35 Burst results for "Lila"

Here Are The Upcoming Senate Deadlines for September 2021

Axios Today

02:01 min | Last week

Here Are The Upcoming Senate Deadlines for September 2021

"Today. The senate is back from recess. And september is full of deadlines actually congressional reporter. Elena trine is here with three. You need to know about good morning elena. Good morning lila. Thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. The first is september fifteenth. Can you tell us what that's about. That is the quote unquote soft deadline for the democrat. Ron committees to finish drafting their sections of the parties. Massive three point five trillion spending bill. I say three point five trillion. It may not look like that after it's negotiated as of now. It doesn't look like though actually meet that deadline but that's kind of the ambitious goal that they're working toward okay. So that's this wednesday. The next deadline is september. Twenty seventh and that has to do with infrastructure. Not the budget right. Yes the that is the deadline. That house speaker. Nancy pelosi had promised centrists that they would have a vote on the one point. Two trillion. Bipartisan infrastructure. Deal the house has been waiting to take it up similar to the fifteenth deadline. I'll be surprised if they're able to to pass that. Massive three point five trillion package by september. Twenty seven senna. Mark warner is also warning that he might vote against the three point five trillion spending package more money is an added for housing assistance. My colleague hans nichols scooped. This is just another indication that the proposal will face a variety of obstacles before the house and senate can agree to a top line number now. September thirtieth deadline is deadline. Congress has to me. Can you tell us why yes. They don't meet their deadline. Of september thirtieth the government will will shut down so essentially. The government runs out of money by september thirtieth and house. Speaker nancy pelosi and majority leader. Steny hoyer said that the house is expected to consider short term spending bill or or what they call in congress a continuing resolution. We're hearing that. It will likely extend through december but that could change as

Elena Trine Ron Committees Lila Senate Elena Hans Nichols Nancy Pelosi Mark Warner Senna Congress House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Steny Hoyer Government
Biden Surveys NY and NJ Storm Damage, Talks Climate Change

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Biden Surveys NY and NJ Storm Damage, Talks Climate Change

"As he toured all right as damaging New Jersey president Biden heard a harrowing tale from one couple that escape before the storm's remnants destroyed their home yeah in the lost valley neighborhood of Mansfield the president stopped in front of what used to be a home birth again Domar said her family left before the storm got really bad to protect their four month old daughter Lila her husband briefly returned a few hours later fort Trinity the cat our plan was to come back once the water has gone down and salvage things from the second floor nursery but before they could after Domar told her story the president gave her a hug thank god you said Sonder Meg Downey Washington

President Biden Domar Fort Trinity New Jersey Mansfield Lila Sonder Meg Downey Washington
"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"You know there's this. There's this sort of lure that you always hear about. How occupy wall street was not effective because there weren't clear policy outcomes to that work and you hear a lot even in progressive circles and. I think that my main advice is that i push back on that notion because the thing that occupied taught me. Is you just go and do the thing that you're able to do in an activist role and so if you are good at writing if you're a good storyteller than like congratulations you have one of the most important advocacy skills that you could possibly have. I think there's a sense that you have to be like good at directing an organization to be a good advocate. And that's absolutely not true. It's a completely different skill. Set i am terrible at the sort of like executive director side of being advocate. I am a good storyteller. I'm a writer. That's what i do for living. And that is what. I found allowed me to be effective in these roles and i think. Also there's this sense that like first of all if you're you get a lot of patronizing advice when you're young. Trying to be an advocate and a lot of that advice i just ultimately had to ignore because a lot of it was designed to prevent me from. Actually you know. Sort of like taking on the roles that i knew i would be effective at and then the other advice that you always get is you have to fund. Raise i and aid in funds at all for this project. I did it because it seemed like an important thing to do. I just you know. I spoke out and then i asked my friends to speak with me when that was necessary. I relied on media relied on social media. I relied on things that would be free to do. In order to get the word out about this and as much as money helps and resources help of course they do. I think a lot of the time people are dissuaded from even starting something because they think that the first step has to be you know to to start fundraising and they don't have family members or friends with deep pockets which you know a lot of people don't and especially people who are in situations where they need some political action often. Don't so i think that my my sort of big takeaway. That i want people to have from my might lame attempt at giving them activists advice is just that you probably shouldn't take anyone's advice too seriously and you should also lean on the thing that you know. You'll be good at the thing that you know you can get away with and not worry so much that you can't follow in the exact path of other advocates that you admire so we're coming up on the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven Which i i'm sure is going to be difficult for for you. And the the people in your community. How would you like people to mark the occasion or not. Mark the occasion. Perhaps i think you know i would like us to mark the occasion as an opportunity to think about what we can do for each other to protect each other. I don't think that it's helpful to spend more than twenty years. Just thinking about this one world altering event he because we are currently in the middle of a world altering event and so obviously world altering events permanently alter the world because other things come along in alter it again I think a lot of the time though the thing that frustrates me about the way that we commemorate nine eleven were so obsessed with hashtag never forgetting we're solemn and we don't use the opportunity to think what could we have learned from the way we responded to this event. And what can we move forward knowing. We wanna do next time and i because we haven't done that i've seen a lot of the same mistakes get made again and again after crises. I see you know. I see the exact same arguments that were used to justify sending me back to school in an unsafe zone getting used to justify sending kids back to school without cove precautions being taken i in the same words even and so i think like for me. The most important thing is that. If we're gonna mark this day. I know there was an attempt to turn it into kind of like a day of service and i would almost rather we turn it into a day of reflection where we think about what we want to take forward from that experience as opposed to just what changed on that day. Because i think if i've learned anything in the kovic period it's that every generation has a moment that changes everything for that generation in life is never the same and i never related to why. My parents were so obsessed with the jfk assassination. Until i went through nine eleven and thought okay that was like a life altering event that changed everything about the way people conceive where they lived in who they were and that is what happened on nine eleven and that's going to happen to this kobe generation to all of us in the aftermath of kobe. And so i don't think necessarily harping on one. Particular incident is the answer. I want to talk about the connections that the survivor community. The the nine eleven community in general has two other disaster communities not not not special and unique you know. So how can people get your book. You can get my book at all. The major internet booksellers you can do it at bookshop Amazon you can do it. I think you know. India bound in books. A million that those kind of places. You can find links to all of this on my website which is lila nordstrom dot com. And then if you are in a major metropolitan area you may also be able to find your local bookstore. You can always order at three local bookstore..

Mark lila nordstrom Amazon India
"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

08:13 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Write a book in someone like me. Explain the connections between you know what what the government can do for people after a crisis and what we expect them to do which is often much less so so yeah the. The community dynamics on on the hill and elsewhere were often a little frustrating. I would note for your listeners that the survivor community is three or four times. The size of the responder community. It's a much larger community it's a vastly more female community. It's it's it's a community that includes lots of young people. There were nineteen thousand public school students that were in school in the exposures zone. There were likely twenty five or thirty thousand other either students or kids who were not of school age who were attending community colleges and other places in the area and so this is a huge population of people. The survivor community as a whole is estimated to be three or four hundred thousand people and so this is a large community of people to represent often being represented by fewer representatives than respond or community. You know a. I testified before congress. Twenty nineteen there was a panel where there were four people to speak for the responder community. I was the only person to speak for the survivor. Community on the panel. That blows my mind because that was the exact opposite proportion of how many people here wearing these communities. But you know that. I think is also one of the reasons that i am really I really advocate for people to put pressure on their state governments to collect as much disaggregated data about cova deaths in cove. It almost is in their state as possible because the the way that we got excluded from a lot of these conversations with that no one thought to get data on us in the first place and so when we showed up to the conversation but firemen had data. We did not and that really made it hard to advocate for ourselves and you so poignantly in the book about how a lot of this population of three to four hundred thousand people is people of color immigrants that you know and but it took white high school students to be the one to sort of get attention in an can you sort of expand on that a little bit like what what that tells us about the people who are falling through the cracks after disasters about you know and it's all sorts of disasters. Right you flint's there's katrina. There's all sorts of things that happen that that it's difficult to get attention on an and to get people to to provide the resources in support that we need to. There are certain kinds of agency that you have access to as a white middle-class person even an in a community that's being overlooked that you don't have access to if you are someone who doesn't speak english well if you are someone who cannot introduce yourself as a vassar graduate if you are someone who can't pull together the funds to walk to washington and if you were someone who just can't speak with inherent authority about community issues. I mean you know the the exposure zone that we're talking about it includes. All of chinatown includes a lot of the lower east side and the communities that were able to get the ear of the politicians. Who were eventually you know who became our advocates. Were communities that had access to them in the first place. Those are communities like tribeca and battery park city that are primarily white middle-class in. That's you know. Is somebody who i am not from those communities but i am sort of from that larger community i had certain kinds of advantages just because i also came from a community where i had been trained to speak to politicians in the first place My mom used to washington. When i was a kid and we would go visit our representatives and that was its own kind of education. I'm one of the few people who got to have a civics class in you know in high school. And that's only. Because i was going to this very well funded public school. That had that as an elective. I'm somebody who you know who's only days off from school that i was allowed to take to protests in so i was aware of kind of how an activist can interact with the government and what the dynamic is that allows activists to be effective. And these are all you know advantages. That largely came because of my background and these are also advantages. That while theoretically i guess could be open to. Anyone are tremendously easier. When you know that you're going to have the funds to go to go find the politicians where they are when you know that media is gonna take you more seriously than they're gonna take somebody whose whose english isn't very good or who cannot speak. You know who doesn't speak this dialect of you know like university english. That are that that that we all begin in like. I think that is why there are two reasons that i think that we didn't get fully overlooked. One is that there were middle class and wealthy white people that were affected by this disaster. And that is of course when you look at who actually gets attention after a crisis. You often don't you. You hear sort of like tragic human interest stories about other communities but you hear action in white middle class communities. And i think the other advantage that we had was that we had the coattails of men to ride. We had the coattails of first responders to ride. When i think about what's happened in flint. Where how long have we been talking about. The flint water crisis. It's it feels like my entire adult life and you know why haven't we seen. Why didn't we see immediate action on that. Well that was a community who had no coattails to ride in addition to being a community that was largely disenfranchised for other reasons for for reasons of race for reasons of economic advantages. Things like that. And so i think a lot of the time the the kind of the communities that end up getting effective results in the communities that end up actually getting their voices heard ended up being communities that have some sort of cultural economic capital. And that i think is why i it's why i was able to stay involved in this issue for so long. This has not been my job. I this is not what i do for work and oftentimes. I mean i'm a freelancer. I often times have been living at a loss. But as i say in the book i knew someone would bail me out if i ran out of money. I knew someone would make sure. I got to washington if i needed to get to washington and just that inherent advantage makes your advocacy work. So much more effective. You know. I did a lot of this work without any sort of budget. I didn't fund raise to do this work. I i did all of its On a volunteer basis for many years and I was able to do that. Because i had other resources. I always like to focus on sort of a action steps. And you have this great the end of your book. You talk about sort of how how did you this kind of advocacy work. You set it up as like. I didn't know what i was doing it up so learn from me. So what are some of the things that that people can learn from from your experiences about how to go about doing this kind of work. Well i always described my parents. Night's chaos people because we don't work well in groups and that's just like a family a family issue that we have But my my mother is an activist sort of in her bones. And so a lot of this was modeled on what i saw her. Do and get away with my mother's also four seven so she's teeny tiny. She's adorable and because she's so adorable. She can get away with a lot of things that other people can get away with. She can totally lose it at a meeting of the chelsea antiwar whoever whatever involved and she can go in the next day and everyone's nicer quick so i think part of what i learned is that everyone has to sort of figure out what their secret thing is. That makes them effective. What their unexpected advantages. Because part of the reason my mother does this has learned. This is because no one listens to her otherwise if she doesn't completely lose it in a meeting. She is talked over and ignored the entire meeting so she has to do that. To be heard. Because that's what it's like to be bat small and a woman but it kind of mean it also means that she has figured out how to use her ability to do that to her advantage and has because of that always been able to be active in a lot of actress muniz..

