25 Burst results for "Lily Jamali"

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Lily Jamali. We begin with tragedy in the city of Orange in Southern California is four people, including a child have been killed in a mass shooting at an office building. Here's Orange police Lieutenant Jennifer a month, speaking at a news conference late last night. Orange is a very safe city and we don't have stuff like this. That happens very often. It's a very tragic incident, and we're doing our very best to make sure that it's investigated thoroughly. The California reports Saul Gonzalez has more Really. This shooting occurred late Wednesday afternoon before people slain included child surviving victim. A woman is receiving care for gunshot wounds at a local hospital and is listed in critical condition. When officers arrived on the scene. They exchanged gunfire with the suspect who was wounded and is receiving treatment for injuries. This is the third mass shooting in the U. S in recent weeks following slayings in Atlanta, Georgia that killed eight people and the supermarket shooting in Boulder, Colorado that killed 10. After Newsome is calling the Nash shooting an orange, horrifying and heartbreaking Billy that was the California report Saul Gonzalez in Southern California. The names, ages and genders of the victims have not yet been disclosed. Police haven't identified a possible motive. It's a gun was recovered at the scene, and it's unclear if the suspects wound was self inflicted or if he was hit by police gunfire. Shooting in Orange was the worst in the city since of former Caltrans worker killed four people at a maintenance yard back in 1997. The gunman in that case had been fired from his job six weeks before the shooting were going to go to the Central Valley. Now first Lady Jill Biden used the occasion of Cesar Chavez Day to show support for farm workers. She visited the original headquarters of the United Farm Workers Union, known as the 40 Acres to California reports. Alex Hall was there and brings us this report. I present you the first lady of the United States, Dr Jill Biden. While visiting the historic 40 Acres in Delano, Jill Biden put a spotlight on the Farm Work Force Modernization Act. That's a bill recently passed by the U. S. House of Representatives, which is expected to face an uphill battle in the Senate. If passed, it could create a path to citizenship for nearly half a million undocumented farm workers in California President Biden has come out in support of the legislation. He believes that our work must be guided by justice and humanity. And that's exactly the kind of immigration policy he's working to build. The first lady was joined by Governor Gavin Newsom, the Chavez family and local, state and federal officials. During her visit, she met with a round table of farm worker women and helped out at a vaccination clinic. That is that Romero is president of the U. S. W. The fact that the first lady said down and talk to farm workers and heard what it's important to them and heard how this immigration from work First Modernization Act is. The number one priority for them hearing that they have the support of the first lady and the president. I think it is is just amazing,.

Saul Gonzalez Alex Hall Lily Jamali Farm Work Force Modernization Delano United Farm Workers Union First Modernization Act Orange 10 Central Valley 1997 Romero U. S Boulder, Colorado Newsome U. S. House of Representatives Senate Jill Biden eight people Chavez
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:31 min | 2 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Lily Jamali, California's covert 19 search has crusted both positive case numbers and hospitalizations are declining. And Dr Mark Galley is making a promising prediction about the state's hospitalization numbers. He's the secretary of the California Health and Human Services Department. We predict that fewer than half the People. Yet when hospitals today will be in hospitals, 30 days for now across the state, though, he warned that could change quickly. If people let down their guard. Galley urged residents to avoid Super Bowl gatherings this weekend. The virus is still widespread. Nearly all of California's counties are in the most restricted status for reopening and the death toll continues to be at an all time high about 540 people are dying in California daily. In another sign that the cove in 19 crunches easing in our hospitals, the state public Health Department says nurse staffing ratios will begin to return to normal KPCC is Jackie 48 reports As the pandemic swept through southern California covert 19 patients flooded emergency rooms in L. A hospitals were increasingly desperate to find enough staff to care for them. So the state allowed hospitals to apply for waivers allowing nurses to take care of more patients at once than they normally would. Now, as the number of people hospitalized his decreased. The state says hospitals must make an effort to return to pre pandemic staffing ratios. All approved staffing waivers will expire next week. Unless there's an unprecedented circumstance. It's unclear how many hospitals in L. A will seek to continue their staffing waivers. There are still more than 5000 people hospitalized with covert, 19 and L A, which is several times higher than the number before this latest surge for the California report. I'm Jackie 48 in Los Angeles. In Washington President Joe Biden recently signed an executive order directing the Justice Department to stop contracting with private prisons. So what impact could that have on detention facilities here in California? Kay VCR's Benjamin Perper has more on that. Biden's executive order directs the Department of Justice not to renew its contracts with privately operated prisons. But that doesn't cover private immigration detention facilities like Adelanto. In fact, the company that operates the facility Geo Group entered into a contract with the federal government in my 2019 that could keep out Alonso Open until 2034. Even be Tron is with the A C l U Southern California. She says she hopes the Biden administration will treat private immigration detention centers the same way it now treats private prisons. We just really hope that the Biden administration sees that the same equities that lead them to understand why Private prisons are harmful in the criminal context apply with equal force in the immigration context. And indeed that incarceration in general right, not just private incarceration is always for somebody's profit. A C L U. So Cal has sued ice over concerns about detainees contracting the coronavirus in the Atlanta facility. Which, according to Isis website has seen 270 positive cases as of January 31st for the California report. I'm Benjamin Perper in San Bernadino. A new poll shows just over half of Californians approve of the job. Governor Gavin Newsom is doing KQED is Katie Orr reports. These findings are better for Newsom than another recent poll. The Public Policy Institute of California finds 54% of Californians approve of how Newsome is doing his job. That's higher than a recent Berkeley I GS poll that placed his approval at 46%. P P I. C President Mark Baldassare e says he was surprised to see Newsome's approval so high in his poll. I've heard so much negative commentary about gather news from over the last several weeks that it was hard to imagine that his approval ratings would be above a majority. Sorry, says he thinks it's too soon to ask about a possible recall of Newsome. Before it's even qualified for the ballot for the California report. I'm Katie or in Sacramento, and we have a correction on a related story that we reported on our show yesterday. We incorrectly reported the proportion of voters surveyed in a recent Berkeley IGs pole, who said that they would support removing Governor Newsome from office in the event of a recall. 36% of voters support removing him 45% support retaining him. We flip those numbers yesterday and we regret the error..

California Governor Newsome Joe Biden Dr Mark Galley California Health and Human Se Public Policy Institute of Cal Governor Gavin Newsom Benjamin Perper Kay VCR Lily Jamali President executive public Health Department Adelanto Los Angeles Geo Group San Bernadino Department of Justice Berkeley
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 3 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Research and the performing arts. And by the listeners and sustaining members of KQED public radio. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Layla falled in tens of thousands of Californians are still waiting for compensation fires that were caused by a local utility destroyed their homes and their businesses. And in some cases killed loved ones. For some of these families. The weight has been five years from member station KQED in San Francisco, Lily Jamali reports on what's caused the delay this summer, Cheryl Maynard thought she saw a light at the end of what had been a long and very dark tunnel. Utility. PG Any was emerging from bankruptcy protection. It entered chapter 11 after its equipment sparked the fire that burned down thousands of homes, including Maynard's. In the Northern California town of Paradise, P. Jeannie Wildfire victims could not wait for the bankruptcy to end it was long it was exhausting. I mean, it was just a horrific process to go through on top of running for your life. Today, Maynard is one of 80,000 survivors of several fires still waiting to get paid from a trust. Mpg, any funded as it left bankruptcy. So far, only 499 victims have received partial payments. So here we are. Two years later, we just thought our lives would be able to start on over again and We're just heartbroken. It hasn't happened. One of the people running the fire victim trust is Kathy Yanni. We're very aware of the fact that do the cove it and economic conditions. That people really really are in need of getting some money. PG Any declined to be interviewed, but said in a statement that it's not involved with dispersing payments from the trust. Getting everyone fully compensated could take a while, says University of California Hastings, bankruptcy law professor Jared Elias. This is just a tremendously complex process. That's in part because the trust needs to verify what people claim they lost. And also, if you just push money out the door, it might mean that there wouldn't be enough money at the end to pay for the damages in the pain of the people who actually did suffer damages caused by P. Jeannie's equipment and perhaps the biggest complication. It's not clear how much the trust is worth. In a rare outcome, even by bankruptcy standards. P Jeannie funded half of the trust not with cash, but with its own stock. The fire victim Trust now owns more than 1/5 of P. Jeannie. That means on any given day, depending on the stocks price, the trust may be worth billions more or billions less. Other groups got cash settlements, including insurance companies and municipalities damaged by fire. I'm very worried for the wildfire survivors being able to piece their lives back together. Will. Abrams lost his home in California's 2017 wine country fires. While many attorneys for survivors encouraged them to take the deal P. Jeannie offered.

