schedule a free consultation call eight eight eight trust in W. that's eight eight eight trust in W. or online to trust northwest dot com simply the best trust northwest seven one zero seven nine no one was roads or pass invading their home that's for sure this summer spiders ants fleas wasps and beetles are particularly bad John to get us here from.

Liman Liane Moondog California John Tom one thousand dollars twenty three years
"liman" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Credit approval required. Liberty Mutual insurance presents. doug liman there's a woman threatening to sign up for generic car-insurance crappy birdseed let's go these papers right here right now ma'am drop the pen liberty mutual customizes your car insurance so you only pay for what you need thanks lima lima moon doug don't think us think liberty mutual but also think us the only pay for what you need at liberty mutual dot com insurance company affiliates equal housing insurer state laws apply the dave ramsey show where commonsense mates dollars and cents valerie's from utah says i have a one year old son and i want to know if the gerber grow up plan is the best life insurance for him okay if you stop and think about it for just a second you say it out loud in this it'll make you laugh i'm going to buy life insurance a one year old from a baby food company does that sound stupid to use it does to me the dave ramsey show weekdays at one on w._c. g._o. Right now. This is Bill. you're invited to join us every sunday for reverend look at the arts and we heard is changing the time about tech and carry candles n._p._r. tune in sundays from one to three p._m. playtime deter and kerri kendall sundays from one to three only on fifteen ninety w._c. summer is here and mask out the barbecue out all ready to grill that's why he trusts super polly grip so he can enjoy his stake with full confidence It sounds like there's a party going on. But something's missing. birthday gals and thanks to politics her bright smile is anything that is prize hey my friends retail store was the victim of iot password theft yup cybercriminals are taking over security cameras payments systems and other devices by exploiting vulnerabilities what did they talk us and are dispersed network more secured with barracuda we have advanced firewalls for our sites enhanced security for our cloud infrastructure and total email protection such a relief protect your business at barracuda dot com barracuda your journey secured.

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"liman" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"liman" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"So that was when I had researched over a number of years about Ronald Reagan's astrologer in the ways that she contributed to an influence his presidency. But that one was important because it wasn't just it was like documenting that documenting what she said. But there was also this interesting conflict between what the fischel story was right because when it came out that Reagan was using a stranger the administration kind of went into damage control and tried to downplay it one of the ways that they try to downplay it is by saying that it was all Nancy, and it was Nancy's Foltz because she was fearful after the assassination attempt on his life. And so she went to astrology as like, Sean. Shortcoming too because she was fearful or something like that. Right. But in reality when we dug back into the history, we could see that they've been consulting with a strategists had been friends with strategies for decades up to that point. So that the official narrative that was put out may not and probably was not, you know, as as as accurate as you might assume. Right. Yeah. And I can see why they would do that. But yeah, it's it's kind of too bad. Like, you know, use the familiar trope of like the woman is fearful and superstitious and the strategy is all her, right? Medical astrology Liman is really the main medical strategy episode that have done up to this point the life and work of Dimitri, George was really important to me since she's one of my primary, teachers and. Yeah. We did a really good job putting together that biographical episode. And I was happy that we're able to do it with her because she has such an interesting life story in his made some major contributions to the astronauts tradition. Definitely. Astrological training certification and credentials that I did with an orderly episode. Seventy two actually always slightly regretted that episode because the point was to debate. There's always been a debate national community about astrological certifications specifically, and whether whether we should have certification and whether it's important for individual professional structures to get certification or how important it is. Or what form of certification? You should have or what what training should have. And and is very pro certification, and I was supposed to play I tend to be a little bit more skeptical of certification as it currently is the astronauts community in the quality of it. But because she was a guest, I think I was a little bit less. I pushed back less on certain points that I might have. And as a result of that. I was worried that it might have come off as a little bit more pro certification than I intended. And that's one of the challenge. I sometimes have in the podcast is wanting to have different voices on different people to present the opposing case. But then the also delicate thing of not wanting to use the position of me being the host as somehow be be seem to use that as having an advantage over the person who I'm either having an is gassed or in some instances debating, so that came up with that came up, for example in the early. Eric Meyers episode on the debate between modern and traditional strategy. And I know that was something where like I held back a lot more than I could have because I was not just a participant in the debate. But I was also moderating it, and we realized in retrospect that was a mistake. I should have had a third party moderating it because then I had to hold back more than I would have in terms of making certain points going after certain things. So as to not be seen as like abusing my position, which I didn't wanna do at all. But I know you. For example, you were wishing I had made certain points jumped on certain things that I didn't necessarily earn the debate. Yeah. I could tell it just wasn't a hundred percent debate. Because of that like, maybe I don't know what I'd give it maybe seventy or seventy five percent of what you could have said. Yeah. Because that originated with our local group meeting, and we had the debate onsite there. And then that turned into an episode. I post the recording afterwards. Yeah..

