35 Burst results for "Lima"

"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

05:14 min | 5 d ago

"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Parking space to other airlines and they're now operating flights between Dubai and Doha as well. So Jason, I'll let you take it from there, and I'll become the numbers guy. All right. Well, ordinarily, at Dubai's other airport Dubai world central, I think there's usually zero passenger flights per day. Maybe there's one or two on some random days, but typically the average hovers around zero passenger flights, not exactly the global hub, they envisioned yet at this point. But because of the lack of hotel space and I guess other things to do in Qatar, Qatar airways and fly Dubai are running basically shuttle buses at this point between DW C and both of Doha's airport. So Qatar is flying to Doha's current airport and fly Dubai is flying to the old Doha airport now named DIA. So the old space that I think is now primarily used by private aviation and also the military actually there, which is interesting. But I knew there were going to be some flights between the two and there are far more than I anticipated in far more than is actually in the schedules since it looks like any flight that Qatar had planned to operate their operating multiple segments ten minutes apart because there's demand for these flights is really high. So the other day there was a Qatar flight at 5 40 a.m. and then 6 40 and then 6 50 and then 7 35 and then 7 40. So these are not all in the schedule, but these are added segments basically. And these are not small aircraft. These are triple 7 300 ERs and mostly a three 3300s which are large aircraft. I counted 30 on one particular day, but the numbers are actually quite a bit more than that, isn't it? Yeah, so the commercial airline flights. I guess belie the fact that they're because it's a World Cup there are also a large number of private aviation sites. So just sticking with commercial fights for a moment. From Dubai world center to both Doha airports. You've got fly Dubai operating on the 20 1st of November. They operated 27 flights over to Doha. So just one way. This is not, you know, back and forth. This is just one way. So 27 flights, the 21st, and then yesterday the 22nd, they operated 30 flights. So more than an hourly shuttle. And then you've got and this is just to buy world center. This is not both Dubai airports. Those numbers are even more astronomical. But then you have Qatar going 15 flights on the 21st and then 19 flights. The 22nd. And as you mentioned, these are large aircraft. The flight 7 three 7s. But the Qatar airways flights are large wide body aircraft operating roughly 40 minute flight. So lots and lots of aviation and transport moving through. A 107 total flights over the past week from over the past few weeks from Dubai world center to both still higher ports and 43 to from to DIA and then 43 to Doha Hamad. So that's lots and lots of huge increase in fights. So we'll see how that goes over the next couple of weeks throughout the World Cup. But something to keep an eye on if you're following a bit of the aviation in book two. Yeah, maybe at the end of the World Cup will give you a total number of flights between Doha. Yeah, we can do that at the end because there you go. It's going to be a number that makes me upset, I think. I mean, at this point we're running hourly shuttles. So it's more so they used to actually run over the shuttle between Doha and Dubai. Much like today, they would throw any available aircraft that could do a two hour turn. But this is even more than that. It's wild. Not a good thing, by the way. I don't like this happening. I'm just particularly interested by it. If only there was some sort of mode of transportation that could carry a lot of people, a slightly longer distance, perhaps a two pieces of steel that you could put on, maybe call it a track or something. Talking crazy. All right, we'll figure it out for next week. Can't be done. I hope everyone enjoyed the trivia game. We're going to keep refining it and hopefully get as many people as we can to play it because it'll be fun. Hopefully we can do some special episodes of the trivia game elsewhere starting to plot that a little in my head. And find out where we can go and what we can do. And then we'll be back next week after the Thanksgiving break. For another episode and hopefully another game. So thank you all so very much for listening to episode 191. If you're in the U.S. or celebrating, just because Happy Thanksgiving, we hope you have a wonderful week and we'll see you next time. I am Ian pechenik here as always with. Thanks for listening.

Dubai Doha Qatar Doha airport Qatar airways World Cup Dubai world center Doha Hamad Jason Ian pechenik U.S.
"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

05:49 min | 5 d ago

"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"Believe it is the first whole loss incident of an a three 20 neo series aircraft. I'd imagine this aircraft likely will be scrapped, but we've seen some strange recoveries in the past. And yeah, to your point, Ian about an inch to the left and into the right to millimeter here. This would be a very different story. Is this aircraft is very, very nearly at the speed of rotation any matter of seconds difference if the fire truck had entered the runway, maybe the farther down taxiway. It could have been an incident where it collided with the aircraft, but the aircraft still had to rotate and take to the air and physically missing an engine and landing gear and all the other issues associated with that impact. This could have been an absolutely catastrophic issue or in this case, it lost the engine landing gear and it just kind of almost gracefully skidded to a stop at the end of the runway, thankfully. And I know we talked about this recently where usually there's some number of injuries during the evacuation. It seemed like not even that happened at this point. It was quite miraculous that unfortunately two firefighters were killed, but nobody on the aircraft was so much as injured as far as we could tell. Yeah, the impact was, I mean, the trucks are, they're heavy, both by design to be heavy. And then you fill them with a lot of water and firefighting agent like a foam or something like that. Those are heavy, heavy trucks. And I was kind of surprised by the fact. And I guess this makes sense because it hit the engine, the engines are designed. If there's an impact to the engine, they're designed to come off. Yeah, I don't know if it's an impact to the engine, I guess, or if there are certain G load stresses on the aircraft. It's probably either way, but I don't think anyone at Airbus or Boeing or bombardier ever ran a simulation on what happens if a fire truck drives into the engine of the aircraft while its speeding down the runway at a 127 knots. That simulation is probably never been run, so I'm assuming this incident will be studied quite a bit moving forward. Yeah, yeah, I'm sure it's just some data that you'd never think to obtain. Something like this actually happens in the real world. But everything, I guess, aircraft wise worked as expected. And yeah, there was a fire, but I don't think that's avoidable given what actually happened. No. So the kind of precipitating event for what happened is the Lima airport's been under a massive amount of construction for a few years now, as they build a new runway, a new control tower and expand the airport. And what was happening at the time was an exercise by the by the firefighting crews to prove that they can get from their emergency base to anywhere on the airfield in less than three minutes. And so they were moving at full speed and entering the runway area. The airport authority has put out some information about the incident. And I'm going to quote it here. And then we can kind of talk about what's happening. This is from, let's see, the 20th of November from the Lima airport authority. Quote, it is important to recall that this operation was previously coordinated between the airport operator and the air traffic authority, meaning the air traffic controllers. As on previous occasions. In this case, coordination started on November 17th and core pack, which is their traffic authority, proposed to carry out the exercise between 1516 hundred hours the following day. On November 18th during the morning and until the beginning of the exercise, the firefighting team made all the necessary arrangements to execute the maneuver, the control tower confirmed the start time of 1510. It being the time fixed for the beginning of the maneuver and the impact with the time aircraft occurred at 15 11. So what the airport is saying is that this was previously coordinated. And that very well may be true, but with they're not saying what they haven't said is if these aircraft rescue firefighting rigs had air traffic control, permission to enter the active runway area. And this is where I'm leaning on the good folks who listen to this podcast and who may know more about this than I do. It is my understanding that nothing not nothing enters a runway unless it is specifically and exactly cleared to enter the runway by air traffic control. Not we talked about this, so we're going to do it. Not we scheduled this so we're going to do it. But you ask and they either say enter or they say don't enter. That is my understanding. And I could be wrong here. And so hopefully if somebody has more if air traffic controllers are listening or if you're in your port firefighter and you're listening or if you're just someone who works anywhere in the field, please correct me if I'm wrong, but that's my understanding. Yep. Same as me. As I've ever known in the past, nothing enters the active runway, unless I get explicit permission from ATC at that moment, I guess it could have been that when a RFF trucks were dispatched out of their base, maybe they were given a set of instructions and permission to enter the active runway, and then there was some miscommunication where the aircraft was given permission to take off when it shouldn't have been, but

Lima airport Lima airport authority air traffic authority Ian bombardier Airbus Boeing RFF
"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

02:46 min | 5 d ago

"lima" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"We do turn to a story where we can say what happened. Last Friday afternoon in Lima Peru. Flight was attempting to depart the airport, flight two two one three was trying to depart Lima. When about a third of the way through its departure at role, it struck an aircraft rescue and firefighting rig that had driven on to the runway. Very sadly, two of the three firefighters who were in the rescue rig were killed. The third, I believe is still in the hospital. We haven't really seen an update on his condition yet. We're still looking out for that. But no one on board the aircraft was seriously injured. Everyone was able to make it off. Photos and videos from the scene are just, I think, some of the most bizarre, it's the most bizarre incident I have ever seen. When you first start, it was very unclear what had happened and then multiple camera angles showed exactly what happened. And it was just almost unbelievable. It was just a lot of video from many different angles came out very quickly on Twitter. Ironically, it was the same day everyone was tweeting their goodbyes on Twitter thinking it was going to disappear overnight. And then one of those defining events occurs that everyone tweets about and all these different camera angles come out and every video we got subsequently gave us a better and better idea of what happened and it was just every video we saw. We just kept saying, this doesn't make any sense. What just happened? And it also becomes clear looking at the video and some of the photos from inside the aircraft that shows the fuel spill igniting on the wing and the aircraft's wing on fire as it slides down the runway to a stop. It becomes clear that the aircraft hit the rig on the right side and it ripped off the aircraft's right engine. And collapsed the right main landing gear. And looking at the photos, it becomes extremely clear that a few feet to the inside of the aircraft, we would be having a much, much different conversation about how many people were killed and what happened. Did we give the stats of the aircraft, if not, I don't think we could. Yeah. Two two one three, just a 5 year old Airbus a three 20 neo registration CC BHB. So this was a relatively new aircraft. And if this is indeed scrapped, I

