19 Burst results for "Lights Bookstore"

"lights bookstore" Discussed on Bubbly Bibbly

Bubbly Bibbly

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on Bubbly Bibbly

"Zone that at all. No i tell you then. I still have breaking dawn. Meyer on our shelf. See this so let me let me ask. This is not the first. Is that the second one. The third one. Why do you have the third in a series. my god is it hardcover and it's hard cover. It's really nice. And look so much. Crap i i don't know why we still have this book. The whole series is just so bad. I'm donating it tomorrow. I'm sorry my head is down. Don't know bet. I knew this was going be on the list because i know a lot of people enjoyed that whole series and it made many people very famous in the movie. And so you know. I don't i don't want to say anything about the you know. I don't wanna make a comment about people who read that book by denigrating you But it's interesting that you would have that okay. Sorry laurie everybody's huntsville metropolitan area. If you're looking for this third book in the twilight series please note that it will be available to you tomorrow at your nearest thrift store. Exactly a cup. If you want you can come pick it up from my house. Another one that. I've tried to read and put down over and over is on the road. By jack kerouac. And i really want to read this one. Because i bought it at the famed city. Lights bookstore Awesome of san francisco. And i just. I like to round out that coolness factor by actually rating it and liking it. But so you. it's so damn boring. One book that. I thought i would love but i didn't miss paraguayans home for peculiar children by ransom riggs. Okay first off. Just the name himself. Ransom riggs fascist coal name. It is a cool yet. Copen i mean i feel like you should be like a football player or something but anyway or estrella the whole point fifty shakes to you but i love the whole premise of the story but it just fell flat in the book. It just didn't feel like it was going anywhere in. The movie was really not that much better. You know that series The next book picks up exactly where this one left off so you really have to read them in in close together then yeah or it just doesn't work and i don't remember wonder why he didn't put the stories together then i don't know there. There are three or four books in the series. Aren't there in the series. Now i think yeah. I don't know i kind of lost interest in it. Yeah yeah and the sound of our cheering fans means. It is time once again for listener comments. Okay guys you guys are now going to be able to leave us a voice message for me and carmen. What exactly it is on our website. Www dot public dot com. Go to the contact page and right below there you can see you can record a message up to two minutes left so we want you guys to let us know what your yours. But you're thinking but you can tell us and we're gonna play some of that on our podcast not love that and we want to hear anything from you. Whether it's what you're reading fact you're interested in reading updates on your book club. A new cocktail you discovered. Or maybe you want to show the world. How much of a beer snob you are. You know let us hear from you. And i really hope we get some good Good plo on this. You know because. I really want to hear from a lot of what you're what the fuck is this book doing. All my bookshelves always check us out on facebook and instagram. there's also a weekly feature called. Would you rather wednesday. We also have monthly request to boesch your pictures of the titles that you've been reading that month and more. Yeah we've really do a lot on facebook instagram We do. I really love when people reply to those and You know it kind of seems like That's dwindling a little bit so listeners. Go and be sure you just pop something in there for us. Sending it encourages. Rachel in may and it just makes no exactly and at least let us know what you're reading post a picture of the buck. You're eating at And don't forget to visit. Www dot bubbly dot com. You can get some very cool merchandise. You can take advantage of the discount. Offered by our wine sponsor war king and raid some new views that i posted while. You're wondering why book on your shelf. Remember the vince. Lombardi go backers said the measure of who we are is what you do with what we have..

ransom riggs Copen Meyer jack kerouac huntsville laurie estrella san francisco boesch football carmen facebook instagram Rachel Lombardi vince
"lights bookstore" Discussed on The Bob Show