Liman Foltz Ronald Reagan George Nancy Sean official Eric Meyers Dimitri seventy five percent hundred percent
10 years after the Great Recession

KNX Programming

05:29 min | 1 year ago

10 years after the Great Recession

"Continuing my conversation with Dr Mohamed Al already in one of the world's most influential economic thinkers, the chief economic adviser Ali aliens, former pimco CEO Newport Beach is bestselling books, by the way include when markets collide. And the only game in town Bonner this weekend marking the tenth anniversary of the March nine two thousand nine bottom of the bear market. Bay drivers lost about half their value. And what was the worst bear markets since the great depression coming off the housing meltdown, the financial crisis in the great recession. We were on the you're having these conversations back in those days, the s&p five hundred close at six seventy six back on March ninth two thousand nine to close Friday at twenty seven hundred forty three quadrupling in value in generating about eighteen trillion dollars in market value over the past ten years. The Dow by the way, hit that bear market low at sixty five hundred forty seven it closed Friday at twenty five thousand four fifty impressive gains and resilient market. That's bounced back despite many challenges. Give us your thoughts on this big anniversary here. So we've come a long way. I mean, you, and I remember what it was like ten years ago when we are looking not only at massive losses. But those are concerned that the worst what you have to come. But a major effort by central banks and a pickup in the economy recovery and economic growth was really instrumental in being here. I think the concern we have is on the length and the extent of the rally and part of that is because some of it was artificially maitre some of it was driven by fundamentals, but by quality by the amount of money that central banks could in encouraging people to move out the risk spectrum. My own view is that it's critical for improving fundamentals to continue to validate this rally because I think central banks are less able to deliver a higher asset prices going forward. Give us your thoughts on some of the extraordinary measures that are still being wind down after all this time, the fed imposed and of course, back in those days, we saw various programs hamp tarp. I think we had barf as well back in those days. And when I when I mentioned that to Treasury Secretary Paulson jokingly said that that's what I did back in those days. So as this unwinding continues. What do you see ahead sort of what to phases phase one was from the Liman failure September fifteenth two thousand and eight till the end of two thousand nine two thousand ten and basically central banks who everything that could think of at the wall to see what would stick in order to normalize markets. People didn't trust each other trade came to a standstill so central Bank to stepped in with whatever they call and basically, experimented and succeeded. In normalising markers face to is when they're. Realized that there was no one to hand off to. So that incited to use experimental policies not trust to normalize markets, but to promote economic activity, and that has proven much trickier, and no one I think expected them to have to stay this long in this game. What I call the only game in town. And ironically, the fed was on its way out and it had to do a massive turn and December January NBC central Bank. Just this week. That is on your turn by saying that we introduce one of these unconventional credit facilities fullback. So I think the big lesson is that central banks carried a massive burden and that it is now time to hand off to other policy making entities who set of tools, but especially in Europe, the politics complicates that hand off. And then reflection to what's happened since those days of Muhammad, I appreciated your most recent article, headlined, why economics must get broader before it gets better. If anyone Google's it they'll be able to find it. Very easily noted the economics profession took a beating after most of its leading practitioners even failed to predict the two thousand eight global financial crisis. Give us your thoughts on the field of economics. And where things go from here. Go back in November two thousand and eight Queen Elizabeth of the United Kingdom goes to the London School of economics to meet with economists to get briefed on the crisis. And she listens to the magnitude of. Of home that's being imposed on people in the magnitude of dislocation disruptions and off the economists. Have thank simple question. Why didn't you see it coming? And that what economic profession has been a major act to that. Most economists never understood early enough the concept of like, my colleague, I called the new normal the sense that the recovery would be characterized by too slow growth and growth that's not inclusive enough. And that's because we tend to do things that are harmful to I understand and predict and I think it's time for the economics profession to realize that we have the ability to restore standing, but it means being much more open minded, and that's why I wrote the article I think this is not a question of ability to be better at what we do. It's a question of willingness to be open minded and bring in other