Lima Peru Twitter Airbus
The world in worship: Jews in Jerusalem celebrate Sukkot at the Western Wall, Peruvian Catholics revive a tradition, and Muslims celebrate the Prophet's birthday

AP News Radio

02:06 min | Last month

The world in worship: Jews in Jerusalem celebrate Sukkot at the Western Wall, Peruvian Catholics revive a tradition, and Muslims celebrate the Prophet's birthday

"On this week's AP religion roundup the world in worship Jews in Jerusalem celebrate suco at the Western Wall Peruvian Catholics revive a tradition and Muslims celebrate the prophet's birthday Thousands of Jewish worshippers attended the priestly blessing at the Western Wall in Jerusalem on Wednesday The traditional blessing attended by tens of thousands of worshipers has held three times a year including this year's sukha holiday It's a weeklong holiday that celebrates the harvest and God's protection during the Hebrew flight from Egypt Thousands of Christians from around the world also marched through Jerusalem singing songs and blowing the traditional Jewish shofar horn To celebrate suco and support Israel Israel has cultivated close ties in recent years with evangelical Christians Many of whom profess a strong affinity for the Jewish faith and consider modern Israeli history as fulfilling biblical prophecy Carl helberg a Maori Christian from New Zealand says the gathering speaks to his identity and his faith I come from a indigenous Maori people in New Zealand and I bring my flavor here and my understanding of who the God of Israel is and who is Sanders you saw the sign A few days earlier Muslims marched through the streets of Jerusalem to celebrate the birth of Islam's prophet Muhammad Mao lid was celebrated by Muslims around the world Including Sudan where hundreds of Sufi worshippers wore colorful outfits and performed rituals in celebration In Peru the country's most popular Roman Catholic procession the lord of miracles returned to the streets of Lima for the first time since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic The procession venerates a 17th century rendering of Jesus Christ The procession culminated with the giant replica painting being carried to a monastery where the original lord of miracles mural is located I'm Walter ratliff

Jerusalem Israel Carl Helberg Western Wall New Zealand Muhammad Mao Lid Egypt Sanders Sudan Peru Lima Walter Ratliff
"lima" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

03:50 min | Last month

"lima" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Someone who can please me love me all night long. I've been everywhere I met looking for you baby looking for you baby such a fire you back. And Lima. Still you know they are. Is there any color?

Lima
"lima" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

03:50 min | Last month

"lima" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"Someone who can please me love me all night long. I've been everywhere I met looking for you baby looking for you baby such a fire you back. And Lima. Still you know they are. Is there any color?

Lima
"lima" Discussed on DreamCatcher Quest

DreamCatcher Quest

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"lima" Discussed on DreamCatcher Quest

"And yeah, my mom always had to work. She had a really tough story, like she something that it's also a reminder. She had her first shows at the age of 12. For example, yes, and it's like, oh, that information of my mother is like really touched me, but yeah, we were all living in poor places of Lima. And yeah, I used to spend a lot of time knowing always new people always knew people. I had school at the place where you live. So yeah, that was my life. My partner, my father, I never lived with him, but he is, he was a really important part of my life. He always, I always see him. I mean, they both have their history. But I always, my mom and my father, they were always like, with that responsibility of, okay, you have to go to see your father or always listen to your mother, you know, that modern father figure, they were always taking care of that. I wasn't really quite kid actually. I didn't talk much in when I was a child. I actually didn't talk nothing. Only my mom knew the sound of my voice. And I always would play with guests or no. And I was like that until I traveled to merchant, where I had to learn to talk. I didn't know. And now I can tell you I'm the smiling but I didn't know my voice. So I had to practice how to talk alone like practice ongoing how do I say hi and to a conversation because I was really quiet. I don't know why maybe because I had to move all the time, but yeah, I always had that modern and father figure, my father

Lima
"lima" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"lima" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"A company that she started in her living room and sold to L'oreal for $1.2 billion. I'm going to talk to her about the rejection that she faced as she started at cosmetics and how she used that rejection to propel her towards success. So let's get to it. Here's my conversation with Jamie. Well, Jamie, it is so great to have you on the podcast. How you been? George, so great. I'm so honored and also fired up to be here. So thank you. Thank you for having me. Well, this is a precursor to having you at our entree leadership summit event, and I'm so excited for our leaders to get to hear from you. Here's some of your story, which we're going to get into today. We're going to scratch the surface of Jamie kern Lima. Is that okay? Sounds good. All right. So in 2019, you stepped down as CEO of it cosmetics and you sold it famously to L'oreal for $1.2 billion back in 2016. But your story, it doesn't start there. It started way back, take us back to when you were bagging groceries and waiting tables at Denny's. In the middle of this entrepreneurial journey, you face, will you call some crazy painful rejection along the way? Tell us what that was like. Yeah, I'm so glad you asked that. Thank you, 'cause a lot of people just see the end result. They're like, oh, Denny's waitress builds $1 billion company and it seems like, oh, did she get lucky or something like that? And the real journey, the real story behind the story is years and years and years of, you know, not just hundred hour weeks, but hundreds of rejections. And rejection after rejection after rejection and many, many years where I literally George, I didn't know are we going to go bankrupt at any moment. And are we going to make it? And you know, when I look back at the journey, I had this sort of big dream. It started with a problem of my own. I was trying to solve, which was I have a skin condition called rosacea, couldn't find anything else out there to work, that would work for me. And I didn't know anything about this industry that I was about to enter. I didn't have any connections in the beauty world. And I didn't have any money, but God put this dream on my heart and I couldn't shake it. And I was working as a news anchor and I just kept getting this feeling. You know, that still small voice, right? That we all get and I just felt like, oh gosh, I've got to listen to this and I felt it in my soul, but my head talked me out of it for a long time where I was like, oh, but you're not qualified, you know, what if you lose every penny you have, like all those things, but I eventually just decided to trust it and on my honeymoon flight to South Africa wrote the business plan with my husband, came back, we both quit our jobs and sort of dove all in. And from the moment we launched this little business with this big dream and in our living room, we poured every penny we had into the product, and I just thought, George, I thought, like, okay, if we make a product that actually works, it's just gonna sell. Like if it's that good, it's just gonna sell. And maybe other entrepreneurs listening can relate to this, but I did not know what I did not know. And from that day forward, it would be over three years before we could afford to pay ourselves at all. And all of these sort of retailers, I put up on pedestals that I used to spend my Denny's tip money, you know, shopping in their stores, the big beauty stores, the big department stores, when I'd send them the product every single one of them said no. And it was hundreds of nos. And I had a dream of going on QVC and they said no for years. And I had one potential investor that I thought was going to actually save our company and he said no, and this was years in. Because he didn't think that women would buy makeup from someone what he said someone who looked like me with my body and weight. So it was nose for so many reasons, but in that journey I just kept having this feeling that I couldn't shake and I think what happens, Georgia, so many people, we have no proof as entrepreneurs. We often go through these seasons where we have no proof around us that we're right or that there's a demand for our product or that our idea is like in our gut feeling is right. When everything's going wrong and we give up and we quit and sometimes it's after like one no or ten nos or 20 nos. And building this company and we built to over a thousand employees and eventually the largest luxury makeup company in the country, but in the journey I did a lot of things wrong and when I look back, one of the things I did right was every time I got another no and another rejection and another sort of blow and another, you don't have what it takes or you're not the right fit. They were painful and there was times I cried myself to sleep and my family would be like, you haven't so you have paid yourself in three years like nothing? Like did you really quit your job to do this? Like you have everyone else's doubt getting so loud, but when I pray about it and get still I just had this knowing this feeling I was supposed to keep going and I think listening to that that still small voice, which we all have the ability to access. I think when we do that, it can not just change our business and our journeys entrepreneurs, but it can change our entire life. So our real story is a story about overcoming rejection and listening to that that knowing over all the nose happening all around me. Wow, it's an incredible story and you unpack it in your book, believe it, go how to go from underestimated to unstoppable and that's exactly what you've done and it's such an incredible story because it's the one of it's all of us as entrepreneurs out there where you go, I'm just crazy enough to think this will work and ignorance is bliss because I don't know what I don't know and therefore I'm willing to charge hell with a water pistol to make this happen. Would you credit that still small voice for carrying you through those really hard moments? Because most entrepreneurs, if they do it for the wrong reasons, they give up. When the money's not coming in and it's not a lightning in a bottle thing, but when you do it for the right reasons because this is your calling, it changes everything, it seems. Yes, and I think it's so key that you really tune into your calling and that you really peel back the layers on it, make sure you're going deep enough to, you know, we hear so many people talk about your why. And but I think so many entrepreneurs, like I've now had the blessing of meeting tens of thousands of them. I mean, just in the QVC green room alone, I did over a thousand live shows myself and you see you meet so many brand founders coming in and taking their shot on air and every different industry and, you know, very few make it. Very, very few make it, and I think that one of the things I see happen a lot is people kind of have their why identified. And it sounds good to other people, so they stop there. But they actually never go deep enough to make it so personal to them and to make it so much bigger than themselves, that it becomes like a tool in your resiliency toolbox. So the times it is tap, you can lean on them, right?.

