35 Burst results for "Lila"

"lila" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:11 min | 4 d ago

"lila" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"That's why in the constitution it explicitly says that Congress cannot do certain things that you have the separation of powers. It's the idea that the rights of the minority or those that might not have the same capacity as you actually matter and most importantly the right to life Lila as we close this conversation, can you also talk about how they always frame this from a woman's perspective on planned parenthood's site here, which do not have a habit of visiting their website. But they frame everything in a pro woman lens that if you dare not support abortion that is an attack on your feminine femininity, it is an attack on your womanhood that you must fight the Patriarchy and by doing so you must be able to terminate pregnancy. What is your response to the kind of pro woman framing of this and how they just make this seem almost a man versus woman issue. I mean as a woman, I find it incredibly offensive because it's telling me that to be strong to be empowered I have to kill my offspring I have to commit an act of aggression and violence against my own flesh and blood, and it's some. It's that women. It's at women back it set us back Charlie? We are not happier by killing our family members. You know we are not more empowered by rejecting our family and our. Own, our own children, and you look at the the grief I mean I I have been privileged to talk to now probably over the years hundreds upon hundreds of women who have been who have had abortions in their path and and they're still looking at me with tears in their eyes because that when when that kind of moment of truth hits them, I mean there's a moment of relief. A lot of women do feel relief after having. An abortion because okay I'm out of the immediate immediate experience of pregnancy. What am I going to do being a mom many don't feel ready to be mom but then it starts to hit them as time goes by and there's all these co-occuring disorders they might have in a mood..

Lila Congress Charlie
"lila" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"That understands that we can actually self. A high stress situation to create adaptive processes. It's how you got good at doing standup comedy, right? Wow, that's crazy. You know it's like Rama bonding or like. When you're in a intense situation like. You're in it with you become friends with him and the. Taking the first time you went up on stage. How good were you? Horrible Horrible and how an how long did that take till? You were really good at it. I never got good at it. Well, you're you're good I've seen. You Stand Joe. Like Look look look in like I talk in front of crowds right and Lila talking in front of ten people was very different than talking in front of thousands of people, right like a very big difference but that's all my head. So the better I can control that in. So check this out. We have a way of controlling that that we're not really aware of some people are but not everybody in our breathing is a direct connection to taking control of our auto. Dates and so if I'm in a high stress situation. If I choose to engage breathing in a specific way. I can actually bu calm myself down and bring more para sympathetic tone into it so that I'm actually more aware of what's going on. Think of a high stress situation like our current situation with you know like what's going on the political scene and everything is like like the cops think of a cop controlling his breathing versus just not controlling his breathing and not being aware of it. I, actually teach this with cops and with operators, Special Forces folks, and the you know even jock tres in high high stress situations,.

Lila
Suspect in killing of right-wing protester fatally shot during arrest

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Suspect in killing of right-wing protester fatally shot during arrest

"The man wanted for killing a counter demonstrator in Portland, Oregon, has admitted in an interview that he did it, but claims it was self defense. Now he's dead here. CBS's Lila Luciano, the main suspect in the shooting death of a right wing protester in Portland last weekend was killed his law enforcement tried to arrest him Thursday, Portland demonstrators expressed even more frustration in mistrust of law enforcement and say this will intensify Other calls for justice over the weekend. We say the man was armed when they tried to take him into

Portland Lila Luciano Oregon CBS
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | Last month

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:13 min | Last month

Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

"Christi Man it's good to have you back. I know I think you have a story about you. You are Carlos now right aren't you writing like a kick bike around and you're getting a hamstring workout what's going on with that? Yeah. So we have three cars which in most families is plenty But my daughter has taken a car up to Minnesota and she usually works during the day. She's GonNa go to Iowa the. Sun's. Going to be a junior but he said his license since December and he has volleyball every day. And then tournament sound the weekend, which I don't know is legal or not these this day and age. But basically, I'm a fifty one year old person that doesn't have a car I have a licensed but most my days and evenings I am Carlos. So. A couple of years ago more than a couple years ago I saw Franz Basch was playing around with the kick bike and John Prior. told me about it so. I've become the kick bike master of Chicago I am the. Middle aged guys zooming around on a red kicked bike. My record so far is fourteen miles. which. Is Pretty good on a kick bike I did it in forty minutes but I. Go Grocery shopping go pick up Britos things like that. Throw in my backpack and I kicked bike around the western suburbs of Chicago, which it may look easy. But kick biking is much harder than riding a bicycle It's your one leg is peddling through. So there's a ton of hamstring involved in the other leg. It's like in this isometric squad before. So. He can get low enough to get your foot on the ground. So. That's been my summer so far kicked. biking around trying to get food or go get whatever I need. I. It's awkward like I go to the wine shop, which isn't too far away but we're a backpack in my backpack I got a bottle of wine in a Burrito like. This is Kinda messed up. Usually, it's like a fourteen year old something like that but it's not often you see a fifty one year old how ask you do you? Do you take that thing through timing gates? How fast is that thing go all well, I have these hotshots because sometimes I just go out for the exercise and there's all these trails nearby and you got these hotshot bikers with all their gear on. And I always like to wear street clothes just to make them feel bad and zoomed by the bikers. So I guess I can go fourteen sixteen miles an hour when I get it moving. That's that's not too bad for non motorized. Yeah. But that's a that's a that's a short burst hold that for awhile. You tired really fast. Yeah I was just GonNa say this is a good segue innocent things that you've been some recent sprint ideas and human locomotion ideas but like the spiralling nature things, right like you got one leg, that's has one job and the other leg has the other job and I know you've been talking about the Lila Somme symmetrical stop there said you feel do you feel like you get a little like spiraling action or how long do you go on one leg before you switch to the other see don't like start running circles or do you care does it Usually I do just because I get bored I counted ten so I do ten pedals But then sometimes I go let's see how many I can do on this leg before my. My metric leg, the leg that's on the machine or bike completely is burning and then I'll switch so. Something like that, and I'm usually listening to a podcast. So I'm doing that too. So I'm. To me, there's nothing worse than doing aerobic work I. Think it's just mind numbing. So between going fast and kick by listening to a podcast and. Worrying about crashing in which legs burning word that usually is enough to keep my mind off the fact that I'm kicked biking and it does get to pissed at my children for taking all the cars and using the a kick bite. I think life is interesting. We don't have a car you know. It definitely I feel like there's always something to be learned I I I was Gonna say I will say as I've gotten older too I. I definitely appreciate having a good aerobic system but finding creative ways to do it not just running and in one direction and all that type of thing. So I did your bear crawl push saying this morning. Nice and that's hard it. Oh Yeah. No, it's super hard. It gets it gets tough like it's it gets logarithmic. You know like one, two, three, four whatever. But then he's getting five, six seven I need to come up with a way to make that more like 'cause everyone's GonNa get stuck at like eight you know or you can just rest the really longtime. Yeah. It I thought it would be easier than it actually was. Yeah, for me. I would do if it was me and someone else doing push ups and it was like you could either do two competitions. One would be just how many push ups can you do in two? Let's do that crawl thing. I would do way at the crawl thing because I get to rest and I'm way better read and it gives me a chance to like the take a break and I've rule more aerobic and all that the last stick. So I I think I, just kind of a cheater way for me to make it look like I'm a little stronger, my body or something I don't know. I feel like it's got I was thinking. It's like you do get the gait cycle in between every bilateral. So I agree I felt that same thing I you know I think the crawling huge is everyone's lack down. And we're lucky because we have gym center basements but still you start cranking off pushups just for something to do and. You can it gets a little numbing after a while and you can feel the impact that? Are Great. I crank off one hundred fifty push-ups but I'm not walking as well in my shoulder kinda hurts now. What am I really doing here is it really important to do that many push ups or is it more important that I feel pretty good after I do the exercise? Yeah. I was doing one of the last traditional strength programs I down for a while and ever since all the lockdown stuff and the weight rooms have been a little more sparse. I didn't have a barbell for quite a while, but one of the last programs that I was doing was just easy strength just two sets of five everyday basically three sets of three and I was Barbell benching every day and I haven't Jack, yeah I'm getting older but I haven't I haven't jacked my shoulder up that bad in a long time like my left shoulder was dying after awhile and every time I do those crawls like it's just like it's all good. You know you just a way to mitigate the same stress and you're back in your shoulder blades being pinned. You know, of course too

Chicago Carlos Biking Franz Basch Iowa SUN Minnesota Lila Somme I. Go Grocery Jack John Prior.
Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger Announce Baby's Birth

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:12 sec | Last month

Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger Announce Baby's Birth

"Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger say they're beyond thrilled and extremely blessed after she gave birth to their first child together. The Avengers actor and the Children's book author announced the birth of Daughter Lila. Maria Schwarzenegger. Pratt in a joint post on

Katherine Schwarzenegger Chris Pratt Maria Schwarzenegger
Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:24 sec | Last month

Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

"Like Stevens, native Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger's say they're beyond thrilled and extremely blessed after she gave birth to their first child together. The Avengers actor and the Children's book author announced the birth of Daughter Lila Maria Schwarzenegger Pratt in a joint post on their instagram accounts. Yesterday, the 41 year old Pratt has a seven year old son with his first wife, actress on a Ferris who went to U Dub. The baby is the granddaughter of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver

Daughter Lila Maria Schwarzene Katherine Schwarzenegger Arnold Schwarzenegger Chris Pratt Maria Shriver Ferris Stevens Instagram
Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

Jim Bohannon

00:19 sec | Last month

Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

"Earl Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver have a new grand daughter. Their daughter, Catherine and her husband, Chris Pratt, say they're beyond thrilled after she gave birth to their first child in an Instagram post, they announced the birth of daughter Lila Maria Schwarznegger. It's the second child for Pratt, who has a seven year old son with his first wife, Anna