washington battery park city cove flint katrina congress muniz
"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Data on this population we don't have coverage for some of those concerns so there's also a lot of a in terms of women's reproductive health cancers there's a very uneven coverage where you're covered for cervical cancer but not uterine cancer like i don't know why that how could those possibly have remarkably different causes when it comes to environmental exposure. But there's kind of like a. We're sort of behind the eight ball out of the time in terms of discovering what conditions were Were going to end up seeing but luckily we also have the model of the first responders to sort of see what we're going to see trickling down into our community. But at the moment you know the the cancer rates are growing the autoimmune disorders are getting reported at much higher rates those primarily affect women's. Those are also something that you don't see a lot reflected in the data but are pretty significant in the community and then the other area where we're not really sure what to expect and we're not really sure what isn't is not linked is in a developmental health related concerns like in a ways that this kind of exposure shape people's underpin systems and things like that. There's not good data on that because there was no tracking of the people that were exposed children and so we expect that this has had consequences for our health. A lot of us have bizarre. Health concerns that we can't really articulate as as a kind of general condition but Those are things that we also expect are likely linked to those exposures. So i think people who have heard about the the legislation the fight for legislation for world trade center related diseases probably not heard that much about the survivor community. That it's mostly been what the first responders experience and how do we cover So can you talk some abou- your advocacy journey. And sort of just trying to get. This is not a small community of survivors. A lot of people who are affected but how hard it's spin to sort of get attention on that particular community. Yeah there's something about the way. We like conceive of healthcare policy and who deserves healthcare protections. That is very much based in a sense that like you should make a sacrifice in deserve it as opposed to a sense that just everyone like inherently deserves some sort of healthcare protect health protection. And so we've come up a lot of the time after something like nine eleven. I think we've seen this a lot with the kobe crisis. We kind of lean on war metaphors we lean on the the sort of symbolism of who sacrificed in who rushed in and who were the heroes and you know we see that a lot where we're constantly glorifying doctors. Who of course are doing heroic work after kobe. But like also if your uncle was lied you and didn't realize that wearing masks protected him than like that is kind of policy failure as well and your uncle doesn't knock deserve protection just because he wasn't quote unquote hero. He's a person who lives in society whose government was charged with protecting him did not Anything in the same way. We faced a lot of challenges as as the survivor community. Because there was a perception that as people who weren't heroes we were speaking out of turn in asking for access to some of the benefits that responders head. I think know. And there's also there's the issue of self identification in a community like that as well because responders by large very proud to have been part of this rescue effort. You know. i've spent a lot of the time. A lot of time on the hill with first responders. I know that community really well. I have a lot of great friends that i've made in that community and all of them are incredibly proud of the work that they did at ground zero and the survivor community does not get to feel the same way because we were just straight victims of a bad policy and and i you know i wanna know. It was victims of a bad policy not necessarily victims of terrorist attack. I think there's also a sense that you know. This was sort of enact of active. Got homeless like an act that we couldn't control that just sort of fell on our doorstep the decision to send us all back into that area though was made by the. Us government was not made by foreign terrorists and so And so a lot of the fault for what ended up happening to our community really belongs on our own doorstep not on some sort of like doorstep we can't control out yonder. And so. I think you know our involvement in this advocacy work has always been there but it has often been overlooked in part because we couldn't access a hero narrative and i would say that's also very gendered narrative that's the narrative that requires. It often leans on metaphors about rushing into things in being strong in both risking survivors out of rebel. And things like that. And that's just like not you know. They're only six women in the fire department on nine eleven. That's not a narrative that necessarily Reflects woman and i've actually spoken to a lot of female first responders who are constantly coming up against the problem of people not believing that their first responders because they're women and so that's already a challenge that the community cases because community advocates by enlarge. And i would say in a lot of crises not just after nine eleven and being women they start as moms and then you know other women from the community step up when you think about who steps up for communities after a crisis it is almost always women first and then if you're lucky cement step up because then you get taken seriously. But it's really hard to get hurt. As a community of female advocates and so on the hill we had to kind of rely on some interesting dynamics. I mean one of the more disappointing dynamics that was helpful to my work but also just like horribly depressing to think about was the fact that at a certain point i started relying on first responders to repeat everything that i said in our lobby meetings so that they would actually be heard because i think even bay noticed that no one was listening to me and i was being mistaken for a staffer everywhere and i had to kind of think you know. I had to rely on some theater to get over that. I had to start dressing down on the hill to stop being treated like a staffer which is such a funny dynamic defenders open on. But i'm you know i'm a woman. I was much younger than the other advocates. I'm the youngest. Advocate has been really active on this issue. And i look like a first year stack her on the hill and always have and continue to even the women in my late thirties. And so you know. There was some dynamics like that that i had to rely on just to make sure our story didn't get lost but there were also a lot of times where for political reasons we were asked to step back and for reasons. That maybe weren't gonna benefit us because there was also i think an understanding on the hill and elsewhere that it's really hard to sell a story about communities. People don't care about civilians in the same way that they care about heroes and i i always think that's so funny because most people are civilians in so it feels like you know if you can see yourself reflected in any part of the nine eleven recovery effort. It should be my story that you see unless you are a fireman. You know it is most likely my story that you see yourself reflected in. It's one of the reasons. I thought it was important that someone like me..

cancer uterine cancer cervical cancer kobe Us
"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Had a gap Speak about this in my life. So the story. That i was telling in two thousand six when i became. An advocate is has been remarkably consistent because roy started telling it only a few years after it happened and i because of that have kind of been able to remember it all the way through so. I think that's why. I was the person that thought i should write this book. And you know. I know a lot of people have written memoirs of how nine eleven affected them have written memoirs of their lives. Since nine eleven. You know a lot of the memoirs in this category are about overcoming personal obstacles like addiction recovery. You know the loss of family members are things like that. And i wanted this to be more of an inclusive story about you know what it is to be part of this community so there. There's sort of two things that affect your life. There's the the actual event. There's nine eleven that happens into and presumably most of the people who are in the school that day and in the area they have have some form of ptsd from that. But that isn't where most of the other health problems happen. It's not that day. That is the problem for you right. It is when you come back into your high school less than a month later Having been told this is safe. It's fine you can gather that is actually what causes the the health problems for your community. So can you talk about Some of what sort of the the environmental. I think for those of us. Who weren't there who haven't lived that like wet. What the environment was you know. Why why was it suit dangerous. What what was it about it. That what caused health problems. And what are the kinds of health problems. Presumably huge range of that came out of the collapse of the twin towers was kind of a unique building collapsed because the buildings kind of fell in on themselves and so they they base all the building. Materials got pulverized and so i think you know people remember those images of like steel girders. You know smoking top pile but what a lot of the debris was was just dust and dust gets everywhere and so not only. Was it a fire that burned until january. So you know. I think a lot of people who weren't at the site don't realize how long that site was on fire. But there was a consistent fire that burned at ground zero until the end of january of two thousand two People residents office workers had been back in the neighborhood for four or five months by that point and then on top of that the cleanup effort required them to move. Huge amounts of pulverized building material around the neighborhood to barges. Manhattan is a small island. There are not landfills on manhattan so all of the debris had to be taken to another island which meant that all of it had to be put on barges and transported to another to staten island. And that meant that they had depart the barge somewhere and the barges were parked right next to our school. So what began as you know a a disaster already because obviously there were these huge dust. Clouds that cody people in dust and also coated one side of my school in dust but there was actually no reason for people in my situation to be exposed to. The you know the pulverized building materials because most of us did not end up caught in that dust cloud. I was able to evacuate that day without being caught in the cloud. What happened was the dust cloud just dot continually whipped up by the cleanup efforts. They they were transporting just dump trucks filled with these polarized building materials back and forth all around her school. They were dumping them right next to our school and that was creating sort of new dust exposure for people and that was you know our building was already not adequately cleaned when we arrived but the building got contaminated fairly quickly because of the way that they were cleaning up the site and so i think a lot of people don't realize like i said that the fires were burning but they also don't realize the cleanup effort as it was going on was continuingly Contaminating the whole neighborhood. It wasn't just saying contained at the site. So that's why so many of us got sick and also it wasn't a school children. Obviously people who lived in the neighborhood cleaned up their residences without proper safety precautions because at the time largely for political and economic reasons we were being told no. Don't worry it's safe. I guess you have nosebleeds but those will be temporary. Don't worry about that. There will be no long term consequences to the headaches. and nosebleeds. you guys they're experiencing so just. Don't worry too much about that. Obviously there is almost no time that continual smoke inhalation does not cause long-term health complications and this was an additional it kind of smoke because it was mixed with this dust you know that included a lot of toxins. That are you know parts of building. So you know early on they. They were very obsessed with finding out if there was lead and there was let it turned out but lead was really the least of our problems. There was like a whole cocktail of dangerous chemicals in this dust So you know the the health issues began fairly predictably with respiratory health issues Headaches things like that. I began experiencing respiratory health concerns right away and then overtime we found that our community lags a few years behind first responders in terms of what kinds of serious illnesses we face because we were much younger when we were exposed. But you started to see first responder cancers pretty quickly and then a few years later you started to see those same cancers in our school population and that's kind of been the trend that's continued so you know what began as more common cancer in young adults and Kansas with shorter latency periods like thyroid cancers and blood cancers and things like that has since transformed into rest cancer prostate cancer. And this is. I would remind you in population that is entirely under the age of forty. Most of them are unafraid to five. So we're not talking about. People who are in high risk categories for things like breast cancer normally and the other issues that we have our that. There's not a lot of good data on the survivor community. So we know anecdotally that we're seeing high numbers of cancers in the same areas that first responders or seeing high numbers of cancers but the first responder community doesn't have a lot of women in it and so a lot of women's health concerns are not well documented we anecdotally hear a lot about auto immune disorders but those are not covered by the world trade center health program. They're not connected. They're not officially linked to the attacks. Autoimmune concerns are linked to the kinds of exposure that we had..

roy staten island cody Manhattan manhattan cancer nosebleeds thyroid cancers blood cancers headaches cancer prostate cancer Kansas breast cancer Autoimmune
"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"lila" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Broads talking politics. Today's guest is lila nordstrom author of the new book. Some kids left behind a survivors fight for healthcare in the wake of nine eleven. Are you. I everyone. This is to pods talking politics. I am kelly and the other broad with me. Today is lila nordstrom. Who has a new book out called. Some kids left behind a survivors plate. Healthcare in the wake of nine eleven. So hi lila. Thanks for having me. Yeah thank you so much for joining me So let me just say. This is an incredible book. It's such a a moving warm. Sometimes funny unexpectedly funny memoir but also discussion of politics now. Politics works so i i'm really grateful that That you wrote it. That i wanted to start not by asking. Why why this topic because that will become obvious to people but but why why read a book and why right now. I think i've been thinking a lot. About how i want to move forward with the story being a nine eleven victim on the twenty th anniversary. 'cause i think commemorations of nine eleven are often very rear-facing. It's very much about the experiences of this one day itself and how world changing that day was for those of us that have lived with health consequences from that day. This is really a much more present story in our lives than it is just a commemoration of time. Twenty years ago. That a thing happened. And i i think that you know i live in california though. I'm from new york. I know because of that. There's not a really clear. Understanding outside of new york city of how wide ranging the effects of the environmental disaster of nine eleven were and. It was really important to me that i validate that story. So that future survivors no to see themselves in the story and also that i provide a road map of what i've learned because there are so many disaster communities that exists in the united states. I would argue that in the era of kobe. Were kind of all part of a big disaster community and it was important to me that we start thinking about how to take the memory of nine eleven and look forward from it instead of just thinking about it as this unique special thing that happened to only some of you know twenty years ago. I think there's a lot to learn from the way that we responded to nine eleven. There's a lot to learn from the experiences. We had advocating for ourselves. And i wanted to kind of lay that out. Yeah so let's sort of set the stage then for people who haven't yet read the book but they should You were a senior in high school during nine eleven And were three blocks from from the twin towers and it through the windows side happening is. You're thinking about writing. I mean i'm sure this is true. Anytime you write a memoir but writing a memoir about you know in part about an event that happened twenty years ago when you were high schooler. That has gotten so much coverage so your own. Memories are probably overlaid with that you've seen and heard and read since then how do you how do you. What is the process for that. Like how how do you go back. And try to reconstruct. What happened to you what you experienced both from your own memories but are there other things that you're consulting as you're thinking through that absolutely i think for me in particular. It was really important that a lot of what i write in the book also be verifiable that they're that this also act as a kind of memory of the events as they occurred to people like me. You know it was. It was important to me that there be a record of the event from the perspective of someone like me. Because i just really haven't seen much of that in media and so although there is a huge amount of coverage of what happened after nine eleven not a lot of it focuses on how an event like that touches individuals in an ongoing fashion and can kind of reroute your life but i also felt like the community story after nine eleven had really not gotten a fair telling and so it was important to me that in the course of telling my story i also create kind of a historical record of what happened to the community after nine eleven and where missteps were made in where the community was mistreated or overlooked and so i approached this a little differently than i think i would have approached a more traditional memoir project first of all remembering a detailed account of what happened to you over. The last twenty years is very difficult. And i actually. You know my first draft of the book. I just tried to write everything down that i remember and some of it it turned out. I remember because i've seen it on the news and some Turned out. I remember because it was my actual memories and some of it turned out. You know contradicted accounts of other people that were with me on the day and that was something i expected because traumatic memories are notoriously unreliable and so this is a pretty common occurrence with people who are recounting a traumatic incident. But i felt like you know if i could get my account out first and then go back and find ways to verify that everything happened which i was able to do. Thankfully there were there. Were two sources that were tremendously useful to me. One was that though. The new york times has really not done much coverage of the survivor community. Since nine eleven they actually did a really detailed account of what the community was going through right after nine. Eleven so a lot of that was in the newspaper and so that was useful. Because i was able to verify a lot of things i remembered through that but then also my mother kept basically. Every document she'd ever been handed that year from the parents association from the city from there are all these letters back and forth that year that we're about the air quality and she kept everything and so i had this store of information that was just think Thanks to mother's sort of pre planning on that. I was able to consult and that also able to verify a lot of what i remembered. It's also been helpful to me that. Because i've been an advocate on this issue for so long i have had some continuity with telling the story whereas a lot of people have had big gaps in their lives where they really haven't spoken about this..