Jamie kern Jamie George Denny Lima rosacea QVC South Africa Georgia
Pennsylvania Senate Candidate Kathy Barnette Sets the Record Straight

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 7 months ago

Pennsylvania Senate Candidate Kathy Barnette Sets the Record Straight

"But Kathy, I like you. I've known you for, I don't know, 6, 7 years ever since you came on Fox with a national security moms. And so I've spoken about the latest attacks against you with somebody who served in the military in the reserves and knows these records. So I want to give you an opportunity in front of millions of people to answer these questions, put them to bed and then we'll see who wins this race. So in the records that you've released from your campaign yesterday in a book about you, there are questions as to officer candidacy school. What your MOS was two months of additional federal service that we don't know what it was for, whether you actually worked for the CID or were of VO a wheeled vehicle mechanics. I want to just give you the opportunity. Talk about your military record and clarify anything that you think needs clarification. Yeah, listen, my military records are right there in front of people now. Yesterday, let me just say, I've been running for 13 months. And only yesterday did mainstream media want to even talk to me. And I've been in a statistical tie for first place for at least four weeks, right? So for at least four weeks, I should have been on their radar, except they just wanted to talk about the two rich men and pretend there was no one else in this race. So the only people who have been derelict in their duty here has been mainstream media because I've been here for 13 months and at least in a statistical tie for first place for the last four weeks. But in regards to my military records, I served three years in the army reserves and I was assigned to the CID, the criminal investigation detachment. My MOS was 71 Lima when I came out as a administrative specialist three years there moved back to Alabama and third with the National

Kathy FOX CID Army Lima Alabama
Staley leads South Carolina over UConn for second NCAA title

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Staley leads South Carolina over UConn for second NCAA title

"Destiny destiny destiny destiny Henderson Henderson Henderson Henderson scored scored scored scored a a a a career career career career high high high high twenty twenty twenty twenty six six six six points points points points in in in in a a a a Lima Lima Lima Lima Boston Boston Boston Boston had had had had a a a a double double double double double double double double as as as as the the the the Gamecocks Gamecocks Gamecocks Gamecocks shut shut shut shut down down down down UConn UConn UConn UConn sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four forty forty forty forty nine nine nine nine Boston Boston Boston Boston finished finished finished finished with with with with eleven eleven eleven eleven points points points points and and and and sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen rebounds rebounds rebounds rebounds to to to to help help help help South South South South Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina become become become become the the the the first first first first team team team team to to to to beat beat beat beat UConn UConn UConn UConn at at at at twelve twelve twelve twelve NC NC NC NC double double double double a a a a title title title title games games games games because because because because they they they they did did did did a a a a great great great great job job job job of of of of scheduling scheduling scheduling scheduling us us us us a a a a hard hard hard hard non non non non conference conference conference conference schedule schedule schedule schedule which which which which kept kept kept kept is is is is repaired repaired repaired repaired and and and and we're we're we're we're able able able able to to to to fight fight fight fight through through through through all all all all of of of of those those those those games games games games and and and and so so so so it it it it just just just just showed showed showed showed how how how how determined determined determined determined we we we we were were were were to to to to continue continue continue continue to to to to be be be be successful successful successful successful the the the the Gamecocks Gamecocks Gamecocks Gamecocks out out out out rebounded rebounded rebounded rebounded the the the the Huskies Huskies Huskies Huskies by by by by forty forty forty forty nine nine nine nine twenty twenty twenty twenty four four four four including including including including a a a a twenty twenty twenty twenty one one one one six six six six advantage advantage advantage advantage on on on on the the the the offensive offensive offensive offensive glass glass glass glass Connecticut Connecticut Connecticut Connecticut shot shot shot shot just just just just four four four four for for for for sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen from from from from three three three three point point point point range range range range page page page page backers backers backers backers with with with with the the the the lawn lawn lawn lawn husky husky husky husky to to to to score score score score in in in in double double double double figures figures figures figures finishing finishing finishing finishing with with with with fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen I'm I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Boston Henderson Henderson Gamecocks Gamecocks Gamecocks Uconn Lima Lima Lima Carolina South South South South Caroli Huskies Huskies Huskies Connecticut Huskies Lawn Lawn Lawn Lawn Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie
'The Case for Christ' Author Lee Strobel on the Biggest Christmas Misconception

The Dan Bongino Show

02:52 min | 1 year ago

'The Case for Christ' Author Lee Strobel on the Biggest Christmas Misconception

"You out there I want to welcome back to the show A good friend to the show for his second appearance a guy who wrote a book that changed my life The book was called the case for Christ it's a magnificent book Lee strobe Lee welcome back to the show Well thanks so much Dan Merry Christmas to you and your listeners Merry Christmas to you as well my Friends so we spoke last time and will be rerunning that interview I got so much feedback about your book the case for Christ Little background folks again Lee Yeah people loved it Lee was a journalist writing a book and again leaf I mischaracterized his stomach but trying to discredit he existence of Christ and found himself becoming a believer while writing the book and wrote about his journey in a book called the case for Christ It's magnificent I just learned today Lee then you have a book as well called the case for Christmas So I am going to be picking this up today and it turns out there are a lot of misconceptions about Christmas that you've discovered in your work You want to go through some of them for us Yeah sure One of the big misconceptions I think stems from the fact that there's a certain Greek word that was mistranslated in the original King James version It's a work Catalina which is a Greek word that refers to a guesthouse And so when you read the story about the Christmas you know everybody's familiar with It's a Marianne Joseph go to Bethlehem for the census And the returned away by the mean oil innkeeper and so she has to give birth either in a cave or in a stable or something like that Well there was really no innkeeper that really wasn't all in The word can't Lima that's used in by the gospel writer Luke refers to a guest room And so what this means what actually happened is in the first century in a Jewish home in Bethlehem it would be one big room divided into two places One places for the animals to come at night and they would keep the animals indoors and there was a major there with some hay for them to eat built into the floor And a few steps up and then a living area which is where they would cook and sleep and so forth And sometimes the animals would come upstairs there's a couple of stairs there into the living area and so they had a major there as well Now some of the wealthier two families would have a second room A guest room called the Catalina And that's what the Bible is referring to And so what happened was Mary Joseph come into town and there was no room for them in the guest room of the house But there was room apparently in the family room and that's where she gave birth not in a cave not in a stable But there were animals around because they were allowed into the home at night And so that part would be accurate So I think people get the misconception that says all in keeper that somehow shun Mary and Joseph from

Lee Strobe Lee Dan Merry Lee Yeah LEE Marianne Joseph Luke Refers Bethlehem King James Lima Mary Joseph Shun Mary Joseph
The Domestication of the Potato

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:12 min | 1 year ago

The Domestication of the Potato

"How many foods that we eat today. All around the world simply didn't exist in the old world of africa asia and europe corn chocolate vanilla peppers green beans pumpkins. Tomatoes and squash are all foods that were completely unknown to the peoples of the old world. Perhaps the most important neural food. However was the humble potato. The potato was originally native to south. America it was first domesticated impro- anywheres from five thousand ten thousand years ago. It's really hard to tell because potatoes aren't very well preserved in the archaeological record. But we know that they were being grown. Probably when studies were first being built in mesopotamia specifically they were probably first domesticated around the area of lake titicaca high in the andes mountains. The first confirmed evidence in the archaeological record comes from the year. Thousand five hundred. You're the coastal city of n con just north of lima peru. The potato was the primary food stuff for the incan empire. Potatoes cooked by ancient peruvians. We're not too dissimilar to how they're cook today. They were baked or boiled and might have been mashed. Potato is pretty much have to be cooked in order for the starches in them to be digestible by humans. Some potato varieties had toxic compounds that required soaking and clay and water to leach out the toxic substances one popular way of processing potatoes in the andes was to make this involved repeatedly leaving them outside to freeze and then thawing them. The next day this freeze drying would go on for three to five nights then they would be laid out and stomped on to remove any remaining water. The result would be white. Rock looking thing not too dissimilar from appealed potato but because it was dehydrated it could last for years. Potatoes had been domesticated all the way down the andes mountains to southern patagonia. In what is today chile prior to the arrival of europeans. The first spanish explorers to the region led by pizarro in fifteen thirty to recognize the value of the potato but when they brought them back to europe it was mostly for consumption by the south american people they brought back with them supposedly and i know this because i actually paid a visit. The first place in europe to grow potatoes was the garden at the monastery in guadalupe spain. It was a place that queen isabella frequently visited.