The Bob Show

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on The Bob Show

"So <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> many unions <Speech_Male> dominated <Speech_Female> by the <Speech_Male> mob so <SpeakerChange> many of <Speech_Male> the unions <Speech_Male> by by <Silence> the italian mob. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Well they didn't have <Speech_Male> like a colombo <Speech_Male> mob here <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> luciano. Mob <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> mob suit mobs. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I haven't <Speech_Male> read any <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and i haven't seen <Speech_Male> much of <SpeakerChange> a history <Speech_Female> of it here <Speech_Female> old this. I know <Speech_Female> because many <Speech_Female> many many <Silence> people have told me <Speech_Male> this then. <Speech_Male> Most <Speech_Male> of the italian <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> mafia <Silence> <Speech_Female> decamped <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Male> places light <Speech_Male> court. They madeira <Silence> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> nevada. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Did you ever hear of cardi <Speech_Female> madeira. Lot of cops <Speech_Male> live there <Speech_Male> coordinators <Speech_Male> over marin <Speech_Male> nevado <Speech_Male> costs <Speech_Male> mainly live up in <Speech_Male> the lotto i <Speech_Male> understand <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> they decamped <Speech_Male> to anywhere. They could <Speech_Male> get out of the city. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> so surprised. <Speech_Male> They went to <Speech_Male> court madeira. But <Speech_Male> i just. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There are certainly <Speech_Male> been gangsters <Speech_Male> san francisco. <Speech_Male> Certainly italian <Speech_Male> wants to connect <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it was <Speech_Male> a port and a lot <Speech_Male> of stuff came through <Speech_Male> here. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> just haven't <Speech_Male> read or heard <Speech_Male> anecdotes of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the type <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> bob organization. <Speech_Male> That i <Speech_Male> would be familiar with <Speech_Male> from the east coast <Speech_Male> new york and philly <Speech_Male> and now <Speech_Male> now like that <Speech_Male> nothing like <SpeakerChange> that. <Speech_Male> I always <Speech_Male> understood. It was sort <Speech_Male> of you. Know <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> talion sheer <Speech_Male> would allow <Speech_Male> that to evolve <Speech_Male> to that point. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't. I <Speech_Male> don't know why can't speak for <Silence> that. But they <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> they had a pretty <Speech_Male> good deal <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Male> in san francisco <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> they weren't <Speech_Male> looking for that <Speech_Male> kind of the shakedowns <Speech_Male> that went with <Speech_Male> the mov <Speech_Male> ving. They didn't <Speech_Male> need it and they were strong <Speech_Male> enough to <Speech_Male> hear the fishermen. They <Speech_Male> weren't necessarily <Speech_Male> off from <Speech_Male> sicily all <Speech_Male> from naples or often <Speech_Male> there <Speech_Male> it just didn't have a <Speech_Male> strong foothold <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Certainly all of <Speech_Male> the american unions <Speech_Male> have been <Speech_Male> traded from time to <Speech_Male> time with the mobs. There's <Speech_Male> a lot of money. There <Speech_Male> they get people in. They <Speech_Male> control the pension funds. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And they control <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know it's a way <Speech_Male> to put rob <Speech_Male> a payroll to pay taxes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So a lot of <Speech_Male> graft <Speech_Male> he goes <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Male> a in <Speech_Male> this city. I've just been <Speech_Male> aware of <Speech_Male> the irish <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> in the construction <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> construction <SpeakerChange> guys. <Speech_Male> Yeah they <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> tampa real monopoly. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Don't they <Speech_Male> where they do. <Silence> And they're <Speech_Male> They're <Speech_Male> pretty tough <SpeakerChange> about it <Silence> and <Speech_Female> You don't <Speech_Female> see many <Speech_Female> latinos or <Speech_Female> Lax <Speech_Female> working <SpeakerChange> on their crews. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Male> it's all you <Speech_Male> know they've got. They've got <Speech_Male> the pipeline of labor <Speech_Male> coming in from <Speech_Male> the pipeline. Belfast <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> yes <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the care of <Speech_Female> their own. You look <Speech_Female> decidedly irish. <Speech_Female> I am your <Speech_Male> coloring <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> idea <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> but <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> yeah they <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> been a lot of those guys <Speech_Male> in the irish construction <Speech_Male> trades who've gotten <Speech_Male> very rich on real estate <Speech_Male> year <Speech_Male> because of course. <Speech_Male> If you get into the <Speech_Male> construction they get an <Speech_Male> inside tip <Speech_Female> and they could young. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> and <Silence> i can say trading <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a little bit like <Speech_Male> dot <Speech_Male> com. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank you comrades. <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> for having me <Speech_Male> was truly wonderful. <Speech_Male> Time <Speech_Male> good thank. <Speech_Male> You was really <Speech_Male> special. And i'm glad we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> got this on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the bob show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That's it for this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you <Speech_Male> to our guest rosemary. <Speech_Music_Male> Mono again <Speech_Music_Male> you can find her books. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> At city lights bookstore <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the beat museum <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in san francisco <Speech_Male>