Chris Pratt Maria Shriver Lila Maria Schwarznegger Earl Schwarzenegger Catherine Anna Instagram
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | Last month

beirut explosion latest news

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. But of course, everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, thousand people in Beirut homeless, five, thousand injured hundreds still missing, and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. The. Lebanese. breath volunteers, obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. Groups coming in different countries, sending their own firefighters medical support in, and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

West Beirut Lebanon Government Beirut Leyla Lebanese Government New Buildings Canary Wharf Lila Milana Timothy Mcveigh Oklahoma City London Prime Minister's Office Baabda Palace Beirutis Allen France Milana Allen Nash. Gymnasium Ohio Asha
I Love Micheladas with Fernando Lopez

Spanish Aquí Presents

05:16 min | 4 months ago

I Love Micheladas with Fernando Lopez

"Give it up really quick for number from I love. Bringing the cousins in the cousins customer. It is. We. Bring everybody through the door. Yeah, I'M GONNA. Be Your mood lighting and your looks great. Hey, do I gotta respect? Respect the show here. I got to bring it up. Got The lighting game down. Lady feels more like yeah like that. This is. The. Living Room Vibes. Have Been Tanning. We were talking about tanning earlier, have you? So actually. Having gone to the manufacturing warehouse daily so I'm like in the car in and out against some vitamin. Yeah like my. My initial point was just so dark that like Turner. Takes, me a while to get to get down because we mortgage. Berg, we just mortgage broker every single Sunday. Out in the sun, setting up the tens and bringing it down, so yeah. So I I really want to just start the you know I guess the podcast in itself with like asking you. You know you have limited Lila's and. Yes, you have your ears in air. Water? But all. Can you tell us how you got started? What was the inspiration for having this like? Michaela. Yeah, it's cool, you know. This was originally the customers. We have a restaurant elegance I'm pretty sure my sister talked about that and we're at the restaurant. It was right after the recession. We're just to figure out how to grind kind of like right now, right? Where like what do we do? What a what do we do and customer walks in? And he asks if he can buyer mich Le Mix from the bar. And the bartender is like. Can we sell to them? And we're like yeah, sure and we empty that Tequila. Bottle filled up the guys like how much and we're like twenty five dollars, I don't know. Because when you multiply it out. To get them each other it costs. Fifties multiplied out and made sense you prorated. Yeah, and then, and then we thought about the guy was like for sure he'll. He took, too so we're like this guy willing to pay. One. More you! It's like if he wants to buy. Maybe there's other people want to buy it. And this is before the cubs before anything there was like no Mitchell out there and like we thought were the one of the only restaurants in La us, but we're like slanging them. And eventually that grew and we started branding it. We're just because of the restaurant. We were slow to market, so we weren't the first ones out there. But we were taking it to all the food. Events with the Premiere of the Mitch Mobile Actually was at the L. Food Festival, and the idea came from being a food festival. People are asking us what we're GONNA. Do and I was like I'll do a mobile mentioned other truck. It was like during the height of the truck. Chris, so that was just like. The idea stuck and I just did it, so we just. Go. Ahead! They didn't go away. It's hard to do the. Them each ladder truck. We have a little model here. That's what it looks like it. Again of Vincent Volkswagen? Van Right. Then it's got a like a TV and speakers and a deejay booth inside the taps stuff from. Are you. Going though on. The model the gift, but yeah we, we have the real one and the Real William Take it every weekend. We rented out and and in all of this happened, so we'll see what happens with A. Working model though this little woman. And I'M GONNA, open a model. Now I know man, don't tell me how much different. Colors. Might make them. Suffer number for those of us who are on an uninitiated with Mitchell others. Could you explain what they are? Each Other. In its very core brought down to us essence, altered beer, beer cocktail, and the the the most purest form should either. It's beer, lime and salted rim. But we were from Oaxaca so armee are are a little more complex like like everything in Oaxaca and. And Mitch Mitchell others, or it's a weird thing because you different than depending on where you are in Mexico or even La. They make it differently they'll. They'll do something different so even even in Oaxaca well. We make kind of like a mutual alibi now. Other places they call it a mutual. Other places they. Yeah, they call me WanNa win. A lot of garlic or was it wasn't. I got. Attitude a lot of. It. Along Bald, yes, bold strong. Is, this beautiful? Virgin Mary's are like the version of that right. That would be the closest cousin. Similar Bloody Mary No. It's similar, but the thing is. Beer. Oblivious has tomato juice. Tomato juice blanding agent so like tomato twenty and just kind of softens it up. So like I mean she has line base so lime base. You can tomato and make it more of a bloody. That are very. They're very late and that would, and that's the thing with culture by culture is weird and fluid especially here in La, so the on restaurant you walk into. They'll make early.

Mitch Mitchell Oaxaca LA Cubs Turner Mary Been Tanning Van Right L. Food Festival Lila Michaela Berg Vincent Volkswagen A. Working Mexico Chris
The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