fire victim Trust Cheryl Maynard P. Jeannie KQED Jeannie Wildfire NPR News David Greene Layla falled Northern California California Kathy Yanni Paradise University of California Hasti Lily Jamali Abrams Jared Elias San Francisco professor
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:06 min | 5 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"51 now This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali. This is quite simply an election day, like no other Californians have already voted in record numbers. There is excitement. But there's also tension in cities and towns around the state, with businesses boarding up their windows and local law enforcement agencies, saying they're taking extra precautions to keep the peace. In case of protests or worse from W. In Los Angeles, Kaylie Wells has more in Santa Monica, the police chief says there will be increased uniform presence and the beach parking lots will close at sunset. LAPD chief Michael Moore says his department will be fully staffed during the election period, with officers alternating shifts to ensure a full presence in Beverly Hills wear weekly pro trump rallies have taken place. Police are asking businesses to quote harden. The target and rodeo drive is boarded up until Thursday. Lieutenant Max Subin with the Beverly Hills Police Department, says his is the most prepared city in L. A county. When it comes to preventing looters. We'll see a lot more police officers. The private armed security as you will, as well as you'll see a SWAT team from Santa Paula, driving around protecting a lot of parts of the community when he commented on Ella's preparations recently, Mayor Eric Garcetti said he didn't want to stoke unfounded fears of election chaos, he said, quote we prepare for the worst, but we're hoping and expect generally the best For the California report. I'm Kaylee Wells in Los Angeles here in Northern California. Oakland has seen its share of protests and, in some cases protest related violence in recent years. Mayor Libby Shaft says the city's emergency operation Center will be up and running today to ensure that we all have an ability to coordinate and collaborate, including with Highway patrol or a C transit, public works and our transportation professionals, So it really is just trying to give a comprehensive look how we make sure the city is taking care of. Mayor chef says the city wants to protect peaceful free expression or protest but will not tolerate violence or vandalism. The state Office of Emergency Services is also prepared for election night and beyond. In case there are any civil disturbances. So since it is finally election day, we figured we'd squeeze in one last word from the California Voter Foundation on last minute voting advice. Remember that if you haven't registered You can still vote today, and there's a lot more to Kim Alexander is the founder and president of the foundation. She's here with me and Kim. What is your top priority for California voters on this election day? I want them to make sure they get their vote by mail ballots in on time to be counted. That means not putting them in a mailbox but taking them in person to a voting site or Dropbox. And obviously, there's been a lot of concern this year. This last couple of months, especially over irregularities at the U. S Postal Service. Is that advice. It is the same advice he would have given in years past. ER. Is it really because of that controversy? It's because of the trend vote by mail ballots not getting counted in California. As we see more and more people casting vote by mail ballots, we see also a stubborn percentage of ballots it go uncounted and get rejected. And with her without the problems with the Postal Service, late nous is the top reason why ballots get rejected. The other reason ballots get rejected is because voters forget to sign the envelope or their signature doesn't sufficiently matched their voter registration signature. So since all registered voters were issued vote by mail ballots, the best thing voters conduce to use the ballot they were issued and to make sure they submitted in time. I'm as long as it's postmarked or received by eight PM on election night, it will be counted for the truth. Slackers out there who have not registered. It is not too late for them to have their vote count. Talk to me about that. How do they get their ballot? We have same day voter registration in California. And this is actually the first presidential election where this opportunity has been in place. We have over 22 million Californians who are registered to vote now, and that is a record number. But there are still nearly four million Californians who are eligible and not registered to vote. And all of them can and they show up to vote on November 3rd. They need to fill out a voter registration application at their voting site and there once they fill out their ballot, it will be put inside. A separate envelope. So once their registration is verified, and elections officials have determined they didn't cast about anywhere else. Then they will get their ballot counted and we have to note the slackers are very much in the minority this year. Have you been surprised by the record turnout that California has seen this year? I am inspired by the record turnout that we're seeing right now on early voting. Here we see the aft and so many other election organizations. Election officials are routinely Urged voters to get their ballots in early on DH. They don't and this time they did, and they are, and so it's very encouraging to see and I think sending everybody a ballot has been a really great strategy, too. Ensure that people can participate without putting their lives at risk. So I want to make sure people know. You know, when we nail everybody about it. Not everybody connects with their ballot, so I really want to make sure voters know Even if they don't have the ballot that was issued to them. They can So go and vote on Election day. And there's really no excuse for not voting in California. Everybody can go toe vote by mail ballot anyone convert in person. And if you're not registered to vote, you could register and vote on Election Day. No excuses. Did you hear that? California Have Teri and Kim before I let you go. I understand that you wrote a song about the election. Is that right? I did. I wrote a song called the Voting Way. It's about Howto vote safely during a pandemic. Just see a day it arrived in the mail on my California bounce.

California Los Angeles Kim Alexander California Voter Foundation Beverly Hills Police Departmen founder and president Beverly Hills LAPD Lily Jamali Kaylie Wells Mayor Libby Shaft Santa Monica Northern California Office of Emergency Services Oakland
Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

All Things Considered

02:41 min | 6 months ago

Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

"The utility PG and E shut down parts of its system to prevent its own power lines from sparking fires during strong winds and dry weather that has left hundreds of thousands of people there waiting for the lights to come back on after two days in the dark. These sorts of widespread power shut offs have become a way of life for many Californians and ask Beedies Lily Jamali reports. Residents aren't happy in the tiny community of Concow, about three hours north east of San Francisco. Jesse Olson and her family have lived through PG and E power shut offs. Not once but twice in the last week. It's not easy. It's like they're adjusted recovering from one power outage, and then you're preparing for the next one. A portable generator has helped them stay warm. Keep phone's charged and for the kids at least try to do school online. We also have. We also have a farm with livestock, So we have to keep the antibiotics refrigerated. The Olsens survived California's deadliest and most destructive fire 2018 campfire. It burned down their home. It was sparked by old poorly maintained equipment belonging to Pee Jeannie Online's that stayed active during peak fire conditions. And now we're all living in an RV. Olson adopted her boys out of foster care. They'd been homeless before that. I never wanted them to have tto deal with homelessness ever again. Ah, they they were supposed to have a forever home some place where they felt safe for the rest of their lives. And now that's gone. Olson calls P Genie's power shut offs and necessary evil. 200 Miles southeast, Terry McBride has also suffered the consequences of fire and power shut offs. Her home in the community of Mountain Ranch was hit by a PG Any cost fire five years ago, 2400 Square foot house to a 250 scores for camping trailer. If you didn't laugh, we'd cry. She's surviving P Genie's power shut offs in her trailer. It's like line camping. You know, my mom's got electricity and Senate dress I was able to put My frozen stuff in her freezer so they don't go bad. It's been tough. And while some p Jeannie Fire survivors feel relief that the company is proactively cutting power, McBride is frustrated at the utility for neglecting its lines for years. My feeling is why didn't you do your job in the first place? Why are we having to go through this? Now? P. Jeannie has promised to make long term fixes to its lines. So power outages like these aren't a permanent way of life for NPR news. I'm Lily Jamali in San Francisco.