Beat Poet, Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti Dies at 101

Pat Thurston

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Beat Poet, Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti Dies at 101

"Poet publisher and bookseller Lawrence Ferlinghetti has died in San Francisco. He is 101, his son says. Ferlinghetti died at home on Monday after battling a lung disease. Ferlinghetti helped launch and perpetuate the beat movement. He was known for a city lights bookstore in San Francisco in North Beach and essential meeting place for the beats and other bohemians in the 19 fifties and

Ferlinghetti Lawrence Ferlinghetti San Francisco Lung Disease North Beach
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KGO 810

"Because so many people are out of work and that's why we have to get the system really energized work let's get out those unemployment checks let's get out those direct payments let's let these get these loans for you don't let the banks would be the friends to this whole system that they are governor Gavin Newsom says starting Sunday residents who are already receiving unemployment benefits will begin getting the additional six hundred dollars from the federal government on top of their weekly amount Californians have filed more claims in the last four weeks than in all of twenty nineteen after twelve positive corona virus test result of Alameda county Santa Rita jail sheriff's officials released six hundred of the more than two thousand inmates in the county lock up now activists want all of them released Alameda county sheriff's sergeant ray Kelly saying more inmates will be released but letting inmates accused of violent crime out would be unwise and unsafe an effort to keep San Francisco's beloved City Lights bookstore afloat is under way the store's been closed down since mid March and it isn't processing online orders so the booksellers can stay safe at home taking care of their stop with full pay and health care but the bills are coming due and while the owners are looking into getting federal and state help they are also asking the community for some financial support now a go fund me page is active the City Lights bookstore will have the cash they need to address immediate future and I keep taking care of their staff let's check in with heather for a look at your traffic next on cagey at sprint our priorities.

Gavin Newsom ray Kelly San Francisco Alameda county City Lights
The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
"lights bookstore" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on Bay Curious