The 3:59

14:47 min | 5 months ago

The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

"Deep fakes. Those digital manipulated videos. That look scary. Real pose a threat to the upcoming presidential election. Real danger will surprise you. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge me reporter John Salesman. Thanks for joining me Joan. Yeah it's great to be back on the daily charge so we've all heard of deep fix but you don't think there's actually a real risk in say candid footage of Joe Biden. Donald trump actually saying something crazy and swing voters. What's real danger deep fix with this election? The Deepak experts that I talk to yes. They said that they're not most worried about a candidate depict like that like something where Donald Trump or Joe Biden is admitting to a hot button. Crime or saying something really inflammatory with. They're more concerned about are two things. One is known as the Liars Dividend. And that's this concept that as more people know that the fakes exists that there can be these completely false highly realistic out there. It gives people who are caught in the act and are guilty more credibility when they deny something when they denial legit video by saying. Oh you heard deep fix. You can't trust what you see anymore. And that just muddies the waters and makes it harder for people to understand and trust what is truth. And what is fiction? Yeah that's that sounds very dangerous because that's like it damages the credibility of basically everything right. Because if you could point to this one thing is oh see this fake. It applies to everything essentially right. Yeah it makes it harder. You know we. Our brains have been wired for so long to believe what we see. And we've learned to you. Know as Photoshop came along and as other sorts of media manipulation have come a long. We've been able to catch up and at least be more skeptical of those but because video is tricking your eyes and your ears because the AI that powers depicts is so sophisticated and so good and making things look real. That's really really deep wiring in your brain telling you all these signals like trust this. Trust this trust this and so when people start saying. Hey you can't trust that anymore. It just means that it's harder for anyone to understand what's even real and speaking of the AI aspect of things you have a nice breakdown of how deep fix work like how how are these videos created defects are created by a kind of artificial intelligence called Ganz that's short for generative adversarial networks and the the the basic way that they work is they have to neural networks. Networks are a kind of learning. That's based on how the kind of inspired by how the brain works so imagine that these two neural networks are actually an artist and an art critic and they're locked in rooms right next to each other. The artist creates a painting trying to make something that looks like a masterpiece. And he shuffles that painting into a stack of other paintings that actually are works by the go or we're in war or whatever they take that stack moving into art critics room and art critic picks out which ones he thinks are a forgeries. The ones that aren't the real masterpieces. That feedback goes back to the artists and the artists gets better and better and better at figuring out how to make a really convincing fake masterpiece up to the point where he's able to he or she is able to. This artificial neural network is able to make something that can trick the critic into thinking that what is fake is actually real. That's how these sort of artificial intelligence systems work. So I mean that sounds complicated by no love this kind of working superfast background but how easy is it for someone to actually make a deep? Do It depends what kind of deep lake we're talking about. You know there are open source tools to make the kind of celebrity face swaps the Elon. Musk sauna babies had sort of thing. They're open source tool sick at that. They're not as easy. Those aren't as easy to make us like a meam or an animated Gif. You need to have technological savvy Know How to get. You need to have a pretty powerful computer you need. Large data sets unique things. That are more difficult than like making taking a photo putting some white text on it of course so those are berry accessible with are kind of acceptable. But what we're talking about here talking about election defects now. These are the kind of things all the experts that I talked to say. You know we have a lower hurdle to suspend disbelief when we're looking at Elon. Musk space on a baby. But when you're presented with a video of a candidate for president or the president of the United States we have a luckily human beings. Have they kind of set a higher bar that you have to clear to actually believe that it's true so what that means is kind of very sophisticated high end e fix that would threaten on election? Those are really reserved for people that work at universities or research centres powerful computers or state actors that have that kind of computing power like China at their disposal. So the idea here. That Kennedy fakes are less of a risk. Like what are some of the defects? We should be worried about what people are more worried about aren't necessarily these candidates it's more an a deep lake that attacks your faith in the election rather than your trust in a candidate so instead of having what are the reasons is at the state in our political discourse where we're very divided. I think everyone agrees that we're divided and our our opinions seem more entrenched than they had before and so in that environment it's harder to convince or sway voters either way with a fake video. You know like if you were to make a video of Donald Trump's hair flying off or something like it will only solidify your beliefs if you liked on trump you'll be like that's a fake. I like Donald Trump. Even more. If you don't like him you'll be like he looks Tom. I dislike them even more. And so a more cunning way to use a deep fake to disrupt the US election would be to create a deep fake of say like an authoritative news anchor or a governor or authority. Figure who not as many people know saying things like. We're in the age of Kobe. Nineteen we have marsh. It's two days before election martial law. You cannot go to your polling place or to create like news. Anchors saying there There are you know there are some sort of you. Know armed militants some sort of supremacists or militants. That are arming themselves. Going to polling places in a specific neighborhood these kind of people need to be scared about showing up to vote and in that way you can suppress votes and you can also after the vote undermine people's faith in the result if you have an authoritative figure saying something about how we have footage of vote-switching from trump to Biden That could so this sort of distrust not only in going to the election but after the election in the results themselves. That's an interesting point because it's it's not necessarily like a defect that would make Joe Biden. Say something like I killed the spurs like this is these are actually kind of believable is right. I think that's your point like this is a lot more coming. It's lot a lot more nuance but I think. That's what makes the lila easier to swallow the fact that it is all what you're saying. It's pretty plausible sounded. Yeah and the other thing to keep in mind. Is that a candidate. Deep fake would. It's kind of like this Yin and Yang. Were like the the head of the snake is eating the tail like a candidate. D. Fake would only be successful if it basically goes viral and lots of people see it right but when it goes viral. One thing that the. Us has say what you will about the US press core. We have a robust free Press we have a robust free press entrenched in our country other countries where there are dictatorships or more emerging democracies. They don't have that quite at their disposal as much as we do. So if a candidate of the president or Joe Biden were to come out. We do have the capacity here built into our democracy to have a force of people trying quickly as possible. To debunk it. Whereas if you were somebody that wanted to make a deep fake that could actually just robbed or suppress boats. It would be more successful if it doesn't go viral if it's not something that draws the attention of an entire press corps. That's entirely focused on this on this election. And so and that way could also kind of be the most successful not going viral kind of existing on the radar enough to disrupt people in say one or two counties that are really important in a swing states. And that wouldn't draw the attention of a national press corps debunk it well defects captial of tension and headlines is really just sort of one way to manipulate the Info right like this. We're looking at it a little bit too narrow. If we're just focusing on defects is that is that the case. Yeah you know. It's it makes sense that people would be scared of depicts because you know as we talked about earlier it. It undermines the species assumption. That if I see it I can believe it. And so that's why. There's a lot of fear around deep fakes and what they could pinch the harm that could potentially cause but the reality is you know because of some of these things we talked before about. How really sophisticated deep picks are still inaccessible to a wide right of people? That's not true for like you said memes for slowing down video like the Pelosi sounding drunk video that went viral. Those are kinds of media manipulations. Sometimes people refer to them as shallow fakes or cheap. Fix that have the power of being cheap easy and still incredibly effective. And so. That's why you know. One of the Edward Snowden slayer. Aclu lawyer this comparison. He said that you know looking at election information manipulation by only looking at depict looking at it through a straw. You're just not seeing. You're seeing something really scary. But you're not seeing the much. Bigger picture of how things could be disrupted in twenty twenty oxygen. Russia played a big role in. You know clouding the two thousand sixteen elections with misinformation disinformation. And you know you talked about how it takes a lot of resources for these fakes to be effective. Obviously Russia's a country with a lot of resources like should we should we be worried about Russia antiques. Well so I talked to one expert on the national security locations of depicts his. Name's Clint Watts. He testified to Congress. He testified to senators about just the sort of thing and he says you know anything's possible but Russia and their disinformation tactics. They are more skilled at the art of this information than they are at the science of deep fakery so they although anything's possible. Russia has lots of oil money could always who knows what Russia could do. But he's more interested in the potential in China or other places China in particular as a place. Where China has you know. They have supercomputers I think Stephen Shanklin expert on nonstop. He always has that but I think they have. More supercomputers than we have in the US or whatever compute they've got lots of supercomputers which is important for making the takes no for sure beyond supercomputers they've invested heavily artificial intelligence. The one leads in the world in a appear that neural network. That's that stuff is a recipe for a lot of potential problems. Down the line. Yeah in China they have completely synthetic television personalities like deep fake news anchors so that a very authoritative anchor can report on something without actually take time out of his day to report on it The fact that a country like that if if they wanted to do that then they could They are the ones that are in the best position to create a deep fake That would disrupt global geopolitics. But you know. State actors could create other kinds of deep fakes. That could cause other kinds of problems. Those are in the world so you know it's just doomsday scenario. No matter how you look at it well that's that's glorious and very positive Just lastly I mean I think we can all figure out that Elon. Musk is not really a baby. But are there giving advice for for like how despotic fake. Or or just a you know how to be a little bit more vigilant when looking at some of the content that surfaces around the web. Yeah so I asked everyone. I talk to you all the extra Saturday. I asked this question. And there's no silver bullet like little loophole that you can find for understanding it's fake For debunking it on your own. If it's a real deep fake than your eyes won't save you like watching it. You won't be able to tell that it's like that's the whole point of a defense that it's an AI. Created where the power of this artificial intelligence outstrips like. Our brains are very attuned human faces. But they're not so fast that they can keep up with how well deep fake technology can progress. And so you know. We don't have computers in our brains that are as powerful as supercomputers at research universities So the advice for normal people that are like hey how do I even know of this fake? It really comes down to like basic hygiene about what you're exposed to if you see a video and it seems like it's so outlandish that it couldn't be true than might not be and if you see a video that is clearly something trying to appeal to some person some segments inflammatory instincts. That's also reason to be skeptical defects just mean. Everyone needs to do what we should be doing with other kinds of manipulated media slowdown. And think before you share. It's hard to do and it's even harder when we're talking about deep ix but it's just as important to act that way what you're presented with a really realistic video as you would be if you presented with a mean or like a cheap slowed down video of a drunk. Nancy Pelosi Right. Yeah well. That's good advice in general whether it's an article or D do a little bit of Homework. Thinks through what you're actually looking at

Joe Biden Donald Trump United States China Russia Elon Nancy Pelosi President Trump D. Fake Roger Chang Liars Dividend Joan Tricking Photoshop John Salesman Reporter
Beauty Deals to Celebrate Women's History Month

Fat Mascara

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Beauty Deals to Celebrate Women's History Month

"Women's Day just passed and now it's women's history month which I actually didn't know is the thing but beauty brooks. I'm horrible okay. So the beauty companies no. It's a thing because there's a couple of good deals going on. I wanted to tell you guys about okay. This is cool only is doing these. Like trio of Nail polishes ten percent of sales are going to downtown women center which is an L. A. Organization provides housing and Services to overcome homelessness and Addiction. And then another one. I noticed as Lila Be. Do you know that brand I do? Yes gotTA love their compacts? They're like little pebbles of their beautiful of beauty so all month they are donating fifteen percent of all their lip and cheek duos to project glimmer an organization that empowers at risk teenage girls and women. So happy me. Happy International Women's month no happy women's history women's history month. Thank you what would I do without

Lila L. A. Organization
"lila" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:21 min | 7 months ago

"lila" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"I love it very well done you guys very very well done Lila is with us in Los Angeles hi Lyle how are you sh I Mister Ramsay such an honor to talk to you for you too how can I help okay so I just finished reading that number one twenty nine years old I've been married for a year my husband and now we're on baby that number two we have seventy thousand dollars in debt that is forty five thousand dollars as student loans to bachelor's master's and ten thousand ten thousand dollars for car and then I think two thousand for medical bills the down seventy thousand but my car is dying slowly but surely leave me on the side of the road half the time so I am in a pickle where I don't know if I need to stop the baby step number two and they are all used car or if I could just push through and later on by a car not really sure what to DO what's your household income I forty seven thousand dollars and he makes thirty eight and we live in southern California in a tiny studio apartment with a thousand dollars a month which is unheard of in my area hello no okay very well done right hi so how many times exactly have you been on the side of the road all this year February probably twice probably three times last year four times in the whole year last year and already twice yeah I got about forty thousand miles left on that car according to my very honest mechanic yeah so what is happening to the car that is leaving on the side of the road all of fourteen year old cars my first car I got a one out of the nineteen sixty corvette that does not leave me on the side of the road okay what is happening to the car other than age this leaving you also read what's the type of break down you half everything from light to dark do not delay transmission fluid leaking from that have to be fixed and the love that you feel the side of the road what broke a few broken down on the side of the road yeah what broke down the left you on the side of the road a tune up doesn't do that leaking trans fluid doesn't do that yeah you know it's just L. desktop they won't they won't want it won't turn on those on them that the batteries and I have to recharge the batteries sometimes it's that and it's the most random things and I keep taking it back again I just don't know if it costing you more money than then a bus pass okay yeah I probably would save a couple thousand dollars and put with this car and buy a different car don't show this car and put a couple thousand dollars with it and.