lila nordstrom kelly kobe new york city california new york united states The new york times
"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:16 min | Last month

"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"They don't ask your race There are colorblind organization neutral. Mix com use the code. Eric now bob i gotta talk to you about. Why do you have hope. I'm talking to bob woodson. Seventeen seventy six nights in the woodson center your black man in a world that has gone crazy were race. Hustlers and a cultural marxists have tried to take over the conversation with regard to race in america. So what gives you hope that what you're doing matters at the woodson center. People are motivated when they know. Victories are possible not by injuries be avoided and reading your work about the group in the eighteenth century and england. Just twenty people just to be clear. My book amazing. Grace which is about william wilberforce. He had a group around him that they call them the clapham group because they lived in clapham. But you're right. It was just twenty or so people. They changed the world. They changed the whole nation even though that written economic interests was on the side of maintaining slavery. They persuaded them to change it. I believe our group. What's center can have the same cultural impact the group head and so. That's my motivation. A so that's why. I believe we can make the change when i talk about wilberforce in my book. Amazing grace a lot of people are aware of it. A lot of people aren't. But i always say that the reason that i wanna talk about wilberforce because it gives us hope that a handful of people genuinely changed things so dramatically. You almost can't believe it seems made up but it was their hearts. Were right before god. They tried to do things but it is about networks. I mean you know the fact is that you know you you you work with other people. It's not just about you And networks sometimes important so that we know. I'm not crazy there a whole bunch of people here working with me as you have at the woodson center Who know that this is. This is the way to go. And that's why i want. I want people to know that you guys are. Are there now. Are you just in the dc area. Where where is the woodson center physically. There was a son as headquarters is in washington. Dc but we have two thousand five hundred restaurants leader whose leaders in thirty nine states black white red brown who apart network our family of healing agents so joseph's as we call them they are an army ready to be a they are the cultural insurgents. Who still believe in the values and virtues of this co founding values and virtues of this country they are real believers. We're just we want armed. And they are the new patriots. I just hope that somebody who has a burden for this issue We'll go to the woodson center website and trying to connect Whether with you in dc or with with some of these branches because people really need hope they need to understand that there are others who see what they see and who working toward real solutions. Not just saying this doesn't matter this really does matter We've only got a minute left. Bob what should we leave my listeners. With let them know that there is a consensus among low-income black america. That america is worth fighting for them and they are real patriots. And i think if america's gonna be saved it's going to be done because of low income blacks around the country who have risen up and saying this is our land and we are going to protect it and that's that's the data so powerful. I mean literally tell people the reason i voted for. Donald trump is because i care about poor urban communities minority community. If you care about those kids and you just want virtue signal and go with the democrats you're a hypocrite and god sees what you're doing you folks. We need to do what works. Not just what makes you feel like a hero in your white country club or wherever it is you are online bob woodson. I just love talking to you. Folks go to woodson center. Where seventeen seventy six nights bob. Thank you everything you do thank you..

woodson center bob woodson clapham group wilberforce william wilberforce clapham america Eric bob Grace england patriots dc joseph washington brown army Bob Donald trump
What Is the Best Way to Fight Critical Race Theory?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | Last month

What Is the Best Way to Fight Critical Race Theory?

"Bob you said the best way to fight critical race. Theory is to give a microphone to the people. He claims to speak for black people in america. Absolutely and that's what's inside of sylvia. Ben stolen is a woman a mom who lost a teenage daughter to urban violence many years ago and she has taken that hurt and that pain and turned it into a positive force and she's now working for the woodson center and she is organized. Two thousand five hundred other moms from around the country and they're called the voices of black mothers united and they are clearly. They took out a full page ad in usa today supporting the police. Two weeks ago. They had a conference where they invited police officers to come with the the various moms and they spent a day in a have discussing ways that they can better cooperate in have that communities protected but again the mainstream media will not publish this and so we are reaching out to other of police officers and we are. They have come together in five cities. Eric to cooperate and as a result of this level cooperation. Homicide closure rates have improved because these mothers have worked with the police to generate respect and trust to build a bridge of trust between the police and urban communities and that movement is spreading so the left does not represent. These people. Do not represent black

Woodson Center America Sylvia BOB BEN Eric
Critical Race Theory: The Anti-Racists Are the New Racists With American Civil Rights Activist Bob Woodson, Sr

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | Last month

Critical Race Theory: The Anti-Racists Are the New Racists With American Civil Rights Activist Bob Woodson, Sr

"I wanna talk about critical race theory. you identify as a black male. Is that right yes okay. That's that's most your life. You're you're in your seventh decade here as blackmail so you speak from experience in the civil rights world before it went crazy and woke You wrote an article at the policy review called a better way to fight critical race theory. What's your thesis in this article. The safe is is not the first of all the so-called anti-racist are the new racist must be very clear they are propagating a theory. That that hearkens back to the days of racism where they're saying that we should be judged by the content of our character but the bottom color of our skin. It wasn't esoteric debate on campuses for many years. But then right. After the george floyd and other incidents the radical left has has has migrated into the public domain and using it now as an instrument to attack american whites attack. Democracy is being used as a pervasive strategy to really undermine the values and principles of the nation of social just and of course. Let's just be clear that what they're trying to do is they're trying to get people to think racially another words. If i see you as a white guy you see me as a white guy sees a blackout when you see that i and when you focus on that it makes you a racialist whether whether we're racists or not the point is it makes you look through the lens of race which you and i know as christians as americans. We know that that's wrong no matter where it goes no matter where it's coming from. There's something unhealthy about

George Floyd
"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:02 min | Last month

"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Unwilling to look at the evidence in the election fraud that was a staggering thing. Because nobody says how you have to rule but would you look at the evidence. The fact that they wouldn't even look at the evidence. It's a chilling thing really that they are already playing politics. They're already abandoning their roles as arbiters of the constitution when when they do things like that so they are human beings are capable and something like that. That's a debate. There's two sides of that debate but when it comes to human life life life. There's no debate on when life begins. I mean this is just shouldn't even be a matter. You don't get to legislate away the right to live a whole group of people. But that's what the supreme court did in one thousand nine hundred eighty needs s. It needs to be undone for secondary. I forgot i was talking to lila rose. It's kind of funny because you see some black and white. Of course it is black and white but very few people rarely people rarely phrase it life and life and death is black and white your dad or your life but no in between i mean i think the issue recently was that the president or jen psaki or who was it that said an nc posey weather but say one answer. They refused to answer whether it is a human being at fifteen weeks. They no. there's only one correct answer but if they admit it yeah it does their entire justification for russian. I mean i look. I think it's safe to say that. They know it's a human being and they still think abortion is fine and they just they. They qualified in their minds. They don't they don't they. Don't see life as sacred right. And i think that all the conversations that we've been having it's all to the good more and more people are hearing about this hearing the arguments and you know and i know that people make up their own minds they listen and they they know it's a baby and so i think that there is a. I'm very hopeful. Frankly let me just ask you though when you said that the abortions have decreased. We just got less than a minute. What can you give us any statistics on that just to yeah so for years they were topping a million abortions and now according to the numbers from macaroni. This is planned parenthood researcher. We're down to eight hundred thousand a year and that's been dropping so we're down hundreds of thousands of fortunes in the last two decades and that's amazing success lives saved it's fantastic. We're we're out of time lila. Rose congratulations so on this book. Fighting for life becoming a force for change in a wounded world by lila rose. Thank you thank you eric. Neither folks just what yes. Did you guess i have as my guest..

jen psaki lila rose supreme court lila eric
"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | Last month

"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Given the new supreme court the new. The new justices that are. Do you think ravi way roe. V wade could be overturned in the next few years. Do you think it's possible you think how would that happen. It's definitely possible that roe v wade case law is so bad even pro-abortion legal experts say it's so bad it doesn't make sense. It doesn't hold together. It's constantly shifting precedent. Why abortion is so-called. Women's right it's not. It's killing a child You know that takes intellectual clarity and courage from the supreme court justices and they're typically supreme court's really Tries to be very moderate. They don't like to do anything dramatic. They definitely don't like undo pass precedent. That's only been done a handful of times in american history right to right. The wrongs dread scott and other terrible cases like that. So i think it's gonna be a hard push for them. But i think that someone like justice. Clarence thomas has it in him. The courage the clarity the intellectual clarity and with the right leadership on the court. They should undo the damage bro. They should just say this isn't invented. Human rights to kill a child doesn't exist. The state has an interest to protect these children. The fourteenth amendment ensures equal protection under the law that should be for all humans including pre-born humans. They're not you know less than a born human Do i think they're going to do that. With this case. I think that would be a long shot. Just because they're kind of timid by nature a lot of these justices and some of them are just outrageous tonight to say cowardly. That's another correct word to you. Back the fact that they were unwilling to look at the evidence in the election fraud that was a staggering thing. Because nobody says how you have to rule but would you look at the evidence. The fact that they wouldn't even look at the evidence. It's a chilling thing really that they are already playing politics. They're already abandoning their roles as arbiters of the constitution when when they do things like that so they are human beings are capable and something like that. That's a debate. There's two sides of that debate but when it comes to human life life life. There's no debate on when life begins. I mean this is just shouldn't even be a matter. You don't get to legislate away the right to live a whole group of people. But that's what the supreme court did in one thousand nine hundred eighty needs s. It needs to be

jen psaki lila rose supreme court lila eric
Will the New Supreme Court Be Brave and Overturn Roe v Wade?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | Last month

Will the New Supreme Court Be Brave and Overturn Roe v Wade?

"Given the new supreme court the new. The new justices that are. Do you think ravi way roe. V wade could be overturned in the next few years. Do you think it's possible you think how would that happen. It's definitely possible that roe v wade case law is so bad even pro-abortion legal experts say it's so bad it doesn't make sense. It doesn't hold together. It's constantly shifting precedent. Why abortion is so-called. Women's right it's not. It's killing a child You know that takes intellectual clarity and courage from the supreme court justices and they're typically supreme court's really Tries to be very moderate. They don't like to do anything dramatic. They definitely don't like undo pass precedent. That's only been done a handful of times in american history right to right. The wrongs dread scott and other terrible cases like that. So i think it's gonna be a hard push for them. But i think that someone like justice. Clarence thomas has it in him. The courage the clarity the intellectual clarity and with the right leadership on the court. They should undo the damage bro. They should just say this isn't invented. Human rights to kill a child doesn't exist. The state has an interest to protect these children. The fourteenth amendment ensures equal protection under the law that should be for all humans including pre-born humans. They're not you know less than a born human Do i think they're going to do that. With this case. I think that would be a long shot. Just because they're kind of timid by nature a lot of these justices and some of them are just outrageous tonight to say cowardly. That's another correct word to you. Back the fact that they were unwilling to look at the evidence in the election fraud that was a staggering thing. Because nobody says how you have to rule but would you look at the evidence. The fact that they wouldn't even look at the evidence. It's a chilling thing really that they are already playing politics. They're already abandoning their roles as arbiters of the constitution when when they do things like that so they are human beings are capable and something like that. That's a debate. There's two sides of that debate but when it comes to human life life life. There's no debate on when life begins. I mean this is just shouldn't even be a matter. You don't get to legislate away the right to live a whole group of people. But that's what the supreme court did in one thousand nine hundred eighty needs s. It needs to be

Supreme Court Roe V Wade Ravi ROE Wade Clarence Thomas Scott
How the Fight for the Unborn Is Gaining Ground and Thriving