Jesse Olson Terry Mcbride San Francisco P Genie Beedies Lily Jamali PG Pee Jeannie Online P. Jeannie Lily Jamali Concow NPR California Mountain Ranch
Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

Environment: NPR

02:59 min | 6 months ago

Power Shut-Offs Become A Way Of Life For Many Californians

"Two new wildfires are raging in the Grassy hills of southern California and tens of thousands of people are under evacuate under evacuation orders. One of the fires the Silverado fire may have been sparked by a piece of debris hitting a power line according to a spokesperson for southern California. Edison. Meanwhile in Northern California, the utility pge shut down parts of it system to prevent its own power lines from sparking fires during strong winds and dry weather that has left hundreds of thousands of people there waiting for the lights to come back on after two days in the dark. These sorts of widespread power shut offs have become a way of life for many Californians and as. Lilly Jamali reports residents aren't happy in the tiny community of CON- cow about three hours northeast of San Francisco Jesse. Olsen and her family have lived through PG, and E. Power Shut offs not once. But twice in the last week, that's not easy it's like you're just recovering from one power outage and then you're preparing for the next one, a portable generator has helped them stay warm keep soanes charged for the kids at least try to do school. Online real. We also have a farm with livestock. So we have to keep the antibiotics refrigerated. The Olson's survived California's deadliest and most destructive fire, the two thousand, eighteen campfire but it burned down their home. It was sparked by old poorly maintained equipment belonging to pg knee online's that stayed active during peak conditions, and now we're all living in an RV. Olsen adopted her boys out of foster care. They'd been homeless before that I never wanted them to have to. Deal with homelessness ever again, you know they were supposed to have a forever home someplace where they felt safe for the rest of their lives, and now that's Gone Olsen calls PG needs power shut offs a necessary evil. Two hundred miles southeast Terry McBride has also suffered the consequences of fire and power shut offs. Her home in the community of mountain ranch was hit by a PG and caused fire five years ago. Twenty Four Hundred Square Foot House to a two hundred, fifty score for camping trailer. Just telling you if you didn't laugh, you'd cry she surviving PG needs power shut offs in her trailer. It's like when camping, you know my mom's got electricity and dress. So I was able to put my frozen stuff in her freezer so they don't go bad it's been tough, and while some PG fire survivors feel relief that the company is proactively cutting power McBride is frustrated at the utility for neglecting its lines for years. My feeling is why didn't you do your job in the first place? Why are we having to go through this? Now PG has promised to make long-term fixes to its lines. So power outages like these aren't permanent way of life for NPR news I'm Lily Jamali in San Francisco.

PG Northern California Olsen Terry Mcbride San Francisco Edison Lilly Jamali NPR Lily Jamali Olson
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This's the California report. Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali. We begin in Silicon Valley, where gay companies like uber and lift got a double dose of big news yesterday, California's appeals court Has ruled that both have been misclassifying hundreds of thousands of workers as independent contractors. The ruling requires the companies to reclassify their drivers unless voters side with the companies and support prop 22. That's one of the most closely watched measures on the November ballot. Meanwhile, to uber drivers are filing a lawsuit against the company over Papa messages in the APP that solicit support for prop 22 acuity Sam her net reports. The lawsuit identified three messages in the uber app that began popping up in August. 1 ask drivers to vote for prop going to which would legalize contract status for gig workers. A second appeared when drivers locked out and until it was updated in recent weeks, it offered on Ly two ways to click out of the dialogue box saying, Yes, I'm property owning two or okay. Drivers also received company messages asking them to take action in support of prop 22. Good companies maintain that their workers or contractors, which they would become legally if prop 22 passes. Plaintiffs say the messaging infringes on their rights to be free of political coercion on the job. And Uber spokesperson called the lawsuit absurd without merit and filed solely for press attention for the California report. I'm Sam her net. A study out this week from Otis College of Art and Design found the creative economy has been slammed by the Corona virus pandemic. The downturn is particularly affecting Southern California. W's Kelly Wells has details. Nationally, the unemployment rate is hovering around 8%. Right now it goes up to 11% for California and climbs again up to 16% for L, a county. A steady uptick is thanks in part to so Cal's big media and art sectors. Theo to study estimates 284,000 creative jobs have been lost since February, and that doesn't include jobs that rely on a bustling creative industry like caterers on a movie set. When you have those in the number of lost positions leaps to 678,000. The study says The pandemic induced contraction of the creative economy could reduce California's GDP by about 5%. It comes to losses of around $160 billion per year. For the California report. I'm Kaylee Wells in Los Angeles. It is just days before the election and almost a million California Latinos have already voted. Sounds like a lot. But the run numbers aren't the whole story because Latinos make up almost a third of the state's eligible voters, and a lot of folks are working to make sure they conflicts that political muscle. Farida Javal Romero reports. The pandemic isn't helping Alondra Laura is 18. She was born and raised in Sanger, a small city in the Central Valley. She's voting for the first time and she's fired up. She wants her vote to represent undocumented people in her family and community is really important for me to not only express my voice but expressed my voice of those who Cannot vote to urge other young Latino citizens to vote. She leads a team of phone bankers with the nonprofit power California They meet virtually via Zoom while they make those calls, But that work feels very different than before the pandemic. When they were together in an office. We would be sitting right by right next to her friends. We would feel connected and we're trying to emulate that with zoom and is tough. The pandemic has made it harder to go door to door and safely have those conversations that are key to get many Latino borders to the ballot box. Says Lisa Garcia. Oh yeah, she's a political scientist at UC Berkeley and author of the book Latino Politics. If Latino voters are engaged, right if people reach out to them and talk to them about the things that they care about, they vote And so the challenge this time is, Are we able to have a conversation? Given the difficulty of connecting with people? In this moment, Latinos could make a huge difference in competitive congressional races like between Democratic representative TJ Cox and his challenger, Republican David Balad, el in district 21. Balad. El lost the seat two years ago by less than 1000 votes.

Southern California California Alondra Laura Otis College of Art and Design Lisa Garcia Lily Jamali Kelly Wells Balad Farida Javal Romero Sam Kaylee Wells Ly El Theo UC Berkeley Los Angeles Cal David Balad TJ Cox
PG&E Mistake May Have Exacerbated Rolling Blackouts

Forum

01:00 min | 7 months ago

PG&E Mistake May Have Exacerbated Rolling Blackouts

"Morning. An error by PG and E last month may have contributed to one of California's first rolling blackouts in two decades. Lily Jamali has more on August 15th when hundreds of thousands of Californians lost power for a second straight day. A power plant in the Central Valley unexpectedly ramped down production. That's according to a report out Friday from the California Independent System Operator. Not stated was the PGA. Any personnel made the mistake, which came just his energy demand was peaking during an intense heat wave. P Jeannie says it doesn't know if the mishap directly led to the blackouts. But energy expert Steve Weisman says any loss of power on the grid would have played a role in some of the black out. Some of the customers who were turned off could have been spared in that situation. The error pulled power off the grid for about half an hour. You, Jeannie said. It took immediate steps to correct it and has been

P Jeannie California Independent System Lily Jamali California Steve Weisman Central Valley
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 7 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the Trump administration can end humanitarian protections for more than 400,000 immigrants nationwide, paving the way for their deportation. Quids Farida Jarvela. Romero spoke with two moms who, along with their daughter's sued in 2018 so their families could stay together in the U. S. Christina Morales is teaching assistant in the Bay Area city of San Pablo. She's originally from El Salvador and has lived most of her life. Here. She was reading a book to her second graders over assume when she got a text the court had ruled against her and others with temporary protected status or DPS. I feel angry, frustrated That fear of being separated of your family. It's really painful. DPS holders from Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nepal, Nicaragua and Sudan would lose the protections as early as next year. For Wilma Desson, a plaintiff from Haiti who lives in Florida, the decision came as a shock He says she recently recovered from Cove in 19. And now is getting ready for approaching hurricanes. We have hold of my race. Really? Hye ri, Can we have this that you know? And now for me, it's another disaster for the GPS. It's that fearful Lawson's very son. Plaintiff attorneys say they'll seek a review from a larger panel of judges at the ninth Circuit. A spokesman with U. S Citizenship and Immigration Services says the agency is reviewing the decision. For the telephone a report on Freddy that javelin Romero as we look ahead to the election, young voters are more likely to have their vote by mail ballots rejected. That's, according to a new study of votes in Sacramento, San Matteo and Santa Clara counties. Thank you. Ladies. DiMarzio Roddy has more as California prepares to mill every voter a ballot this fall. The issue of ballot rejections is a rising concern. Over the last decade, an average of 1.7% of mail ballots have been rejected, says Kim Alexander, president of the California Voter Foundation, which released the study. The problem of ballot rejection is evidence on the fact that we don't have widespread fraud because the reason we about rejection is precisely because balance it arrived too late. Don't get counted. Palates that aren't postmarked by election Day. Don't get counted people who forget to sign their envelopes. Those ballots don't get counted. The study found Voters under age 25 more likely to have their ballots rejected in San Mateo in Santa Clara. The top reason for rejection was about being returned, postmarked or arriving too late in Sacramento, it was issues with voter signatures..