Lila Los
Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

Long Distance

09:16 min | 8 months ago

Larry Itliong and the Great Delano Grape Strike

"Year is nineteen sixty five. The Vietnam War is escalating. I have today ordered. Tha Nam the Air Mobile Division and certain other footage which will raise our fighting strength from seventy five thousand one hundred and twenty five thousand men almost immediately X. is assassinated Jeff Van. The gunfire went off and his hand was up. I remember turned around and the next thing I saw smell come falling back in the jet. Martin Luther King Junior leads a series of civil rights marches in Selma Alabama. They I want to say to the state of Alabama. Just want to say to the people as a matter of and the nations of the world that we are not about turnaround. We own the move. Now yes we on the move and Norway racism the Bannon and in California farmworkers faced with racial discrimination and economic hardship organizing for their rights as workers. And as okay so quick recap on the history of farm workers on the West Coast and specifically California. Immigrants had been exploited as cheap farm labor for years. I Chinese Japanese migrants then Filipino. Nationals arrived in the nineteen twenties. Mexicans became a large part of the farm labor force around time but also just poor folks of all backgrounds looking for work. Black White Brown were exploited. They lived in shabby wooden houses near the fields. They worked for hours under the Sun. Some even lived in former concentration camps which house Japanese Americans during their internment in World War. Two since they first started coming over in the nineteen twenties Filipino. Farmworkers had tried negotiating for better working conditions and wages with their bosses. Usually white guys called growers beheld. Strikes started organizations and unions. They were often met with violence. Or they'd lose their jobs. Gore's were higher other ethnic groups. Instead scabs to their strikes like the immigrants who came before them Filipinos were thought of as hard workers who were obedient easy to control but they were also militant having lived through years of race. Riots shootouts violent. Confrontations with police growers SCABS. It wasn't uncommon for Filipinos to draw knives on the picket line. Larry it Leon came up in this old school. Militant tradition of striking labor organizing and by the nineteen sixties. He was a leader of a union that represented farmworkers call the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee. A Walk which was supported by a larger union the AFL CIO. Larry worked the likes of Mexican American activists. Dolores Huerta and Filipino. American organizers Philip Aracruz. Who called Larry the most powerful Filipino leader in a walk? He had the most experience. I mean he'd been in a lot of strikes you know and he was the head of a walk at the time this. Miriam Powell a journalist and historian who spent almost a decade writing books and articles about another famous Labor leader Cesar Chavez and the United Farm Workers which we'll get to in a bit in terms of the nuts and bolts like being a Labor leader running a union. Larry was the guy absolutely. That's where story picks back up as a union organizer and leader one of Larry's jobs is to visit farms in the Central Valley to recruit. New members moves his family to Delano. Where he the mostly Filipino. Workers in May nineteen sixty five opportunity knocks in nearby. Coachella valley where there are also Filipino. Workers who need help. Here's Patrick again. As older Larry. Here's some workers did a dollar forty in our Filipinos are getting a dollar twenty five an hour. Now that don't make sense to me. It's time to strike okay so to strike meant. The workers would stop working until their employers. The growers listen to the demands but striking farmworkers wasn't going to be easy they were going against big agricultural business agribusiness. The man agribusiness was the most powerful industry in California at that time. Million Powell again arm workers were really the poorest people who also had no protection all of this sort of existing health safety and labor laws that applied to other professions. Do not apply to farm workers could be fired at will. They be made to work any kinds of hours or no restrictions no health or safety requirements so for them to take on this enormously powerful industry a was a huge talent when the farmworkers decide to go on strike in the Coachella Valley. They don't go to the fields to work. Instead we pick it in demand for better wages. They held up signs march. Saying chant confront the growers. They don't get paid and some workers are even arrested. But in ten days the growers give in the workers get their fifteen cent raise. Let's pick these grapes. After the harvest Larry in the farmer workers head north to the next job the grape fields of Delano. Where they hope to get the same rates but the growers refused to give the farmworkers meeting a community. Space might remember called Filipino Hall. Let's do this. Delano has a thriving Filipino community with lots of farm workers and members of eight walk so they actually establish a Filipino Hall. And at this meeting it is packed. It's mostly Filipinos but there are also some members who aren't the Black Puerto Rican Mexican even white their backgrounds different. But they all have one thing in common. You've suffered enough under the growers and they want real change now. Really neither raised by public actress on this anymore. We are getting any younger. We need better wages and union today. Dude these courses suck breezing my us of here. Larry and the other union leaders here the farm workers but understandably they have concerns if we strike. You might lose your house. You might lose your car. Your family might be on the streets. Hungary. It's going to be tough. Are you sure you want this farm? Workers decide to vote on whether or not they should go on strike back. My name is John Arlington born and raised here in Delano in present day Filipino Hall. I talked to John Arlington. Whose Father Mariano Lila Farmington also known as Bob was a Filipino immigrant and Delano farmworker. He was in Filipino Hall. That Fateful Day my dad and our family were part of a long agriculture workers organizing committee and with Larry. And Leon Philip the Veracruz People Osco and so many others were here in this hall. I'm talking to you now. In September seventh nineteen sixty five where we had a day long second meeting about the strike. And when Larry asked if anyone could make a motion regarding strike my father stood and made the motion to begin the great strike that started in Delano. Bob's made the motion to go on. Strike those in favor of the strike. Stand up and raise your hands high. Okay so what the heck everyone standing up. We're going on a strike you crazy. Bill Pinos Next Day September eighth nineteen sixty five the farmworkers show up at the grape vineyards ready for work according to the documentary Delano Manos by Marissa. Arroyo just like any other day at work. The farmer workers started picking Ripe Grapes on the vines. Then they'd set them down on the ground they move onto the next Bein. Fake Red Grapes. Set them down. Here's a clip from the film with organizer United Farmworkers Vice President. Pete Velasco we pick the ripe grapes and trim it and then move onto the next by under the same thing at moon. Our there are a lot of big grapes under that is when about the thousand five hundred. Pretty Pianos went on strike against the grape growers in

Larry Delano Filipino Hall Agricultural Workers Organizin California Coachella Valley Miriam Powell Alabama Delano Manos Leon Philip Martin Luther King Norway Dolores Huerta Air Mobile Division West Coast Selma Alabama Jeff Van AFL
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's decision to step back

WBBM Evening News

04:20 min | 9 months ago

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's decision to step back

"News in the UK the queen has announced that prince Harry and Meghan will no longer use the royal titles and will no longer receive public funds for carrying out royal duties the suffixes will no longer represent the queen as working members of the royal family including official military appointments for prince Harry the arrangement is expected to go into effect in the spring now it all comes after the couple said earlier this month that they want to just step back his senior Royals in a statement the queen said quote following many months of conversations and more recent discussions I am pleased that together we have found a constructive and supportive way forward for my grandson and his family Harry Meghan and Archie will always be much loved members of my family the announcement from Buckingham Palace follows more than a week of intense private talks aimed at managing the fallout of the couple shock decision to give up front line royal duties let's take a look at what this all means with author and Royals expert Diane click hain Harry Meghan lost their HRH title and that is his or her Royal Highness so that's a a title that goes along with the other title of you can get your topic it appears they will still be the Duke and Duchess of Suffolk spot it's the H. hurry that designation that can be taken away by the queen as she did princess Diana lost her HRH designation after her divorce from Charles so this is something that I expected to have happened because they can't get rid of the suffix title because that's their brand which I think they're still they're extremely fortunate that they are allowed to do that but that the HRH title really doesn't need much outside of the U. K. and Diane how significant is this the monumental event with in the confines of the royal family there's never been a royal that has effectively quit the firm I mean when we talk about Edward and Lila since then he abdicated the throne completely different this is effectively a divorce from your own family so it's very significant and it also I think is a huge PR blow for the queen and the royal answered it exposes them to a lot of other questions because I think this would happen people have raised the subject you know do we really want to pay for these people what are what are they doing so this is it this is a big PR issue on the heels of a not so great twenty nineteen day and the tone and the mood of the statement from Buckingham Palace was personal and very warm I'd talk to us about that well I think the queen had to think she had to accomplish with this whole episode which is she had to figure out a way to effectively use them out of royal life and deal with the financial aspect but she also very much wants to keep the family together my sources have told me they were greatly concerned about Harry Osho welfare and life is long and we don't know how this is going to end up so they want to keep the door open and make sure that Harry still felt part of the family and as far as balding Meghan and Archie into the statement that makes perfect sense she is his wife he is her child he is of the queen's great grand child I think they really want to stress that they wanted to be part of the family if they can't be part of the firm is a big difference between the two of okay big question how will the two of them make money Meghan are poised to become one of the biggest lifestyle brands in the world this agreement now frees them up to pursue whatever kind of endorsement or media deals that they are interested in pursuing and I expect those to start rolling in and if not have already started she has this thing she doing with Disney I think they're going to model themselves after the sort of post presidential Obama life will see books will see documentaries we'll see all kinds of things so financially they gained a lot more than they lost final thoughts I think this ordinary I think that they are going to be up probably the biggest leverage the world for a really long time and I think it's going to be a pretty bumpy twenty twenty and Harry thinks that he's going to get less attention now I I fear he very much mistaken author and Royals expert Diane click hand Aymeric simply today CBS

UK Prince Harry Meghan
Fun Facts About Christmas Carols

Classics for Kids

04:09 min | 9 months ago

Fun Facts About Christmas Carols

"Not all pieces. That use Christmas Ms Carols were meant to be played at Christmas time when he composed music for a play called Lila's the woman from ro a city in France. George borrowed an old French Christmas. Carol called the March of the three kings the three kings feature in another piece that uses a Christmas Carol Auto Reno you know risky composed a musical description of three paintings by Italian renaissance artist. Sandro Botticelli one of those paintings is the adoration of the Maj I in addition to the Gye the three kings. The painting shows a huge crowd gathered to admire the baby. Jesus to set the scene recipe gay quotes the old church chant. Benny Benny Emanuel which you know as the Carroll O.. Come oh come Emmanuel The Germans have a Christmas Carol Lullaby in which Mary Sings. Joseph Dearest Joseph Mine asking for help rocking rocking the baby. Jesus to sleep. Yohannes Brahms used a bit of that Carol. To open a song he wrote in honor of another baby the son of his good friend. Joseph or four Yosef in German Yawkey Brahms like the inside joke the to Joseph's and he liked the wonderful tune which he gave to the viola walk Otto Nicolai put the Carol from human known in English as from heaven above to Earth High Com into his Christmas overture and Johann. Sebastian Bach used that Carol in a set of organ variations. There's also a Christmas carol with music by Ahah classical composer. Even though that's not what he originally intended for Felix Mendelssohn wrote a Song Celebrating Yohannes Gutenberg. The man who invented invented the movable type printing press but Mendelssohn didn't like the words to the song which were by somebody else so he told his publisher to find another use for his music music. He thought it might be good for weddings but not for anything. Really religious. After Mendelssohn died someone in England discovered that the music like went perfectly with a poem by Charles Wesley. The brother of John Wesley who founded methodism. Ah