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | Last month

How the Fight for the Unborn Is Gaining Ground and Thriving

"Is the battle for the unborn different today than it was when you began your organization. It's so different in a good way. I mean there's so many more voices younger voices speaking out for change and on behalf of the pre-born mothers the abortion rate has declined in the last ten years to in some ways historic lows. Pro-life legislation is at an all time high at the state level unprecedented pro-life legislative game attribute that to. I think it's a lot of factors but primarily the energy and enthusiasm of the fight. I mean there's millions. I mean live. Action has five and a half million people following us following along and we have other organization live. Action has how many myself and live action. We have over five and a half million people following our work and fifteen million people reaching weekly with our work and and these are mostly young people young women. So that's the backbone of our movement and i just i didn't that didn't exist ten years ago and it's exciting to be part of that in other pro-life groups The founded and grow into amazing work serving mothers and need and families as well as educating and getting involved in politics. I think i was at the pro-life march a few years ago. And i remember saying that i think that the trend part of the reason the trend has been changing is because of science in other words. Ironically we know things today that we didn't know we have ultrasounds you have pictures of your unborn siblings on the refrigerator and so it's not worth. It's not a thesis. You can see actually that this is a person. This is my brother. This is my sister. This is my grandchild. It's it's become a thing. Technology has enabled us to see the humanity of the unborn and so science. The more we know a from from science and technology we have the the more clear it is that this is a person and obviously nineteen. Seventy-three was very easy to talk about it. As a as a bunch of cells or the blob or something. It's less easy to do

"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | Last month

"lila" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"The story of my little sister who actually attempted suicide and she let me share her story. She's very open about it. And her story being transformed by choosing life when she experienced unplanned pregnancy. So it's much more than a political fight. it's a personal fight and we each have to fight it fight for our lives and the lives of those we love or yeah so if your sister unplanned pregnancy this is real. it's not theoretical. And i didn't know that you had struggled with with depression To the extent that you just mentioned i didn't know it at all I've been public my own struggles and i. I love it when people are public. Because everybody thinks it's just them and there's so many people that have been dealing with that so thanks for talking about that. We're going to go to a break when we come back. We'll talk more with lila rose. The book is fighting for life Evokes tell you a secret about relief factor that the father son owners. Pete and seth taliban have never made a big deal about. But i think it is a big deal i i really do. They sell the three week. Quickstart pack for just nineteen ninety-five to anyone struggling from pain like neck shoulder back hip or knee. Pain nineteen ninety-five about a dollar a day but what they haven't broadcasted much is that every time they sell a three week quickstart they lose money in fact they don't even break even until about four to five months after it you keep ordering it friends. That's huge people. Don't keep ordering relief factor month after month if it doesn't work. So yes pete. And seth are literally mission to help as many people as possible deal with their pain. They really do put their money. Where their mouths if you're paying from exercise.

seth taliban lila rose depression Pete seth pete
Philippines' Duterte Will Not Cooperate With ICC Probe: Spokesman

Pacifica Evening News

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Philippines' Duterte Will Not Cooperate With ICC Probe: Spokesman

"Rodrigo Duterte says he will never cooperate with a possible international criminal court investigation and to the thousands of killings under his anti drug crackdown. That's what Duterte spokesman says, calling an international inquiry insulting to the country's justice system. But human rights activists are welcoming the possible investigation as a long awaited step towards justice and accountability. Leading Duterte critic jailed opposition Senator Lila de Lima. Said the Philippine leader may now be harboring fears of being dragged in chains to the Hague to be tried as an enemy of mankind. Outgoing I C C Chief prosecutor But you Bensouda said that a preliminary examination found reason to believe crimes against humanity had been committed. During Duterte's crackdown on drugs between July 1st of 2016 and March 16th of 2019. Those dates covered the period between when Duterte launched his police enforce crackdown shortly after winning a six year presidential term and when he withdrew the Philippines From the International Criminal Court. Critics said at the time he was trying to avoid accountability Simon Marx reports in a major escalation between the court and the government in Manila. The Hague's top prosecutor says an investigation should go ahead over President Rodrigo Duterte extrajudicial war on drugs. Our correspondent

Duterte Rodrigo Duterte Senator Lila De Lima Bensouda Philippine Simon Marx International Criminal Court Philippines Manila President Rodrigo Duterte
"lila" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

08:43 min | 4 months ago

"lila" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"It's funny. I end biting for life the book. That's the guidebook for activist or change makers and i ended thing you know have family. embraced family life. Embrace marriage embrace heads. And if you don't feel called to that yourself support other people who are because ultimately the changes made in our own families and how we commit to love and commit your responsibility. That's really the deeper cultural. Change that the reason. We have all these political excesses of most pro-abortion administration and our history. I mean even worse than under obama. Joe biden stepped into the and even more radicalized version of himself when he partnered with kamala harris. Who's going after our friend delighting. Sandra meriden california when she was attorney general to try to prosecute pro-life journalists in despite all of that. What's the end game for. I think not just conservatives but people have conviction and truth people who care about the future of this country it's really rebuilding in our communities not primarily through the family on my second kid. We're expecting number two. And i know i know that you're you're married. Michael and the whole daily wire thing as the family and promoting families. That's really the future. I think it is. You can see the affect my first child on my under. You can see that. That is really deepened. And i can't wait for number two. And then i want to have three four five and six. I want an army of little michael's to spread around this country But but a lot of people are not doing that. And i think a lot of you see it reflected in the data. A lot of millennials in particular or just putting off getting married and they'll cohabitate and they'll have long relationships. They're putting off having kids. They'll get a little puppy that they drag around on a thousand dollars stroller but they they don't want to have babies and i say this from personal experience. I like you lila. I'm a mackerel snapping papist and click. And so. I expected to have a kid nine months after my wedding day. And it didn't happen. You know it actually. Sometimes it takes a little while. And so you know i i. It's just so so sad to me that there are some people who can't have kids. There are some people for whom having kids is a very difficult thing and there are some people who can do it and they just throw it away. They describe Having children is basically as venereal disease. They described the problem with overpopulation. You notice the people who talk about overpopulation. Never wanna take themselves out of the population. There was one and take somebody else out of the population. So how do we. How do we push back against That that movement that seems to have so much momentum. Well it's funny. Because i mean even british vogue. There was a couple that article a few weeks ago saying is having children environmental terrorism and there is this push that saying having children as a bad thing and there are economic struggles and all sorts of concerns. That millennials have about kids which i think are important to discuss an explorer but what i did in fighting for life as i walked through. How did we get here. I mean it's both the story of live action and starting at age fifteen and building it into this global pro-life movement but it's also how did we get to the point as you described where they were narrowly a million abortions a year. And why do we have this negative attitude about kids. And what i explore in what i think is so incredibly important to talk about michael which i know you've discussed before but it needs to be talked about more is it really goes back to two things number one. Something called the sexual revolution in our country where we divorced. We separated from children and marriage so now is about one thing only consent. Basically don't rape other people. That's that's the morality today around sex. Don't rape have fun if you can whatever you wanna do as long as it's to adults you're good to go. And that's not the way stacks works. I mean that can create new life sex bonds people together very powerfully emotionally and spiritually. I believe and it's not something that is just about moments of pleasure it's a relationship ultimately and there's a reason i mean discussed fighting for life pow even planned. Parenthood admit means the biggest abortion chain and the guttmacher institute is their research arm and guttmacher institute admits the pro-abortion people admit that fifty percent of the women who have abortions today in in in our country that's twenty three hundred abortions the day fifty percent of those women were using contraception in the month that they got pregnant with unplanned pregnancy fifty percent so this idea that contraception safe stacked will protect against abortion is a myth and ally and it's one of the reasons we have so much abortion because people we expect that sex is without responsibility and that really is part of the solution is changing our mindset on relationships changing our mindset on and and encouraging younger people. I mean i think a a message that abortion is a solution if you got pregnant but you should just have sex bradley. You know it's not. It's not about love and responsibility is a completely backwards message. Instead of saying celebrate children no matter how they're conceived and sexes actually precious than involved responsibility. Back the message. We should be sending people. So i think that's part of the change. That's needed a cultural educational shift for our country to have right and i love this. This focus on consent. I think you're totally right. Consent has now become the only thing that matters whatsoever when you're talking about sex however you'll notice that that when sexual matters go awry when the sexual revolution leads to bad consequences. The left needs to put this in the language of consent. So what they'll say is well. Yes this look like totally consensual sexual act but actually the woman was drunk and now the man was probably drunk to but they'll say well if you're drunk you can't give consent which means that basically any sexual union between single people under the age of thirty is date day facto rape mutual rape right because most people are having a couple of cocktails before they make these sorts of decisions. Okay now let's say that alcohol is not involved or drugs or any sort of impairment. You you've seen this now. With some allegations against rock stars like marilyn manson where a woman will say. Look i was in an ostensibly consensual relationship and now we weren't drinking water using drugs or anything but it was still. It still wasn't really consent because he manipulated me. He groomed me when i was twenty. He he just. I don't know he warped mind into consenting to things that i've now come to regret and it seems to me with their grappling with is the fact that is as you described very well. These virtues are habits. You've got the more you practice. Virtues the easier they become and vice is sort of habit to and when we engage in vice and sin we compromise our free will and you know so the heroine addict is a heroin addict and all he wants to do is shoot up heroin. He can't consent anymore even even when he's sober can't consent because he has this vicious desires. So i'm so with you. I really wish we would take the conversation beyond these shallower talking points into another area. But but how do we do it You know so much of your work is focused on abortion. This is one of if not the greatest scourge in the country but the pro-life issue is about more than that. The culture of life would be be about even more than the issue of abortion right. It's about Ultimately who we are individually and how we love others. I mean that sounds so fundamental but it is the truth. It's about how we see the dignity of every single person we encounter and so a lot of my book. Fighting for life is about just that it's not just the story of me starting this organization at fifteen and how you get started as an activist. Or how you if. You're young mom at a school and you wanna get involved in the school board or if you're student or whatever your how you get involved in the pearly fighter really any cog but it's also this journey of personal transformation a journey that i'm still on which i think is the ultimate solution to the the crises today made. How do you solve the problem of abortion. Well it goes back to a problem of personal relationship and really how we see ourselves and our own right just as cheapening of sacks as you were describing addictions around back than dysfunction around that. And where does that come from. That comes from a misunderstanding of who we are as people have what love is Of what really. We should be aiming foreign like what makes us happy. Does short term sexual pleasure. Make happy that leads to unplanned pregnancy..

Joe biden fifty percent Michael marilyn manson guttmacher institute first child six twenty kamala harris two things fifteen both second kid twenty three hundred abortions five three obama one Sandra meriden california age fifteen
"lila" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"lila" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Hey everybody welcome to this episode of the charlie kirk show with us. Today is a friend of mine. Lila rose who is the author of a terrific new book. I have to say it is the most amazing packaging i have ever seen when it comes to a book fighting for life by lila rose and i'm also a proud monthly donor to live action. I think it is the only other nonprofit. I support personally because the fight for life is so important and lila to such an amazing job. Lilo welcome back to the charlie kirk show. Thank you charlie awesome. We are so grateful for your support and very grateful for the work. You're doing so much. So we talk about the life issue a lot here on this program and it is not our sole focus but it is part of our worldview Just introduce yourself a little bit to our audience. And i want to get into your terrific book fighting for life but just introduce yourself to your audience. I'd love to so i lied. Live action as you mentioned. We are the global educational leader for the pro-life movement. So that means we are reaching fifteen plus million people weekly with the truth about human dignity. The violence of abortion we promote motherhood and fatherhood and i started actually fifteen years ago as a teenager. So i've been doing this whole adult life. And i began it because i just heartbroken at discovering abortion became very passionate and convicted that i had to do something and then it just been a crazy journey since and the goal is complete legal protection for the pre-born and just changing culture so that people respect and revere human life and love it and then besides i am also now an author with fighting for life the new book and most importantly though i am a wife and a mom and i am a christian so those are those are the top things but it just a. It's an honor to be part of this fight and it's a fight for all of us. I totally agree. I really believe this media matters hates when i say this. I'm going to say we are gonna get rid of abortion like we got rid of slavery in this country. It's going to happen. And they are moral equivalence. They hate when you say that. Because i 'cause true and so you wrote this terrific book. I haven't finished it yet. Fighting for life and becoming a force for change in a wounded world. Before we get into this. Can you comment on the pro-life movement in general a lot of our listeners They are pro-life but they're not necessarily optimistically pro-life what are your thoughts on the trajectory of the pro-life movement..

