10 Burst results for "Lillian Smith"

"lillian smith" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

08:33 min | 1 d ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Is the Tom Hardman program In April of 1963 8 white clergyman one was a rabbi the other one was a Catholic priest the rest for Protestant ministers Jointly published a letter in the Birmingham newspaper telling doctor Martin Luther King to basically stay out of town Don't provoke violence Don't come to our town and create a problem When he was arrested in Birmingham and put in jail he was given the newspaper in which their letter was published And in jail he wrote a response to it asserting on the margin of that newspaper eventually one of the trustees in the jail gave him a little more paper that he could write on And this is what I'm reading from We're about halfway through it here This is doctor king's letter from a Birmingham jail April 1963 You speak of our activity in Birmingham as extreme At first I was rather disappointed that fellow clergymen would see my nonviolent efforts as those of an extremist I began thinking about the fact that I stand in the middle of two opposing forces in the Negro community One is a force of complacency Made up in part of negroes who as a result of long years of oppression are so drained of self respect and a sense of somebody Ness that they have adjusted to segregation And in part of a few middle class negroes who because of a degree of academic and economic security and because in some ways they profit by segregation have become insensitive to the problems of the masses The other force is one of bitterness and hatred And it comes perilously close to advocating violence It is expressed in the various black nationalist groups that are springing up across the nation The largest and best known being Elijah Muhammad's Muslim movement Nourished by the negroes frustration over the continued existence of racial discrimination This movement is made up of people who have lost faith in America who have absolutely repudiated Christianity And who have concluded that the white man is an incorrigible devil I have tried to stand between these two forces saying that we need that we need emulate neither the do nothingism of the complacent Nor the hatred and despair of the black nationalist For there is the more excellent way of love and nonviolent protest I am grateful to God that through the influence of the Negro church the way of nonviolence became an integral part of our struggle If this philosophy had not emerged by now many of the streets of the south would I am convinced be flowing with blood I am further convinced that if our white brothers dismiss as rabble rousers and outside agitators those of us who employ nonviolent direct action and if they refuse to support our nonviolent efforts millions of negroes will out of frustration and despair seek solace and security in black nationalist ideologies A development that would inevitably lead to a frightening racial nightmare Oppressed people can not remain oppressed forever The yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself and this is what has happened to the American Negro Something within as reminded him of his birthright of freedom And something without as reminded him that it can be gained Consciously or unconsciously he has been caught up by the zeitgeist And with his black brothers of Africa and his brown and yellow brothers of Asia South America and the Caribbean The United States Negro is moving with a sense of great urgency toward the promised land of racial justice If one recognizes this vital urge that has engulfed the Negro community one should readily understand why public demonstrations are taking place The Negro has many pent up resentments in latent frustrations and he must release them So let him march Let him make prayer pilgrimages to the city hall Let him go on freedom rides and try to understand why he must do so If his repressed emotions are not released in nonviolent ways they will seek expression through violence This is not a threat but a fact of history So I have not said to my people get rid of your discontent Rather I have tried to say that this normal and healthy discontent Can be channeled into the creative effort of outlet excuse me of nonviolent direct action And now this approach is being termed extremist but though I was initially disappointed to be categorized as an extremist as I continue to think about the matter I gradually gained a measure of satisfaction from the label Was that Jesus an extremist for love He said love your enemies bless them that curse you do good to them they hate you and pray for them which despitefully use you and persecute you Was that Amos and extremist for justice He said let justice flow down like waters and righteousness like an ever flowing stream was not Paul and extremist for the Christian gospel When he said I bear in my body the marks of the lord Jesus was that Martha Martin Luther and extremist your high stand I can not do otherwise to help me God And John bunyan quote I will stay in jail to the end of my days before I make a butchery of my conscience And Abraham Lincoln quote this nation can not survive half slat slave and half free end quote And Thomas Jefferson quote we hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal So the question is not whether we will be extremists But what kind of extremists we will be Will we be extremists for hate Or for love Will we be extremists for the preservation of injustice or the extension of justice In that dramatic scene on calvary's hill three men were crucified We must never forget that all three were crucified for the same crime The crime of extremism Two were extremists for immorality and thus fell below their environment The other Jesus Christ was an extremist for love truth and goodness And thereby rose above his environment Perhaps the south the nation and the world are in dire need of creative extremists I had hoped that the white moderate would see this need Perhaps I was too optimistic Perhaps I expected too much I suppose I should have realized that a few members of the oppressor race excuse me That few members of the oppressor race can understand the deep groans and passionate earnings of the oppressed race and still fewer have the vision to see that injustice must be rooted out by strong persistent and determined action I am thankful however that some of our white brothers in the south have grasped the meaning of this social revolution and committed themselves to it They are still all too few in quantity but they are big in quality Some such as Ralph McGill Lillian Smith Harry golden James McBride dabs and Braden and Sarah Patton boil Have written about our struggle in eloquent and prophetic terms Others have marched with us down nameless streets of the south They have languished and filthy roach infested jails suffering the bruise abuse and brutality of policemen who view them as dirty N word lovers Unlike so many of their moderate brothers and sisters they have recognized the urgency of the moment and since the.