Carol Joseph Dearest Joseph Mine Felix Mendelssohn Yohannes Brahms Christmas Ms Carols Benny Benny Emanuel Sandro Botticelli John Wesley Charles Wesley England Lila Carroll O George Sebastian Bach Mary Sings Otto Nicolai France Earth High Com Publisher
Restaurant business is a labour of love

UN News

08:41 min | 10 months ago

Restaurant business is a labour of love

"A woman chef a New Orleans in United States has been telling you a news how the restaurant business business and cooking in particular has been a lifelong labor of love for her Roseanne Rosta. Kerr decided she wanted to be a chef at age fourteen and ultimately opened her own restaurant nine years ago she spoke to the International Labor Organization as part of a photography project to mark the the centenary of the establishment of the UN agency. The project called dignity at work. The American experience documents the working life of people across the the United States Kevin Cassidy the director of the Eiloz Office for the. US sat down with a following a busy shift at her restaurant. Red gravy in in New Orleans. We moved here in two thousand and ten my boyfriend and I and he gave up his law practice to down here and do this with me. I always wanted a restaurant some time I was ten years old. My mom had gone back to work. It was nineteen seventy two and prior to that it. It was a one income family. My father worked. My mother was home. Become you know the seventies you wanted things. It was time for the MOMS to go to work and she did. I had an older brother who was baseball. Football paper route all that that kept him out of the house younger sister that I had to come home and watch and get dinner started which I loved doing. I didn't mind at all. I used to watch Julia Child. And the galloping gourmet everybody else's watching bugs bunny and and and the other thing that's on but I learned how to make a rue when I was ten years old and I didn't even know what I was doing. I just knew that I could make Brown gravy. Maybe better than my mother. I knew that and it got to the point where I was giving my mother. The shopping list come. I'm too young too young to go to the market to give me this. Give me this this that and the other thing and they were coming home to meals that were you know they were good. I thought I was doing well and then when I wanted to go to cooking school in high school in Bergen County. They had a vocational high school. You could go to the public high school you go to a parochial high school or you go to the vocational school which was Bergen Tech and that was where I wanted to go. I knew I wanted to do when I was fourteen years old but they said No. You can't go no job for women. So I went to a parochial high school segregated from the boys which I didn't care for at all and that was the direction that I went when it came time to go to college. I asked again. Can I go to Johnson and Wales. Can I go to the culinary institute but my mom worked at Fairleigh Dickinson University Teaneck and as a result we could go to college college. They're for free so blue collar family. It's either we're going to spend money on the middle child to go to cooking school. Follow some pipe dream or we're all gonna go to fairly Dickinson and I went fairleigh Dickinson and I was going to be an English teacher. What can I do that gets me out of an office because I knew I didn't want to be in an office and I went to school to college for a semester and a half before I dropped out I had gotten engaged young when I was about nineteen years old and once my future husband and I had decided that so we were going to get married and I said well you know what. I don't want to be an English teacher. I know I don't WanNa do that so I quit. And I went to work for newspaper doing classified ads. We got married. We had our children. This is the mid eighties and in the late eighties early nineties when it was time for me to go back to work because my kids. We're old enough that they didn't need round the clock care and we could do daycare. I got a job at a company. Called Dak- I think it was called full working at the corporate kitchen of ups so's my first job as a professional cook. I live I mean the entire resume I said I had a catering business I said I did pies for the holidays but I knew how to do it. I just had to get my foot in the door. Four and it just so happened that it was a female chef who maybe wanted to give me a chance but she hired me and then I'm like okay. I got to talk talk. I need to walk the walk and within six months I was her sous chef so I pulled it off and we kept going. We worked together for a year at that particular account and it was a brand new kitchen. Everything was shining and sparkling and worked. And everything you wanted did there was three and four and then we lost that account because as is with corporate dining they're always bringing in new clients and you lose the accountant and you go work someplace else. So we went from this beautiful corporate kitchen of the United States Postal Service ups to ramp college. And I think the kitchen was five hundred years old. The Grease was certainly five hundred years old. The mice were five hundred years old and I took one step into that kitchen and Chinese and there wasn't anything everything was broken. The officers were small smell bad she left for another thing and they gave me the account. I'm running this account a year and a half after I first walked into the kitchen and managing a one point two million dollar recount. I have no idea what I'm doing. When it comes to the numbers I had to be taught how to take an inventory and I just kept moving up that ladder? I never wanted to stay with. They hired they hired me to make Tuna Salad Chicken Salad and Egg Salad and then from eleven o'clock until three o'clock work the Deli line making sandwiches for people some weird combinations. I mean there are people who put onions and mayonnaise and Salami the on the tuna sandwich. I've eaten some weird shit. I mean I had two babies. I know what it's like to eat somewhere you know. I'm trying to smile Lila. I'm preparing you all sandwich. The whole New York in May is now. I left that for a little while. I don't know how now honest you want me to be on this thing but I did leave the cooking industry for a little while to become New York. City's most vicious dominatrix and I did that. For about out. Five years I worked out of a studio in New York on twenty four while but I didn't like the commute and I didn't like sitting around and waiting to get picked. I don't like authority. And they don't like somebody to look at me and say no. No no I want somebody else so I went into business for myself and I turned the family basement sment into a dungeon slash studio told my kids never come downstairs and this is no place for you. A- and I continue to do that until nine eleven and then all the disposable income in New York dried up nobody wanted to spend money back on frivolity. If we might be going to war at any minute and I got the older I wasn't I wasn't young like the regular Dominatrix matrixes who were like twenty eight and do anything. I was in my late thirties at this so I did that for awhile while decided okay. I can't keep doing this. I'm too old. I'm certainly not GonNa just do anything these guys ask and I also wanted a lot of money. I was getting almost hundred dollars an hour to do this so talk about the lottery. I went back to work in the kitchen for half half of what I had been making eight years earlier but I very quickly work myself going back up again because I wasn't going to stay at that same level and by the time time I left to move here I moved here in two thousand ten. The last cooking job I had was the executive chef at the New York Stock Exchange won't and I left that to go to the county college of Morris to be the director of the account because I wanted to learn the back of the house a little bit. I want to learn the office. I knew how to cook. I knew how to

New York United States New Orleans Director Fairleigh Dickinson University Bergen County International Labor Organizati UN Kevin Cassidy Julia Child Sous Chef Roseanne Rosta Kerr Eiloz Office Bergen Tech Baseball Dickinson Football
The Round Schoolhouse of Japan

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:43 min | 11 months ago

The Round Schoolhouse of Japan

"Podcast. It was requested by tyree. Hesse told me on the island of Hokkaido so herod has tyree in today's mystery. Japan's most haunted placed first a bit about Japan. Japan has made many iconic spine chilling moments in the history of the horror. Reveal John Laura yet is considered to be one of the safest places to live in the world. The United States has roughly four times more violent crimes in Japan. Gun crimes in Japan are ranked at point six per hundred residents compared to the United States. Eight point eight that said the. The United States boasts hundreds of haunting from the Pacific northwest these coast but perhaps none so chili's those across the Pacific and Japan today will visit Japan's haunted schoolhouse and Japan's largest island Kaido nestled on the shore of Lake. Mu G me which is kind of wetland Liza creepy ruins of a former schoolhouse at has a sinister reputation. As one of the most haunted places in Japan the structure was built in one thousand nine hundred six and designed in a round shape there is referred to as the round schoolhouse from nineteen forties up to nineteen seventies seventies. It was used as an elementary school than it was closed for. Unknown reasons and left to fall into ruin tablespoon desa collecting dust. They're all lined up as as if expecting students. The surrounding grounds have become a thick tangle of overgrown brush that surround the building. The playground is consumed by force growth. The only way to reach the round schoolhouse is by foot. Rumors Sprang up almost immediately after the school closed locals claim that the woods around around the school were haunted with shadowy figures received period out from behind trees several students who ventured into the woods surrounding the schoolhouse who reported missing stories surrounding the haunting. The schoolhouse soon attracted paranormal. Investigator concluded that indeed there was a dark force present for nearly thirty thirty years. People came from all over Japan to visit the school house in hope of Seen Ghost as recently as twenty twelve. Paranormal investigators have said they were chased from the woods spy. Well some claim to have been followed by creepy shadows. The schoolhouse has no history of violence Lila or tragedy and some speculate that the images that lurk in the woods the shadowy images that seem to chase people are the Oct- those used occupy. The schoolhouse are not go. said all but the product of an open door to another dimension in the United States. We have Halloween spirits rice. Shaw usually. They're very short demand candy. Still Halloween is a time of seances. A meeting of which time people attempt to make contact with the dead especially especially through an agency of a media but in Japan summer is known as a kind of ghost season. One reason for this is that summer's traditionally believed not to be when ancestors spirits. visit the land of the living during the festival of Oman and families gathered together to remember their deceased once. In fact in summer when you visit an Amusement Park in Japan you might notice that one of the more popular attractions may be the haunted houses where you can have some real l. hair raising experiences as for the round schoolhouse being a doorway to another dimension if you have a chance to travel around the beautiful island of Hokkaido. Don't don't forget to visit Lake Maya Tsim and rows schoolhouse there. Then decide

Japan United States Tyree Hokkaido Lake Maya Tsim Hesse John Laura Pacific Liza Amusement Park Investigator Oman Lila Shaw Seances Lake Thirty Thirty Years
"lila" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

09:29 min | 1 year ago

"lila" Discussed on The Frame

"Of all the ultrasound that he brings up an interesting point that even if Michael Jackson is a polarizing figure to ignore completely I know it's kind of an excellent can you tell me about the song about your collaboration with your mom well this is an amazing song I think.