"You're in this. This ship below deck. You can smell the sea. And the musk of the wood nearby men's way back and forth in their hammocks snoring softly amid the creeks of the hall. The Cook set you down here Bringham salt pork. It's the eighteen forties so it'll be at least another other seventy some years before. Incandescent lighting becomes commonplace but fire. Fire can be expensive smoky even dangerous angels out on this floating tinderbox especially if the cargo is flammable for light down here carew depend on glass poured in the shapes of cut gems in late into the deck. They glow above your head. refracting rays of sunlight onto the OAK cribs. These are prism lights. The light can go both ways the daylight comes down and if a fire breaks out below the prisons teams will glow with warning at the feet of the sailors above that prison. Technology used on ships is soon brought onto land so that the space is below. The sidewalk can be lit in eighteen. Forty five inventor thaddeus hyatt patents the vault cover in which a series of small glass pieces are placed in big cast iron panels. The panels are modular. So you can put many of them in a row over large Areas the glass pieces in high. It's early panels are circular and always flush with the sidewalk there flat in the ground so that the foot of a passer-by doesn't trip on them. Some are flat on the bottom but high. It also has refracting lenses where the glass extends down in triangular shapes these exposed rosed prisons toss and bend the light into dark subterranean corners. These panels of glass are called. Volt lighting involve lights are eventually made available in different variations circle and square glass different kinds of prisons in panels made out of concrete instead of cast iron. The vault lights become popular in cities. And they're used in many iconic and interesting architecture projects. Here's a fascinating one but it requires a little back story the city of Sacramento is between two mighty rivers the Sacramento in the American rivers. which for a long time made the city very prone to flooding in eighteen? Sixty to the city flooded and the newly elected California. -FORNIA Governor Leland Stanford was brought to his inauguration in a row boat to protect businesses against floods and avoid the rowboats votes that same year it was decided that certain parts of the city would be elevated up to fourteen feet but instead of lifting the buildings in some places they simply built over the first floor which means below the sidewalk. You can still l.. Pass between the abandoned storefronts of the city forgotten and these eerie streets are illuminated by vault lights which cast Sta Gentle purple glow into the dark neglected spaces. It said that people have seen ghosts down here an old woman in a black Victorian dress with a white ruffled collar and a small girl who was scared and won't let go of visit and then there's the iconic ways vault lighting has been used. Some of New York City's first. Subways used vault lights to illuminate the shining tiles. And then there's the other icon. Many of us never got the pleasure of visiting Penn Station. The original Penn Station in New York City was built in nineteen ten and and was opulent beyond belief it had this huge passenger concourse that led to all the train platforms. It had a magnificent tint arched glass canopy held together with an exposed steel structure. The ground of the concourse was almost entirely volt lights so said the sunlight pouring through that glass canopy would spell down to the lower levels but that station station was demolished in the nineteen sixties and replaced with the Penn station. We know today since then. It's been said Ed. One once entered the city like a God but now one scuttles in like a rat but what about San Francisco. What what do our lights light? Well most of them light sub sidewalk basements. You see a lot of buildings in San Francisco have basements assignments that extend out under the sidewalk. They can be used as extra storage or workspace and similar to a ship. It was less dangerous and expensive to use natural lighting reading than to have a flame under your building if you want you can see beneath the panels vault lights in the well-known City Lights Bookstore store in San Francisco's North Beach to find the underside of the vault lights. Go downstairs and walk over between the shelves of Cognitive Science and Asian Classics X. Look Up. And you'll see the colored glass dim as the feet of pedestrians crossover it. These are not prisons. Though they're flat on the bottom it's unclear. How many sub sidewalk basements there are in the city? I asked San Francisco. Public Works about it and they don't really have account but there's another mystery. I can solve our listener. Noted that a number of these glass prisons are purple and that was not intentional. So glasses made of silica which can be found in sand but often sand will have other elements in it to clarify and stabilize the glass. They add manganese dioxide it essentially makes the glass clear ish so we lease vault lights. I installed they were clear but the thing thing is when manganese is exposed to UV rays for long periods of time it oxidises interns purple or bluish. This process can take decades so when you see the purple glass it's old or they faked it and used colored glass to mimic the old class. And what is this week's question asker can make of all. This did seem like the ones that are purple are much more broken up and they've been weathered over time so that makes them very cool. Thank you so much for answering my question like I said I love your podcast from farm. Always listening to it so I look forward to hearing this one reporter Jessica paycheck. Today's Today's episode was sound designed and engineered by Rob Speight. If you are a die-hard Bay curious listener we made a little something for you. A Quiz inspired by all of our twenty nineteen episodes test yourself and see how much you retain from our shows last year find the quiz at bay curious dot org and we'll also link to it in our show. I'm Alan Price have a great week..