Birmingham Tom Hardman Negro church Elijah Muhammad Martin Luther King America Martha Martin Luther king South America Caribbean John bunyan Asia Africa Amos Abraham Lincoln Thomas Jefferson Paul Ralph McGill Lillian Smith Harry golden
"lillian smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:42 min | 4 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"District is defying Governor Iran to sense this ban on mask mandates. They do require masks. But not vaccinations, and the district says none of the staffers who died were vaccinated. Alberto Carvahlo is superintendent of Miami Dade County Public Schools. Superintendent 13 Dead sad but scary A big number. Who were they? It is a big number. It is a bruising statistic that we need to absolutely internalize. These are teachers. Four of them are teachers. The vast majority of them are bus drivers. There is some additional support personnel. And I think this sad statistic underscores at the impact of misinformation and disinformation efforts through some vocal entities. Who, quite frankly profess anything but scientific reality and the outcome. The consequence is the death of individuals, and that's just unacceptable. One of the teachers according to your local station there, LRN Lillian Smith, an elementary school teacher. Never got to see her students on the first day of school. I mean, look, I want when I asked so many things, but let's start with so you are, you know, I'm just appalled at this disinformation. That maybe is keeping from people from getting vaccinations. But why not have a vaccine mandate? So that is a very good question, uh, in the state of Florida, we are basically not allowed on the basis of statute from mandating. Vaccination specific to Covid 19. That is the reality currently in Florida. We don't even have the right to as an employer survey our workforce regarding Whether or not they have been vaccinated. So we defaulted to the next best thing, providing a $275 stipend to those who have been vaccinated as well as to those who will be vaccinated in the future, as long as they proved they have done so. I have to tell you that the positivity rates in our community remains extremely high. It's currently at 9.75%. With elevated hospitalizations, elevated ICU cases and a growing number one in four in terms of pediatric cases, recognizing that the impact on young people is not as severe. As those who are older but cannot be ignored. Yeah, as you say, for instance, Children under 12, there is no vaccine for them right now. Thank goodness if they were to get the illness It is generally not as severe although in some cases it is as it is for adults, but meantime, I'm sorry to ask again, but You say you cannot have a vaccine mandate well by the governor's decree, you can't have a mask mandate and you do your defying that. Is there any thought of defying the vaccine requirement? We are defying the mass mandate because number one, it is well endorsed by scientific knowledge that Children and adults wearing masks, particularly in indoor settings, is a preventive measure against the spread of covid 19, particularly this much more aggressive variant. We continue to look at other protocols a specific to protective measures for our school system, and that includes obviously vaccination. That's an ongoing discussion with other school systems as well as the state of Florida. Look, We only have a little bit of time here, but we know that cases are rising among kids across the U. S. What happened? You had all these staffers die from Covid 19 Did you have to quarantine kids do their common contact with kids. What's the situation? So despite the very harsh and bruising, painful reality associated with the loss of 13 of our colleagues, the vast majority of those individuals contracted Covid and were hospitalized and passed away prior to the beginning of the school year. And But with that high number, I'm sure parents are out of their minds about You know what happens, going forward Parent you know, bus drivers, lunchroom staff teachers. Who might be next. Well, you know the best way. The best way to protect the workforce and the students is by exercising. The CDC recommended strategies, which include physical distancing in classrooms and school buses and cafeterias. Alternate seating areas for meal times and then providing not only the incentives but also access to free vaccination, which we continue to do in our schools. So we have 6 to 7 sites every single week where we vaccinate students with parental consent as long as they are 12 and other employees as well as members of the community. The biggest danger, quite frankly, is the fact that they are constantly bombarded. With information that is not fact based. That is not medically endorsed and serves no purpose other than creating confusion, the results. Unfortunately, in the death of people like we've seen here in Miami date. Alberto Carvahlo, superintendent of Miami Dade County. Public schools. Best to you going forward. Thank you. Thank you very much, Robin. Black homeowners impacted by a longstanding FEMA requirement will now be able to receive aid after a disaster. The governmental agency is now making sweeping changes to a policy that disproportionately impacted black homeowners in the South. Who didn't have documentation like deeds to show proof of ownership. To understand this a little more. We're joined by Chance. You Willis, co founder and chief executive officer of the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion, an emergency management and Chance CL joins us from Louisiana Welcome. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. You're there in Louisiana, helping to assess the needs of people that have been impacted by this latest storm. How significant is this new change to to the FEMA rule? This is going to be very significant, and I'm hoping very hopeful that it will be a positive change for the hundreds of thousands of Disaster survivors that have been impacted by this inequitable policy and these groups of marginalized people who are disproportionately black and brown. Have not received billions and disaster relief funding. When they and their families have needed it most. As I mentioned you're in Louisiana, assessing the needs of the people there. Do you feel these rules go far enough. Well, you know. It's great to celebrate this significant step. But FEMA Congress and and the Biden administration should make the policy retroactive. Beyond Hurricane ADA beyond Hurricane Ida, and it's sad that disaster survivors had to suffer the most impacts negative impacts of this policy on top of their initial Lost through numerous disasters and and Hurricane Katrina. Sandy what are some of the impacts of not receiving emergency aid, especially considering that many of those Living in coastal regions. As you mentioned experience, multiple weather disasters during.