Michael Jackson
"lila" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"lila" Discussed on The Frame

"The Broadcast Center at KPCC This is the frame I'm John Horn on today's show Michael Jackson has been accused of being a pedophile Mild but a Broadway musical about the singer is still moving forward then musician Leila downs explores themes migration in the United States and Mexico understandings and times hopefully bring people together I really do believe that and a veteran R. and B. Singer who transformed a sixties hippie anthem into a soulful valid all that coming up on the frame a documentary about Michael Jackson that premiered earlier this year offered telling evidence that the late singer was a pedophile in the wake of the documentary called leaving Neverland a lot of people reassess Jackson and his legacy the plan Broadway musical about Jackson was not abandoned in fact it's now got an opening date next August Greg Evans is an associate editor her and Broadway critical deadline Gregg welcome to the show thank you nice to be here so tell us the latest news about the musical it has had a somewhat rough start already what we know so far it has been in development for quite a while certainly long before the the latest accusation nations the documentary was on Hbo and so you can only imagine you know there were blindsided as everyone who had anything to do with Michael Jackson or was involved in Michael Jackson project was at that point yeah I'm going to ask you what the creative team has said the director is Christopher wheeled in the writer of the book. Lynn nodded who is a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright her plays include sweat what they said about what they're doing and how doing might have been changed by the news came out in the documentary they haven't been giving a lot of interviews which isn't isn't unusual for a musical laura any play this music was initially supposed to have a pre broadway engagement in Chicago which was cancelled and it was cancelled right around the MM time that that documentary was aired now they say that the two things had nothing to do with each other we have no reason to doubt that but there is timing so what they have told I believe it was Chicago newspaper is that the focus is on his music it's not a sort of biographical thing it's not a doesn't get into his personal life much in fact what it does it focuses on one period of his life when he is getting ready for the dangerous tour that in Nineteen ninety-two initials him in rehearsals for that even if isn't going to be a classic jukebox musical musicals based on famous musicians often do really well on Broadway I'm gonNA play a little bit from a recent and current hit James Van.

Michael Jackson Hbo Leila downs B. Singer Pulitzer Prize John Horn Greg Evans Chicago Neverland associate editor United States Gregg Mexico Christopher director writer Lynn James Van
Grover: An Algorithm for Making, and Detecting, Fake News

Linear Digressions

09:46 min | 1 year ago

Grover: An Algorithm for Making, and Detecting, Fake News

"You hear the news what news sesame street has cancelled. What no don't don't don't tell me that I'm sorry. That's that's actually fake news. That's where we're going to talk about today and it actually connects with sesame street in and an unusual way. You are listening to the New Year decorations. Actually maybe it connects sesame street in the most boring way a possible. which is the model that we're GONNA be talking about his name grover and I mean funny cide thing? Thanks so in other contexts. We've also talked about elmo which is a machine learning or the person. It's like a word and bedding thing. There's something called Bert. I think this is just having a moment right now. Such doctors yeah okay just to be very clear. Sesame Street is is not cancelled goodness. That'd be terrorist mistreat. We'll go on for centuries. I sure hope so about machine learning today. Ah Yeah so this is new algorithm. It's out of the Allen Institute for artificial intelligence which is a group based up in Seattle. That does a lot gotta work with different kinds of so this is a there. NLP group their natural language processing group and in particular as we kind of made a bad joke about early on grover is an algorithm this particular to fake news which as we all know is a problem this only becoming a bigger problem every day so the question is how do we think about it. How do we think about an approach that or the involvement but that machine learning has in making the problem worse than maybe hopefully not making it worse okay so I just before we leave. The topic of Sesame Street was was grover particularly trick story. I thought he was just cute and lovable. I think he's mostly cute and lovable. He's he's a little bit anxious as a muppet. That's his main like big should've called this Oscar or something well number one. Maybe there's some other algorithm called Oscar yeah anyway okay anyway moving on so the general general idea is that we're interested in kind of algorithm that can do two things generate fake news and discriminate between lean fake news and real news and I'm. I'm there's a lot of actually substructure those two ideas there so we should dig into it a little bit more but it sounds like you were about to say something yeah. I JUST WANNA clarify. The purpose of creating fake news is not to mislead as most fake news is created to do you. It's to I guess to interact with the model so the model has something to to compare against real news sources fake news. Is that the motivation motivation well. Yes so to think to unpack a little bit what we mean by fake news real news on this kind of stuff so number one. There's kind of two different types of news that are relevant in this treatment here so one is fake news in the sense that it is generated by I a computer and it might not have any corresponding anything in real life but it sounds like kind of a regular new story if you want to think about it that way and and second is there's the notion of computer generated what they call propaganda so that's like the fake news that's related damaging and offensive right right so there's just false stuff and then there's stuff that's may be more acerbic right so when they were thinking about training this algorithm they had two different types types of data that they traded on one was ordinary what I would call mainstream media written news articles coming from like like NBC CNN in The New York Times and these sorts of outlets and then there's also news that they or a version of the algorithm some some training of the algorithm they did on fake news came from like Breitbart an info wars and some of these places that are a little bit more famous for having let's say adhering to less rigorous journalistic listrik standards and the idea is that these are two different types of generation and discrimination that the Algorithm Might WanNa do and so so those are those are the two the two different types of fake news but then there's also of course the corresponding version of each of those Suzan Ras of journalism but actually written by humans right okay so I'm imagining one of those like two by two grits where you've got the two kinds of news in that column and maybe you have who generated it in the the rose yeah like is it mainstream news or propaganda style news is one access and then was that generated by a computer generated by Brin by human so those are sort of the parameters and so then what they do is go acquire a pretty big data set of sounds like they had to go scrape at themselves from a number of different news sources put this data set together that was going to be there training data set and and plug it into as far as I can tell the the actual structure of the algorithm itself is really similar to GP t two which we talked about for a little while ago that was that language algorithm that was yeah that was very had very interesting thing kind of generative very very interesting generative passages that it would create. I was the one that we called like the I'm using air quotes here. The model that was too dangerous crystalise because of how high quality of the fake stuff was that it could make imagine the Harry Potter Fan Fiction that produce right right and how quickly right so it's the general idea of we have sort of a two part algorithm one of which is a generator and that makes passages and then there's a discriminator that tries to tell the computer generated stuff from the real stuff oh right and these things can kind of play off of each other and both learn in grow together yeah exactly so it's the same general structure the same idea they had a few different versions of the model that had different were different sizes like how many free parameters that they have of each one of the models which has sort of how much detail are they trading it in a sense and and so then they go in and create this grover model and talk a little bit about at some of its attribute which I think are kind of interesting so what are some of those attributes so the first is that exactly what kind of news exactly how they generate the news has a an impact on how good the generation Tasca's so they actually broke the problem apart into a few different pieces and then had different versions of the model that they trained but when I break it apart into different pieces. There's several different parts of a new the story that you can imagine so. There's the main body of the news story but there's also accompanying Meta data one. Is the domain like what is this article generally about dot com toxic. Yeah yeah sorry I didn't. I thought you were going to go slower so oh yeah that's right. so what what domain is this this. Is this a new story coming from. What is the date on which it's published who are the authors of this piece? What is the headline of the peace and then the actual textual body of the piece itself and so in some cases they would pre pre generate or seed the starting conditions of the algorithm with say the domain date and authors and then have it generate a tight headline than take those four attributes domain date authors headline news that to generate the body sometimes they would use different combinations of what they were starting with and what it had to fill in but in general when they started with more contextual Tormenta data type stuff at the beginning then they would come up with textual bodies that sounded more sounded more believable to like humans men's who are evaluating these things second. I not this was I thought this was pretty interesting. So grover does not make particularly plausible sounding real news quote unquote so if Lila's sound like the sesame street character so if you're if you're reading a real news articles versus one that was generated by grover in aggregate humans are relatively successful at telling the difference between the two two but when it comes to propaganda like the you know more sensationalistic fake news grover actually generates better propaganda than humans. Do I think is really funny and interesting way yeah so there's this there was a step that was a manual the valuation step so they had three annotate errors presumably people and then on the metrics of style

Grover Oscar Seattle Bert Allen Institute Harry Potter Lila The New York Times Suzan Ras Breitbart Brin CNN GP
"lila" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"lila" Discussed on KTOK

"Away mug club from us. This is the show you built that was from Steven Crowder, and we wanted to re tweet it on Facebook not YouTube. And now the blaze has been blocked from passing anything on about Steven Crowder. Oh and one last thing. Somebody else was blocked yesterday. Lila rose now Larose runs live action. Lila rose Twitter band live action and her account from all adds democratize when we asked Twitter, why they said we could resume ads only if we deleted the following content from their Twitter and website. So their Twitter feed and their website. They would all they would have to do. Is just remove anything about abortion procedures from their website. This is an antiabortion website. It's going to be tough anything about abortion procedures anything about investigations of Planned Parenthood, and all all tra- sound images. Seventy five percent of social networks are people sharing their sound or ultrasound pictures, and now they have to do it because they want to keep the babies in the sounds alive. I'm going to share with you what all of this means and I'm gonna go to Leon wolf, who is our executive editor now of the blaze dot com. He was on the phone with Facebook yesterday. Arguing with them. And I'm going to explain what all of this means coming up, but I'm going to give you the action right now. Please, please hear this. We need your support or our voices will be silenced. We need you to join blaze TV, go to blaze, TV dot com. Use the promo code freedom of speech. It's the biggest discount. We've ever I what is it forty bucks off some like that of a year subscription, which is a hundred? There's a huge discount..