S. Christina Morales Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals El Salvador javelin Romero Santa Clara Sacramento Haiti Farida Jarvela Lily Jamali U. S Citizenship and Immigrati California Voter Foundation San Pablo Trump San Mateo Wilma Desson Lawson teaching assistant Bay Area
Crews struggle to contain record-breaking wildfires in California

All Things Considered

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Crews struggle to contain record-breaking wildfires in California

"Combination combination combination combination combination of of of of of wildfires wildfires wildfires wildfires wildfires smoke smoke smoke smoke smoke from from from from from those those those those those fires fires fires fires fires and and and and and now now now now now power power power power power blackouts. blackouts. blackouts. blackouts. blackouts. This This This This This after after after after after a a a a a holiday holiday holiday holiday holiday weekend weekend weekend weekend weekend marked marked marked marked marked by by by by by record record record record record breaking breaking breaking breaking breaking heat. heat. heat. heat. heat. Lily Jamali is a correspondent and co host of Cake Ladies, The California report. She joins us now and Lily. There are currently 25 major wildfires in California. Among the largest is the one burning east of the state's Central Valley. How fast is that one growing? That's exactly right. The creek fire in the Sierra Nevada mountains near the city of Fresno has been burning since Friday, and in just the last day it has doubled in size to about 144,000 acres. It's already destroyed some homes. It's forced evacuations. Erin Byers is a bulldozer operator. Working that fire he spoke with my colleague Alex Hall. We have a tender box up here. The whole Sierra Nevada's has rotten timber in it, and it just mixed like a giant matchbook. All that rotten timber is a legacy of California's drought in the last decade, and that's part of why California's fire seasons are growing worse by the year and no one Has ever seen one quite like this one as that creek. Fire continues

California Lily Jamali Sierra Nevada Erin Byers Fresno Central Valley Alex Hall
Californians Are Weathering Wildfires, Smoke And Power Blackouts

All Things Considered

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Californians Are Weathering Wildfires, Smoke And Power Blackouts

"Millions of Californians are weathering a combination of wildfires smoke from those fires and now power blackouts. This after a holiday weekend marked by record breaking heat. Lily Jamali is a correspondent and co host of Cake Ladies, The California report. She joins us now and Lily. There are currently 25 major wildfires in California. Among the largest is the one burning east of the state's Central Valley. How fast is that one growing? That's exactly right. The creek fire in the Sierra Nevada mountains near the city of Fresno has been burning since Friday, and in just the last day it has doubled in size to about 144,000 acres. It's already destroyed some homes. It's forced evacuations. Erin Byers is a bulldozer operator working that fire he spoke with my colleague Alex Hall. We have a tender box up here. The whole Sierra Nevada's has rotten timber in it, and it just makes like a matchbook. All that rotten timber is a legacy of California's drought in the last decade, and that's part of why California's fire seasons are growing worse by the year and no one Has ever seen one quite like this

California Lily Jamali Sierra Nevada Erin Byers Central Valley Fresno Alex Hall
"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 10 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning. I'm Lily Jamali. We begin today in Santa Cruz, where health officials say they're preparing for a big surge in Corona virus cases. Escape is Hannah Hagman report reports, the county's chief doctor says it's only a matter of time. We're pretty much surrounded now, and the virus doesn't know county boundaries that Santa Cruz health officer Dr Gale Newell, who says she's worried her county is headed in the wrong direction. After a few weeks leg, We will be joining our neighbors. I'm sure in getting dialed back by the governor compared to the Bay Area in California at large. Covert 19 cases and Santa Cruz have been relatively low, but now we are experiencing a large surge in cases. Newell thinks there's more than one reason why that's happening. When the governor reopened the state we had a lot of visitors come in to our county, all of the reopening summer weather and beach season has contributed to Or spread of Copan. She says. The beaches were partially closed until recently when officials decided it was too hard to keep people away. People on the beaches just were less and less willing to be enforced. Should I say we're not cooperative with law enforcement? Santa Cruz is one of the on ly regions in the state that did not shut down shorelines over the fourth weekend. For the California report. I'm Hannah Hagemann and Santa Cruz. Despite the pandemic and large budget shortfalls, the state isn't taking its eye off of wildfire preparation that was Governor Gavin Newsom's message when speaking yesterday alongside fire officials. Science reporter Daniel Ven Tin has those details. Governor Gavin Newsom stood in front of a new Firehawk helicopter at McClelland Air Force Base near Sacramento, reminding the public that the state faces a riskier than average fire year. Following a dry winter and a hot early summer. One thing we know is our approach to dealing with wildfires has to change and adapt with a climate that is changing very, very dramatically. The state is spending nearly 285 million on 12 new helicopters that can carry more water than current models. A budget also includes money for more fire spotting cameras and nearly 900 additional firefighters with season, California Office of Emergency Services director Mark Ghilarducci warned evacuations this year will be different. It may be that we don't put you in a congregant. Shelter situation. We may be putting you into hotels, any shelters that are set up. We'll have temperature checks, mandatory masks, prepackaged meals and room for social distancing for the California report. I'm Danielle Benton. Californians who have lost their jobs during this pandemic have grown pretty familiar with the state's Employment development Department. The agency has been flooded with applications for unemployment benefits. San Jose Mercury News reports two million claims filed since March still haven't been paid. Assemblyman David Shoe of San Francisco has been documenting his experience trying to get help for constituents on Twitter using the Hashtag DDD fail of the day. We spoke earlier. We have had hundreds of constituents who have come to us in recent months who have needed help interacting with DDT, and I'm sorry to say this, but unfortunately we have just seen everyday how Edie is absolutely failing Californians. People are suffering tremendously. We've had constituents. Who have gone without any benefits since March. Just heart wrenching stories from constituents who have pleaded their life savings gone into extreme debt are having trouble figuring out how to put food on their table for their families as they're waiting for answers from Edie. What have you learned is you've gone through this process about what's up A t e d d. Why can't they fix this problem? It's been months now, and this is their primary goal is an agency. You know, we all appreciate that. Indeed, he is dealing with an unprecedented volume. I'm very sympathetic to that. But it has been nearly four months and at some point we've got to see some progress. People's lives are depending on it. There's been a number of issues that we have tried to highlight staffing, technology, bureaucratic culture. Suffice to say these are challenges that has known about not just during this time period but known about since the great recession they had promised. It's different aspects of their system and never got to it. And unfortunately we're seeing the terrible consequences of that today. Yeah, Assemblyman. At what point did you decide to take your concerns and air them on Twitter? Which isn't something we always see people in your position. D'oh. No. I've been a public official for 12 years, and I've never been put to the point where I've had to put a department on blast like this, And it's difficult to say this is someone who generally believes in government. This only came after countless conversations between my office and other legislative offices with staffers. We've offered suggestions. We demanded solutions, but we were see very little progress and the strong the camel's back for me was a few weeks. Ago we were sent a memo from Edie told that we could only asked for one case a week to expedited for review By Edie. It was amazingly tone deaf. It was just a classic example of bureaucratic arrogance. So we've been in recent days. Highlighting every day. Yet another hashtag DDD failed the day that showcases a very typical scenario facing in different ways. Well, Assemblyman David Chu, we thank you and we hope you'll come back on the show soon to let us know how things were going so much, and we reached out to Eddie for comment. They tell us $41 billion have gone out to workers who have lost their jobs since the pandemic hit California, and they've processed 7.5 million claims more than any other state, a programming note. A deputy director of Dede will take questions from the public on ladies Call in program Forum this morning. Support for the California report comes from California Earthquake.

Santa Cruz California Edie Governor Gavin Newsom Dr Gale Newell Twitter Hannah Hagman Bay Area Assemblyman David Chu Lily Jamali San Jose Mercury News Hannah Hagemann California Office of Emergency Employment development Departm Assemblyman David Shoe Copan officer McClelland Air Force Base Danielle Benton
"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

"For NPR news. I'm Lily Jamali. You're listening to NPR news in Washington. The city of Denver is facing a class action lawsuit over its aggressive police response during Black lives matter demonstrations last month, Colorado Public Radio's May Ortega reports, the plaintiff's accused police of using pepper spray and rubber bullets to break up a peaceful protest. The seven plaintiffs in the case range from a local freelance photojournalist to a small business owner. They say police used excessive force and violated their First Amendment rights by shooting at them with things like rubber bullets and pepper balls. One day, police started using tear gas before three in the afternoon, when kids and older people were still on the streets. Elizabeth Wang with Lo VE and Lo ve is representing them. They all experienced yoga and varying degrees Pepper. Pray as well. Some of them were hit directly with pepper bullets or other project. Otto, a civilian run City department that oversees investigations into law enforcement officers, is looking into deep Edie's handling of the protests for NPR news. I'm a Ortega in Denver. The Trump administration is promising a massive fourth of July fireworks display in the nation's capital. Despite warnings from public health officials against large gatherings and did the corona virus pandemic. The festivities are expected to include a mile long display of 10,000 fireworks. President Trump and the first lady are also planning to host events on Saturday from the White House. Meanwhile, Washington D. C. Mayor Muriel Bowser is urging residents to celebrate the fourth of July at home. A number of new Corona virus infections in the Washington.