Alberto Carvahlo $275 Robin 9.75% Miami Institute for Diversity and In 6 12 Miami Dade County Public Schoo 13 U. S. Florida Lillian Smith CDC Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Ida Willis Louisiana Miami Dade County Four
"lillian smith" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:12 min | 4 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbz. You are donya moseley. I'm robin young. It's here now. We go to florida. I a stunning headline from miami. Dade public schools the fourth largest district in the country at least thirteen. Staffers have died from cova. Nineteen since august sixteenth. Not most before. School started two weeks ago but eyebrows are raising. The district is defying governor onto census ban on mask mandates. They do require masks but not vaccinations and the district says. None of the staffers who died were vaccinated. Alberto kavala is superintendent of miami. Dade county public schools superintendent Thirteen dead sad but scary a big number. Who were they. It is a big number it as bruising statistic that we need to absolutely internalize these are teachers for them. Were teachers The vast majority of them are bus drivers. There are some additional support personnel. And i think the sad statistic Underscores the impact of misinformation and diz information efforts at through some vocal entities. Who quite frankly profess anything. But scientific reality and the outcome. The consequence is the death of individuals. And that's just unacceptable teachers According to your local station there w lillian smith. An elementary school. Teacher never got to see her students on the first day of school. I mean i. I wanna so many things but let's start with so you are just appalled. This disinformation that. Maybe he's keeping from people from getting vaccinations but why not have vaccine mandate so that is a very good question In the state of floor that we are basically not allowed on the basis of statutes from mandating. Vaccinations pacific dacoven nineteen. That is the reality currently in florida. We don't even have the right to as an employer survey Our workforce Regarding whether or not they have been vaccinated so we defaulted to the next best thing at providing a two hundred seventy five dollars stipend to those who have been vaccinated as well as to those who will be vaccinated in a future. As long as they proved they have done. So i have to tell you that. the positivity rate in our community remains extremely high. It's currently at nine point. Seven five percent with elevated hospitalizations elevated icu cases and a growing number one in four in terms of pediatric cases. Recognizing the impact on young people is not a severe as those who are older but cannot be ignored. The as you say for instance children under twelve there is no vaccine for them right now. Thank goodness if they were to get the illness. It is generally not as severe although in some cases it is as it is for adults. Put but meantime. I'm sorry to ask again but you say you cannot Have a vaccine mandate well. By the governor's decree you can't have a mass mandate and you do your defying. That is there any thought of defying the vaccine requirement. We are the fine. The mass mandate because the one It is well endorsed by scientific knowledge. That children and adults Wearing masks particularly in indoor settings is a preventive measure against the spread of Covert nineteen particularly this much. More aggressive variant. We continue to look at other protocols Specific to protective measures of for our school system and that includes obviously a vaccination. That's an ongoing discussion with other school systems. As well as the state of florida. Look we have a little bit of time here but we know that cases are rising among kids across the us what happened. You had all these. Staffers die from in nineteen. Did you have to quarantine kids. Did they come in. Contact with kids. wha what's the situation so despite the very harsh and bruising painful reality associated with the loss of thirteen of our colleagues the vast majority of those individuals contract at it and were hospitalized and passed away prior to the beginning of the school year and put with that high number. I'm sure parents are out of their minds about what happens going forward. You bus drivers lunch from Staff teachers who might be next. Well you know the best way the best way to protect The workforce and the students is by exercising the cdc recommended strategies which includes no physical distancing in classrooms in school buses and cafeterias alternate seating areas for mealtimes and then providing not only the incentives but also access to free vaccination which we continue to do in our schools so we have six to seven sites every single week. A where we vaccinate students with parental consent zones. They are twelve and older employees as well as members of the community. The biggest danger quite frankly is the fact that they are constantly bombarded with information that is not fact based that is not medically endorsed and serves no purpose other than creating confusion the results and fortunately in the death of people. Like we've seen here in miami dade alberto corallo superintendent of miami dade county public schools. Best to you going forward. Thank you thank you very much. Robin black homeowners impacted by a long standing fema requirement will now be able to receive aid after a disaster governmental agency is now making sweeping changes to a policy that disproportionately impacted black homeowners in the south. Who didn't have documentation like deeds to show proof of ownership to understand this a little more. We're joined by. Chauncey willis co founder and chief executive officer of the institute for diversity and inclusion an emergency management and chauncey joins us from louisiana. Welcome thank you. I'm happy to be here. You're there in louisiana helping to assess the needs of people that have been impacted by this latest storm. How significant is this new. Change to the rule. This is going to be a very significant. And i'm hoping very hopeful that it will be a positive change for the the the hundreds of thousands of disaster survivors that have been impacted by this inequitable policy and these groups of marginalized people who are disproportionately black and brown have not received billions and disaster relief funding when they and their families have needed. Most as i mentioned you're in louisiana assessing the needs of the people there. Do you feel these rules. Go far enough. Well you know it's great to celebrate this significance doubt but fema congress and and the biden administration should make the policy retroactive beyond hurricane ida beyond hurricane ida and it's sad that disaster survivors had to suffer the most impacts negative impacts this policy on top of their initial loss through numerous disasters and and hurricane katrina sandy. What are some of the impacts of not receiving emergency aid especially considering that many of those living in coastal regions as you mentioned experience multiple weather disasters during a lifetime. Wow the impacts are tremendous the data demonstrates that vulnerable groups recover at a.

wbz donya moseley robin young Dade public schools Alberto kavala miami lillian smith florida cova Dade county npr alberto corallo Robin black Chauncey willis institute for diversity and in louisiana cdc fema
"lillian smith" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