Twitter Steven Crowder Facebook Lila rose Leon wolf YouTube executive editor Larose Seventy five percent
Disney Takes Full Operational Control Of Hulu, Will Buy Out Comcast In Five Years

The Frame

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Disney Takes Full Operational Control Of Hulu, Will Buy Out Comcast In Five Years

"The annual up-front are taking place this week in New York City. It's when broadcast and cable networks gathered to unveil their fall lineups and make their pitch to advertisers today. Disney announced its plans to buy com casher of Hulu for no less than five point eight billion dollars giving Disney full control of the streaming site. Bloomberg news reporter, Lucas Shaw told me what Disney plans to do with its new acquisition all the executives who that asked. Today said it was too soon to know, you know, one divide that we know is that is neat. Plus or all of the family fund friendly has classic Disney programs so Pixar, and then also some marvel and in Star Wars who is going to be home to more of the adult show. So like, the FX network which had American horror story and people for so Jay and pose those shows are likely to live on. Hulu how exactly that's gonna work still being sorted out. Some of the other networks, you know, what's the different shows on ABC or could end up in in both places. And also dizzy has ESPN plus which is going to be sports streaming service. So Disney total will have what five streaming platforms in the next couple of years or four at least by the end of this year. It'll have the three big ones of of Disney, plus. Who and ESPN plus, and then there may be some some smaller one round the margin. But I think if you're gonna put all of its investment into those three as John Landgraf, the head of FX said this morning, there's not a whole lot of sense in being a smaller streaming service competing now that you have some of these huge companies, apple Amazon. Netflix is knee AT and T com. Asked all kind of racing toward the same place. John Landgraf also says he's letting FX now go away. And instead the streaming for FX will now go on Hulu. So it does feel like there's a massive consolidation even between the FOX and Disney and ABC assets right now. Yeah. And it's funny. You know, we used to talk about in the entertainment business. There's a lot of talk about the six meters ios, and that was mostly in reference to the movies, but it's true and TV too and that six has shifted where you still because of the consolidation. The Disney is is still a really big player. Universal is through Comcast which owns it. But you know, have the. Of the tech guys seated at that table thing that also seems to be happening is that the networks are canceling a lot of shows, and obviously that are going to be introducing new ones does it feel as if they're higher profile shows that are now being axed. The number of shows that really matter on broadcast has gone down. You know, you look at what the ratings are what the shows that people are talking about. And they're just not a lot of new broadcast hits every year. You know, when you were talking making reference to big shows getting cancelled one of the big shows that you think got cancelled with was empire, you know, just four years ago that was the big new hit on TV. You know, great news for FOX it added viewers every week season. Finale was watched by like seventeen eighteen million people and just a few years later the audience for that show is really shriveled. It's not even one of the sixty most watched shows on on TV anymore. So it seemed to make sense for FOX to have that end after six season, and then the type of show that really capitalizes and an audience every year like empire did a few years ago is few and far between you've had empire that this is compare that the number of sexy shows that have come out on streaming or on cable in recent years in broadcasts and share of pop culture, just shrinks every year dizzy. His obviously been on a spending spree and buying a lot of the assets of Twentieth Century, Fox. And now, it's Hulu deal. Are there are other networks and media companies that feel like they're a little bit behind is there one network. In other words, that has more to prove at the up front than others right now that, you know, the companies that have a lot to prove or actually the the smaller media companies that own cable network, most of the companies that own a big broadcast network CBS NBC ABC FOX are in a little stronger position because the audiences for those broadcast networks are still quite large. Whereas the audience is for a lot of these smaller cable networks the ones owned by discovery. Viacom, AMC networks aren't a little more little more of a challenge. But among the four broadcast networks NBC and CBS are far ahead of their competition. ABC announced that it is cancelling an Oscar host for next year's award show. The head of ABC said they were so pleased with with how the show went this year the ratings were up, and they announced that on the same day that they said that Jimmy Kimmel was sticking around for another three years. So it would have seemed like if you wanted to have him come back as as Oskar host. You might put that announcement together. But Franken is as you're as somebody who watches the Oscars. I thought it worked pretty well. Without a host didn't talk specifically about NBC. It's part of Comcast. And NBC universal is going to launch its own streaming service. How does it affect shows like the office, which right now is available on Netflix? But might be going away is that the right impression the fate of shows like the office and friends and some of the reruns that are quite popular on Netflix is is is up for debate right now what you have is companies like Comcast and AT and T who studios own though shows trying to decide what they want to do with them because they're coming up with their own streaming services. You certainly want to have if you're Comcast. You wanna have the office on the NBC universal streaming service. If you're eighty and he Warner media, you wanna be able to offer friends on yours, but you get paid so much money by net flicks for those reruns, and you get to expose that show to to a bunch of those. You're netflix. It's the largest audience if any streaming service, so what they may do is take an of a almost like a timeshare approach where it'll it'll exist on both. And it's not so different. You know, friends is on Netflix now, but reruns are also vailable on traditional TV on different cable networks, and so you could see media companies do that or they may choose to remove the show altogether. They haven't announced plans brighter, those programs yet

Disney Hulu ABC Comcast Netflix NBC John Landgraf Espn New York City Bloomberg FOX Amc Networks Reporter Lucas Shaw Warner Media JAY
"lila" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"lila" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Done multiple combat deployments and was killed in a parachute training accident and she had six kids, and we registered them. And they went on our waiting list. And it was a few months. You know, if there was some time before we were able to call and say, hey, we can enroll your six kids and get them in an accident. And normally that's very positive conversation. But it was tough because she said while I only have five now my two year old Lila just round and it absolutely crushed us. What we had done with even the first kids we ever supported was swimming lessons and the youngest one was so little it was a, mommy and me swim class for him. And then anytime we had young kids we recommended that. And in this case, Lila drowned, and and we've looked into it. I learned that it's the second leading cause of death for kids fourteen and under, but it's preventable. Statistically, if you get swimming lessons, it's huge reduction in the risk of that. But Eliza had five remaining kids and her husband passed and just thirteen months later, Lila drown. And it just it just really blew us away. So. What we did was I called a listen, I told her I want to try to prevent this. I don't have the budget to just enroll every kid out there. But I'm going to try to convince community centers to give swimming lessons. If if there's a child of their fallen in their area, and we called lessons from Lila named it after a while, and we've been able to roll that out in the end of two thousand seventeen and then through last year and actually all the kids on our waiting lists. That didn't know how to swim we've been able to get in swimming lessons, and we just to go back then to to Elissa story, she's going through all this loss and six months after a while drowned her brother committed suicide and shortly after that her other brother was murdered. And then she lost her grandparents, and she's going through all.

Lila Elissa Eliza thirteen months six months two year
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"So it's a ton of alarms and live with comes into play. Lila comes up and just screams that you to be like excuse me. I heard ear Larmer it's time to get up. And it's not like, they're not grazed feeders. And she needs like food. It's literally just like she loves so it's great but ever since then now she sleeps with me at night. And so I've been getting less sleep because you know, how people do the thing where I think it's called co sleeping where you have like a newborn baby and it sleeps in the bed with you. And I I'm assuming they have like a little lake almost called it a raft. Foot likely kind of it's like this little padded baby thinking that gets created. I don't know. See my fear and sold this with Lila is that I'm just gonna roll over crusher. But hasn't happened will crush you. She'll she'll crush you. She'll let you know if something it's going to happen. And if all those fills she does have claws, and she has used them before. So I don't I don't worry about that. So. He doesn't have claws. I don't know my baby would've clothes. Clause a clause in this. What? Anyway sleeping with the newborn baby. That cried a lot less because I've just been really weird positions to accommodate for her comfort tenders, and I've been like, I don't know. It's just a fucking mess. So I've been getting no sleep it just because of that early day today. So here we are overall very. Very way you're busy for every other day. So we're doing the podcast. Now, we have like what we record it when I'm tired..

Lila
"lila" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"When he had given, thanks. He broke it and said, this is my party after all food is your buddy. I can remember let me stop here. Enjoy. In jewish. I think you know, I'm using my memory. But I can remember I think I can I'll give it to try Monash tunnel. Lila has that McCall lilos. That's it. And what it means is blessed. Lord, my God who gives us bring forth bread from the earth. It's it's something from Judaism England, did Jesus is Jewish get into your head. He's jewish. And this multi be said about that. Among Goto this. If you don't mind because making these my memory's, not great good. So when he's given the. So when he was given, thanks. He broke and said this is my body which is for you to do this in remembrance of me. All right. It's simple. It's coming into something very important in the same way off to supper. He took the carpet. And he says this Cup is the new covenant new new. A new account the word covenant. I looked to try to look it up. And it didn't is just said Covent tipped on talking about. What I'm reading? Now didn't help me much. But we think we can guess what it means. This is the new carbons in blood in my blood do this. When you drink it in remembering.