FED Town Bonner Economic Adviser Pimco London School Of Economics Dr Mohamed Al Ali Aliens Newport Beach CEO Muhammad Google Liman Queen Elizabeth
"liman" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"liman" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Founder of Liman academy of excellence out in Mesa in the east valley you like freebies. I'm giving a free talk on my New York Times bestselling book have a new kid by Friday sounds like a lie. But it's not love it. Guess what every family that comes receive a free copy of a new kid by Friday, you can RSVP online at Leeman academy dot com. Join US January thirtieth at six pm blaming academy. May are you tired of your neck and back pain? Have you been doing all the preventative measures to manage your pain, and they're just no longer effective? Have you been told you need a spinal fusion, and you're looking for another option? Consider Sonos fine. Sonos fine is a leader in next generation ultrasonic spine surgery and your guy too quickly. Getting you back to your best life using revolutionary ultrasonic technology, Sonos, fine, sir. Surgeons decompress pinched nerves relieving pain getting you back to the life. You once enjoyed in weeks, not months Sonos fine. Ultrasonic surgery is a minimally disruptive outpatient procedure that may avoid spinal fusion, which means no rod screws or loss of mobility. Call eight eight eight nine five spine to schedule a visit with our local Scottsdale clinicians about your situation Sonos spine Scottsdale, the ultrasonic revolution in spine surgery. Call eight eight eight nine five spine or online at Sonos spine surgery dot com that Sonos fine surgery dot com. Don't miss out on life because of chronic pain. Learn more today at Sonos fine surgery dot com. Dave Ritu, tri-city, transmission and Costa bumper-to-bumper radio. I bet you didn't know that one out of three transmissions are replaced an air that several thousand dollars. You just didn't need to spend. If you just bought one too late don't look back. But if you're in the market think twice and call tri-city transmission has Arizona's oldest and most trusted transmission shop, we have the experience expertise in reputation. Not only. To overhaul transmissions, but in most cases, just perform a simple repairs. Well, check us out online at tri-city transmission dot com. That's tri-city city. Transmission dot com. So nice now that the kids are asleep. Cheers. We got the kids are house a stable income checking off all the boxes, but there's one box. We haven't checked off life insurance..

Leeman academy tri-city New York Times Scottsdale Liman Founder Dave Ritu Mesa Arizona Costa thousand dollars
"liman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"liman" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Liman crisis is quite simply that if a Bank is over exposed to a particular sector in the case of lemans that was the subprime mortgage market. I combine combined with high levels of leverage, the not may calls a Bank to Bank is big enough and interconnected enough that may have systemic ramifications. So the two the two areas of global regulators as we all know have focused on his number one trying to ensure the banks run themselves prudentially in more prudentially robust manner things capital, adequacy levels, liquidity, ratios, etc. And Secondly Bank does indeed fail policy tools in place for the authorities to take action to avoid systemic contagion. So I think that's been the response. I mean when you look at the battle the bank's balance sheets and specifically the liquidity ratios being the levels of deposits or the level of of loans they've grown over the last ten years. The ratios have improved depends. Of course, what particular metric you looking at. What more needs to be done here, though, the story is never complete. No, it's true. And the question how do you Leeman proof banks in the future? I think the main point to note is that of course, the the the US and the GTC in particular in general, sorry, experienced something in two thousand eight the global financial crisis affected real estate markets here which calls certain degree of lost to arise on Bank balance sheet regionally particular here in Dubai, but actually what you found them. What you still find today is that regional banks and banks in this country as well as the country's run themselves much more conservatively than the US and European counterparts and actually back in two thousand and eight that that helped them the worst excesses of the global financial crisis combined with of course, some governmental support in terms of liquidity and capital funding. The banks have struggled with the story in real estate. Because that has been the he'll at times, especially doing doing slowdowns what is exposure like at the moment with banks to to.