07:41 min | 4 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on WBUR

"District is defying govern Iran's senses ban on mask mandates They do require masks But not vaccinations, and that it just district says most or rather, none of the staffers were vaccinated. Alberto Carvahlo is superintendent of Miami Dade County Public Schools superintendent. 13 dead Sad and scary. A big number. Who were they? It is a big number. It is a bruising statistic that we need to absolutely internalize. These are teachers. Four of them were teachers. The vast majority of them are bus drivers. There is some additional support personnel. And I think this sad statistic underscores the impact of misinformation and disinformation efforts through some vocal entities. Who, quite frankly profess anything but scientific reality and the outcome. The consequence is the death of individuals, and that's just unacceptable. One of the teachers according to your local station there, LRN Lillian Smith, an elementary school teacher. Never got to see her students on the first day of school. I mean, okay, I want when I asked so many things, but let's start with so you are, you know, I'm just appalled at this disinformation. That maybe is keeping from people from getting vaccinations. But why not have a vaccine mandate? So that is a very good question, uh, in the state of Florida, we are basically not allowed on the basis of statute from mandating. Vaccination specific to Covid 19. That is the reality currently in Florida. We don't even have the right to as an employer survey our workforce regarding Whether or not they have been vaccinated. So we defaulted to the next best thing, providing a $275 stipend to those who have been vaccinated as well as to those who will be vaccinated in the future, as long as they proved they have done so. I have to tell you that the positivity rates in our community remains extremely high. It's currently at 9.75% with elevated hospitalizations, elevated ICU cases and a growing number one in four in terms of pediatric cases, recognizing that the impact on young people is not as severe. As those who are older but cannot be ignored. Yeah, as you say, for instance, Children under 12 there is no vaccine for them right now. Thank goodness if they were to get the illness, it is generally not as severe although in some cases it is as it is for adults, but but meantime, I'm sorry to ask again, but You say you cannot have a vaccine mandate well by the governor's decree, you can't have a mask mandate and you do your defying that. Is there any thought of defying the vaccine requirement. We are defying the mass mandate because number one, it is well endorsed by scientific knowledge that Children and adults wearing masks, particularly in indoor settings. As a preventive measure against the spread of covid 19, particularly this much more aggressive variant. We continue to look at other protocols specific to protective measures for our school system. And that includes obviously vaccination. That's an ongoing discussion with other school systems as well as the state of Florida. Yeah. Look, We only have a little bit of time here, but we know that cases are rising among kids across the U. S. What happened? You had all these staffers die from Covid 19. Did you have to quarantine kids? Did they common contact with kids? What's the situation? So despite the very harsh and bruising, painful reality associated with the loss of 13 of our colleagues The vast majority of those individuals contracted covid and were hospitalized and passed away prior to the beginning of the square, and but it with that high number, I'm sure parents are out of their minds about You know what happens, going forward Parent you know, bus drivers, lunchroom staff teachers. Who might be next? Well, you know the best way. The best way to protect the workforce and the students is by exercising. The CDC recommended strategies, which include physical distancing in classrooms in school buses and cafeterias. Alternative seating areas for meal times and then providing not only the incentives but also access to free vaccination, which we continue to do in our schools. So we have 6 to 7 sites every single week where we vaccinate students with parental consent as long as they are 12 and older employees as well as members of the community. The biggest danger, quite frankly, is the fact that they are constantly bombarded. With information that is not fact based. That is not medically endorsed and serves no purpose other than creating confusion, the results. Unfortunately, in the death of people like we've seen here in Miami Dade Alberto Carvahlo, superintendent of Miami Dade County. Public schools. Best to you going forward. Thank you. Thank you very much, Robin. Black homeowners impacted by a longstanding FEMA requirement will now be able to receive aid after a disaster. The governmental agency is now making sweeping changes to a policy that disproportionately impacted black homeowners in the South. Who didn't have documentation like deeds to show proof of ownership. To understand this a little more. We're joined by Chance. You Willis, co founder and chief executive officer of the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion, an emergency management and Chance CL joins us from Louisiana Welcome. Thank you. I'm happy to be here. You're there in Louisiana, helping to assess the needs of people that have been impacted by this latest storm. How significant is this new change to to the FEMA rule? This is going to be very significant. And I'm hoping very hopeful that it will be a positive change for the the the hundreds of thousands of Disaster survivors that have been impacted by this inequitable policy and these groups of marginalized people who are disproportionately black and brown. Have not received billions and disaster relief funding. When they and their families have needed it most. As I mentioned you're in Louisiana, assessing the needs of the people there. Do you feel these rules go far enough. Well, you know. It's great to celebrate this significant step. Um, but FEMA Congress and And the Biden administration should make the policy retroactive beyond Hurricane ADA beyond Hurricane Ida, and it's sad that disaster survivors Had to suffer the most, Um impacts negative impacts of this policy on top of their initial lost through numerous disasters and And Hurricane Katrina Sandy what are some of the impacts of not receiving emergency aid, especially considering that many of those living in coastal regions As you mentioned experience multiple weather disasters during.

Alberto Carvahlo $275 Robin Institute for Diversity and In 9.75% 13 6 12 Miami Dade County Public Schoo Florida 13 dead Hurricane Ida FEMA Louisiana Hurricane Katrina Sandy Lillian Smith U. S. CDC Four Miami Dade
"lillian smith" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Pronounced dead on the scene. The Harris County sheriff's Office says clean up around the incident again in the Hoffman and Crosby area is expected to take most of the afternoon. Oil producers in the Gulf of Mexico are struggling to bring production back to the levels seen before Hurricane Ida hit the region last week. Our energy reporter Kyra Buckley, tells us the industry is facing one of its worst weather related losses. In 16 years. Or oil production in the Gulf is still offline. It could be weeks before some start operations up again, and Reuters is reporting more than 17 million barrels of oil have already been lost and overall U. S production could be cut by 30 million. It's one of the worst losses since 2000 and five when Hurricane Katrina, followed by Rita cost producers more than 150 million barrels over three months. That's Kyra Buckley reporting and Houston Municipal workers who Aren't vaccinated against Covid 19 will be required to get tested twice a month. Now. Mayor Sylvester Turner issued the executive order this morning. Adding fully vaccinated employees and those with religious or medical exceptions will not need to get tested. We're looking at a high of 96 today. I'm at Arab News 88 7. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include C three A. I. C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at Enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems. C three A. I. This is Enterprise AI. From NPR NW. Bur I'm Tanya. Mostly, I'm Robin Young. It's here and now in Florida, a stunning headline from Miami Dade Public Schools, the fourth largest district in the country. At least 13 staffers have died from Covid 19 since August, 16th. Most before school started two weeks ago. But eyebrows are raising the district is defying govern Iran's census ban on mask mandates They do require masks but not vaccinations, and that it just district says most or rather, none of the staffers were vaccinated. Alberto Carvahlo is superintendent of Miami Dade County Public Schools. Superintendent 13 Dead sad and scary, a big number. Who were they? It is a big number. It is a bruising statistic that we need to absolutely internalize. These are teachers. Four of them were teachers. The vast majority of them are bus drivers. There is some additional Support personnel, and I think this sad statistic underscores at the impact of misinformation and disinformation efforts through some vocal entities. Who, quite frankly profess anything but scientific reality and the outcome. The consequence is the death of individuals, and that's just unacceptable. One of the teachers, according to your local station there, LRN Lillian Smith, an elementary school teacher. Never got to see her students on the first day of school. I mean, okay, uh, one when I have so many things, but let's start with so you are, you know, I'm just appalled at this disinformation. That maybe is keeping from people from getting vaccinations. But why not have a vaccine mandate? So that is a very good question, uh, in the state of Florida, we are basically not allowed on the basis of statute from mandating vaccinations specific to Covid 19 That is the reality currently in Florida. We don't even have the right to as an employer survey our workforce regarding whether or not they have been vaccinated. So we defaulted to the next best thing providing a $275 stipend to those who have been vaccinated as well as to those who will be vaccinated in the future, as long as they proved they have done so. Have to tell you that the positivity rates in our community remains extremely high. It's currently at 9.75% with elevated hospitalizations elevated. I see cases and a growing number one in four in terms of pediatric cases, recognizing that the impact on young people is not as severe as those who are older but cannot be ignored. No, it was you say, for instance, Children under 12 There is no vaccine for them right now. Thank goodness if they were to get the illness, it is generally not as severe although in some cases it is as it is for adults, but meantime, I'm sorry to ask again, but You say you cannot have a vaccine mandate well by the governor's decree, you can't have a mask mandate and you do your defying that. Is there any thought of defying the vaccine requirement? We are defying the mask mandate because number one. It is well endorsed by scientific knowledge that, uh, Children and adults wearing masks, particularly in indoor settings, as a preventive measure against the spread of covid 19, particularly this much more aggressive there. It. We continue to look at other protocols specific to protective measures for our school system, and that includes obviously vaccination. That's an ongoing discussion with other school systems, as well as the state of Florida. Look, We only have a little bit of time here, but we know that cases are rising among kids across the U. S. What happened? You had all these staffers die from Covid 19. Did you have to quarantine kids? Did they common contact with kids? What's the situation? So despite the very harsh and bruising, painful reality associated with the loss of 13 of our colleagues, the vast majority of those individuals contracting Covid and were hospitalized and passed away prior to the beginning of the school year. And but it with that high number, I'm sure parents are out of their minds about You know what happens going forward Parent, you know bus drivers lunch from staff teachers. Who might be next. Well, you know the best way. The best way to protect the workforce and the students is by exercising. The CDC recommended strategies, which include physical distancing in classrooms and school buses and cafeterias. Alternate seating areas for meal times and then providing not only the incentives but also access to free vaccination, which we continue to do in our schools. So we have 6 to 7 sites every single week. Where we vaccinate students with parental consent as long as they are 12 and older employees as well as members of the community. The biggest danger quite frankly, is the fact that they are constantly bombarded. With information that is not fact based. That is not medically endorsed and serves no purpose other than creating confusion, the results. Unfortunately, in the death of people like we've seen here in Miami date, Alberto Carvahlo, superintendent of Miami Dade County, Public Schools, best to you going forward..