Andes Mountains Lake Titicaca Squash Mesopotamia Europe Asia Africa Lima Peru America Southern Patagonia Pizarro Chile Guadalupe Spain Queen Isabella
"lima" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Inspires me. Change inspires me. Risk inspires me. I'm obviously this is in. My personality will house. But i am. I'm drawn to this. I'm drawn to these people who imagine something more something better something more just more equitable more beautiful than what they were told was possible. These are the ones out there that are dreaming new dreams in creating new spaces in hosting new conversations in pushing forward important change though social and cultural and emotional changes that are huge that matter that mattered our world. And so i know that flipping the script can look like a lot of different things individually as we think about ourselves as you're thinking about yourself today as you're listening in i made it could be as simple as the way in which you are taking care of yourself now maybe having neglected yourself or harmed yourself or ignored yourself all these years. Maybe you are flipping the script on the way that you treat other people. Maybe you've decided. I am not stuck in these dysfunctional relational patterns just because i repeated them for a lot of years. You're flipping the script on that. And i say bravo that you. Maybe it's just your outlook on life. In general maybe it's cheer belief system. Maybe it's your convictions. Or if you're like our guest today. Maybe it's a career flip i knew in the series i wanted to talk to somebody who engineered a career flip simply because we'll familiar reasons. I'm inspired by stories like that. But also i listened to you a lot. I listened to the women in our. And i've watched so many of you. Flip the script on your careers and start later. Go back to college in your thirties or forties finnish degree. Change it up at fifty. I know that this is something. That's dear to our community. This idea that were never really stopped in a career space just because we started there or just because we even if we once loved it that a lot of us have new visions and new ideas and new places. We'd like our professional energy to go and so it could be because you're no longer happy where you're at. It could just be grown. You know it could just be. It's not necessarily that. You're leaving something that maybe it's something you're running to right or maybe it is that you are in a place that is dysfunctional in a work environment. That's hurting your soul or hurting your marriage. Just hurting who you are. At whatever the reason is. I think this is something on the plate for a lot of women and so i'm excited to really pick up this conversation today date. It's in this case centered around the entrepreneurship dreaming. Something up from scratch. it's a challenging road to walk. I mean it's a pretty big rock to pick up and carry. I'm a very unique way to move through the world because having an holding dream close to your chest for years can be both an absolute source of inspiration but it can also be a stressor right and maybe that's a good thing that push pull it sometimes. What kicks us out of the nest. But i can speak for myself certainly because i flipped the script on my career. You know i started out as a teacher was an elementary school teacher and out of the clear blue john decided to become a writer with no credentials. No backers no platform. No clue so i think maybe this is why this is precious to me because i know what that exact spot feels like where the fear of failure lives the fear of being rejected right by retailers or investors or customers or whatever whatever the thing is so i have questions for that space right there and i have a lot of like love in nurture for that space. Because how do we learn to that. Right how how do we get through that. How do we come to accept the discomfort right there. That standing between us and what is in front of us you know. This is why we're so lucky today to be speaking with the one and only jamie kern lima. So you don't know. She is the expert on fighting the fight and pushing through years of no and rejection and obstacles and roadblocks in pursuit of what she just knew in her gut was her thing too. She just knew it. Jamie is an absolute self made entrepreneur. She's a co founder of the beauty brand it cosmetics. Jamie started the span in her living room which he's gonna talk about her living room and she spent years working and reworking after hearing hundreds of rejections by real retailers and investors and she actually works tirelessly down to her last penny essentially to keep the dream alive. And because of that. And you're going to hear this whole strike jamie by the way is a great storyteller like this is like listening to a really released. Find exciting documentary. You're gonna hang on every word today because she she hung on nan. She hung on persevered. She pushed through and jamie eventually sold that brand for one point. Two billion billion with a b. As in boy dollars she became the largest beauty brand ever sold on. Qvc and she earned a place on the forbes. Richest self made women list having been down to her last penny her last shot. And she's pretty candid about that struggle and she's also very open about how prayers at faith in guide were kind of her core kind of her central keeping her steady and focused and anchored and resilient as she kept moving forward despite it all so it. Cosmetics is a household name She built something incredible. Jamie is super passionate about mentoring entrepreneurs about investing in other companies and then ultimately making a difference in the lives of women and girls which obviously you can see why. I'm drawn to her completely. She's also a very renowned public speaker and shares. Her story was a lot of candor about overcoming fear and rejection and self doubt. You are going to be inspired today. I think i've found myself listening to jamie and just feeling a so much identification. I mean we obviously a completely different spaces you know. I didn't build a beauty brand. But she's a woman who had a dream in a field that she wasn't qualified or experienced in and that makes sense to me. That's how i started. You're gonna love her. This is one of those things when you wildly cheer for somebody else's success because they're so great 'cause she's fantastic in generous of spirit and wonderful and kind and so gosh. She buys joy this incredible conversation with the absolute wonderful go-getter. Jamie kern lima..

jamie kern bravo Jamie jamie lima john Qvc Jamie kern lima
Defining and Breaking Down Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy A.k.a ‘The Pump’

Mind Pump

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Defining and Breaking Down Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy A.k.a ‘The Pump’

"Here's what i want to talk about with a lot of people know this about so circle. Plasma hypertrophy actually pulled up a definition. So that when you get the pump. That's called transient circle. Plasma hypertrophy meaning. It's this temporary growth of the muscle because blood fills the muscle but is water included in that water. Yeah of course well. Big percentage of blood is water to but you can actually build muscle without building muscle fibers. Through what is known as circle plasma mccafferty so plaza mc hypertrophy is an increase in the volume of the circle. Lima and or sarcasm. Now here's important part accompanied by an increase in the volume of mine. Cadre circle plasma ridiculous t two bills and or plasma enzyme or substrate content in other words all the stuff that makes up your muscle size besides muscle fibers. That are also important. Because you're also important things that are involved in the function of your muscle the performance of your muscle. They're involved the building of your muscle. You can actually increase the amount of these things by training and utilizing. The pump is by bodybuilders. For long time have loved notice that like an exotic. That's it that's it. That's the research that supports. Why be afar absolute so beneficial. Because you're obviously not breaking down like you would. If you're heavy loading barbell squat or doing something like that but you are getting a massive pump from it. Yeah and if you think about it you know if you were to look at all the things that make up your muscle size your muscle fibers are actually not the majority. It's the circle plaza all the other stuff that makes up the size. Your muscles so in terms of also helps performance. That's that's a key. I wanna make not just looks but if you wanna make your muscles look bigger rounder fuller training for the pump going through this. Why and maps programs We always have or typically. We'll have some kind of a pump phase in there. Yeah it's a part of developing

Lima
GlucoMedix - Naturally Supporting Healthy Glucose Levels

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 1 year ago

GlucoMedix - Naturally Supporting Healthy Glucose Levels

"I'm just fascinated because the more you learn the more interesting it cats and you were just talking about. What is it glucose glucose medics. It's a pro product. We've been working on for been under development for many years and it's a combination of cemento and stevia stevia. Yes stevia has the sweetener the sweetener if If it's a whole leaf extract it has blood sugar support properties Cardiovascular support properties. Zatterin does not have that saccharine. Sucralose does not have. I don't think so so aspartame does not have that no so So most people think of stevia as a natural sweetener yeah but but a whole leaf extract of that of that leaf Can as i mentioned have blood sugar support properties etc so. We combine that with cemento and we did. Some research and our university did some research. And what do you mean. Our university university now are when you work with a university in peru. Actually the top university improved doing research and publishing the research is called the the Cayetano university in lima peru and and They did a Several studies comparing luca medics For metabolic support blood sugar support cardiovascular support and it was very comparable to these other remedies was compared to so that has all been That research has been compiled in and it's been submitted to a very high level Pure reviewed medical journal in europe for publication waiting to see if that's going to be accepted for publication but that's really helped a lot of people glucose

Zatterin Cemento Cayetano University Peru Lima Luca Europe
"lima" Discussed on The Poker Coaching Podcast

The Poker Coaching Podcast

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on The Poker Coaching Podcast

"This one has white back. He's readbacks what's it. What's the difference. Lima under the difference. Someone's if it's from like a different different series. Oh wow this is number nine of thirteen at one. Is this when numbered. Can you see this. This is number nine of thirteen. These don't have numbers on them. Kind of weird. It also looks different after show you this. Now let's see just tuned in can recap the story with these playing cards. These are trading or not playing cards. And i don't know man go back and reclaim. Oh no these are numbered. See it wait. Only some of these are numbered. What in the world's happening. I'm so confused. Look okay come on light the number right here. Fifteen or twenty five. Can you not see this area nine to thirteen fifteen or twenty-five but then none of these other ones are numbered. Had no idea what's happening number.