Secondly Bank Bank to Bank US Dubai GTC ten years
"liman" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"liman" Discussed on Super Station 101

"She says this is karen liman who is a phd and the director of tobacco use research center at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia for some people genetic variations may make it more difficult to quit than for someone else who smokes the same amount for the same same amount of cigarettes for the same amount of time the study findings are more applicable to quitting smoking them becoming addicted in the first place so although we have a variety of different factors they're saying now genetics is a component as well and it comes down to the receptors in the brain that's why there's a lot of natural ways to do that but again it's going to be harder for some than others i still believe with what i have seen personally in my career just that people wanted to quit there was something that scared them or a life event or they had a child die or a husband die or a wife die there were some massive amount of pain or massive amount of fear that got to the point where they just said enough i'm not gonna smoke anymore i'm not doing this any more it was over i see more people that have quit cold turkey and it'll blow you away i mean somebody smokes for twenty three years and they just quit you sound done it's over that i'm done went to the hospital and i was like granny and she said that she was really sick and went in the hospital and said tell the lord she said if i don't have.

director philadelphia karen liman university of pennsylvania twenty three years
"liman" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"liman" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Doug liman directed he went onto bring us born and the underrated edge of tomorrow joan favorite starred in wrote who went on to help launch the marvel cinematic universe with ironman and vince vaughn who an injustice says my three year old daughter tabitha recently established a welcome fascination with et super is my choice as it brings back fond memories of when i was similar age which in anything that fell under the umbrella of amblin my first feeling was super for this list roby i was surprised that my kids didn't take too to et so immediately yes i was a slight super refusenik after satan but i mean clearly speed hells moving castle great films house moving castle not just because it's japanese but this quiz early detailed homies accusation and particularly with recently the loss of cell takata of course akis cofounder is great great week to kind of immerse yourself in jubilation however i am going to choose the walk by robert zemeckis and i think on whether you've got this movie about the wire this is a movie about the wife okay the the french acrobat stuntman there was documentary as well right yes right man on wjr mountain so basically it's connected to what we were saying about rampage earlier this idea that cinema can redeem terrible real world events and of course the twin towers largely almost to associated public imagination with this attempt eleventh attacks the walk sets out to do in a similar way to mantle wire is to redeem those buildings as a symbol of human engineered am bishen please.

Doug liman joan tabitha roby robert zemeckis wjr mountain vince vaughn akis three year
"liman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"liman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Zorg them and we could help induce that to happen but art schools were more limited than many people thought in that context and going back coming into leman weekend we were left with those same tools oh better options in wait but that's kind of my point right because you you did bear and it worked because of all the factor right there was a buyer there were guarantee able assets the fed could actually have collateral to lend against i wonder if well did you say your cells up to fail with liman because bear stearns workout in theory so well the the point i tried to make early on which i think is just the opposite okay i think that if we had had bear stearns go down we would have had shortly thereafter in layman go down after the bear rescue then and i went and talked with barney frank at the house financial services committee we went up there and we said you know we we learn something barney we don't have the emergency powers in our regulatory system the dealing with a failing nonbank allen and investment make starts to go it in the middle of a run disintegrates very quickly if you don't have the emergency power to to guarantee or to plan capital so we need some kind of emergency resolution laurie so ben yeah so we with bear stearns i very well remember the conversation i was on my cell phone getting out to the car in the morning and timon hank we're on the phone and we were saying well you know here's how we do it should we do it or not what the pros cons and we decided okay we're going to go we're going to do it so we agreed to do it we never had that conversation with lehman because we never had a viable option there were three ways in which we help save firms one was to have a buyer and we thought we had a buyer but we had both bank of america barclays both of those both of those failed second way was to inject capital which is what we did after the.