San Francisco Penn Station New York City City Lights Bookstore Sacramento Governor Leland Stanford thaddeus hyatt Alan Price carew Rob Speight reporter California. Cognitive Science Jessica paycheck Ed North Beach
"lights bookstore" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"We're gonna have a lease that appear signed copies of her after these things out so please by about thanks again for coming and top guys this event took place this past April hosted by the green light bookstore in Brooklyn Emily Bazelon of New York magazine her book charged the new movement to transform American prosecution and end of mass incarceration he was joined by defense attorney Julia Duffy rice and tour the people she wrote about in her book the artist to robbery and could dean kids of the center for community alternatives WCS promotion book TV attended the recent Los Angeles Times festival of books here's a portion of an interview with author and radio talk show host Larry elder from the book fair you know if you want to get something if somebody angry at something sweet little racism on it the idea that that the plea for black people over it disproportionately on the minds of a lot of people is an example of systemic restructure racism it is not true in two thousand thirteen the National Institute of justice which is the research arm of the DOJ did a study on race in traffic stops it turned out seventy five percent of black motor tour stop agreed that they were stopped for legitimate reasons it also turned out that you name the speeding offense then defense whether speeding driving without a license driving without a seatbelt on a black Morris of more likely to commit that offense and the the in I. J. concluded that the differences in stock but you had to do with differences in offending similarly a years back there was a argument that black for being unfairly pulled over on the New Jersey Turnpike the then governor of of New Jersey Christie Todd Whitman ordered a study that he came back and it turned out that you know the time because of the reflection you couldn't tell what race they were in my time because the of of the docket you couldn't tell and the study concluded that let's see we're not unfairly stopped the faster this the the more likely it was it was a black motorist driving she did like the results she said it was a bit methodology if you had a different form to do a different study with different methodology thank inclusion the cops were not pulling over black people for racial reasons now it seems to me Peter this is good news when I say these kinds of things to people prickly black audiences they often want to hear it and I'm not gonna respond this way once you once you pulling for me to be like when you put when blacks are pulled over for for it not to be some sort of racial reason when you preferred death on the study that was done by the Washington post a thousand people a few years ago were killed by cops five hundred and were white twenty fifty of them were black about sixteen or seventeen were unarmed black man killed by white cops there were more on armed white men killed by cost an unarmed black man but I defy your audience to name one and that is because when I'm on on black person gets killed income CNN income van Jones income they understand Cooper incomes Chris Cuomo but when it's a a black cop killing of a black person you don't have the same kind of.