Kyra Buckley Alberto Carvahlo $275 Robin Young Covid Florida Reuters Miami Dade Public Schools 6 30 million Tanya NPR Miami 12 9.75% Gulf of Mexico last week today 16 years Miami Dade County Public Schoo
"lillian smith" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"To to to go into the go into the seminary at a time when the church had not decided whether or not the church it not voted to ordain women when paulie entered The seminary and she said to this friend you know. I think the missing element is theological and she was thinking about issues of dignity. She was talking about issues of dignity and justice she wasn't she was saying she was saying that the law was important but that the missing element in her life was theological so in his julie Just say religion being a a piscopo alien Was very much part of polymerase core. She was like six or seven generation. episcopalian so this was a very deep part of of of who she was. And it it it is mice sense that it was in later years In later life pauli marry felt that there was acceptance on the family. There were people along the way who had always been accepting aunt. Pauline was just incredible Aunt pauline referred to polly my boy girl Eleanor roosevelt was accepting. I had never discovered any letters. A correspondence between them that suggested that there was a discussion abou Sexuality or or gender identity but i had the strong sense that eleanor knew who polly was and polly knew that eleanor knew who she was in she just felt tremendous acceptance and that relationship became a surrogate mother daughter relationship. That was very important to to apollo mary's sense of wellbeing so this sense of finding community in acceptance in others became Became it was pronounced as in in mid in later. Life in And so i guess. I feel that the decision to move into the ministry was evidence of her healing in her desire to be as her niece as a listener in support of the healing of others. Which i think is important. You know this. Is betsy just one thing to add when you start to make a film. You don't know what discoveries you're gonna make and one of the most amazing discoveries was something that julie found in this lessons. your library. That had been misfiled. Wasn't with the pauli murray collection but it was an interview that a young woman had done woman named lynn conway putting together a feminist syllabus and interviewed pauli murray in polly's priest's collar sitting at the desk working at the typewriter and We were of course thrilled to have this video. We have a lot of audio tapes but have video. The thing about it. That is to me was so wonderful. In addition to seeing polly's relationship with one of polly's beloved dogs who keeps barking. And she down down roy and but was was police smile and it was just a beautiful beautiful. Want just welcoming fantastic smile and you know. We used it throughout the film to give a sense of who this person was. And certainly that poi- police seems happy. So glad You said that betsy. Because i also Was so struck by that beatific smile. It just was a really quite visceral. How this is somebody who had really found a piece of the film is my name. Is pauline murray. It premiered at sundance. it will be released by amazon. This fall it was made by directors betsy west and julie cohen who made the phenomenal pathbreaking documentary. Our bg at professor patricia bell scott was a consulting producer on the film. She is professor emeritus of women studies and human development and family science at the university of georgia her biography the firebrand and the first lady portrait of a friendship pauli murray eleanor roosevelt and the struggle for social justice. When the lillian smith book award i cannot thank the three of you enough both for your time today but also really for helping excavate and bring to life. Something that patricia said it best. I cannot believe how angry i am that nobody told me about this in law school. Thank you so much for.

polly pauli murray Aunt pauline eleanor apollo mary paulie pauli lynn conway Eleanor roosevelt betsy Pauline pauline murray julie betsy west julie cohen patricia bell scott women studies and human develo roy murray eleanor roosevelt lillian smith
"lillian smith" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