lila rose Lilo Lila rose lila fifteen years ago fifteen plus million people Today charlie christian kirk
"lila" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

04:33 min | 4 months ago

"lila" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Lila Rose joining us. Now she is the president and founder of live Action. She has a new book out fighting for life. Becoming a force for change in a wounded world. Lila really appreciate your work. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me on just for a forever listening in case they don't know. What do you do at live action? Sure. So I live action is the leading glow the global leader for the pro life movement in education, So we reach 15 plus million people weekly with facts about human dignity, abortion. We promote motherhood and fatherhood connecting and activating. Communities, toder pro life resource is and our goal is to abolish abortion and build a culture of life first here in United States and ultimately internationally and What is what is the current status of what you're seeing right now in the abortion movement across the country with this new administration, and just what are some of the fights that policy fights that we're engaged in right now. So the fight for life is at a fever pitch. And that's one of the reasons I just wrote my first book called Fighting for Life because we've seen right now. Politically, we're seeing the most extreme pro abortion politics that we've actually ever had. I mean, under even under Obama president vice president Then Biden supported taxpayer rejecting taxpayer funds for abortion, so he actually wanted to Protect what's called the Hyde Amendment. Now, Joe Biden has gone far left. He wants to force taxpayers to fund abortions. He has put in powerful positions in his administration, some extraordinarily pro abortion and unqualified people like ex savior, but Sarah's the head of HHS, health and human services. This is a guy with no medical experience. He was an activist Dick lawyer from California who actually prosecuted And tried to throw in jail pro life activist some of my own friends, So it's a really radical and extreme. But here's the good news to fight despite the fact that the Democratic Party has gone so far left on abortion, I mean, just out of touch with the safe, legal and rare mantra of their past. But you know, Hillary Clinton would say that about abortion. There's unprecedented stuff happening in the movement for life. I mean, there's been unprecedented pro life legislation in the last two years at the state level, so over 600 pearling fills in just two years. Dozens of them have been passed into law made into law and more Americans than ever are pro life. The abortion rate has been declining over the last 10 years. So even though the politics at the federal level are so extreme, there's incredible work happening where people are just passionate and standing up because they realize this is a life or death battle. And we need to protect our most vulnerable members of society, which are our pre born Children were speaking of Lila Rose, founder of Live Action, and her book Coming Out is Fight Fighting for life becoming a force for change in a wounded world. A lot of you mentioned Bezerra going after Some of your friends. Is that the David delayed in center for medical progress issue. Can you tell him? Can you remind everybody about that, Of course. So live actions done investigative reporting of abortion clinics for announced over 10 years I started doing that when I was a student at U C L A David The Leiden was a friend and co worker of mine. So he worked with us that live action on some of these investigations. He went on to start center for medical progress, and he and Sandra Merritt and others exposed planned parents selling baby body parts. I mean, actually harvesting the part sometimes of babies that were born alive with beating hearts because planned parent does abortion through six months. So some other babies are born alive, and then they butcher them, and so they're selling these body parts. Evidence and are exposing it there. This is happening in California, and at the time the attorney general was Kamila Harris, now our VP, and she sends state agents to raid with with with with guns to Ray David's apartment, take his computers with the footage of Planned Parenthood's misdeeds and then when she's replaced by ex savior, But Sarah because she goes off to be a senator, and by the way, well, that's well she's doing this My parents, even her campaign contributions. I mean, she is in the pocket of the abortion industry, and she's using state power to go after pro life activists in the state and the next savior, But Sarah takes over and he actually criminally prosecute is prosecuting Still a state of California, David and Sandra. So it's It's an unstained situation here in California, but the crooks the political crooks, who are responsible, are.

Joe Biden Sandra Merritt Hillary Clinton Sandra Kamila Harris United States Democratic Party Sarah Lila Lila Rose six months Obama California Ray David Bezerra first book Biden 15 plus million people HHS Fighting for Life
A Conversation With Travel Influencer, Glo Atanmo

Checking In with Michelle Williams

05:42 min | 6 months ago

A Conversation With Travel Influencer, Glo Atanmo

"Listen you guys. Today's episode is so exciting. I didn't want every episode to be of people that i don't know or have relationship with so i'm excited on this week's episode. This is someone who has come into my life and when we get together it is so much fun and there are a few times when we've gotten together and i've said we should have recorded this. It's horrible that we are now in a world where we're saying. Oh my gosh. She should have captured this. This is tweet about this. Is i g worthy. Except why can't this just be a personal moment between us. Everything is now. Oh we should record this. I guess because to let people in on our lives and to give people a little bit of us and so i'm excited because my next guest glow attend mo is someone that is so inspiring to me. I follow her on instagram at glow graphics and she is beyond graphics hunting. She is in educator. She is a traveler. A blogger an influence or and i don't mean influence as it only gonna look at my new nail polish. No honey an influence each life in your mind right. Please welcome i. Frank glow attend mo- such a long time. I'm just sitting here and gratitude. Thank you so much michelle and just you know you've influenced importance in the same way and i just have so much respected admiration for you. So thank you for having me on the show. It is honey. Come on this. Podcast is caught checking in. And i love to check in with people from all walks of life and i admire how you check in with yourself daily minute by minute. You are taking care of yourself. You're making moves that have you in mind cause lots of times. We can work in an industry where it's to have other people in mind mr put others first regardless of how you're doing like today i had to check myself because i've been waking up to messages. That don't even say good morning. Is it a little off. Everybody's off to the races. And i'm learning that you are type of person where there is a deadline. Yes i respect it lines. But you've gotten to a place where you're like come on share and look. I have to be so intentional because michelle. You and i both have really big hearts and we're very generous people and people know that and when you're a light worker in your light people are drawn to that and i decided unlike for my own self care. My phone goes on. Do not disturb from eight pm to eight am if the world is burning down i wouldn't until eight. Am girl like eight am. I check in with everybody else but until then wake up at five. So i need my three hours of lila nds. Meditation prayer. Journaling working out. Because if i'm not whole i cannot poor from a place of wholeness and a lot of times and i did this most of my life on wakeup check. My who needs me before. I can even porn to myself. I'm already pouring into someone else. The minute i wake up. And i'm not pouring from a place. A fullness importing from place of urgency or desperation. Oh my gosh. This sounds like an emergency. Your emergency does not constitute one on my end. Yeah and people love to project and also you'll lack of preparation is met my emergency okay and and again like you have to give you have to love yourself more than you love other people in that sound selfish but like it's an act of self care So you don't believe that self care is selfish is when you're at her that south carolina selfish. It's all about you you in. It's gonna take time to transition and and people will come back at you like you'll you took three hours to get back to me. I i was working out. I was praying. Yes i check my phone for the first time at ten. Am yes. I got back to you when i saw my phone. Lau and people can't even contextualized as a possibility that someone else could be pouring into themselves before for yemenia yet. And i think that's a great lesson for everybody. Listening to this week's episode is Maybe in order for you to do that you might have to wake up an hour earlier like you say you're up at five. Am maybe i thought i was doing something by being a no later than seven. Fifteen am but i'm to try to see what it's like to actually be a bit five eight. Am and with this time change. It's dark it's still dark at five. Am and here's the thing. Because i'm a creator. I have this like mad. Scientists evil genius in me. That i'm like before the sun go what we not feel. Almost this instinctual sense of like i'm doing something. Yes dark the sun. what's up. What you can with our sleeping grinding. Also go to bed at nine o'clock. So i also want people to listen to this and think by. Oh you ain't getting sleep. No i love. I love my come on. But i'm going like grandma. Go to nine o'clock so do you think you're most productive when you stay on that schedule. Yes yeah thousand percent because of something beautiful about knowing that even if my phone wasn't on do not disturb. Most people aren't up one needs me. They're not going to give you till eight. Am when they wake up. So the fact that. I can do what i gotta do before people wake us like i just it makes

Frank Glow Michelle Lila Nds MO LAU South Carolina
Who do you need on your team?

The Next Level Life Podcast

05:17 min | 6 months ago

Who do you need on your team?

"To all about love this and business and how to develop a team that supports here. So who do you need on your team when it comes to being lonely business. I think he's the biggest thing is like allow to cultivate your aren those there won't you because you know what you need. Nobody else does. And sometimes it can feel if you get really lonely business because sometimes surrounded by people who don't understand what it's like to be in business and it's an option to understand it right and i think it's really being mindful of like who you surround yourself. He's not going to be supportive of the success that you create. It's also going to be supporting you able to get to the next level so when you think about the loneliness you experience in your life. What is the cause of. What do you find that you need to you. Need someone to check in with you on a regular basis to you. need someone to allow you to bent. Do you need someone to celebrate you. Know what do they really need it. If you took the time to. Actually i what that would be. It can be anything from having a support network surrounding you to elevate you to the next level. So what are the by saw. Wanted build yourself a team and understand what your needs in regards to that team so attain can be attained france employees. Ease any suppo- accumulate is the evening to lane on to support you to bounce ideas off to alive of to recognize drink things. That are really supportive of your journey and being attitude telling you the truth like every pace of it. I think is really came when it comes to developing you team so you can be a bunch of also people their own have to get along the same circle so it can be a mix of business friends. It can be a mix of friends that are in business can be a night could be any business. Support your karch. Uva please because you don't have to do with a lion and the biggest thing is that this sorry much out there available to utilize to support your network into. Are you attain that. You may as well do it right because there's an r. Point sitting on your art trying to figure out why itself so grow you attainment thing about what it is that you need can develop a team. That's gonna support you now. They're us by pfeiffer online groups that he he to support you through my fave the coo l collective therefore creatives and freelances being able to support you in being really productive and taking the next step in annual creative journey then found his team which they have memberships right through tomasa minds to support you and accountable and keep you kind of two goals moving forward and then they also visiting early. Quite laughing of business shakes the logic of community and access to loss of different people in different environments different industries. So they facial surround yourself with epic people and recognize when you're in need of different people and sometimes it comes down to really having some really structured compensations and how to set up because people are going to nor that you need them on their team until you tell them so i would. I would just suggest distinct about who need on your team and who they base would have been that. You need to develop contain regards to support. Do you need to develop your friends network. Do you need to develop network of influence and once you have a bit of an idea. Blue taking my medicine right. Who is that i do. I need that support to decide. Chat way i need extra support for the two. I need someone to inspire me. Do i need someone to help me. Celebrate wins so when you know what it is then you have to go out and find them and it might be people that you already norse or just developing and strengthening that relationship. It might be people you've met in the past will quality of okay. Maybe i should just reconnect with them and strengthen that relationship or maybe need to find new people. So we'll see haven't been of an idea who they are and where you're gonna find. That's about cultivating relationship with a conversation that Policy being able to open the conversation to share within that loves babble to strengthen your team you'll support team and have them aboard sir. It might be symbols habit of compensation to let them know that. Hey i really just wanted to help my friendship group of the moment of love and if you've got some time to go and have coffee where he out. Your business needs mixture support. I just love to be able to bounce ideas on how can keep this up accountable and bam to develop that group of friendships that they had support you because you know sometimes we named the friendships where we talk all about business and the time of need friends that action told nothing about business and so once you clear on that then you can start to strengthen those relationships and say some really epic group of people that advantage support you can cheat you on. I feel so so if you recognize that you've been experiencing longest recently. I'd love you to do activity because lila is an emotional response to feeling like you need extra connection so that connection could be everything from a relationship right romantic pot off right through having friends to reach out and chat with so support yourself by creating that support network and if you have a little critic coming in saying no one's going to want to be friends with me all no one's gonna want to have to hang out with me. La off because they guarantee you this other people feeling exactly the way that you do and you just want to find them seem to have those conversations and just ask them out for coffee organized times to catch up and that's when you actually strengthen those relationships and the times that i've done that is only ever been an incredible experience so

Karch Tomasa Pfeiffer France Lila
"lila" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