seventy five percent
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

"The city lights bookstore and its connection to the beat writers. Remember from the fifties? Elon Ginsburg, Jack karaoke. Southern California doesn't quite get the credit that it deserves for its strong, literary community and a great spoken word scene. But now we're going to explore that with a couple of local poets Shawn Buchanan, and Mike Songsen. Hi, guys. Hi, hey, how are you? Well, Sean start with you because we just heard from Bridget Bianca in the last segment reading from the, the message. Yeah, right. I mean how immersed in the community you have to be to get something like that out to, to an audience. I mean they were really receptive, so it's really interesting about the Los Angeles poetry community. There are several places that we frequent and we're also trying to bring new poets in, because a lot of us have been reading for over twenty years amount now. And so I would say that the world's stage is one of the places where you can kind of cut your teeth and where Bianca is, you know, is a member of the announcing writer's workshop, which happens on Wednesdays, I would also say beyond baroque is a place where people show up, and we kind of enroll enroll you in the tribe of, you know, in Los Angeles. There are some other places around LA county, Tia Chucho. They have an open mic obsidian tongues, and Pomona. But I do think that we are representing and reflecting the landscape, which we came from so a lot of the, the world's stage was founded by Kemal doubt, lewd, and Billy Higgins, Billy Higgins, one of the most recorded jazz drummers in the right ever. Exactly. Yeah. And come out award-winning poet. And they founded the world's stage as a place where people could deposit, their tears. But they came from the watts writers workshop, which is insurrection. So the spirit of activism has always been in Los Angeles poetry. Maybe that's one of the reasons that we are not as applauded, or, or lots of other people because we are very much about speaking our truth, as poets and the spoken word is welcome. We, we love that spoken word pieces. Well, it sounds very insular. It sounds like you know that we're, we're, we're, we're more about addressing ourselves than telling the rest of the world who we know it may have begun in the sort of insular fashion, but the poetry community could could be the very most diverse seen in the city of Los Angeles. You can do poetry seven nights a week and prior to the birth of my daughter, I would oftentimes do two or three venues in one night, and one night, one of my craziest nights ever. I did approach even in Long Beach. I did something out in the San Fernando Valley and at the end of the night, I did something in Pomona drive and one one night. But there the community is a wonderful place in I always talk about how I really found my identity through the poetry scene. And in every different neighborhood of the city, the tough thing. That I think about when it when it comes to poetry, because I remember I had a journal wrote a lot of poetry when I was high school college and throughout, you know, some of the more angst full of my life. And when you write those things down this very, very personal things about, you know, what you're lamenting who wants to read that in front of a crowd. I mean that's like therapy stuff. It's there. But the personal is political slowing, you Sanchez says, that I mean, we've been talking about Jayne, Cortez. The personal is, again, the personal representation of what's happening in society and culture. Right. So I mean, just for example, I wrote my book, who's afraid of black Indians, dealing with the biracial try racial ethnicity, you know, issue. And, but it's personal poetry about my family, but at the same time, it's excavation of the free people of color in America, and mixed bloods in America, and subsequently that became my memoir, which I'm putting it, you know, it's coming out in August, but I do think that the personal is the place where you begin as a poet. Right. And so, but, but it's a story in its narrative that we're all sharing. But not everybody's writing about it. And that's why a lot of people kind of gravitate towards towards poetry as expression. Police say you know, there, there was a number of different surveys have said, there's more people reading poetry now than ever before a number of reasons why I think a lot of ways people are starving for some real, meaning any age of whatever you say. Fake news, and all of the different things that are happening people want some real feeling. So a heartfelt poem, everybody we all every single person on this planet, if he cut them they're going to bleed, so people can relate to these things that may seem utterly personal. But it's, it's really relevant everybody on the personal is political and the personal is also universal done heartfelt. Their storytelling shows like the moth that we carry on this radio station, I've certainly been a part of some of those their poetry slams. There's quote unquote serious poetry, right, another places. How do you compare those different types of places for me page poetry can be performed in it can be lifted off of the page? It can be memorized, but there's also something very story telling about it. There's a kind of a bit of a more serious air in less intonation and for spoken word spoken. Where does that can be said any way you want it to be said, as long as you say it in a sing song, kind of man? And we all know that poetry, and that we like it, you know, because it's like it, you know, we.

Los Angeles Bridget Bianca Billy Higgins Shawn Buchanan California Pomona Elon Ginsburg America Long Beach LA county Tia Chucho San Fernando Valley Jack karaoke Sean Mike Songsen Kemal writer Sanchez Jayne twenty years
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners members sustaining members supporters of public radio eighty eight point five FM in San Francisco and eighty nine point three FM in Sacramento. It's morning edition on I'm Brian watt. The NC double A women's basketball tournament starts today with Stanford Cal and UC Davis playing first round games tomorrow. The Stanford women. No, the steps of the big dance. Well, they played in the tournament for the past thirty two years and been to the final four thirteen times this year. There are a number two seed after winning the Pac twelve championship for more on Stanford. We've called up. Daniel Martinez cramps who covers women's basketball for the Stanford daily. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So how have they been beating teams this year? It sounds like they are pretty dominant team. They're certainly used to going to the NC double A tournament. What's what's been the big success point this year this year, they have an incredible big three of senior Ford, Atlanta, Smith sophomore guard counter Williams, and junior guard DJ carrying thing. They're huge. One of them can get hot any game. All three of them have gotten hot some games, and they can beat you inside and out. So they are playing UC Davis from right up the road. What are they looking for in the UC Davis game? Yeah. So they know UC Davis real well because Tara VanDerveer to Stanford has talk with Jan gross head coach at UC Davis quite a bit. They know each other they help each other. And the two teams did face off early in the year that was the first opener for both teams. There is definitely gonna look to stop UC. Davis is big. They have a really great inside player. So that's going to be accused key for them. But then also you see Davis left to take the three San Francisco to down once again. The cow women also start to play in the NCAA tournament tomorrow, this the fierce rivalry between Stanford and Cal extend to women's basketball. Oh, it's huge. And everyone takes it. Quite seriously, Stanford traveled up to Berkeley earlier this year, and they got beat on a buzzer beater Stanford came back after that loss and put up a twenty five point win. And then they faced off in the first round of the Pac twelve tournament. And once again Stanford was on top. But not after a really slow start. These teams get after one another, and this is a it's a real rivalry. And it's a fun one to watch. So where would they meet in the NC double A tournament? If both teams just keep winning. I don't believe they would meet until the final. So we kind of dare to dream Jared. Shame. Yeah. They'd also cow. It off the beat Baylor to get out of their bracket, which is definitely a tough task. But cow house the players inside, especially Christine, watching her is something special. She's not a few games back went for thirty points and thirty rebounds, which you just phenomenal. I remember that. I remember the morning after that. Right. Daniel Martinez crams of the Stanford daily. Thank you very much. Thank you. On Sunday Lawrence Furling, getting turns one hundred years old the conic publisher poet activists helped to change the face of literary culture when he founded city lights bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco in the late nineteen fifties. He cuties khloe Veldman spoke with him about his life and work. The last couple of years have taken their toll on Lawrence founding Getty. He's frail and nearly blind. And no longer does. In person interviews an echo in my phone. I'm not getting your voice, very clearly funding Getty's body might be failing him, but his mind is on fire. He's hoping for a revolution. Trouble is the United States isn't ready for revolution. I asked him what it would take to start a revolution. Take a whole new generation that wasn't trapped in the me me me culture of this country wasn't committed to. Commercial and material success fanning Gatti's rejection of capitalism. His doomsday worldview drive,.