07:57 min | 5 months ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"Name. Is pauline murray and my field. Concentration has been human rights. My whole personal history has been a struggle to meet standards of excellence in a society which has been dominated by the ideas that blacks were inherently inferior to whites and women were inherently inferior to men. Murray was far too complicated for any twentieth century rubric. to contain black. non binary. queer feminist and civil rights. Pioneer murray was a poet a teacher illegal activist a white-shoe lawyer ultimately an episcopal priest. Murray hung out with langston hughes. James baldwin had a twenty three year friendship with eleanor roosevelt and helped betty for. Dan found the national organization for women. Might name is pauline. Murray was made by directors. Betsy west and julie cohen. They made the documentary. Our bg that helped catapult justice ginsburg into the super celebrity stratosphere. Betsy and julie are joined with me today by professor patricia bell. Scott a consulting producer of my name is pauline murray and professor emeritus of women's studies and human development and family science at the university of georgia her biography the firebrand and the first lady portrait of a friendship pauli murray eleanor. Roosevelt and the struggle for social justice won the lillian smith book award. Julie betsy professor bell scott. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much for being here. I don't even think my introduction that i just gave which had so many exclamation marks begins to do pauli murray justice. I feel as though watching the film and doing some reading primary is like a. Where's waldo of the big major labor racial gender movements in the last century except pauli. Murray did it a decade before anyone else thought of it and not just in terms of activism but actually constructing legal architecture and i think if you add in pauley murray's lifelong insistence that she was a man living in a woman's body pleading with doctors to hear her and help her. It's clear to me that pauli murray was not in any category that the twentieth century can contain so patricia. Can you help just set the table for listeners. Who've not heard yet of pauli murray what the early life was the education and all the ways in which these kind of weird constructed boundaries kept throwing up walls yes I think when we try to decipher what resulted in this incredible person to whom we are all so We are all so indebted. We have to start with her childhood. Pauli murray was a person Who had tremendous Sensitivity to injustice when she was a child and i i'm right now using The pronoun she because she presented as a female Largely as as a result of the pressures of social forces and political Political issues in her life however she presented as female publicly however privately and through All of her life she would be someone we would describe now as someone who was gender queer or we might say that she was gender. Non binary And there is a phrase of that. Some people use that i truly think is appropriate when we think about her in that she is someone who really takes a very expensive few of the human experience so that she sees herself spoke male and female beyond beyond those boundaries. She was of mixed race ancestry ancestry so she saw herself as beyond just male and female. So when i say she. I don't necessarily mean she in the conventional sense. But i'm using that. Because that is how she wrote about herself that is how she presented herself Publicly and to people. We have to start with this childhood of a of a someone who at age six lodged her first protest against inequality over the dinner table win. Aunt pauline who became murray's adoptive mother was distributing The pancakes and polly was given one. Pancake and grandfather. Robert was given three and she looked at his plate and looked at her plate in decided that this was not fair and so she turned to aunt pauline and say it aunt pauline. Why do you give grandfather robert Three pancakes and me only one well The adults At the table really had no answer that they were willing to share with this young woman and even though it perhaps would have been a question that they had expected her To let lie. She didn't so that Later when she was at dinner at debt they were dinner guests at the home of a of a prestigious family in the community. A black middle class family and they were Being served a meal in pauley who was tiny but always ravenous say. I'd like to have another helping of meat Aunt pauline say. No and then paulie say it. Will i still feel like. I should have another helping of meat. And she insisted in finally aunt. Pauline said l. Please excuse us to The host took paulie in another room gave polly spanking and then when they returned to the dinner table. You would not be surprised to know that this child turned to her. Aunt pauline in the guests see it. I one another helping of meat. So what we sow. Was this what you see in. This comes from murray's Account of childhood in her memoirs. Some in a weary throat is is An insistence to Not be silent in the face of injustice and persistence and determination to question power and authority. Whether that authority be on the in the person who had of her older relatives who raised her or In the presence of the white house. Eleanor and franklin roosevelt. To whom she wrote hot letters protesting jim crow in the south. So early on we see in pauli. Murray someone At a very young age highly sensitive to injustice and very much determined to question it and to persist and accept the consequences even if the consequences in one case as a child was a spanking. And betsy and julie. I feel like i want to ask you that. Initial framing question that patricia just brought up..

Pauli murray pauline murray Murray Pioneer murray Betsy west julie cohen professor patricia bell women's studies and human deve murray eleanor lillian smith book award Julie betsy bell scott Aunt pauline pauline pauley murray James baldwin national organization for wome langston hughes eleanor roosevelt ginsburg
"lillian smith" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on Switch4Good

"City and your franchised. Bodybuilding has is more rapid than all of those sports with drugs. That's how would exist. And so in natural bodybuilding. It's just you take a polygraph test a urine test and if you win a major title like a world championship. They do a blood test as well to make. Sure your natural. But but yeah alexandra. I would compete with people who literally eight six chickens. A day like literally six chicken breasts today. Maybe twenty four egg whites so okay. Not the whole chicken. Because i was thinking that would be. They would eat six chickens like you pick them up at boston. Whatever that places i guess. Chicken breasts six different lives though right. It's still no doubt like the vigils and come us all those dozens of eggs plus Way protein drinks can contributing to Negatively to the dairy industry. And and you know we know how awful got is. and so. that's that's the world that i was in and so one of the fun things was that when you get a chance. Suicide the federation's. I competed in and i competed in. I think four different ones when you one. You've got a chance to talk on the microphone. So i could talk about the vegan on stage and sometimes i would have that in my music as well. You have this posing routine you put posing trunks in you do all this flexing and choreographed routine music for sixty seconds and i would sometimes have degan messages in the lyrics. Not kind of thing and so. That's what i did for for ten years. And then i retired at a pretty young age age twenty nine or thirty because i wanted to write books dot c. Like you said since age eight which by the way. I have to say one of the most exciting things i've been doing recently I hope you get kicked out this. This is so fun for me. I was inspired to to be writer in third grade. My teacher Mrs young and i have. I've reconnected with her I just got an email from her two days ago. And i've rejected with my favorite teacher of all time which my fourth and fifth grade teacher mrs smith. She's ninety one now while and And and lillian. Smith is the one that put me in touch with carol young They're both teachers from third fourth and fifth grade. That time of my life eight to ten years old. My decided what i really wanted to do with my life. And i've been able to be in touch with both of them recently and some books for them and thank them for the role. They played an helping me get to this point..

alexandra boston Mrs young mrs smith carol young lillian Smith
"lillian smith" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

Conversations with Rosh Review

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on Conversations with Rosh Review