Lima
Philippines' Duterte Will Not Cooperate With ICC Probe: Spokesman

Pacifica Evening News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Philippines' Duterte Will Not Cooperate With ICC Probe: Spokesman

"Rodrigo Duterte says he will never cooperate with a possible international criminal court investigation and to the thousands of killings under his anti drug crackdown. That's what Duterte spokesman says, calling an international inquiry insulting to the country's justice system. But human rights activists are welcoming the possible investigation as a long awaited step towards justice and accountability. Leading Duterte critic jailed opposition Senator Lila de Lima. Said the Philippine leader may now be harboring fears of being dragged in chains to the Hague to be tried as an enemy of mankind. Outgoing I C C Chief prosecutor But you Bensouda said that a preliminary examination found reason to believe crimes against humanity had been committed. During Duterte's crackdown on drugs between July 1st of 2016 and March 16th of 2019. Those dates covered the period between when Duterte launched his police enforce crackdown shortly after winning a six year presidential term and when he withdrew the Philippines From the International Criminal Court. Critics said at the time he was trying to avoid accountability Simon Marx reports in a major escalation between the court and the government in Manila. The Hague's top prosecutor says an investigation should go ahead over President Rodrigo Duterte extrajudicial war on drugs. Our correspondent

Duterte Rodrigo Duterte Senator Lila De Lima Bensouda Philippine Simon Marx International Criminal Court Philippines Manila President Rodrigo Duterte
Internal Family Systems Therapy with Dr. Richard Schwartz

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Internal Family Systems Therapy with Dr. Richard Schwartz

"Dr schwartz. Thanks for joining me today. how are you doing. I'm good for us. Great to be with you. Thanks for inviting me. Yeah thanks so much for taking the time to do this. I really appreciate it. And as i mentioned earlier you started out working as a family systems therapists before creating i f s so as kind of way of introduction for you and maybe for i whole what were you doing and seen just around you in the field at the time that the creation of ifs was kind of response to. Yeah so. I was one of those sort of zealous family therapists. Who but we've found the holy grail and fought those psycho dynamic with psychoanalytic therapists that were monkey around in the inner world. We're wasting their time. 'cause we could change all that by just reorganizing. These external families and i set out to prove that thousand nine hundred eighty one. I think i was a fresh graduate from my doctoral program in wayland family therapy and i decided to what we gathered together about thirty lima kids and their families and tried to prove that the structural strategic family therapy works and found that it didn't actually i could reorganize the family's just the way the book said to these kids would keep binging and purging to my frustration. So i began asking why and they started to teach this to me and it was very foreign to me at the time because they would talk about as you say these different parts of them say some version of when something bad happens this critic attacks inside caused me horrible names and then that brings up a part that makes me feel yang empty and alone worthless and that feeling is so dreadful that the bench comes in to get away from that. The act of the binge brings the critic back. Who's now calling me a pig on top of the other names in that. Of course the brings back that young empty alone worthless part and so they were talking about these parts is if they had a lot of autonomy in almost like little inner beings so i got scared. I thought maybe these kids were sick. To than i thought and then i started listening inside myself in my god. I've got him to and some a minor has extreme is. There's just

Dr Schwartz Wayland Lima
Dallas Cowboys LB Sean Lee Retires From NFL After 11 Seasons

The Rich Eisen Show

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Cowboys LB Sean Lee Retires From NFL After 11 Seasons

"Eleven seasons in the nfl of being one of the leading tackles of the dallas cowboys on one hand and the operations guy operation guy on the other according to espn lima's time in his career with hamstring risk. To- neck need in core muscle injuries as well as concussions. My god eleven seasons he led. The cowboys tackles fourth including twenty. Two single game tackles against the giants in two thousand sixteen. It's a record

Dallas Cowboys NFL Lima Espn Cowboys Giants
American Airlines Cutting Flights to South America Because of COVID-19

Texas Standard

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

American Airlines Cutting Flights to South America Because of COVID-19

"What they were before the pandemic. 90% free covert levels was the quoted figure. Dallas Morning News is reporting that things are a bit more turbulent on the international side of things, however, American plans to cut down on its flights to South America routes to places like Sao Paulo, Lima and Santiago will all be reduced along with some outbound flights from New York and Miami. Driver here is what else? The pandemic Covert 19 cases are rising and parts of Brazil, Peru and Colombia that's reducing the demand for international travel, at least for now. American Airlines plans to revisit these root reductions later in the summer. Stevie Ray Vaughan and taking us up to 29 minutes past the hour. Texas Standard Time The news roundup.

Dallas Morning News Sao Paulo Lima South America Santiago Miami Peru Colombia Brazil New York American Airlines Stevie Ray Vaughan Texas
United Airlines International Travel Recovery Still Far Off

Texas Standard

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

United Airlines International Travel Recovery Still Far Off

"What they were before the pandemic. 90% free covert levels was the quoted figure. Dallas Morning News is reporting that things are a bit more turbulent on the international side of things, however, American plans to cut down on its flights to South America routes to places like Sao Paulo, Lima and Santiago will all be reduced along with some outbound flights from New York and Miami. Driver here is what else? The pandemic Covert 19 cases are rising and parts of Brazil, Peru and Colombia that's reducing the demand for international travel, at least for now. American Airlines plans to revisit these root reductions later in the summer. Stevie Ray Vaughan and taking us up to 29 minutes past the hour. Texas Standard Time The news roundup.

Dallas Morning News Sao Paulo Lima South America Santiago Miami Peru Colombia Brazil New York American Airlines Stevie Ray Vaughan Texas
Birth Control In Times Of Crisis

Latino USA

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Birth Control In Times Of Crisis

"We're in the maternity waiting room at hospitals university. Tarot asthma has meals the main public hospital in gupta columbia's biggest border city with venezuela it's before the pandemic and there are some fifteen pregnant women sitting in the green towel hallway it's heart and the fans are buzzing the women's quietly in tank tops and flip. Flops they robbed their prominent bellies. One woman's she's wearing a pink will be squished between two older book. Your women she looks fragile in her hospital gown. She holds an ivy back in her left. Hand her name is excellently. So long deal thing will make a yankee. Lima nipples in the balkan kunz online exhibition traveled alone more than seven hundred miles from so i think her hometown in northeastern as well. She was afraid of giving birth in her home country because hospitals have no resources and she couldn't afford a private clinic and clearly she wasn't the only one more than half of the women in the waiting room. Arvin as well to see my conversation with axial ends abruptly just having really painful contractions and a nurse sticks her way into the delivery room at twenty years old. She's about to give birth to her second child. None of her pregnancies where

Hospitals University Gupta Venezuela Asthma Columbia Lima Arvin
A Breakdown Of Latinx Heavy Medal

Latino USA

02:04 min | 1 year ago

A Breakdown Of Latinx Heavy Medal

"So i'm in the studio today with producer. Genie montalvo gene. So thought i wanna take you back to the latin grammys of twenty nineteen. What happened well. A bunch of things happened but relevant today. Yeah lars ulrich of metallica presented with the person of the year award. It's kind of like a lifetime. Achievement did not know. That's where you're going to go with this surprise but really you can see kind of losing it on the video but listen to him here. That's very funny to me for those who don't know who is. How would you describe his music. It's like top yet. Like pop rock but the area likes comey sunday at me but i had no idea he was a huge metallica fan. Wine is is a huge mental fan. And so we're a lot of people in latin america and that is what i'm going to be talking to you about today mysterious. I didn't know you were into metal finds story. Because i'm actually not. But i am surrounded by latino metal heads. My brother was into metal growing up my neighbors into metal and plays in a metal band. And what would life be like. It didn't marry someone who was also into metal much quieter. So speaking about my husband or nesto who you know as from peru. He was telling me the story the other day that got me thinking about this topic. It was about the time. When one of his favorite bands the british rockers. Iron maiden came to lima in two thousand nine. You have heard of iron. Maiden i've seen the sweatshirts when our media i came. I announce actually their visits lima. People started making plans to come to the show. People started coming from other cities. Even from equador people throw away from waiheke from keitel youth ecuadorian flex in the crowd

Genie Montalvo Comey Lars Ulrich Latin America Lima Peru
Can teaching your children sign language can help language learning?

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Can teaching your children sign language can help language learning?