NPR Ortega Washington Denver Lo VE Mayor Muriel Bowser President Trump Lily Jamali Elizabeth Wang business owner White House Otto Edie Colorado
"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KCRW

"Com slash give this is the California report good morning I'm lily Jamali you're gonna be hearing a lot about unemployment in the coming hours as the weekly national numbers come out again today and once again it's pretty bleak ever since the cover nineteen pandemic took hold it's been clear from your emails and tweets to us that for so many of you the process of filing for unemployment benefits has been confusing and sometimes infuriating for answers we called up Jenna Gerry she's a senior attorney at legal aid at work and we begin by asking her about the technical issues that people are coming up against when they try to file their claims I think what we're seeing is you had a very stagnant system built on very old I. D. that is not able to be dynamic and you now have a new unemployment insurance program that it just opened up the floodgates you know this is pretty unfortunate because I don't know if you're aware but prior to all that happening in the EDM actually was about neither had were about to put out a request for proposal to revamp their entire online system for unemployment insurance status ability insurance and paid family leave and in that work with both the start this coming fall because they recognize help out dated their system is I mean it's in the system from like the ninety is that just can't deal with the modern complex any and you know updated acknowledging that we have today one question that a number of people have asked is what if you've exhausted some or all of your previous benefits what now do you qualify for new you know a new round of benefits is that clear that question is a little complicated because it's really gonna depend on your specific situation but part of the federal care tactic create peonies Graham which a lot of people who had exhausted state you I. benefits here have an additional third week thirteen weeks of unemployment insurance that program is not yet up and running and we have not gotten any guidance from the EDT when that will be up and people will be able to apply for that however for individuals who had secretly adopted their state unemployment insurance had gone back to work but now we're unemployed for any code nineteen related reasons they can apply for pandemic unemployment acceptance and that application of the light day what do you think the issues folks are having now say about the infrastructure of unemployment support as a whole I think absolutely this pandemic in crisis I highlight it just yet family never social safety net that them and we see that the we compare what's happening here to other countries who had this and already in place where we're trying to build ours from you know from nothing and it's extremely difficult and I think most highlighted in that contact Marlon undocumented community I mean right now these individuals are in I mean I can't stress enough how difficult the situation is if they are currently unemployed they have no state or federal program back and provide for them and they're trying to help themselves and feed their families and while we were so excited about the governor's announcement that set up the disaster relief finds that will provide some you know some help in the form of one time payment there is no program currently for them that allows for continued wage replacement benefits during that time so what would you say to people right now who are dealing with both the uncertainty of unemployment and the frustration of a system that seems to be broken I think the great thing is that you have to be patient but persistent and that the people are working really hard to fix these issues and get the back guide Intel that people can get the benefits they need to be aware that your claim is going to be backdated to the date that you lack work so while it may take a while I know just fine and of itself is dire for people who have to pay rent and have to pay bills but eventually you should get paid for the entire time that you were eligible for unemployment insurance or the new pandemic unemployment but then again that was Jenna Gerry as legal aid at work are thanks to her governor Gavin Newsom says it is not safe to loosen shelter at home orders unless hospitals can handle a potential surgeon covert nineteen cases even though California seems to have flattened the curve so far of future spike is possible especially when current restrictions often did you really science reporter Lesley McClurg looks at how well some hospitals are prepared last month David into a cell the CEO of Stanford health care braced for the worst we literally thought we would have hundreds of patients model suggested he needed a thousand hospital beds at the time he had six hundred so Stanford like all California hospitals canceled elective surgeries everything from tummy tucks to brain surgery was put on hold the move freed up beds staff and conserve precious resources like masks then medical leaders around the bay area spent hours on zoom calls discussing contingency plans for potential patient overflows it was incredibly complicated incredibly time consuming Dr Adrian green is the chief medical officer at UCSF we have mostly done this at our day jobs since the beginning of February when we had our first couple of patients here UCSF surge plan includes extra tents outside of hospitals a new mobile clinic and to decommission floors at one of its hospitals just opened to care for coronavirus patients were now ready and we have all the building blocks to be prepared for a resurgence if it happens a special set plans in.

lily Jamali California
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sutter health it's the integrated network of doctors and hospitals it's understanding what's broken is an always on an X. ray it's a thousand things big and small Sutter health. this is the California report good morning I'm lily Jamali in San Francisco and I'm sold in solace in Santa Barbara where is the sun rises authorities are transitioning from a search and rescue operation in the wake of yesterday's tragic both fire off of the coast to Santa Cruz island to the very grim recovery of human remains officials say the bodies of twenty five people have been brought to the harbor nine more people are presumed dead just five people all of them crew members who were on that diving boat known as the conception survived the crew members escaped the fire by jumping off the conception and using an inflatable boat to get away a crewmember recounted how they had just celebrated three passenger birthdays hours before the fire including one for a seventeen year old girl who was on a diving trip with her parents salt what do things look like where you're standing there at the Santa Barbara harbor. well this was the home port of the vessel that was lost and near where was doctor people have put out candles and flowers also at the same time you have emergency crews arriving from other parts of California the state of California set up kind of a mobile operations emergency operations center here and then again people are just approaching this this memorial to pay their respects one of them was Jennifer Stafford who I met in the predawn hours.

Sutter health San Francisco Santa Barbara Santa Cruz island California Jennifer Stafford Sutter lily Jamali seventeen year
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mindfully. So would what does it look like to fail? Mindfully for me. Failing might fully means being aware of the impact of closing business. That is why I am convinced that you can fail in a good way and innovative way, I know this can sound weird, but for me failing in a good way is to fail. Mindfully to be really aware of what is happening and to try to minimize the negative consequences of the failure of that business. I am so sad to say that I spent seven years, the Niane, what had happened not talking about it, and I think that my life could have been much happier. If I have like these garage or vulnerability or the safest face what I know now and what I can share with other interpreters, is that if your business failed shared that story and also the most important part is sharing those lessons hearing, those learnings with the world. That's Latisha Gusta. She's founder of FM nights. You can check out her entire talk at Ted dot com. On the show today. Ideas about setbacks guy rise in. You're listening to the Ted radio hour from NPR. Beaches mountains, desert farmland and forty million people. At the California report, we take you. There telling you stories you won't hear anywhere else on wealth sitting in traffic with you. I'm lily Jamali bringing you the news and stories of our state each morning, on the California report. California report comes up on morning edition and right after morning edition as foreign and this morning, you're going to hear rebroadcast of the shows expiration of animal emotions with pre Matala just France. Do wall his book is mama's last hug then at ten o'clock, it's a rebroadcast.

California founder Latisha Gusta lily Jamali NPR France seven years
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Drugmakers and the lower prices. We don't believe that disclosing prices will shame drug corporations. They are happy to be shamed. All the way to the Bank. That's been what kinda executive director of patients for affordable drugs is direction, but we would strongly encourage additional actions to lowered present drugs industry groups have objected to the rule in court challenges may becoming Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news. Dow futures are down at this hour. This is NPR news in Washington. Seven months after hurricane Michael leveled parts of Florida's panhandle. Many residents are still waiting for disaster aid. But is NPR's. Ryan Bank reports President Trump yesterday promised hundreds of millions more in federal funds for -ffected areas at a rally in Panama City beach. One of the hardest hit panhandle communities. President Trump announced a quick infusion of four hundred forty eight million dollars in housing and urban development funds. These are additional moneys coming in to help the families put their lives together, some families still working very hard. It's a tough one in is like Mexico beach loss eighty percent of its buildings to the category. Five storm and residents are still struggling to rebuild homes and businesses panhandle receive some immediate dollars following Michael. But a fight in congress has tied up additional funds. Trump blame Democrats demanding more aid for Puerto Rico, which is languishing almost two years after hurricane Maria. Ryan Bank NPR news. In the aftermath of the fire that devastated Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, French health. Authorities say there are extremely high lead levels in the plaza outside and on adjacent roads. Paris police say lead levels from the roof or found to be between thirty two and sixty five times the recommended limit set by French health authorities the main danger they see his lead dust, and they recommend that pregnant women and children washed their hands frequently. I'm Louise Schiavone NPR news, Washington and here in San Francisco. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman on K Q E D coming up on morning edition and just a couple of moments. It's a conversation with Facebook cofounder. Chris Hughes who in New York Times op Ed piece suggests it's time to break up the social media company that's a head lily Jamali will have statewide coverage on the California report a head at five.