"I said I feel like I've been sleuthing. I feel like I'm doing to you what you do. Whatever one of your criminal background or anything? Hello and welcome to another episode of conversations. This is Adam rush and I want to thank you for joining me. This episode is incredibly special as I speak with attorney Angela. Povilas who is a nationally recognized voice for victims of sexual assault domestic violence and child abuse. Currently Angela is an attorney with the State of Michigan whose work focuses on sexual assault domestic violence and other crime victim rights issues prior to that she was a senior attorney in the state attorney. General's Criminal Division and lead prosecutor on multi victim domestic violence stalking and sexual assault cases and for twelve years. She served as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Wayne County working. On cases of Child Abuse Child and Adult Sexual Assault Child Homicide and other felony cases. Politis gained worldwide attention in two thousand eighteen as lead prosecutor in the case against a former United States gymnastics. Physician Larry Nassar who was convicted in January. Two thousand eighteen of sexually assaulting numerous young girls attorney elitest was instrumental in arranging for more than two hundred of Nassar's victims to give impact statements the court during his sentencing. Hearing while the world watched live on television this was perhaps one of the defining moments of the metoo movement in this episode of conversations. Politis talks about her journey to becoming a prosecutor what led her to focus on sexual and domestic violence cases and what it means to be. Victim centered offender focused and trauma informed. She also talks about three distinct cases that I'd like to provide some background about to give you context during this episode. The first case is the people vs Father. James Rap rap was a Catholic priest accused of sexually assaulting young boys at looming Christian High School in Jackson Michigan in the nineteen eighty s in two thousand and fifteen povilas filed nineteen sexual assault cases against rap. Who eventually pleaded no contest and the night before rap sentencing in April? Two Thousand Sixteen pub organized a dinner and meeting for about ten of the victims the next morning. Several impact statements during the sentencing. The second case is the people vs Calvin Kelly. The defendant was an interstate truck driver. Serial rapist who preyed upon vulnerable women including those struggling with drug addiction and poverty led by Povilas and her cold case sexual assault team the Michigan Attorney General's Office Link Kelly to eleven reported rapes in four states spanning over twenty years Politis issue charges in two thousand fourteen and after many adjournments delays and appeals a two week jury. Trial began in September. Two Thousand Seventeen. Where three victims testified. Kelly was acquitted despite overwhelming evidence shortly after his acquittal. Kelly was charged with three rapes and Tennessee. At the time of this podcast he remains in jail awaiting trial. The third case and the most widely known is the people vs Larry Nassar. Nassar is one of the most prolific sexual abusers in. Us history. Having abused well over five hundred victims his criminal case began with a report from one victim in August of twenty sixteen and quickly grew to hundreds of athletes from over a dozen different sports ranging from Gold medal-winning Olympians and national team members two club level gymnasts but before the world knew his name. A case was built and led by Povilas enter team from the Michigan State University Police Department and Attorney General's Office as the lead prosecutor on his State Sexual Abuse Charges Pof- lightest issue charges presented evidence questioned witnesses and drafted an historic plea agreement. Where more than two hundred victims give? Impact statements while the world watched and learned of the horrors of sexual abuse and trauma. Now if this wasn't enough exceptionalism for this episode there's more and I took the back seat and welcomed Danielle McGuire. Phd To host. This episode. Danielle is an award winning author and historian of racial and sexual violence. Her first book at the dark. The street black women rape and resistance a new history of the civil rights movement from Rosa Parks of the Raisa Black Power which was published by enough. Won The Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the Lillian Smith Award and is widely read in colleges around the country. Danielle is a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American historians and has appeared on National Public Radio Book. Tv CNN MSNBC and dozens of local radio stations and has spoken throughout the United States and around the world so this is truly a dynamic duo it is rare to get two people together who have such incredible backgrounds and to have one conversation between these two so without further ado. Here is the far reaching conversation. Between Attorney Angela Povilas and Professor Danielle McGuire. Welcome to the show and she pov litis. Do you go by Angie or Angela. So my friends. Call Me Indy. So you can call me into his friend. Thanks all right. Well let's get right to it and Daniel you take it away and get us going okay so anti know each other. I think I through youth sports where both soccer moms and we share a very competitive spirit. So I think it's only fitting that we start this conversation with a little sport talk so I was doing a little research on you and I read that when you were in high school and Baldwin Michigan you earned thirteen varsity letters and most people don't even earn one so I was like what thirteen varsity letters. That's impressive key. Tell us a little bit about that. Absolutely I'm impressed with your research skills there because that was that was a deep dive so Baldwin for the folks that don't know is a small community in northern Michigan. It's about equal distance between traverse city in grand rapids than our for each of those larger towns about thirty minutes from Lake Michigan. So it is a Class D school. I think the changes in the Michigan High School Athletic Association that. Yeah I know I was an athletic About five nine so I was about five nine at twelve and got recruited to play. Basketball at our basketball team would be the center. I had a nickname at the time of Totem Pole. Which is a little traumatizing. But I loved it. I loved everything about basketball. I mean I was thinking back to some of the Great Pistons ears here and was huge Pistons Fan and would record the gains on VHS to watch all summer and practice in my backyard so it's a tiny town where forty five people in my graduating class. I did get to play four years of Varsity on our basketball team. We did have a JV team but it was kind of fun to be there as a freshman and then I played for years of volleyball and then four years of track. I think that brings us to twelve in my senior year. I got to play softball with my sister. Who's a freshman so that was really special? She was very good pitcher in decided to Kennedy to sports that season. But you know I was a good student. I was student body. President was involved in a lot of different activities but uh sports were incredibly important to my childhood growing up in. I think you know an integral part of of my competitive spirit and any transitions well to you. Know my later. Career as a prosecutor trial attorney in so many of the lessons I learned being part of a team and having a goal and working toward it handling defeat being resilient. All of those came from the basketball courts in Michigan. Wow that's incredible. I read also that you actually were inducted into the Baldwin High School Basketball Hall of fame. Yeah that was a couple of years ago and the other thing. I'm proud of in humble break away. Was I was all area? Dream Team for two years in a row so now local paper but the transition of that rate is is. I was a big fish in a little. Pat Was Not good enough to play Division One or division two. I think I had a slight interest in navy pursuing basketball. But I mean I would.