"I'm surprised that attachment experts and people that are really You know enthusiastic. I won't say into but you know attachment. I'm they wouldn't have brought this up and said wait a minute. Debate one of the best ways that we can increase attachment in up for kids and their parents would be to teach them to sign. Then the other thing is as far as learning other languages in the future me say your child wants to learn spanish in fourth grade or french or latin. Like i did. It's gotta be so much easier for them because they know how to work different parts of their brain time. They'll both of my kids. I haven't even mentioned this to you. That's what i'm saying. We're on the same wavelength. Both of my kids are well. I i'm trying to get them trilingual and so sign is they know the least amount of words but they are a hundred percent bilingual english and spanish. You could talk to them all day in spanish and not say one and their three or two and three you can letters goalie bonian lebedeva or just as i was getting london from the park. I was talking to her in spanish in saint northstar stormy indo. Why are you not sleeping right now. Let's go given the call sign and schilling george inner mixes. She will one hundred percent. She'll say grass on Oh my gosh. She said the other day she said Coma safety say like she was asking me. How do you say Gosh she say she said komo's ad say word in spanish amit was wild and then she asked the sentence in spanish so she was just wondering we weren't even speaking in spanish. Yup is she is she was on yet. But i promise you sign. Language is the reason that she has blown through her milestones. At one year she was she could do such a nerd journaling every month of other things or whatever so they can read back on it. I actually made them a g mail account and i like email them emails so that one day they can read stuff that i like sent to them on. That's my mom again. Jama color jama grant jan and grandma jam telling me to do that so we did that but say gosh. Where was i going with that and we were talking about. You want trilingual hocken about the ease that you Create for your kids in learning third and fourth language. If at early age they've learned to yes and i. It's it's it's very true. Yeah i am telling you. Oh we asked that was her. It was at her pediatrician appointment for her one year. They're like you know. Kimchi say three to five words. And i might jan which language and they were like what she knows. English sign in spanish. And i'm like teller. London like lima one year old. My one year old was. I'm like come on. You know it's hard because you know kids if they're not always going to do what you want especially that kind of clam up at the doctor's office but she was like we're not leaving here until she says a word all these languages than being on like london you know. Show us milk show as eater. Whatever she could say a couple words in spanish Probably like five six in spanish probably ten in english as a one year old. Now that's different. I was wild pick. I mean my pediatrician. Just couldn't believe her eyes but my son wasn't like that so it's not like they had the same upbringing in the same house. That totally proves every kid is different. Like my son could not do that. Yeah i actually am not. That's not unusual that you know girls. Language progresses more quickly than it has nothing to do with intelligence. It's just it's you know who they

Bonian Lebedeva Schilling George Hocken Komo Amit London Lima JAN
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"I was really driven by like a a way bigger thing i wanted to do right and so like i didn't have time and i never took any them personally. I literally just made my i just. I made the decision that like. I was going to change the beauty industry so they just didn't get it yet and they're saying no to our products like i feel bad for them. They're just robbing their customer. Great experience and they're just delaying changing. Lives like i would. Just tell myself those things and believe them. Because i did that. That work of peeling back student a wide beneath the why not. I love that. And i'm a complete believer in it as well. you know. I think a lot of times we get to this place where we're trying to figure these things out and we also. Your intuition tells us that there's something there keep going. We have this deeper. I in my life call five levels of why each keep asking until you get to it and for me. When i this goes back to early conversation i know that it it when i actually feel it. You know if. I can throwing out an answer because i come up with a language i can come up with a lot of compelling. You'll like things that i can post on a brand statement and all this network sexy and a pitch dot you know and i knew it will -ccomplish a specific goal. But if i don't actually feel like for me. The tell is i physically will start to shake it will i will start low res l. i will get teary like if i if i'm not there. I know like we. So i've got some good reasons here. But you said and and those reasons very often. I think they'll get us through eighty ninety percent of the challenges. Come away but when you're building something really substantial on its term. It's that last ten to twenty percent of the stuff that's really brutal that the sort of like the surface of a watch doesn gets you through..

ten twenty percent eighty ninety percent each five levels
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"You have to pay for but if it doesn't sell or jonathan. The other thing is what i learned. What i learned is that you might be given this ten minute window. But if you go live in your minute in and it's not selling your time gets cut live right so you think you have ten minutes maybe a minute or two in. It's not doing well all of a sudden. Your clock is down to two minutes instantly. You're like an and then it all gets shipped back to you and in our case we would go out of business right so it was a big risk at that point to your point. We didn't know how we were going to stay alive anyway. We were down to under a thousand dollars at this point in our company bank account which was our personal bank account so we apply and we really doing the two three orders a day on our website so we Applied for sba loans and his twenty two banks had no so the last the twenty third bank gave us alone just to cover the inventory for this one airing on qvc so basically long story short everything was on the line and you know as an entrepreneur should never accept a disorder. You can't afford to lose but at this point like you know like it's kind of our one shot so i had practiced the whole demonstration. I was gonna do on the in this ten minute airing and all this we hired third party consultants. That are awesome. They help people sell their products on television and in stores And the big dilemma. That i walked right into. Was that all these third party. Experts told me that you know for me to have the best chance of success in that ten minute window. I needed to. Have you know all of these models with flawless skin. And here's hi needed to present the product will. This was everything that it ever worked before. So i got why they were saying this but it also went against the authentic reason. I created this product to begin with so i would say to them things like well. If i'm sitting at home. And i am in my seventies at how do i know that it's gonna work for me if i only see someone who looks like. She's twelve modeling. Or if i'm home with rosacea or hyper pigmentation. But i don't see somebody with my skin tone. My skin challenge like how do i know it's gonna work for me and we would get into it and argue and they wanted me to win. They wanted the best thing for me and you said something earlier. Actually that made me think of this moment because people that are visionaries even though they would never admit this. They also often can't imagine something succeeding if they haven't seen it succeed before because subconsciously. There's no proof it's going to write so i'm arguing with the best of the past experts. And they're telling me one thing and my gut is telling me another. But i also didn't want to go out of business and i was putting this really tough situation where literally everything was on the line so i flew out to pennsylvania which is where. Qvc as it's about thirty minutes west of philly and i sat in this rental car in the parking lot a week early so i got there a week early and i sat all alone in this rental car staring at the front door of qvc. Which is this massive campus. Because the pressure felt so. Great where i was like. I don't wanna go out of business. I don't want to lose everything. And.

pennsylvania two minutes ten minutes two a minute twenty two banks Qvc ten minute twenty third bank seventies qvc jonathan philly a week one shot under a thousand dollars one thing twelve modeling a week early about thirty minutes
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And see the proof in front of us and all those things and so you know for me. One of the biggest stories. That comes to mind of. I think when it spoke to me the loudest and how it felt was after three years of constant from from everyone including including qvc. I had finally gotten the head person at his name was alan burke and he ran all of beauty at kabc ease of use response. He's considered a legend in the in the beauty industry. And he's responsible for building this Billion dollar multi billion dollar empire over there and finally gotten him on the phone. And i thought if he's going to you know talk to me and spent any of his precious time. It's going to be a good thing and long story short When we when we got on the phone he said you know it's a no and It's a unanimous no All the buyers feel that you're not the right fit for us or for qvc and cried myself to sleep that night and then three nights in a row and eventually was at a big beauty trade show or thousands of their six thousand women there and happens once a year and every beauty brand demonstrates their best product launches of the year and i entered us in that show and Long story short at qbc was there and one of their hosts happened to try our product and love it and tell the buyer about it. And i snuck out from the booth when you're not supposed to leave and went up and met one of the buyers hoping happened. We ended up getting a meeting. Finally an in person meeting finally for. Qvc we gotta yes and what this meant was we got one shot in this ten minute. Live airing on. Qvc now at the time we were doing two to three orders a day on our website. Right so so. You're kind of like at the end of your rope. I mean it was. This was make or break time for you. It was maker break and after three years of no hearing. No and you're not the right fit from everybody to finally get this big. Yes was huge but it also became one of my greatest lessons on intuition. I think that i've ever had in my career so far because it's one thing to know what we stand for and to know what we feel and then it's a whole 'nother thing when everyone's telling you to go against it and when everything's on the line and what i mean by that is we got this. Yes which met. We got one chance one shot to go live on. Qvc which is a television shopping channel broadcast two hundred million homes live. And it's consignment so you know what that meant for us at the time was oh we had a sell over six thousand units of our product in this ten minute window in order to hit their sales goal or not come back and it was all consignment meaning we somehow had to pay for all of it manufacture all of it ship it into them not to mention all the boring stuff. I won't go into which is like third party. Manufacturing ftc compliance all the stuff fda clinical testing all the stuff..

alan burke three nights two six thousand women two hundred million homes One ten minute qbc kabc once a year one chance one one shot dollar Qvc three years qvc over six thousand units thousands three orders a day
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Good life fifty. I mean i. It's interesting to hear you know the The went to hold them went to fold question. I think is something that so many people grapple with whether it's your own company whether it's a career whether to relationship you know it's that universal question where we get so trapped very often i think also by wanting to be perceived a certain way by people around us who we respect and who's respect we want by data which sometimes tells us you know at well the data can prove it and data can prove anything that hasn't been done before so there's no yeah you always have to balance that but then i mean i'm i'm fascinated by sorta like the deeper knowing that you talk about you know because i think we look to. We look to outside. People trust reluctant information and we so often never validate intuition as data And i think it's really important. You know i think sometimes it does lead us astray. There's really interesting..

fifty
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Looks like everyone's having these great success but when we share our stories of oh yeah. Here's the outcome. Oh yeah i grew a billion dollar business but like but all the all the people that are so proud of our partnership now. It actually started out as three years of rejecting me or saying. You're not the right fit. Or and just hal to know if you should keep going or not is really the heart and soul is book. It's not how to create a billion dollar company had learned to believe in yourself and trust yourself and go from doubting your enough to knowing your enough but also just had a tune in and get still and go. Oh yeah. I'm i need to keep going. Because that's what feels right even if it doesn't make sense right now or oh you know what. It's time to quit. And it's a victory that. I know that you know what i mean. Project disappointed by tommy. John's let's be.