NPR President Trump hurricane Michael Ryan Bank Washington Paris Facebook Bank Notre Dame cathedral Selena Simmons Dave Freeman New York Times executive director Louise Schiavone hurricane Maria Florida Mexico Chris Hughes President lily Jamali
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm lily Jamali. Authorities have arrested in nineteen year old man from Oakland for allegedly shooting at a group of people at a state park near San Luis Obispo this weekend KCBS Xs, Greta Mark reports the suspect could face attempted murder charges. San Luis Obispo county sheriff's deputies made the arrests yesterday afternoon while investigating the shooting incident that occurred around midnight, Saturday a spokesperson with the sheriff's office confirmed that six people were hospitalized five of them with gunshot wounds. No immediate deaths were reported and no information was vailable on the extent of the victims injuries in what police describes an isolated incident. Nineteen year old Francisco arrose, go of Oakland is accused of shooting into a group of people camping on the beach in Osceola dune state the Hitler recreation area state park police. Responded to several nine one one calls reporting the shooting in a local Cal fire crew provided initial medical attention. The dune complex is a popular place to ride off road vehicles in the sand attracting a few thousand people each weekend. The county sheriff's office continues to investigate the incident for the California report. I'm Greta mart in San Luis. Obispo state. Attorney general heavier viscera has informed. The states Roman Catholic diocese that his office will review how they handled allegations of child sex abuse K, Kuwaitis, Shaya Levitt reports the attorney general sent letters to the states twelve Catholic diocese late last week in the letter, but Sarah said his office will review whether the archdiocese adequately reported allegations of sexual misconduct as required by state law. Sarah asked the diocese to preserve all records relating to child sexual abuse, including those in quote, secret archives, acting them to self report they've been doing isn't working. That's Joey piscotty Kelly from the survey. Fibers network of those abused by priests. Necessary for the general just take the steps to demand documents be sensitive investigate it more piscotty. Kelly says he and other survivors had a meeting with Sarah and district attorneys across the state in the fall. He said they were looking for information on bishops who may have covered up sexual abuse allegations. Also last fall the attorney general's office launched an online complaint form seeking information from the public on clergy sexual abuse for now the attorney general's request is voluntary. But piscotty hopes that if churches don't comply. I think the next step after that to take more serious action. And hopefully, those subpoenaed documents then pyschedelic claims the public will understand the magnitude of clergy sexual abuse in California for the California report, I'm shy of it now to our ongoing coverage of California's new police transparency law body Cam footage, an internal interviews released under that law or giving the public insight into the decisions that officers make when. They take someone's life family public radio's Lewis it sui takes us through a police shooting in the small central valley city of Hanford be aware that some of this audio is disturbing to people are dead and a canine officer was recovering.

San Luis Obispo Joey piscotty Kelly Obispo state Sarah California Attorney Oakland Catholic diocese lily Jamali Greta Mark state park Greta mart Osceola dune Cal Hanford Francisco arrose Shaya Levitt
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the California report, I'm lily Jamali. A new poll finds governor Gavin Newsom now appears to have voters on his side when it comes to placing a moratorium on the death penalty from K Q eighties politics and government desk, Katie or has that story the findings from the public policy institute of California survey show newsome's decision to halt capital punishment might be on solid political ground PIC president Mark Baldessarri says the poll was done after Newsom announced the moratorium by a two to one margin Californians now say that they favorite life imprisonment over the death penalty in cases have first degree murder that number has shifted over time. In two thousand the poll found California adults were split on capital punishment. However in two thousand sixteen voters rejected a ballot measure that would have repealed the death penalty and approved one. That's better. Up for the California report, I'm Katie or in Sacramento now to a big announcement out Wednesday from the Orange County sheriff's department, which says it will stop housing immigrant detainees for the federal government KPCC's, Leslie, Barry Stein. Roe Haas has the details. The county Lisa's detention space to ice at two jails that together can hold close to a thousand detainees, but it's ending its contract with ice and is set to stop housing detainees. As of August. I Orange County. Sheriff Don Barnes says the county needs more beds to accommodate a growing number of inmates with mental health issues. This is not about immigration. This is a business decision based on serving the residents foreign county, and our immediate needs to sheriff said, there are other factors presently. The county is holding fewer detainees than its ice contract allows which means fewer federal dollars at the same time. He said the county misspent money to upgrade its jails. I said the decision will force the agency to relocate detain. Knees farther away from their families and their lawyers Barnes said they'll probably be moved out of state the ACLU called on ice to release as many of the detained immigrants as possible. For the California report, I'm Leslie bear Stein, Rojo's in Los Angeles. Well, there has been a surge in the number of Wales being hit and killed by ships, travelling California waters, the figure reached its highest level since the US government started tracking that data the California report Samari Franklin. Harvard has more cargo ships killed ten whales and likely many more off the California coast in two thousand eighteen part of the problem is that ships travel fast, and they can't see the whales at night, which is when they often feed at the water's surface, Chris Mobely overseas Channel Islands, marine sanctuary off Santa Barbara. He says the whales are just going where the food is the rich feeding grounds tend to be on the continental shelves and slopes, so near near the coasts of the continent's. That's also happens to be typically where major ports are. It's like LA in Long Beach, the busiest in the country. Michael Fischbach heads the great whale conservancy. He says in an ideal world ships would adjust their routes to avoid Wales. If we can separate the ships in the whales by space. We have fixed a ship strike problem..

California Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes public policy institute of Cal Gavin Newsom Leslie bear Stein Katie Los Angeles lily Jamali Wales Roe Haas Michael Fischbach first degree murder newsome Mark Baldessarri president Barry Stein Samari Franklin Lisa
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Trump believes he can win for NPR news. I'm lily Jamali in San Francisco. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Passed a bipartisan Bill to change the way, the department of veterans affairs pays for outside private care. The specifics of those changes were made public today. It's hard to say if the new plan has support veterans organizations and congressional leaders say they've been frozen out of discussions about how the law will work, and there are critics accusing the administration of a stealth effort to privatize the VA NPR's quil Lawrence has this update via has been sending patients to outside specialists for years, but mostly that was VA doctors doing it for clinical reasons the choice program, which started in two thousand fourteen gave veterans the option of picking private doctor. If VA care was too slow or too far away choice has been a mixed bag for people like Iraq vet Kayla Williams. I was notified recently that they have not been able to find any providers in the DC metro region who are willing to accept the Medicare rates that choice uses choice got a reputation for paying provide. Late and confused everyone with red tape, though Williams knew the ropes she's not only a vet. She's a former senior official at VA when the new expanded version goes into effect this June. There might not be so much choice to choose from. She says because healthcare is in heavy demand nationwide. A lot of folks seem to believe that the capacity exists in the community that providers are equally good. But that's not the data that I've seen studies show that VA care is on par or better than private care for speed and quality in most markets. So even as it's about to expand private care via officials like Dr Richard stone acting head of the health have been stressing. The fact that vets who try outside care usually return. They have had a choice for years on where to go for healthcare. More than ninety percent of them have chosen to stay with us. And of the ten percent that shoes to go. Out to commercial healthcare providers. The vast majority go once and then come back to us, but expanding choice could prove that wrong says Dan Caldwell on Iraq vet with the conservative group concerned veterans for America. When you give veterans the ability to vote with their feet, you're gonna see. Really how the VA's performing and how veterans perceive VA called wells group, which is backed by billionaire conservative. Charles coke advocates for all that to have a choice between private care and the VA. He calls the new rules. A good step in that direction. We want to get to a place where veterans have the ability to access a private provider without prior authorization from the VA critics say that would amount to privatizing the VA, and because private care is more expensive would also bleed resources away from the department and the cost is still an open question for this new VA expansion house veterans affairs committee, chairman Mark tocado says the Trump administration hasn't been telling congress how it intends to pay for it. We don't know what the costs are going to be. We don't know how they're gonna pay for all this what what the cost models. Are. You know, highly specious arguments about why there could be more transparent with congress to of signed onto a letter from. Critic and Republican committee chairs this month asking VA to collaborate more with congress. They still haven't received the information they ask for but two days later, the put out a press release, proclaiming a.