09:20 min | 8 months ago

"lila" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Lila. Corwin berman is professor of history at temple university where she holds the murray friedman chair of american jewish history and directs the feinstein center for american jewish history. She's the author of numerous books including the jewish philanthropic complex. Which we're talking about today. As well as metropolitan jews politics race and religion in postwar detroit which appeared in two thousand fifteen and her two thousand nine book speaking of jews rabbis intellectuals and the creation of an american public identity. I'm so excited to share episode as lila points out in her book. Philanthropy is something that touches on all aspects of our lives and we should think critically about how it operates and what that means in historical and cultural terms. I hope you check out the book. And i've also linked to an excerpt. Thanks for listening. Hi lila will help to the podcast. Thanks i'm so glad you could join us to talk about your book which is really. It's just so phenomenal. I think that there are so many different things that we can talk about from this book and all the different issues that it really raises. I think that one place for us to get started really is to think about the manifold ways that philanthropy touches our lives. Well you know when. I started working on this book. Although i realize i had lived a life that was really very much shaped by philanthropy. It wasn't really something given a lot of you know. And then once. I sort of went back to try to create an inventory. I was a little bit shocked. I literally did try to sit. And kind of calculate like okay. How much money has been invested in me. You know my family. My children would ever through philanthropy. You sort of realized it's everywhere in in a sense. Maybe that's why i hadn't seen it that much because we're just seemed natural is just the world i lived in in. It's not just in my world as a person who happens to be jewish but in museums i go to newspapers. I read the radio station. I listen to kind of every facet of my life had some kind of imprint of philanthropy. So like in a certain sense. I think it makes sense that you know. This isn't a topic that people necessarily think of studying that much because it just feels very ubiquitous but then when you kinda take a step back from it and think about well how does this work and why does it feel like it so natural. It's so inevitable you realize like most things. It has a history and this thing that seems like it's so familiar and has always been the way it may appear in our lives today actually has really changed vastly over time and so that was kind of like the animating question that it had you know even on a kind of philosophical level like what are the things that we just take as being very natural in our lives and how can we sort of dig into them and understand how they formed at how they developed into feeling like these structures that are so so natural. Part of what you're pointing out here is the way in which so many of the tuitions that we interact with like you mentioned. Museums newspapers radio stations. Many of them are charitable in their structure. Right there five. Oh one c. Threes thinking about museums for instance or they are subsidized to large extent by foundations or other kinds of charitable donations. I think that this is an elements that people recognize. We understand this would just don't always give it a lot of thought. I think there's all sorts of ways that you can think about even when you go to university. I mainly thought about how. I pay tuition at the college. They went to his undergraduate in that tuition was paying for my education. But actually the college i went to had an endowment and it had donors who gave an it had a whole other structure that tied it not really contractually in terms of relationship to me right as kind of the customers paying my tuition to go there but actually tied it. In arguably a more contractual way both to the donors who gave money to it into the american state. That in various ways subsidize that. So i think that you suddenly realize the sense that like the room is much fuller than you might have thought or if you think about the people who are like eighteen to maybe thirty or whatever now who go on a trip to israel through birthright generally. I think it feels like you. Think of that as okay. Here's like this college student and ney get accepted into a particular birth-rate program and they go with a bunch of other college students in there are counselors or leaders. Go with then maybe you realize oh well who's paying for this right because it's free of course not free someone's paying for it right so who is paying for it. How do the mechanics of that work. And how is that person or that entity that foundation that federation whatever it might be involved in a relationship in terms of what the program is but also in a relationship again with the american state right because any of that money that is given to a five. Oh one c. Three is also tax wise being subsidized by the american state. So you suddenly have a much more interesting set of actors that really alight on these kinds of nonprofit institutions right that make them actually fairly complicated sites for thinking about how power so that is an incredibly kind of rich place to start to questions about different structures that inhabit and how those structures delimit the kinds of that operates and how those structures have changed retirement y. Yeah i mean you're talking about the way in which we have to have a critical perspective on philanthropy. I think that this is a very narrow line to walk as it were because on the one hand i think that we all recognize the philanthropy and charity are social goods and this is the reason why. The state subsidizes essentially through making it tax deductible so while we recognize that that flappy is a good thing. Why is it important for us to have a critical perspective to bring historical perspective. And how do we do this in a way that still also recognizes that philanthropies of social. Could i don't know that. I am so interested in starting from kind of normative statement of whether something is or isn't social good for me. The important thing to think about is how do these different kinds of forces that continue to shape people's lives. How do we understand their historical formation. And how can that help us ask different questions about the way they're operating and maybe eventually those normative questions about whether or not. They're doing the best that they might be able to do. So it simply is a fact that this system philanthropy exists in american life and certainly sust in american jewish life and it has a history and to understand that history. We need to ask what. I would call critical questions. Which doesn't mean that we need to condemn it or roundly criticize it but the very basic question of saying how did this thing develop into what it is is already itself a critical question. Because it's making us kind of pull back the fashioning of something being just natural or inevitable and having to ask know what were the different. Contexts enforces in conditions. That caused it to be developed. So one of the responses that i would receive when i would tell people especially people who were working in the world of jewish philanthropy when i was talking to them about the book i'm writing. They would say clearly. It's going to be very important that you talk about how generous american jews has been you know and they would talk about the fact that over time american jews have given high levels of charity in that they're very philanthropic minded and in my mind the critical question there is not to say we praise or do we not praise people participated in this system. The critical question is to ask how have people been conscripted into this system. Such that it seems like it itself defines. What is generosity because we also need to ask about other ways that people might have been using their resources or other ways of the american state might have been using its resources to have. Is this particular system. Come to define a mode of generosity. The intellectual project of this book is really asking about how an institution was shaped and how it was formed right. I mean. I think that this is a key distinction that we always seems to be making because critique does not always mean critical right those two words have a linguist relationship to each other but there are different modes of doing this and i think that intellectual critique is really a central animating process that we need to be applied to all aspects of life and all aspects of history even to things which we understand are generally good in their nature. They also have a history like you said they also can be looked from critical perspective without condemning them.

lila corwin berman lila Corwin berman american jason la steak jewish today American two thousand nine book jews two thousand america american jewish multibillion dollar one place postwar detroit once fifteen friedman feinstein
The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

Jewish History Matters

09:20 min | 8 months ago

The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex with Lila Corwin Berman

"Lila. Corwin berman is professor of history at temple university where she holds the murray friedman chair of american jewish history and directs the feinstein center for american jewish history. She's the author of numerous books including the jewish philanthropic complex. Which we're talking about today. As well as metropolitan jews politics race and religion in postwar detroit which appeared in two thousand fifteen and her two thousand nine book speaking of jews rabbis intellectuals and the creation of an american public identity. I'm so excited to share episode as lila points out in her book. Philanthropy is something that touches on all aspects of our lives and we should think critically about how it operates and what that means in historical and cultural terms. I hope you check out the book. And i've also linked to an excerpt. Thanks for listening. Hi lila will help to the podcast. Thanks i'm so glad you could join us to talk about your book which is really. It's just so phenomenal. I think that there are so many different things that we can talk about from this book and all the different issues that it really raises. I think that one place for us to get started really is to think about the manifold ways that philanthropy touches our lives. Well you know when. I started working on this book. Although i realize i had lived a life that was really very much shaped by philanthropy. It wasn't really something given a lot of you know. And then once. I sort of went back to try to create an inventory. I was a little bit shocked. I literally did try to sit. And kind of calculate like okay. How much money has been invested in me. You know my family. My children would ever through philanthropy. You sort of realized it's everywhere in in a sense. Maybe that's why i hadn't seen it that much because we're just seemed natural is just the world i lived in in. It's not just in my world as a person who happens to be jewish but in museums i go to newspapers. I read the radio station. I listen to kind of every facet of my life had some kind of imprint of philanthropy. So like in a certain sense. I think it makes sense that you know. This isn't a topic that people necessarily think of studying that much because it just feels very ubiquitous but then when you kinda take a step back from it and think about well how does this work and why does it feel like it so natural. It's so inevitable you realize like most things. It has a history and this thing that seems like it's so familiar and has always been the way it may appear in our lives today actually has really changed vastly over time and so that was kind of like the animating question that it had you know even on a kind of philosophical level like what are the things that we just take as being very natural in our lives and how can we sort of dig into them and understand how they formed at how they developed into feeling like these structures that are so so natural. Part of what you're pointing out here is the way in which so many of the tuitions that we interact with like you mentioned. Museums newspapers radio stations. Many of them are charitable in their structure. Right there five. Oh one c. Threes thinking about museums for instance or they are subsidized to large extent by foundations or other kinds of charitable donations. I think that this is an elements that people recognize. We understand this would just don't always give it a lot of thought. I think there's all sorts of ways that you can think about even when you go to university. I mainly thought about how. I pay tuition at the college. They went to his undergraduate in that tuition was paying for my education. But actually the college i went to had an endowment and it had donors who gave an it had a whole other structure that tied it not really contractually in terms of relationship to me right as kind of the customers paying my tuition to go there but actually tied it. In arguably a more contractual way both to the donors who gave money to it into the american state. That in various ways subsidize that. So i think that you suddenly realize the sense that like the room is much fuller than you might have thought or if you think about the people who are like eighteen to maybe thirty or whatever now who go on a trip to israel through birthright generally. I think it feels like you. Think of that as okay. Here's like this college student and ney get accepted into a particular birth-rate program and they go with a bunch of other college students in there are counselors or leaders. Go with then maybe you realize oh well who's paying for this right because it's free of course not free someone's paying for it right so who is paying for it. How do the mechanics of that work. And how is that person or that entity that foundation that federation whatever it might be involved in a relationship in terms of what the program is but also in a relationship again with the american state right because any of that money that is given to a five. Oh one c. Three is also tax wise being subsidized by the american state. So you suddenly have a much more interesting set of actors that really alight on these kinds of nonprofit institutions right that make them actually fairly complicated sites for thinking about how power so that is an incredibly kind of rich place to start to questions about different structures that inhabit and how those structures delimit the kinds of that operates and how those structures have changed retirement y. Yeah i mean you're talking about the way in which we have to have a critical perspective on philanthropy. I think that this is a very narrow line to walk as it were because on the one hand i think that we all recognize the philanthropy and charity are social goods and this is the reason why. The state subsidizes essentially through making it tax deductible so while we recognize that that flappy is a good thing. Why is it important for us to have a critical perspective to bring historical perspective. And how do we do this in a way that still also recognizes that philanthropies of social. Could i don't know that. I am so interested in starting from kind of normative statement of whether something is or isn't social good for me. The important thing to think about is how do these different kinds of forces that continue to shape people's lives. How do we understand their historical formation. And how can that help us ask different questions about the way they're operating and maybe eventually those normative questions about whether or not. They're doing the best that they might be able to do. So it simply is a fact that this system philanthropy exists in american life and certainly sust in american jewish life and it has a history and to understand that history. We need to ask what. I would call critical questions. Which doesn't mean that we need to condemn it or roundly criticize it but the very basic question of saying how did this thing develop into what it is is already itself a critical question. Because it's making us kind of pull back the fashioning of something being just natural or inevitable and having to ask know what were the different. Contexts enforces in conditions. That caused it to be developed. So one of the responses that i would receive when i would tell people especially people who were working in the world of jewish philanthropy when i was talking to them about the book i'm writing. They would say clearly. It's going to be very important that you talk about how generous american jews has been you know and they would talk about the fact that over time american jews have given high levels of charity in that they're very philanthropic minded and in my mind the critical question there is not to say we praise or do we not praise people participated in this system. The critical question is to ask how have people been conscripted into this system. Such that it seems like it itself defines. What is generosity because we also need to ask about other ways that people might have been using their resources or other ways of the american state might have been using its resources to have. Is this particular system. Come to define a mode of generosity. The intellectual project of this book is really asking about how an institution was shaped and how it was formed right. I mean. I think that this is a key distinction that we always seems to be making because critique does not always mean critical right those two words have a linguist relationship to each other but there are different modes of doing this and i think that intellectual critique is really a central animating process that we need to be applied to all aspects of life and all aspects of history even to things which we understand are generally good in their nature. They also have a history like you said they also can be looked from critical perspective without condemning them.

Lila Corwin Berman Murray Friedman Feinstein Center For American Temple University Detroit NEY Israel
Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

Forum

01:03 min | 8 months ago

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

"Lila wants to know. With even comment on information that there may be new variants of the virus, which the vaccines may not target. Yes, that's a very active area it the bottom line is In some people, it may be the case that certain variants Uh, reduce the efficacy of the vaccine Somewhat, so that's a very iffy If you feel kind of statement, I know, but so far we don't have evidence that they're variance that Uh, completely evade the vaccine and are causing significant problems. But but more generally I think it's likely and most experts feel it's likely that This coronavirus like this may for a number of 10 or 20 years be a period maybe a little bit like influenza viruses where we have to periodically beat get re injected, or, you know, like tetanus shots that you get boosters. Every so often we may need to be re vaccinated eventually, but We don't need to figure that out just yet.