John three years tommy billion dollar
"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"lima" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Us or our own self doubt to the point where we don't even hear our own internal knowing anymore or ever learn how and when i realized that like so many people send me messages or were. Dm's on instagram. Or whatever saying you know you know. I didn't have that kind of luck when i tried this or that. Or you know. I keep getting rejection. But i'm happy for you. it's like oh wow. I had this big moment right. I realized that if we don't share these kind of stories right of all their action or or the times that the things we did right by listening learning how to turn tune into our knowing or not doing it and having huge you know. I think i think sharing all these kind of stories is so important. Which is why i love your show by the way but also why in its right. I wrote this book because so many people listen my story. It looks like a fairy tale or something it looks and all that does is make people feel alone in their own rejection or their own opposition. They're facing and my story is really a story of a girl who went from not believing herself to believing in herself and not trusting not trusting yourself at times like learning how to trust yourself. Even you know when it didn't make sense and so. I think that that's the journey. I think i think most people won't want to create a product company insufferably. The journey is for all of us is learning how to like breakthrough all the noise of of self doubt and in other people's opinions all that and learning actually how to hear our own truth and then in the trust it because for me. I think that's the only way to actually step into all of who you are in your call to be and i think that so few people never actually become oliver are and everybody listening right now. Probably no because we all have this knowing we all have this knowing deep down inside where we know if we're in the right job right now or if we're in the right relationship or is this friendship right for us. Is we all kind of know you know we. We all have that knowing. But i think so. Few people actually get into the practice of learning how to hear their own truth and then trust themselves. May biggest hope and prayer for this book is that it just means every lesson i've ever learned Firstly and professionally. On how to do that and had to believe in yourself how to trust yourself and jonathan mean when when i left television news i thought. Oh my gosh. If i can just create a product. That's really good that works. It's going to be huge. Like i just thought that and i didn't realize oh it's not that easy in a report every penny we had into the business i. My husband could job job. Wrote our business plan on our honeymoon flight. South africa got back good jobs and just dove all in and spent every penny we had..

South africa jonathan Firstly instagram Few people every penny so many people people every
Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

Dose of Leadership

06:37 min | 1 year ago

Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

"Jamie kern lima on dose of leadership. This is amazing. Welcome to the show. Richard thank you so much and excited to be here to share this special moment with you your whole community to you. So it's an honor. Thank yo i gotta tell you. This is an amazing piece of work. You should be extremely proud of yourself for this. I don't need to tell you that. But i mean just from a reader. Just read this. And i've read it and i told you in the prerecording i got this. You guys fed ex this to me monday. I think got it. And i got it last night so i read it nine pm here. It is the next day. I finished it at one pm. Amazing book i just i love it. It made look. I'll be honest with you. It made me cry. I've never cried in book. it made me cry. Maybe he never cried. Okay not in a not in a book like this. I mean maybe in a fictional book. Or something yeah. It's an amazing story. Thank you so much. It's and you know it's been a journey. I think everyone of us has has a story. And i think you know just all of us are kind of on this journey. I think of. I mean for me. It's really it's really you know. So many people think oh. Is this a book about how you went from. Denny's waitress to leading a business. A billion dollar businesses like that's part of it but it's really a story of a girl who went from not believing herself to believing ourself and like not trusting myself to list like to learning how to hear my own gut instinct and learning how to trust it And just learning how to break through all that self doubt that. Hold us back so often and why i wrote. It is really like for a lot of years. I would get these. Dm's on instagram. Where people say. Oh i saw your your story Like hat like was it. Like did you just get lucky. Or because all that's out there is kinda like the headlines. And i realized oh if i don't share if i never share the real story behind the story like how it all happened years and years of rejection opposition and all those things than it's like so many other people out there that maybe are trying to launch their own dream or maybe they're trying to be a better leader or whatever it might be are gonna feel alone and their struggles if they're just reading like the highlight reel of people's success is online and so this is the first time ever but i just i took everything and kinda like throughout that filter out the window and just poured everything i had every personal and professional life lesson i've ever learned and my hope is just. It's absurd for anyone else out there who's really on that journey of like breaking through that self-doubt in and an on that journey to becoming the person they're created a bi. No i mean it's it's it's it's a prescription boards a recipe that you've kind of attacked life with anyway. What thing that's really kind of. Come out of this show and all these conversations when people ask me well. What are the biggest lessons that you've learned from talking to all these people and your book hits all of these these points that you know the prescription that is needed so that is in such lacking in everywhere we look. Is this authenticity. This transparency there's vulnerability which lends itself yet to be courageous. If you're gonna do those things because we suck adams human beings you know what we're bombarded with from our limiting beliefs are doubts. The pop culture the the social media now that just even feeds on that. I mean everybody deals with this head trash this limiting beliefs. These self doubt. It's a constant battle. You still battle with the today. I it with everybody that had on. The show has said that. And that's been a big moment for me on this show and a relief a sense of relief and reading. Your book is kind of the same feeling. That god is when you read it and because you're so authentic you're so transparent you're so vulnerable in this book and you have been in your whole. That's why you've been so successful and entrepreneur in in your brandon's accessible because of those things what do you think when you hear me say that that authenticity transparency vulnerably. That's the currency that's needed right. It is and it's scary for so many of us. I think that you know you look at so many of the studies out there that show. How like it's impossible to have a real human connection if you show up as your representative who you think people want you to be in the and the only real way to have a human connection as show like only parts parts the messy parts but a lot of people who know that awesome miss that connection of like our relationship with our customers also needs to be an authentic one our relationship with our teams and our employees also needs to be an authentic one and we ended up putting so much pressure on ourselves right social media your point to that too but we think all i a leader acts this way or we learn these things and we end up showing up is our own representative and then you know what i've learned and i don't wanna like jump too far ahead give anything up because there's so many crazy stories in the spot but wanted the leadership lessons i would say and life lessons frankly that i after which is three years of rejection a crazy story we finally got one shot on qvc. I can talk about only only if you want to but but you know being on. Kabc for united about a thousand shows live myself. And so i've met tens of thousands of entrepreneurs and brand founders and senior executives. That will go on the television for their company. And it's like all the years when i look back at. What is the commonality between the people that made it and those didn't because most people in the space they they get one shot on air and they never come back because they don't have the sales goal or maybe they they come back twice or three and then they're gone so i've seen thousands of people leave and then like what's the commonality between the ones that lasts and literally. It's not who's smarter. It's not who's more qualified or more accomplished. The people that will lasted were the ones that were the same off air in the green room as they were on here for better or worse like some were wild and crazy in quirky in somewhere very conservative and quiet and like but they were the same and it's because that live on air to one hundred million homes you can't fake authenticity and the only way for customers to connect as when you show up as you you fully are in the thing that one of the things i talk about in the book is In believe it is this lesson. I learn which is that like authenticity. Alone doesn't guarantee success in authenticity. Guaranty's failure

Jamie Kern Lima Denny Richard Kabc Adams Brandon QVC Guaranty
Escape from Warsaws Ghetto: Memories of a Child Witness

UN News

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Escape from Warsaws Ghetto: Memories of a Child Witness