VA Kayla Williams congress NPR Iraq Trump lily Jamali San Francisco Dan Caldwell Medicare Lawrence Dr Richard stone Charles coke acting head wells group America
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. I'm lily Jamali, governor Gavin Newsom, I'm still getting used to saying that will unveil his first state budget today. K Q E D senior editor for politics and government. Scott Shafer is here to give us a preview. Hey, scott. Hey lilly. We've heard a lot about what Newsom wants to fund in this budget child poverty, fighting it healthcare housing, but no governor can fund all of these areas as much as they'd like to can you really back up these campaign promises in this budget. Well, I would think of this first budget lily as kind of a down payment on those promises can he fulfill all those ambitious gold? No absolutely not need be the first to tell you that that said there's going to be an extra fifteen billion dollars in this budget. According to the legislative analyst's office and projections from the department. A finance? So that's a lot of money. Now will that kind of extra money be there next year? We don't know because you never know what the economy's going to do. But this is a great year to become governor compare that fifteen billion dollar extra money with what Jerry Brown inherited eight years ago, a twenty six billion dollar deficit. He's to have a lot of options coming into very different economic conditions. Although a downturn seems to be on the horizon, what are some other things you'll be looking for in terms of spending well in his inaugural address on Monday, the governor talked about creating a Marshall plan for housing. So what does that mean what kind of money is he gonna put into the budget to expedite or to build more housing kind of grease the skids a little bit with with perhaps nonprofit developers? That's one big thing. We'll be looking for also the delta tunnels wanted Jerry Brown's signature projects. Controversial. And will there be money in there for that? Since you mentioned governor Brown. How might we expect governor Newsom to be different from his predecessor when it comes to thinking about state budgets. Well, Jerry Brown often said that no one's cheaper. The buck than I am. And I think there are a few that would disagree with that Newsome is very much more willing to lean into some of these big picture issues. I think this budget is going to be generous with toward families toward kids and perhaps students as well with an extra year of free community college. So I think you're gonna see a governor who is much more interested in using the power of government to make change for the people of California. Jerry Brown was much more reluctant to do that. I think he Cutie senior editor for politics and government, Scott Shafer is going to be in Sacramento to watch all of this unfold. I am plus your hosting political breakdown tonight from there. Yeah. And our guest is going to be Holly Mitchell state, Senator from L A, very interesting our own right? But she happens to be the chair of the Senate budget committee. So we'll be talking with her about all this as well. And I never miss that show. That is the right attitude lily, I like that Scott, thank you. Let's go to byu county now where there is confusion over President Trump's tweet that he's ordered FEMA to stop sending money to California citing quote forest mismanage. Keep in mind. This area is one of California's last Republican strongholds, it's Trump country. Here's reporter crystal Smith from the FEMA disaster recovery center in Chico. It was a wet and windy morning outside. The former Sears store that now houses FEMA survivor services. Fema officials on site wouldn't comment, but many people there reacted to the president's tweet. Like, Michael Scott of conclo- who lost his home and is still living in.

Jerry Brown Scott Shafer FEMA governor Newsom Gavin Newsom governor Brown Michael Scott senior editor California lily Jamali Sears President Trump lilly Holly Mitchell analyst Newsome president reporter Senate
ACLU going up against Trump administration over asylum seekers

Morning Edition

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

ACLU going up against Trump administration over asylum seekers

"Today lily Jamali with member station. K Q E D reports the ACLU will face off against government lawyers over President Trump's attempt to bar migrants from seeking asylum. If they cross into the US from Mexico illegally last month, a federal judge issued a temporary restraining order against Trump's policy. Saying violated a clear command from congress today, the ACLU will argue for a longer term halt. The Federal Reserve is expected to announce another hike in short-term US interest rates today.

President Trump Aclu United States Federal Reserve Lily Jamali Congress Mexico
Judge bars enforcement of new Trump restrictions on asylum seekers

Morning Edition

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Judge bars enforcement of new Trump restrictions on asylum seekers

"Blocked President Trump's restrictions on asylum applications from those entering the country illegally, the California report lily Jamali has more US District Judge John Tigers ruling Monday halts the Trump administration. Regulation announced earlier this month that barred migrants from seeking asylum if they cross into the US from Mexico without going through an official border crossing arguing on behalf of groups that assist asylum-seekers including some based here in California. The ACLU said the law allows migrants to apply for asylum. No matter. Where they cross a Justice department lawyer had countered that the current flood of migrants has worsened an already existing crisis at the border. Here's ACLU lawyer legal learnt, they're certainly not a crisis and the administration's attempt to manufacturer crisis will hopefully not be sustained. The government lawyers had said Trump's order would discourage migrants with legitimate asylum claims from quote and blowing their shot by crossing illegally. Judge Tigers decision is the latest setback the courts have dealt the Trump administration on immigration. The two sides will be back in court next month for the California report. I'm lily jolly,

Donald Trump United States Aclu Judge John Tigers Lily Jamali California Tigers Justice Department President Trump Mexico Official
Judge bars enforcement of new Trump restrictions on asylum seekers

Morning Edition

05:14 min | 2 years ago

Judge bars enforcement of new Trump restrictions on asylum seekers

"They cannot handle more. And what's interesting is that both sides argue here that the wait times that those official points of entry can be days if not weeks, so this is just the latest example of the president trying to change regulations to kind of clamp down essentially on existing law. What the judge said though, was he was overstepping his authority basically stepping on turf that has been. Been congresses for many years now who took this into court. This case was brought by the ACLU you heard from legal. Learnt who was the lawyer who argued the case in federal court yesterday. They are representing along with some other civil rights groups organizations that provide services to asylum seekers many of these asylum seekers come from the northern triangle, countries, Guatemala, Honduras, and Salvador, many are claiming that they're fleeing violence and persecution and the argument for the temporary restraining order, which the scale you ultimately got was that it's a violation of immigration laws. We laid out earlier that a lot of the time people are doing this by accident or because their push to. And and so essentially the judge sided with them at the end of the day temporary restraining order, meaning the arguments aren't over here. Exactly the department of homeland security hasn't commented on this judge's ruling. We're waiting to see how secretary Nielsen. And of course, President Trump and self respond, but it's worth noting that judge tiger was appointed by President Obama that might be a line of criticism. We see in the coming hours and days. Specifically what we're watching for is will the department of Justice appeal this decision. The ninth circuit court of appeal. Okay. Lily Jamali co host of the California report at thanks. Thank you. Four people are dead after a mass shooting at mercy hospital in Chicago yesterday. They include a doctor and a Chicago police officer WBZ's miles Brian reports the shooting took place yesterday afternoon at the near southside hospital police say it started with a fight between Dr tamra O'neil and a man she had a quote, domestic relationship with the Chicago Tribune reports it may have been over a broken engagement someone called nine one one. But before officers arrived the man pulled out a handgun and shot and killed O'neil in the hospital parking lot. Tracy Lyons had just finished radiation treatment when she heard the shots.