UC Davis Stanford Stanford daily Stanford Cal Lawrence Furling Daniel Martinez San Francisco Brian watt Pac Getty Sacramento basketball United States Christine NCAA Gatti
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

"Later today on KCRW is all things considered president Donald Trump's emergency declaration has freed up money to pay for his border wall. But that could mean cuts to other programs run by the Pentagon. You'll find out what's on the chopping block on the next all things considered starting at four thirty today right here on KCRW. It's eight fifty one. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The poet and publisher Lawrence Furlan Getty is enjoying one benefit of living to one hundred. He's around to read tributes and retrospectives of his long career Furlan Getty is known for his beat poetry his bookstore and small press both called city lights and his defense of the first amendment now that he's turning one hundred celebrations of his life in worker planned at multiple venues in San Francisco where he lives not that he's done working. He's also just published a new novel Tom Vitale has a story for Lawrence Furlan Getty. Living to be a hundred is no fun. Speaking from his home in north beach. Recently Furlan Getty said he's practically blind now he can't read and he's skipping. His big birthday bash at city lights. They're going to have quite a celebration. But I won't be there. There's no use my appearing in public because I couldn't speak. I mean, I could speak, but an academy eyesight. It would be. I don't know what it would be. Nevertheless, Furlan Getty has a lot to celebrate his nineteen Fifty-eight book of poetry, a Coney Island of the mind sold more than a million copies in it. He compares the horrors depicted in Goya's paintings of the Napoleonic wars to scenes of post World War Two America. Here. He is reading in nineteen Ninety-four. They are the same people only further from home on freeways, fifty lanes wide on a concrete continent spaced with land billboards illustrating imbecile illusions of happiness his language in his humor. And the things he was saying were things that appeal to could be understood by the average man on the street, Gerald, Nicole Asia is a bay area critic who has written extensively about the beat writers. He says Furlan giddy is notable for writing poetry in everyday language. A poet in the American voice, and that was one of the breakthroughs, of course of the fifty. Was taking poetry away from academia away from this rarefied aesthetic language that nobody could understand and writing in the voice of ordinary people. Critics however didn't consider Furlan giddy on a par with the other beat writers. He called his friends Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso Allen Ginsberg Furlan Getty doesn't wanna talk about his past now. But in nineteen Ninety-four he told me that even though he was raised in New York. He never met those east coast writers until he moved to San Francisco and opened city lights bookstore is natural place for poets to hang out, and they started showing up their city lights became a magnet for west coast. Intellectual and leader, a tourist destination. Furlan Gedi also started a small press called city lights books in the fall of nineteen fifty six he published a little seventy five cent. Paperback the first edition of howl by Allen Ginsberg. I saw the best of my generation destroyed by madness starving. Hysterical. Make it.