Lila Influenza
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei-Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

The Official Watchmen Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Writers Lila Byock, Christal Henry, and Stacy Osei Kuffour

"Lombok is a TV writer who's been on the leftovers Manhattan and Castlerock, and she is credited with Damon on episode one. Oh, three, she was killed by space junk. Hello, Leela Crystal Henry is a police officer turned TV writer and has written on shows like the Chicago Code and a PB. She's also credited with them in on episode one, Zero Four. If you didn't like my story, right, your own I n Stacey Oh say for is a playwright and had one TV credit penn fifteen under her belt before. Watchmen. She since written on hunters and run, and she is credited with Clare Kiesel on episode one seven and almost religious. Awe around there. We Look Crystal Stacey. Welcome. Thank you for having us. I'm kind of a fan of what you all did and because I'm primarily writer, this is a conversation I've been looking forward to for a long time. I want to start with a question about how the room actually function because this show appropriately enough is kind of like a Swiss watch, there are a billion spinning plates. As collaborators, how did you pull this off? How did you manage to do all of these things separately and together and make it seem so seemless Will I have two kids? I've given birth twice and I think there's sort of an analogy to to being on the other side of giving birth where you look back and you're like I literally have no idea how my body did what it did and I have no memory of what happened I kind of feel that way about looking back on the almost two years we spent writing this show I'm like Holy Shit. How did that happen? I don't know what do you guys? Do you guys think well, you know what? For me I had never been in a room this diverse before and it wasn't just the ratio of. The journalists there were playwrights and I wasn't necessarily used to that like I come from primarily the procedural world and to come to a room where everything was approached by character, and there was just a different way of breaking story and worked in network. Before it's the machine, it moves at a pretty rapid pace. It would wash one of the wonderful things about it is that we actually had time to develop a chemistry with each other. Stacey. For me, it was my second show that I had worked on I did the TV show happy for watchmen but really didn't talk much in that Roman. So Pretty Green and being able to be a part of the show and seeing all of the mechanics seeing people that were so incredible at hitching. So intelligence. So in love with watchmen. Had really ever heard of the comic book but I, was talking to David about how he made the decision in terms of which people he chose for the writer's room and he was saying he really likes people who ran hot and I feel like everybody cared so much about. Not only making the show truthful but like racial aspects of it, we all just cared so much. I think because we all run hot, it's reflected in show maybe it is that part of why this all worked is because it's not like you all knew that you were writing something that was going to be sort of profoundly impactful on the environment you were working on a show in and of itself, and that's all that mattered and you didn't have the weight of expectation there necessarily. But what you did have was a very fearless approach to topics that a lot of people are just uncomfortable dealing with although obviously the show is very much centered on race. You're also tackling the persistence of white supremacy in law enforcement. The role that the media including television shows plays in perpetuating racist thought. Generational trauma and the way inherited pain damages the people who come after. And you're even tackling the kind of inherent nationalism of the Superman of the hero itself. And you did it all it seems to me on my side of the TV without fear or blinking or compromise. But I'm kind of curious because you all work together in the room how you navigated that space together to be free enough to screw up. But not being so free that you end up hurting each other. I, think the show for me. It just happened to come at a time where there has been such a major shift and America's perception of race and policing and I think that police lean and to a larger extent the criminal justice system has always been a tool of white supremacy. And being former officer, I can say that you know I'm a witness to it but I think the response to racism feels different. One of the things that really attracted me to watch men when I had the meeting with Damon. was that he was like, okay. One of the things that we definitely WANNA tackle is racism and policing and the idea of masking gain, and all of that was very attractive to me because all I kept thinking about, what would a world where police wear masks look like? Because knowing how the system works now and how it oppresses communities of color and how it negatively impacts people of color while they're showing their face. So imagine what that would be like if the police were mass,

Writer Crystal Stacey Leela Crystal Henry Damon Officer David Penn Clare Kiesel Chicago Castlerock America Manhattan
Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:13 min | 1 year ago

Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

"Christi Man it's good to have you back. I know I think you have a story about you. You are Carlos now right aren't you writing like a kick bike around and you're getting a hamstring workout what's going on with that? Yeah. So we have three cars which in most families is plenty But my daughter has taken a car up to Minnesota and she usually works during the day. She's GonNa go to Iowa the. Sun's. Going to be a junior but he said his license since December and he has volleyball every day. And then tournament sound the weekend, which I don't know is legal or not these this day and age. But basically, I'm a fifty one year old person that doesn't have a car I have a licensed but most my days and evenings I am Carlos. So. A couple of years ago more than a couple years ago I saw Franz Basch was playing around with the kick bike and John Prior. told me about it so. I've become the kick bike master of Chicago I am the. Middle aged guys zooming around on a red kicked bike. My record so far is fourteen miles. which. Is Pretty good on a kick bike I did it in forty minutes but I. Go Grocery shopping go pick up Britos things like that. Throw in my backpack and I kicked bike around the western suburbs of Chicago, which it may look easy. But kick biking is much harder than riding a bicycle It's your one leg is peddling through. So there's a ton of hamstring involved in the other leg. It's like in this isometric squad before. So. He can get low enough to get your foot on the ground. So. That's been my summer so far kicked. biking around trying to get food or go get whatever I need. I. It's awkward like I go to the wine shop, which isn't too far away but we're a backpack in my backpack I got a bottle of wine in a Burrito like. This is Kinda messed up. Usually, it's like a fourteen year old something like that but it's not often you see a fifty one year old how ask you do you? Do you take that thing through timing gates? How fast is that thing go all well, I have these hotshots because sometimes I just go out for the exercise and there's all these trails nearby and you got these hotshot bikers with all their gear on. And I always like to wear street clothes just to make them feel bad and zoomed by the bikers. So I guess I can go fourteen sixteen miles an hour when I get it moving. That's that's not too bad for non motorized. Yeah. But that's a that's a that's a short burst hold that for awhile. You tired really fast. Yeah I was just GonNa say this is a good segue innocent things that you've been some recent sprint ideas and human locomotion ideas but like the spiralling nature things, right like you got one leg, that's has one job and the other leg has the other job and I know you've been talking about the Lila Somme symmetrical stop there said you feel do you feel like you get a little like spiraling action or how long do you go on one leg before you switch to the other see don't like start running circles or do you care does it Usually I do just because I get bored I counted ten so I do ten pedals But then sometimes I go let's see how many I can do on this leg before my. My metric leg, the leg that's on the machine or bike completely is burning and then I'll switch so. Something like that, and I'm usually listening to a podcast. So I'm doing that too. So I'm. To me, there's nothing worse than doing aerobic work I. Think it's just mind numbing. So between going fast and kick by listening to a podcast and. Worrying about crashing in which legs burning word that usually is enough to keep my mind off the fact that I'm kicked biking and it does get to pissed at my children for taking all the cars and using the a kick bite. I think life is interesting. We don't have a car you know. It definitely I feel like there's always something to be learned I I I was Gonna say I will say as I've gotten older too I. I definitely appreciate having a good aerobic system but finding creative ways to do it not just running and in one direction and all that type of thing. So I did your bear crawl push saying this morning. Nice and that's hard it. Oh Yeah. No, it's super hard. It gets it gets tough like it's it gets logarithmic. You know like one, two, three, four whatever. But then he's getting five, six seven I need to come up with a way to make that more like 'cause everyone's GonNa get stuck at like eight you know or you can just rest the really longtime. Yeah. It I thought it would be easier than it actually was. Yeah, for me. I would do if it was me and someone else doing push ups and it was like you could either do two competitions. One would be just how many push ups can you do in two? Let's do that crawl thing. I would do way at the crawl thing because I get to rest and I'm way better read and it gives me a chance to like the take a break and I've rule more aerobic and all that the last stick. So I I think I, just kind of a cheater way for me to make it look like I'm a little stronger, my body or something I don't know. I feel like it's got I was thinking. It's like you do get the gait cycle in between every bilateral. So I agree I felt that same thing I you know I think the crawling huge is everyone's lack down. And we're lucky because we have gym center basements but still you start cranking off pushups just for something to do and. You can it gets a little numbing after a while and you can feel the impact that? Are Great. I crank off one hundred fifty push-ups but I'm not walking as well in my shoulder kinda hurts now. What am I really doing here is it really important to do that many push ups or is it more important that I feel pretty good after I do the exercise? Yeah. I was doing one of the last traditional strength programs I down for a while and ever since all the lockdown stuff and the weight rooms have been a little more sparse. I didn't have a barbell for quite a while, but one of the last programs that I was doing was just easy strength just two sets of five everyday basically three sets of three and I was Barbell benching every day and I haven't Jack, yeah I'm getting older but I haven't I haven't jacked my shoulder up that bad in a long time like my left shoulder was dying after awhile and every time I do those crawls like it's just like it's all good. You know you just a way to mitigate the same stress and you're back in your shoulder blades being pinned. You know, of course too

Chicago Carlos Biking Franz Basch Iowa SUN Minnesota Lila Somme I. Go Grocery Jack John Prior.
Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger Announce Baby's Birth

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger Announce Baby's Birth

"Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger say they're beyond thrilled and extremely blessed after she gave birth to their first child together. The Avengers actor and the Children's book author announced the birth of Daughter Lila. Maria Schwarzenegger. Pratt in a joint post on

Katherine Schwarzenegger Chris Pratt Maria Schwarzenegger
Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger announce baby's birth

"Like Stevens, native Chris Pratt and Katherine Schwarzenegger's say they're beyond thrilled and extremely blessed after she gave birth to their first child together. The Avengers actor and the Children's book author announced the birth of Daughter Lila Maria Schwarzenegger Pratt in a joint post on their instagram accounts. Yesterday, the 41 year old Pratt has a seven year old son with his first wife, actress on a Ferris who went to U Dub. The baby is the granddaughter of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver

Daughter Lila Maria Schwarzene Katherine Schwarzenegger Arnold Schwarzenegger Chris Pratt Maria Shriver Ferris Stevens Instagram
beirut explosion latest news