Covent Monash tunnel Lila England McCall
"lila" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"A bad game of bingo. Welcome to the hammer. He didn't warn me about this. So you are all about legal weed factor. Fiction fact coming why I don't smoke or drink myself. I am a health nut, but I believe that you own yourself. And if you can't decide what to put in your body, your take out of it than what freedom. Do you really have? What has a better chance of happening in Indiana, honestly, medicinal marijuana or recreational medicinal marijuana? The bible belt here is just too strong. Like, they don't think that you should be happy. You think the governor's on board for that? Because I just got a gut napping from my conversations now with the governor that that's not something that he's all in on a lie lillies here allow lillies working on synthetic THC, which obviously will not be as good as natural. God, you know, grown version. Senator Donnelly started to say something about that last night about well Lila's working on this non addictive painkiller. And I'm like can I bring up the marijuana again? Didn't have time. But I thought about it and you're for recreational. Absolutely, okay. Why why why would you limit yourself? I mean, each I'm drinking a big old caffeine mocha lattes here that changes my mental state and makes me happy so somebody chooses to ingest marijuana why not? Do you buy in to legalizing marijuana would also help with the opioid crisis? Without a doubt without a doubt. You look at the the labels on opioids, and they must include death and liver damage, and all kinds of really nasty side effects, and the biggest side effect of all, of course, which is lining politicians and pharmaceutical companies.

marijuana Lila liver damage Senator Donnelly Indiana caffeine
"lila" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"But who do you have on a conservative side you look at. Lila rose, Twitter has been forcing and just shutting her down does she's a. Pro life activist just, shutting her down blocking her, every step of the way but they don't do that with Planned Parenthood You you can't, have you can't have the illusion of freedom And. And then being so blatantly. Obvious that. There is no freedom that's what the internet. Is all about the internet is so big because it's free the Facebook was so big because it allowed you to connect with who. You wanted to and see the news you wanted to, see it's not. Like that now it's not like that I mean somebody is going to put you in charge. Again and if you are in charge. First thing that they will say is all well this is just making it easy for the Neo Nazis, twister that's what they'll say think about how crazy it is because this is what they've done you go to a website you go to your on Facebook and you go to the blaze I wanna get news from the blaze you click like on the blaze to get the news, from the blaze and then, Facebook delivers to. You like five percent of the things that the police posts and it makes you think. About this radio sense, if every day like I want to go to my local station and listened to Glenn Beck, on the. Air and. Every time you tuned. In only one out of twenty times you actually got Glenn Beck. The other nineteen you've got. Another show. Like you specifically are choosing to get the. Information from these sources and Facebook is saying but what we think is that you don't know what you want to it is Cass. Son stan's nudge it's not. It's progressivism and action I'm, going to give. You yes the fries are available I'm just gonna make it a little more difficult for. You to get to, the fries that's what nudges I'm going to put the fries in the back I'm not going, to display. Them you. Can ask for them But if, I. Put. Him, in the, very back. Chances are you're going to. Go, over the apples and. Over this and you'll just be like it's too far to reach I'll just take this. That's nudge will that is exactly what Facebook is doing I'd like. The Glenn Beck program please okay. Well you know that's cute Hey, have you tried, this have you. Tried this have you tried this have you. Tried this oh here's your Glenn Beck hey have you tried this have you tried. This have you tried this have you tried this have you tried this your life will be better if you try one, of these other things?.

Facebook Glenn Beck Lila rose stan Twitter Cass five percent
"lila" Discussed on About Last Night

About Last Night

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on About Last Night

"Give me a second i'm what are you what are you what are you be what do you mean just look at what i got for options i spent on night making a purple shirt i'll still make the purpose of yeah you'll still do that like what was his concert what it was it was the spring concert did like old classics stevie wonder they did nineteen thirties they did they killed it they killed it these kids were nailing it in jamming and it was like the capella group in the harmony and the him and just and he's now he's he's he and lila are singers are they singers on a level i'm gonna when we're done i'll play a little vx for just deciding to sing happy birthday to me but like singing it like mariah carey why is like what is happening bronco in like like her finger like just like the i was singer finger almost there but she did singer is just as good if not better it was awesome because when you see a singer closer is you like all right they're like they're in yeah i'll never close my eyes my saying because i just can't 'cause you i can't say i mean that's still debatable you choose not to the amount of times i've tried to get you to do karaoke cannot sing karaoke i get flop sweat just thinking about i i don't care how many drinks you give me i once in college i did it i don't recall that i did it and then i went to work the next day the manager called me and he goes so i heard you guys hit it hard at such and such like are we just you know happy already because no he went onstage i went i did what you close the bar they asked if you would h on the karaoke system basically but he was live karaoke like they had a backup band that's awesome i i guess i couldn't turn the phone and i just tore it up they tell you what you're saying i'm sure he did don't recall that is college.

lila mariah carey
"lila" Discussed on Happy Hour

Happy Hour

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Happy Hour

"Infinite ways that someone could say something and it wouldn't have clay and then it'd be like just making for you and you have to talk to someone about i mess his business that i think makes it where we will see that in the wild like way more often than than the not and we always seem like it's live as part of lila's olympic three in worrying used by few businesses but i think legally easy for more companies to jump on board is because the apples got their end of it but then the other end of it is like an existing customer service you know system that businesses are already using for their website online support or remote support and on their side they see it as like one more support ticket like when more you know chat log where they need respond they don't know don't think even know came from i messed business chat you know it just looks certain plugged into their system which i think is asking businesses like by your solution using a ho second infrastructure just this thing yeah intellect plug into it basically and i think that that's nice because it's like it takes what people already do as businesses with support and says we wanna work with what you have and not you know is our is smart enough to outsmart human or add this new thing that you don't already use so but but it's it's clever i've not like sat down and watched the keno.

lila
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"I know the mine would be potions because it's fucking measurements and probably but also care magical creatures for me now squeezy and lila lila would be what's the fluffy est divination no no she's i mean care of magical creatures yes she's care metro greer preachers convert crew leaguers what's his name creature fuck crust squeezy would be against the dark arts really cause arts i don't know maybe not maybe he would just be like i feel like or history history magic yeah that's very scholar yeah he would enjoy professor bins drew on he likes relaxing ancient runes he would also enjoy that or like muggles because he's like what are yeah yeah he's a he's a man he is very smart someone on twitter wanted us to tell the story that was so disgusting about squeezy that we could not share is still not willing to share that doing that i wanna preserve your innocent image of squeeze beautiful man that has never done anything at all remotely vomiting in bruising he's vomited a lot getting me get so excited about us gables just as astier chris rachel in the fluffy junks adding the adjectives there so you're buttering up i've been living with my boyfriend and his place which is a house with him four other men in was wondering how you ever deal with roommates eating your food and touching your god four and how do you find balance when sharing small space with your partner.

lila lila twitter chris rachel partner professor
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"That's wild i know it is it's interesting but like i can't wait to lead everything squeezy yeah he deserves it all oh my money can things to pet i what would that do i don't know honestly like i would say what i'm gonna do is like everything's and then everything that you are not going to use that like i know that you won't use we'll just be donated like that's what i'm doing pretty much the same sat dark media it definitely start but you know whether talking about this kinda shit so whatever it's just fucking life so happy birthday tagging strange life we know if that's you if it is up here it's it's interesting i must say but like i'm trying not to like let that the that's like the pisces mood coming in right scorpion or whatever it's annoying though i must say but i'm trying not to let that fuck over the whole birthday scenario honestly her mental health lately has not been fabulous feeling a little bit of that feeling i was feeling in january and i think it's because like my attention is now off of wireless and says she's okay so now i'm like all the things that i was ignoring because i was worried about lila are back so she's back on oh honestly art is helping like so much just like putting all of my energy into my at see store right now and i hope it shows but like literally that's all i've been doing like all i'm doing is working on its he stuff and it is making is one thing keeping me like okay.

lila
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"So overall not agree moment but she's fucking back i mean she literally didn't even have time i know like they were saying recover from the procedure within like twelve hours almost like immediately after overlaid she was like doing really fucking well except she was kind of drowsy i know but even the drowziness didn't last very long exactly like some cats like bleed after they get scoped through their sinuses and stuff so like that didn't even happen i don't know they were basically like she was fucking gm and also something that was funny so are other that like our main vet that we go to i guess somewhere in lila's file they have written there that she's really cute that's part of her file and they have a photo of her in there and i finally just like saw on one of the bills the photo that they have in her file and is q q and so when we took her in to the other place because we had to go to like more of like a emergency animal hospital to get the procedures done and stuff 'cause they had like all the stuff for that that tech comes in and she's like oh wow i saw her file in you know she is really cute so funny like every doctor and everything that we talked to they were like yeah like actually she lives up to the hype oh my god they love her they loved her because she's like really chill when she's at the vet like she gets a little anxious but her body isn't like the cath like hisses and hides in the corner or anything she just like really lovey and she'd like who's circles around everybody in like rubs up against everybody's legs and his leg just chill is fuck one she's nervous she gets even more lovey it's so weird.

gm lila twelve hours
"lila" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Let me just post this piece of white deavere you not most of like so we could actually do something like that like just get loads of copies of the change highgate set mandatory police are men trader they were rerun no meanwhile listener execs one of the night neither takes on teach one right listen win in two thousand and twelve there was no chance i was going to read a peaceful feminist literature like there's just no trunk line i look i used to argue feminism to wear that include uh you know i didn't know nothing about feminism and all other them but then either a sip of people address i made that would get the book and emulate or are they need the book some of them needed the money didn't audio but for juice it's easy to get him notable unua down at audible how he added you sign up not yet lila was audible again since the audio book platform linked amazon iraq is like seven pound may nine among anke doubt unlimited download so yes you can get credit i mean you can download unwatchable komo on friday cheapening kindle no to basically basically if you don't alsana three of day if you don't might use your credit each month it just stock's up threat so like i tend to leave mindful who good three for months i'll go back to an immensely full and the named as ifor credits are by ford yochelson audiobooks if you buy them without the credit then i 25 pounds plus but the audio books in it they just yours interest in his cool the download the minister okay while noche i've shaoguo here bottle yet com.

lila iraq kindle amazon anke ifor ford yochelson seven pound 25 pounds