"Halina wallow and her parents. I've safely on the shores of south america in nineteen forty eight as jewish refugees from their native poland. The month long voyage by boat from italy's port of genoa was but one stretch of a lengthy journey from surviving. The warsaw ghetto to eventual immigration to peru just a toddler when the nazis stormed her. Family's confining living quarters in the warsaw ghetto halina says the smell of fabric left lingering reminder of the lifesaving moment. Her grandfather hid her between textile goods as women and children were piled into german trucks and taken to death camps following her grandparents deportation. Her father organized a successful escape from the ghetto. One of many times their fate would be defined in an instant speaking to us from her home in capital city. Lima halina explains how her family's escape from persecution. To safety was helped by demonstrations of humanity by the unsung heroes of the holocaust non-jewish europeans and other rescuers who risk their lives to protect juice eighty four years. Old halina says fulfilling. Her purpose of survivor means telling her story. This interview was conducted in spanish and has been translated seeing but saw via. I was born in warsaw poland in the year. Nineteen thirty six. My full name is kalina stein and then all once. I was mary it. If you could briefly describe your first years in poland. What was your childhood. Like your comment you. Well i practically didn't have a childhood. Unfortunately because we was for years old the second world war started the nicest took my parents apartment. Ally grandparents bernie. I'm buddha's in the. Because i was on. I was four or five years. What i can tell you is what my pardons told me on allie. He's have eat the ones who saved my life winds. There was a moment when your grandfather hid you correct. Could you tell us about that moment. They won't sign us. My grandfather produced jackets and coats beginning several years before arriving to the ghetto. And that's had a lot of five hundred in addict so the day. The nasty came in their tracks. You realize day came to take all the world bank and children that will work with sewing machines so my grandfather grabbed me shall between the fabric material. Seen these were how he saved me so the german square taken these life. Mama one do you remember. You felt in that moment. Lord i remember by this mellow no. That is most often make us remember. Even now at age eighty four and just short eighty four. Every time i go into a fiery shop. I remembered the mommy it's part of my life say i will never forget. Of course life in the ghetto was very hard. They had asked without food without medicine and they were know how to work for a very very har life in nineteen forty two businesses. Took my grandparents on my uncle rev linka after the after my father decided to organize escape from the ghetto. And we did so. He taught us to pray. The lord's prayer in portage is big perfect polish until today. We keeping to deny as christians. Luckily my father had a lot of non june's france in the area and part of our so. He arranged to have each of fast leaving in three seventy one jewish homes while for my mom. Another for my father another for me. I was taking get off by a friend of my father's a good woman who told me read that right. I was with her until nineteen forty five when the war ended in neon depose. Where order to tourney eighty jew. There was so my party squid and visit me much. They bissett me the one able to mind. This is how we save ourselves.

Halina Wallow Poland Halina Lima Halina Old Halina Kalina Stein Genoa South America Peru Capital City German Square Italy Warsaw Allie Bernie Ally Rev Linka Portage France Bissett
Relationship Marketing with Jessika Phillips

Brands On Brands On Brands

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Relationship Marketing with Jessika Phillips

"I'm so excited to welcome our guest jessica phillips to the show today jessica. I thank you for being here first and foremost this. Thank you for having me gone of course well and the reason i'm excited today and yes. I'm always excited with the reason today. I'm excited as we get to talk about the power of relationships to grow a business. Does it actually happen in the. Dm's what's the what's going on today. We're not talking about networking. We're talking about relationship marketing. Let's start there. What's the value of relationships. And why are you. Why are they so important. Oh my goodness i say. Relationships are the currency of business today. Honestly because they're they're powerful always been powerful right. But i think we've lost sight of it a little bit because we got all this new technology and ways of reaching people so we thought we could save time by reaching the masses. Well something happened there. In the olden days. I would say that we all realise word of mouth was best business generator for us and really that has changed. It's still word of mouth but now we have access to world of mouth right when we look online and see what others are saying about different brands and we have access to more information products and services at our fingertips and can decide for choosing one brand over another and the most powerful decision that we can make is really influenced by others. That are talking about brands. So i know there was even study. That was done. Said online reviews whether we'd know the individual or not eighty eight percent of people are trusting reviews that are left by our peers about whether or not we should choose a brand to work with in the only people that are leading those reviews people that are psyched up about that company. I mean if we're buying something years from someone we're expecting to get the value back that we gave four that transaction happen. We're not going to go rave about it on review if that wasn't the case it's just hey. We did it. Air transaction so brands have focused in on relationships and really building that extra little something that they can do with individuals. The people that they're currently serving the ones that are going to be leaving those reviews and hopefully talking about them online. So they're showing up more often. That's now how sales are generated especially in this world that we're moving into which is that dark social world in which is a lot different than the dark web but more and more conversations are happening in the inbox even with people talking about brands in so we as companies can't even see necessarily what those conversations are being had about our business and we're definitely not getting invited to the conversation and less. We've established some kind of deeper report than a transaction with our customer. I think that's fair. I think a lot of people would say okay. Relationships are important. I wanted to hear your version of it. Because i think you start to take a different level as you know. How do we see this as an opportunity and a new way to think about our relationship with our customers. And i love that. Don't even say with you. I didn't know who you were a year ago. And i started this show. I started interviewing speakers and as follows. Their journeys like oh. They're speaking at this event in lima. Ohio and i'm like what events in lima ohio. And guess what. It's an event thrown by jessica. And so i'm like okay. Well who's jessica yu so you start to figure this out and then i mean iraq with some of the speakers and they're like jessica's awesome. You should meet her. And then we go to an event in your there and it's like these relationships start sometimes not even in person they start just in the ether if you will make just like. He's like word of mouth but it's not the way people think about it. It's like your name is living on your reputation on elsewhere that magnet versus bullhorn thing. Yeah but it's like you're tracking in your community of like minded individuals and people that are going to stick with you and advocate for you win. That's what you're putting out right like you're you're gonna find your matches very easily that the referrals from referral right and people that have done business wave more efficiently effectively and sustainably than if you're just doing the bullhorn approach that we've all been taught about marketing advertising that we just have to blast our message out loud to began to reach as many people. It's not as effective if we just focused on doing the work so people come to

Jessica Phillips Jessica Lima Jessica Yu Ohio Iraq
"lima" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"lima" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Also i was saying. There's a spot called laba. Rita it's in butchers hill neighborhood down the shaft from lab arita used to be the chef and now he is phenomenal guy. He's lottery now. And i'm like i wanna go there. All the time is so good. So i would definitely say go there and another one of my favorite places. Just let you guys know that. I'm not fancy all the time. It's cabinet lonzo pennsylvania avenue. Katie's the chef everything they have coming out of there. The fried fish dinner. With the mac and cheese string beans. They have strawberry hennessy to go all the soul who they had these baked potatoes. That are named after like jazz singers musicians. They're like loaded with like crab meat in shrimp and cheese and chicken so yeah capital police go. Okay okay. I like this. I like this. This is good. These are all suggestions. I'm secretly writing down for my next food. Odyssey so yeah. So here's opportunity at the end of this show and again thank you for coming on. This has been a lot of fun. Total treat for me. Here's a chance to shamelessly plug your social. Where can he find you your website all of that stuff away. Thank you having me. This has been exciting fun I'm always excited to talk about food. you can find me on instagram on facebook and on twitter at arles appetite a. r. l. i s. a. p. p. e. t. my blog is also armies appetite dot com promise. I'll start blogging a little bit more twenty one and that's me in a nutshell and also there any restaurant owners out there. That need how their social media hit me up. Because i do that on the side as well. I would be happy to help you with that. That's great that is wonderful. So thanks again. I'm gonna do my son often. That'll be that for r-lima from harley's appetite. I'm rob lee saying that. There's all types the delicious savoury alcoholic things in and around baltimore. You just have to look for..

Katie Rita twitter facebook instagram lonzo pennsylvania avenue lab arita one harley twenty one rob lee laba arles appetite armies appetite butchers com dot
"lima" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"lima" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Joining about 140 House Republicans, and they say they will object to certifying of the electoral vote during Wednesday's joint session of Congress, and they're demanding a special commission. To investigate claims of voter fraud. Those claims have been repeatedly rejected by courts and state legislatures and unproven by audits and recounts. Utah Senator Mitt Romney calls the effort by fellow Republicans a danger to democracy in a written statement Saturday night, saying partisans would inevitably demand the same any time their candidate lost, calling it a dangerous ploy. Republican Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse on social media, saying it's a case of ambitious politicians who think there's a quick way to tap into the president's Populist base without doing real long term damage, says says they're wrong Quote Adults don't point a loaded gun at the heart of legitimate self government. It's NBC's Chuck Secrets in reporting. Massachusetts police officer playing Santa and Saving Christmas for a couple of women accused of trying to steal groceries for their family officer Matt Lima are responding to a shoplifting call at a stop and shop in Somerset. This was back on December 20th. Two women had to young kids with them. They were accused of bagging groceries at a self checkout kiosk without scanning them. The women said they had fallen upon hard times and wanted to provide Christmas dinner for their kids. Officer Lima said he was reminded of his own Children and decided not to charge them with the shoplifting. Instead, he used his own money. And bought $250 in grocery gift cards. Well done. Officer Matt Lima, the Corona virus pandemic having little effect on deadly car crashes..

Officer Lima officer Senator Mitt Romney shoplifting Senator Ben Sasse Congress NBC Nebraska Utah Massachusetts Somerset president Santa