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:43 min | 1 year ago

beirut explosion latest news

"Some exercises in perspective the IRA bomb which severely damaged Canary Wharf in London in Nineteen ninety-six was estimated at just over one ton of ammonium nitrate Timothy McVeigh's bomb which demolished a federal government building in Oklahoma City in nineteen ninety-five was just over two tons of the same material. The boss which erupted in Beirut's port on Tuesday was estimated at two. Thousand seven hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. One of the biggest peacetime non nuclear explosions in history as Bhai. Route begins the barely imaginable task of cleaning up and is understandably enough growing tear gas was fired yesterday at protesters near the parliament building I'm joined. Now by Lila Milana, Allen France twenty four's correspondent in Beirut Leyla. First of all, you have been visiting the port which was the epicenter of the explosion. I can't begin to imagine where you would even describe such scene but I'm going to ask you to have a crack at doing that the scene is as you say, almost indescribable does smoke still rising from the charred MBA's off. Destroyed packing crates destroyed shelving and it says every kind of. Utility things you'd expect to see in shops. Twisted. Washing machines on the floor items from pharmacies because this of course port, this is the one thirty functional in Lebanon imposed everything and everything was stored than in the center. You have the remains of these enormous grain silos that carried the grain for the majority of the country completely destroyed and parts of them. Still collapsing there you have a aid workers desperately trying to dig people of rubble that's thirty meters deep, and the conditions are horrific temperatures of thirty degrees baking hot sun. The air is thick and brown the smell acrid burning metal and plastic. It really is post-apocalyptic and this goes on for over a mile. Entire poor is just smoking twisted metal and daybreak. Nash. have. You got a clear sense of how widespread the damage across Beirutis. How far can you go from the blast without seeing broken windows? So it. was about nine kilometers where we're still doing things like breaking windows the impact of it and having people. That's it really has spread incredibly far, and it's an uneven spread as well because. What's happened is that the grain ciders positioned in a certain way which meant that it protected half of the city of West Beirut, which historically has in many disasters. Conflicts actually born the brunt of of problems in Beirut and actually deflected the majority of the blast towards the East and the south, which is why a famous areas like Gymnasium Ohio Asha fear completely The buildings there obliterated and one of the concerns now is a lot of. Buildings the older buildings in Beirut the few buildings left in the east of in pre-civil war, which were much loved already, quite delicate on the point of collapse yesterday as people were trying to clear the streets constantly civil defense volunteers trying to pull people back away from these buildings with balconies hanging down stone starting to crumble because of course, that's a huge dangerous. People are still sifting through rubble trying to find loved ones that buildings could. New Buildings that had not yet collapsed could collapse on top of the other issue is that the new builds a lot of them are concrete and speaking to an engineer what can happen with concrete is that with a shockwave blast like this concrete cracks easily under pressure and so that can be in tunnel cracks there that you don't know about in can't be seen from the outside, but the make the building unstable and because there's really been. Very, little help from the government with people trying to go back into their homes, clear up and see what they can retrieve and whether their homes are still livable. Many people going back into very unstable buildings and some living there because they have no other former shelter. So a real risk of further injury as buildings might potentially collapse over the next few days very similar to the aftermath of an earthquake, which is what this is compared to. A among the people who was serving the damage in Beirut yesterday was of course, President Emmanuel Macron of France undertaking a extraordinary spontaneous visit. How is that being received? I mean, it's it's understandable enough that Lebanese politicians don't want to interact at a personal level with the public at the not only for their own safety but is it being regarded as strange that the first high profile politician to to take a walkabout should be the president of an entirely different country? Well, it is strange, but it's not being regarded as strange. I was down on the street yesterday when McCone was was walking through glad-handing the crowd I mean, he really was you know playing up to it and was supposed to be going to Baabda Palace, the Presidential Palace to meet with politicians and delayed that for an extra hour on the schedule to stay with Lebanese people in the streets of course, playing up very much. The fact that he was there to see them he'd said before the visit my main priorities to go and be with the people of Lebanon. And extend, solidarity's to them, and then after that I will be dealing with the political varieties speaking to them. So in the streets, he was absolutely mobbed by people he's hugging people shaking hands with them people coming up tim saying, please don't give those politicians any money that corrupt criminals we don't trust them and he responded to one woman I know you don't trust them graffiti everywhere saying don't give one. Euro. To those Michael help us. So he really did make himself as I say a man of the people yesterday I spoke to a couple of young women afterwards. WHO said to me? That man was more of a leader to us in fifteen minutes than any of our politicians have been where all day no one has come to see us where are they wears the help and later in the day after a lot of commentary that. The. Obviously. Lebanese politicians feeding quite shamefaced one. The justice minister did come down to the streets to try and speak to people clearing up and she had water thrown in her face and chanting protest. Immediately, they're not welcome and that people absolutely fading that the government has no interest in safety in their health in their wellbeing and their ability to rebuild hiding away from them as everybody marshals together to try and get things. Back to nothing like normal but something livable at least just to follow that up finally, regular listeners may recall that you and I were speaking on Monday talking about the resignation of Lebanon's foreign minister and that seemed like a pretty big story at the time He's probably ruin his timing at this point but have you seen or heard anything in terms of actual messaging attempts to help or anything from the alleged government of Lebanon or d you kind of assume that they've all got to the point where they just realized the games up nobody really wants to hear from them anymore. It's quite extraordinary. There is honesty nothing happening in terms of that what the government is doing a lot of finger pointing at each other and previous administrations about who's to blame for this they've put everybody associated with the report under house arrest and saying that they're going to find the perpetrators. But of course, everybody's saying somebody else's the perpetrator on what we know so far it seems that for six years has been ongoing negligence at the highest. Level where a several reports were were built up by the head of the port and have customs sent to the government center the Prime Minister's Office the judiciary about the fact that this was a ticking time bomb and something has to be done completely ignored. So the government is going on about this investigation saying they'll find responsible meanwhile three hundred, thousand people in Beirut homeless, five, thousand injured hundreds still missing, and honestly all you can see on the streets is volunteers. The. Lebanese. breath volunteers, obviously with their ambulances civil defence wanting tears, young people armed with spades and rooms marching down the street just going into people's homes into buildings and sweeping up what they can and moving onto the next one cleaning up themselves. They all said to me of course not here we wouldn't expect anything else from them with the only people who can help ourselves and today international aid. Groups coming in different countries, sending their own firefighters medical support in, and still a complete absence of the Lebanese government anywhere except the poor area learn Milana Allen in Beirut thank you very much for joining us.

West Beirut Lebanon Government Beirut Leyla Lebanese Government New Buildings Canary Wharf Lila Milana Timothy Mcveigh Oklahoma City London Prime Minister's Office Baabda Palace Beirutis Allen France Milana Allen Nash. Gymnasium Ohio Asha
I Love Micheladas with Fernando Lopez

Spanish Aquí Presents

05:16 min | 1 year ago

I Love Micheladas with Fernando Lopez

"Give it up really quick for number from I love. Bringing the cousins in the cousins customer. It is. We. Bring everybody through the door. Yeah, I'M GONNA. Be Your mood lighting and your looks great. Hey, do I gotta respect? Respect the show here. I got to bring it up. Got The lighting game down. Lady feels more like yeah like that. This is. The. Living Room Vibes. Have Been Tanning. We were talking about tanning earlier, have you? So actually. Having gone to the manufacturing warehouse daily so I'm like in the car in and out against some vitamin. Yeah like my. My initial point was just so dark that like Turner. Takes, me a while to get to get down because we mortgage. Berg, we just mortgage broker every single Sunday. Out in the sun, setting up the tens and bringing it down, so yeah. So I I really want to just start the you know I guess the podcast in itself with like asking you. You know you have limited Lila's and. Yes, you have your ears in air. Water? But all. Can you tell us how you got started? What was the inspiration for having this like? Michaela. Yeah, it's cool, you know. This was originally the customers. We have a restaurant elegance I'm pretty sure my sister talked about that and we're at the restaurant. It was right after the recession. We're just to figure out how to grind kind of like right now, right? Where like what do we do? What a what do we do and customer walks in? And he asks if he can buyer mich Le Mix from the bar. And the bartender is like. Can we sell to them? And we're like yeah, sure and we empty that Tequila. Bottle filled up the guys like how much and we're like twenty five dollars, I don't know. Because when you multiply it out. To get them each other it costs. Fifties multiplied out and made sense you prorated. Yeah, and then, and then we thought about the guy was like for sure he'll. He took, too so we're like this guy willing to pay. One. More you! It's like if he wants to buy. Maybe there's other people want to buy it. And this is before the cubs before anything there was like no Mitchell out there and like we thought were the one of the only restaurants in La us, but we're like slanging them. And eventually that grew and we started branding it. We're just because of the restaurant. We were slow to market, so we weren't the first ones out there. But we were taking it to all the food. Events with the Premiere of the Mitch Mobile Actually was at the L. Food Festival, and the idea came from being a food festival. People are asking us what we're GONNA. Do and I was like I'll do a mobile mentioned other truck. It was like during the height of the truck. Chris, so that was just like. The idea stuck and I just did it, so we just. Go. Ahead! They didn't go away. It's hard to do the. Them each ladder truck. We have a little model here. That's what it looks like it. Again of Vincent Volkswagen? Van Right. Then it's got a like a TV and speakers and a deejay booth inside the taps stuff from. Are you. Going though on. The model the gift, but yeah we, we have the real one and the Real William Take it every weekend. We rented out and and in all of this happened, so we'll see what happens with A. Working model though this little woman. And I'M GONNA, open a model. Now I know man, don't tell me how much different. Colors. Might make them. Suffer number for those of us who are on an uninitiated with Mitchell others. Could you explain what they are? Each Other. In its very core brought down to us essence, altered beer, beer cocktail, and the the the most purest form should either. It's beer, lime and salted rim. But we were from Oaxaca so armee are are a little more complex like like everything in Oaxaca and. And Mitch Mitchell others, or it's a weird thing because you different than depending on where you are in Mexico or even La. They make it differently they'll. They'll do something different so even even in Oaxaca well. We make kind of like a mutual alibi now. Other places they call it a mutual. Other places they. Yeah, they call me WanNa win. A lot of garlic or was it wasn't. I got. Attitude a lot of. It. Along Bald, yes, bold strong. Is, this beautiful? Virgin Mary's are like the version of that right. That would be the closest cousin. Similar Bloody Mary No. It's similar, but the thing is. Beer. Oblivious has tomato juice. Tomato juice blanding agent so like tomato twenty and just kind of softens it up. So like I mean she has line base so lime base. You can tomato and make it more of a bloody. That are very. They're very late and that would, and that's the thing with culture by culture is weird and fluid especially here in La, so the on restaurant you walk into. They'll make early.

Mitch Mitchell Oaxaca LA Cubs Turner Mary Been Tanning Van Right L. Food Festival Lila Michaela Berg Vincent Volkswagen A. Working Mexico Chris
"lila" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Done multiple combat deployments and was killed in a parachute training accident and she had six kids, and we registered them. And they went on our waiting list. And it was a few months. You know, if there was some time before we were able to call and say, hey, we can enroll your six kids and get them in an accident. And normally that's very positive conversation. But it was tough because she said while I only have five now my two year old Lila just round and it absolutely crushed us. What we had done with even the first kids we ever supported was swimming lessons and the youngest one was so little it was a, mommy and me swim class for him. And then anytime we had young kids we recommended that. And in this case, Lila drowned, and and we've looked into it. I learned that it's the second leading cause of death for kids fourteen and under, but it's preventable. Statistically, if you get swimming lessons, it's huge reduction in the risk of that. But Eliza had five remaining kids and her husband passed and just thirteen months later, Lila drown. And it just it just really blew us away. So. What we did was I called a listen, I told her I want to try to prevent this. I don't have the budget to just enroll every kid out there. But I'm going to try to convince community centers to give swimming lessons. If if there's a child of their fallen in their area, and we called lessons from Lila named it after a while, and we've been able to roll that out in the end of two thousand seventeen and then through last year and actually all the kids on our waiting lists. That didn't know how to swim we've been able to get in swimming lessons, and we just to go back then to to Elissa story, she's going through all this loss and six months after a while drowned her brother committed suicide and shortly after that her other brother was murdered. And then she lost her grandparents, and she's going through all.

Lila Elissa Eliza thirteen months six months two year
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"So it's a ton of alarms and live with comes into play. Lila comes up and just screams that you to be like excuse me. I heard ear Larmer it's time to get up. And it's not like, they're not grazed feeders. And she needs like food. It's literally just like she loves so it's great but ever since then now she sleeps with me at night. And so I've been getting less sleep because you know, how people do the thing where I think it's called co sleeping where you have like a newborn baby and it sleeps in the bed with you. And I I'm assuming they have like a little lake almost called it a raft. Foot likely kind of it's like this little padded baby thinking that gets created. I don't know. See my fear and sold this with Lila is that I'm just gonna roll over crusher. But hasn't happened will crush you. She'll she'll crush you. She'll let you know if something it's going to happen. And if all those fills she does have claws, and she has used them before. So I don't I don't worry about that. So. He doesn't have claws. I don't know my baby would've clothes. Clause a clause in this. What? Anyway sleeping with the newborn baby. That cried a lot less because I've just been really weird positions to accommodate for her comfort tenders, and I've been like, I don't know. It's just a fucking mess. So I've been getting no sleep it just because of that early day today. So here we are overall very. Very way you're busy for every other day. So we're doing the podcast. Now, we have like what we record it when I'm tired..

Lila
"lila" Discussed on Happy Hour

Happy Hour

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Happy Hour

"Infinite ways that someone could say something and it wouldn't have clay and then it'd be like just making for you and you have to talk to someone about i mess his business that i think makes it where we will see that in the wild like way more often than than the not and we always seem like it's live as part of lila's olympic three in worrying used by few businesses but i think legally easy for more companies to jump on board is because the apples got their end of it but then the other end of it is like an existing customer service you know system that businesses are already using for their website online support or remote support and on their side they see it as like one more support ticket like when more you know chat log where they need respond they don't know don't think even know came from i messed business chat you know it just looks certain plugged into their system which i think is asking businesses like by your solution using a ho second infrastructure just this thing yeah intellect plug into it basically and i think that that's nice because it's like it takes what people already do as businesses with support and says we wanna work with what you have and not you know is our is smart enough to outsmart human or add this new thing that you don't already use so but but it's it's clever i've not like sat down and watched the keno.

lila
"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"lila" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"I know the mine would be potions because it's fucking measurements and probably but also care magical creatures for me now squeezy and lila lila would be what's the fluffy est divination no no she's i mean care of magical creatures yes she's care metro greer preachers convert crew leaguers what's his name creature fuck crust squeezy would be against the dark arts really cause arts i don't know maybe not maybe he would just be like i feel like or history history magic yeah that's very scholar yeah he would enjoy professor bins drew on he likes relaxing ancient runes he would also enjoy that or like muggles because he's like what are yeah yeah he's a he's a man he is very smart someone on twitter wanted us to tell the story that was so disgusting about squeezy that we could not share is still not willing to share that doing that i wanna preserve your innocent image of squeeze beautiful man that has never done anything at all remotely vomiting in bruising he's vomited a lot getting me get so excited about us gables just as astier chris rachel in the fluffy junks adding the adjectives there so you're buttering up i've been living with my boyfriend and his place which is a house with him four other men in was wondering how you ever deal with roommates eating your food and touching your god four and how do you find balance when sharing small space with your partner.

lila lila twitter chris rachel partner professor