liman barney frank allen laurie lehman fed bank of america
"liman" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"liman" Discussed on Mixergy

"Uh valve is done such a great job in terms of bringing that community together but at the time when we first created place burt that was not a foregone conclusion necessarily uh there was another product called x fire um who had recently been bought by viacom on and it did something somewhat similar but having been bought by by at eat there is some opportunity rear there are some new windows of opportunity to to to be an independent player and even today i mean there's some uh you know there's a bunch companies in the voice space that are continuing down that path clearly there's still a need um so it's it's it's it's an interesting space we ended up on you know launching a product in august of two thousand eight and does you recall that was about a month before liman it's laid off their entire crew uh and there are some pretty significant economic uh environmental and and sank fully over the course of the next few months uh we were a able to success we sell uh play expert to razor uh which uh to this day uses a uses the place for technology that split razor causes so if you use razor laptops uh keyboards mice and you want to communicate with the razor community true razor com that's actually all the experts acknowledging i see what kind of an exit was that for you i couldn't tell bags mall i don't wanna get into the details on it 'cause they have no you now well enough to know you're not going to tell me so i wanna give you advice to just give me like for a base hit a walk as it the add that was a that was a small one um it was disappointing uh only because there wasn't a single venture guy that wanted to write a single check in the fall two thousand eight i sense so if we were going to try and make this work we were down to figure out how we were gonna modifies an all mall was not to be monetize uh uh immediately you really to build the community and.

viacom windows liman
"liman" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"liman" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"In the liman is fifty and older sin city of mammogram his ability to four percent that is pretty good but that that are down state of this destinadas so that may be false positive as as sometimes but directive that again you know early in the best of the best hansa you know sometimes those things happen other than that i mean he still a good that are some harmful effects of mammogram radiation according to some studies and the spd in work six years back in in british general embassy medical jenin a day they said that uh you know they they don't need throughout mammal graham said as often as people do now but again this is something konta lucian and you know i would condemn specifically touch upon that the topic in this position by now but i would ask you to a check with your physician connie health professional and more even though i just wanted to mention to you that day that on the studies that show by milligrams said men on be as much necessary as often as necessary as is being done now on american cancer society says moreno ler floppy should get that mammogram every year the registers prevent deuce at least ask force which had raised with a photo going men seized women over fifty should get that mammogram every other year every other year if these women 42 fontanet inch beside what they want based on that has the story and it's not clear if we mental was sandiford even bother with mammograms so decide that is some of the things that are still ongoing discussions but then that ira in now the latest thing i wanted to see the few minutes that.

liman graham lucian ira sin city false positive four percent six years
"liman" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"liman" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Well my visit to be cpr two thousand seventeen were incomplete unless i stopped at the federal both george but drawn or got to see my friend i was always less time we're together was just over a year ago i spent the afternoon with you at puerto headquarters in miami we talk with you and your dad they history that that that i learned that you're abuse things that unita realize that great response listeners was just a fascinating talk about higher dead started how he rented a couple on way since then fifty years ago fifty three years ago very lucky nugget have patriarch hill divisions start this business to haul his liman is the the push hours you're doing all he could be here with us on his trip but he's watching us those carry somebody told me that there were cameras yet on what i hear what if you can see there's a camera there and on what what does cameras for some of that so jose patrol watch back literally this thought on the and he's asking his way guys sitting down my nephew way why are they see our customers exactly so he's keeping an eye on every single europe lot steady well we got big announced or got the big the federal book that i want to talk about because that is just really a great history of rhone three special let's talk about the ovation the ill my father all all had his he'll writing a book with his life story on all you know we had the wrong foundational opponents and so we decided it was a good opportunity to do it the book will be out of the temporary story about his life from mm childhood incurable always damon hill families while all fall than than all to build his business and a great story and not just above all but also about his life so call the proceeds of the book are going to go on vacation in a one hundred percent leposava 100 everyone without via little book viagra vice tempus kimber and they'll be two versions one is the commemorative version with this one with a warrior leather bound right in a letter what's like what avila leather bound in an it'll be in that.

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