Angela Povilas attorney prosecutor Michigan assault Basketball Larry Nassar Us Professor Danielle McGuire Calvin Kelly Politis Michigan High School Athletic senior attorney Adam rush Baldwin Michigan Nassar Baldwin High School Lake Michigan
"lillian smith" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:59 min | 3 years ago

"lillian smith" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This is an uncle presentation on C span radio WCS from Washington. The Virginia festival the book to place the weekend of watch twenty second books. These reason coverage of the Virginia festival of the book and Charlottesville, first up a discussion on some lesser known leaders in social and political Justice movements. I want to I want to welcome. You all for this session. Called rebels with a cause. My name is Phyllis Leffler, some locals Nomi around here. I I'm a retired faculty at the university of Virginia and. I'm very excited about this morning's program, I want to start with a couple of broad announcements before we get into the substance of the program. Most of you know, this festival is free of charge. But it's not free of cost. So we request that you go back online after this event or after the festival. To make a contribution or to pick up one of the giving envelopes from the information desk and support this at the Omni and support the festival so it can be sustained for many more years. The books of both of our authors today will be on sale immediately following the program out in the lobby right behind you. So we ask that you support the festival authors in our local booksellers by purchasing. Book to read, and I can assure you that they are both incredibly worthwhile books to have in your personal library. So I thought I would begin by just saying. Well, I I I'd like to introduce both of of our authors. So Charles Marsh, who's sitting directly to my left is the Commonwealth professor of religious studies and director of the project on live theology at the university of Virginia. He is the author of at least seven books. One of the most recent prior to this current edited volume being strange glory a life of Dietrich von Hoffer. He's been the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship in the creative arts he served as the Ellen Maria garrison fellow at the American Academy at Berlin. And he's currently writing a new book entitled evangelical anxiety, which will be out in twenty twenty. So I suspect he will be back with us. How crow their Crowder Crowder? Thank you. Is a critic and essayist who lives in Hillsborough, North Carolina. He's also the author of multiple books, including an infuriating American the incendiary arts of H, L Mankin and four collections of essays. He was a finalist for the national book Critics Circle prize in criticism, and he has won numerous prizes as for the best SAS working in journalism today. He's the winner of the Lillian Smith book award for commentary received numerous numerous fellowships. He's also a former screenwriter news magazine editor for both time and Newsweek and syndicated columnist. So we have absolutely a wonderful lineup of speakers today who have written two books one by the book of Charles Marsh? Which is he is he is an editor of this book called can I get a witness thirteen peacemakers community builders and agitators for faith in Justice, and how Crowder who's written freedom fighters and hell raisers a gallery of memorable southerners. So I thought I might just start out by making just a couple of remarks about what I see as the broad-based similarities and differences between these books. I will take as. Little time as I can to give our speakers as much time as possible. But I thought it might help just to create a little bit of context for what each one of them will speak about today. Phyllis Leffler is fresh Ramirez from Euboea. So both of these books are and Sala gies. And so they're they're collections of essays about different individuals. They are all in. That's clearly one of the larynx another similarity is that all of the people that are being written about are deceased. Both authors. Believe in the power of stories to reach into the hearts and minds of readers. And to clearly influence readers. And both sets of essays. Reflect the diversity of interests of the people that they're writing about. So they're not all journalists. They're not all artists there. There's a combination of interest that these individuals that they're writing about represent they cover the fields of music literature. Theology writers public activists. So it's a really broad swath of people who are covered, which I think makes the book books incredibly interesting and both of these books reflect and ethnic and racial diversity in terms of the people who are being written about. And Finally, I think both authors are deeply interested in telling stories of complexity as a way to understand truth. There are some differences between them one of them is an edited work. Charles, Charles marshes. Has three there three editors. But each of the essays is written by a different person. Whereas how Crowder's book is a series of essays written by himself. So that creates a slightly different. Tone for for each of these works and the focus of the works. Although similar in the ways, I just explained to are also different in some ways. Firkh for marshes work for can I get a witness the focus is to reflect on the tradition of Christian, Social progressives. And. At end to understand have Crispin teaching and Christian theology. Formed people who made a very significant difference in the world. I just wanna read very quickly from page two of the introduction to this book, which I think tells you more about what the book is about. So in this in this paragraph. The reference is to Dietrich von Hafer who. The author is saying that Bonn Hafer when he visited the United States found a largely forgotten tradition of a confessional. Life activists theologians bible, wielding labor. Organizers social gospel reformers and African American preachers, which is to say he writes, the cast of characters four grounded in can I get a witness? So that reflects I think on the on the diversity of the book itself. So the focus of Charles marshes at all edited work because he's a sole editor of this work is that Christian Social progressive tradition. The the focus and scope of his book is also national. So we we come into contact with a variety of people from all parts of the country, the focus of how Crowder's book is on southern rebels southern fighters he calls it a gallery of southern of memorable Southern's southerners, freedom fighters and hell raisers and in his own words. He calls this meditations on race religion. Art, politics, social, Justice and much more. He says they're neither obituaries nor eulogies. And I thought I would just very quickly read way back toward the back of the book something that that he says, which I think helps us to understand more broadly. What the focus of this book is. He says the people I admire most are embarrassing people outlaws agitators uncompromising rebels and crusaders whose courage makes the rest of us uncomfortable. During their lives. We write about the less than we should perhaps. Because most journalists affect a detachment that distances them from the champions of lost and quixotic causes then one of them dies and guilt. See his knee in one sense. It's too late. But it's never pointless to pay your last respects to heroes to settle scores with history and place their accomplishments in the context, they deserve the truly embarrassing people. He writes, Martin Luther King junior, for instance, for Jesus Christ can be a greater force dead than alive. So it's a little maybe we'll be an opportunity for some question. So again books have a broad similarities, but also some significant differences, and I'll just add by saying I really appreciated having the opportunity myself Torri, both of these books thoroughly they really resonated with me. Personally because in my own career. I have also focused on some.

Crowder Crowder Charles Marsh Phyllis Leffler Charles marshes editor university of Virginia Virginia Dietrich von Hafer Washington Dietrich von Hoffer Charlottesville Martin Luther King John Simon Guggenheim Hillsborough Sala gies Omni L Mankin Lillian Smith North Carolina Charles