Dr Tamra O'neil Chicago Tracy Lyons Mercy Hospital President Trump Chicago Tribune President Obama Aclu Southside Hospital Official Lily Jamali Department Of Justice Secretary Salvador Nielsen California Guatemala Officer
"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"lily jamali" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm lily Jamali and in southern California. I'm John sepulveda's and on Wednesday. We're going to tell you whether voters wrote a Blue Wave or whether it was more of a blue splash. Cash also will the gas tax get repealed. What's the future of rent control and Ken Republican win a statewide race for the first time since two thousand six I'll that Wednesday morning on a special post-election, California report. Hear that Wednesday morning at all five fifty one and six fifty one more election results and discussion on the forum program with Michael Krasny. They'll do national election results in the nine o'clock, hour and state and local orch and results and reaction in the ten o'clock hour on forum nine to eleven AM on Wednesday. You're listening to election Night Live from NPR news. I'm Sam Sanders, and I'm Sarah. We're watching California where yet more house seats could flip from red to blue and put Democrats in clear control of that chamber. The to the Senate overall and California Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein, secure her six term once all the votes are counted, they're speaking to her supporters in San Francisco, the eighty five year old took the long view. This is such a great country. And it's been factionalized and trivial lies with rhetoric. We must stop that. We must come together as the great power that we are for the good of the nation, and I think of mankind. Thank you. Diane Feinstein at her campaign party in San Francisco. We're going to check in now with NPR's Jessica Taylor. There are still a few high stakes Senate races that are too close to call among them, Nevada and Arizona, Jessica tell us about those so yeah, these were the two very late closes that. We are looking at in Nevada. This was the one St. that probably was the best pickup opportunity for Democrats because we talked about those ten states the Democrats were defending in places that President Trump carried. But this is the one St. incumbent dean Heller running in a state that Hillary Clinton carried we have about three fourths of the vote in there and his democratic challenger congresswoman Jackie Roseanne is up by about seven points. So we will see we find it was a very slow counting state. We finally gotten some results in there. But that race has has not been called yet. Arizona is just incredibly tight. This was the open Seve. Congress since Senator Jeff flake, a very outspoken. Trump critic has retiring there, you have congresswoman Martha mcsally air force pilot, the first woman to find combat running their against cursing cinema. Democratic congresswoman she would be the first bisexual Senator if she's she's elected. We have just under half of the vote. In MC Sally has a very narrow lead. But I will caution Arizona is one of these states that takes a long time to count they have a lot of mail in ballots to so we may not know this one for a couple of days if it remains this tight. Yeah. I mean, the the scuttlebutt with with flakes departure, right? Was that he'd been somewhat of a critic of the president didn't feel maybe that he fit in so well in the current political climate, if if Mick Sally wins can I mean, what do we know about her and her relationship to President Trump says she someone who has evolved on President Trump during the campaign in two thousand sixteen she was a very much a critic of him after that infamous access Hollywood take take came out. She came out against him where she's still not said completely if she voted for him or hot. But now she has become she's cozied up to him. She appeared with them at rallies there. She is praised him. She has sided with him on immigration and stuff too. So she is someone that has evolved in sort of sob, President Trump is someone that maybe could could help her as we've seen other Republicans like Ted Cruz come around, certainly that's NPR's. Jessica taylor. Thank you. I think Sarah going out NPR's, asthma holid-. Hi, how are you? Hey, I'm doing. All right. I want to ask you about turnout. We've heard that it's up for this midterm quarter. The last one who were those new midterm voters. Do we know yet? We don't know yet. Right. Sam. I mean in part of it's hard because when you look at exit polls, there's all these kind of like wild estimates out right now. But your point turnout does seem to be up, and we're sort of guessing that or gauging that by looking at the early vote in the early vote was hitting record numbers. And we know that the early vote was say about a third of the overall total voters. So we're looking at higher turn out than normal intimate termeer does that higher turn out help one party more than the other? Or do we not know yet? I mean, you could again assume that it. It would probably help Democrats. But that's just because the overall kind of electorate in a midterm year tends to be older it tends to favor Republicans. And so that's kind of the base level that you're starting off with. So we know that there was democratic enthusiasm this year, we knew that because every poll indicated that, but we also know that there was Republican enthusiasm the uptick in sort of the growth for potential, though was on the democratic side because Democrats their voters tend not to show up midterms. Yeah. Yeah. There was a lot of talk for a while at the top issue for voters, this midterm was healthcare within the last few weeks. We saw caravan caravan caravan, and that chains narrative, what was the biggest issue that you could tell for voters. So we had to things that we were able to look at this year. One is this massive pre-election survey that Fox News in the Associated Press did and then we have the traditional exit polls in both of those healthcare was the most prominent issue, but below that we did see immigration the economy trend high, but I will say healthcare in my mind. Really on the ballot. And I want to point out. Why I think that we had a number of candidates who are talking about expanding Medicaid, not all of them one. But we had ballot initiatives referendums to expand Medicaid and last. I checked that initiative had passed in two of the states, and it was up in the third. So that is just a single issue question where you're asking voters about healthcare in terms of the, you know, expanding Medicaid, and it seems like that was an issue voters were supportive of if turnout is up for this midterm. Can we expect it to stay up for twenty twenty? Does this set the stage in some way for what might happen? Then there is no way to know. Gosh. I don't know that there's any way to know. Right. I mean, I think as we get more and more finely tuned data, just based on different kind of election results that'll pan out. We'll get census information, right? We'll get initial data looking at the voter file from the research center that might help us figure out a little bit of who these voters were. But I do think overall there are some indications just based on the election results that the shift we had begun to see among college educated voters, specifically white college educated voters is a trajectory that continue tonight. And the reason I say that is when you look at the fifteen most highly educated districts in this country, all but two recurrently represented by Democrats one of them the GOP Barbara Comstock, she lost her seat. The other is Georgia's sixth congressional district. And the last time I checked the incumbent was only up by fifty seven votes last question for you. In terms of Trump's base seems like you still has a really strong hold on them. Now. Gosh. I mean, I think I think he does just based on the fact that we look at the places that he went and places that he traveled the places where he brought those candidates up onto the podium onto the stage with him that was a real great success rate. And we can look at that. We saw that in Indiana. We saw that in in Florida. We sit in sort of state after state that he visited and I was out with him on Sunday. We lose out campaigning in Georgia and Tennessee, the man can still easily fill a stadium and energize a crowd. And it's the same type of energy. I saw ahead of the twenty sixteen election. Thanks. And let's go now to a place where the night is still young Alaska the race for governor. There became much more interesting last month when the only independent governor in the country Bill Walker dropped out of the race and threw his support behind the democrat. Mark baggage in his race against Republican. Mike Dunleavy joining us now is Andrew kitchen men from Alaska public radio. Hi, andrew. So thanks for joining us. Let's go back to what happened last month with the incumbent governor Bill Walker. Remind us why he dropped out of the race. Well, he was already. He was always been difficult position. He had been elected for years ago with the support of Santa crack, he's a former Republican, and he had taken some steps that were very unpopular to essentially shore up budget and put the state in a founder financial position that included cutting the very popular checks that every man woman and child receives as a result of its oil out. So he lost his popularity Republicans. Look like they were in a strong position to retake the governorship and then Mark back. It's an established democrat former US Senator entered the race and Walker and baggage really the center and left the center of oh and former state Senator Mike Dunleavy from Westville was positioned to win fairly easy. Really? Then Walker is running mate Lieutenant governor suddenly resigned as a result of inappropriate contact store woman. We still don't know a lot of the details of that. But Walker with is kinda see was basically fatally wounded at that point. And basically because he was concerned about Dunleavy. He he withdrew that he would support baggage gave kind of limited support for him. He wasn't endorsing him. So it's a little complicated and that made it closer. But Dunleavy is doing pretty well. In early return. Republicans are feeling really good right now with thirty eight percent of the returns in. He has a pretty solidly. So it looks like it will be good night for Republicans in Alaska, but still a lot of returns left to come in. That's true. That's true. And some of the more democratic districts reported, although their results yet. Is it surprising that despite the governor throwing his weight behind the democratic candidate things seem to be going well for the Republican? Yeah. Yeah. I not necessarily it is a Republican leaning state. Now lady is a particularly conservative Republican. He was arguably the most conservative member of the state Senate before he left it to run for governor. And but he had told up a really large lead and baggage hadn't necessarily built up that kind of statewide campaign that he normally would have had in his Senate run. He entered the race kind of late in June. And then was trapped in this this battle with Walker. And so he just had a very short period of time to really fully built out that kind of major race that that he would normally have had and one last question, Andrew what have been the big issues here. I mean has it been immigration and healthcare the big national issues? There hasn't been more about local Alaska concerns. La healthcare has come up to some degree Walker. Governor Walker had done the Medicaid expansion over the objection of the Republican legislature, really crying. It's been a big issue in part driven by the opioid epidemic..

Democrats Governor Walker President Trump Senator Dianne Feinstein Senate Jessica Taylor California Arizona Mike Dunleavy Sam Sanders Alaska San Francisco Ken Republican NPR Senator Andrew Michael Krasny Senator Jeff flake