Lawrence Furlan Getty Gregory Corso Allen Ginsberg F Furlan Gedi KCRW Allen Ginsberg Donald Trump Tom Vitale Steve Inskeep San Francisco Pentagon Rachel Martin NPR Coney Island president Jack Kerouac publisher Nicole Asia Goya New York
"lights bookstore" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"These giant polices to go to the movies. And in would be peaches plums, nectarines, it'd be like carcasses chicken and Turkey from the night before debut thermos coffee thermos of chocolate note. It's like we were going to desert. Join us for this story and more next time on the moth radio hour from the public radio exchange. PX dot org. Tonight at eight on ninety three point nine FM WNYC coming up on morning edition, the West Virginia. Attorney general is suing a Catholic diocese alleging that it knowingly employed. Pedophile 's the wheeling Charleston, diocese engaged in a pattern of denial and cover up. It's priests were sexually abusing children the suit accuses church leaders violating consumer protection law. We'll have more on that story coming up just about fifteen minutes here on WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The poet and publisher Lawrence Furlan Getty is enjoying one of the benefits of living to one hundred. It's almost like your present to read your own. Obituary Furlan Getty is known for his beat poetry his bookstore and small press both called city lights and his defense at the first amendment now celebrations of his life and work are planned at multiple venues in San Francisco where he lives not that he's done working. He's just published a new novel, Tom the tally has a story for Lawrence Furlan Getty. Living to be a hundred is no fun. Speaking from his home in north beach. Recently Furlan Getty said he's practically blind now he can't read and he's skipping. His big birthday bash at city lights. They're going to have quite a celebration. But I won't be. There is no use my appearing in because I couldn't speak. I mean, I could speak, but. Unaccounted my eyesight. It would be. I don't know what it would be nevertheless Furlan giddy has a lot to celebrate his nineteen Fifty-eight book of poetry, a Coney Island of the mind sold more than a million copies in it. He compares the horrors depicted in Goya's paintings of the Napoleonic wars to scenes of post World War Two America. Here. He is reading in nineteen Ninety-four. They are the same people only further from home on freeways, fifty lanes wide on a concrete continent spaced with land billboards illustrating imbecile illusions of happiness his language in his humor. And the things he was saying were things appeal to could be understood by the average man on the street. Gerald, Nicole is a bay area critic who has written extensively about the beat writers. He says Furlan giddy is notable for writing poetry in everyday language, poet in the American voice, and that was one of the breakthroughs, of course of the fifties. Was taking poetry away from academia away from this rarefied aesthetic language that nobody could understand and writing in the voice of ordinary people. Critics however didn't consider Furlan giddy on a par with the other beat writers. He called his friends Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso Allen Ginsberg Furlan Getty doesn't wanna talk about his past now. But in one thousand nine hundred four he told me that even though he was raised in New York. He never met those east coast writers until he moved to San Francisco and open city lights bookstore is natural place for post hang out, and they started showing up their city lights became a magnet for west coast, intellectuals and leader a tourist destination Furlan giddy. Also started a small press called city lights books in the fall of nineteen fifty six he published a little seventy five cent. Paperback the first edition of howl by Allen Ginsberg. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness starving. Hysterical. Mated dragging themselves. The negro speaks at looking for an angry fix. How was a new type of poetry that became an anthem for the nascent counterculture? Well, not the sides of things just the way rock music in the sixties, not the sides out of you'll music world. How includes passages of homosexual imagery Furlan Getty was arrested in nineteen fifty seven on charges of publishing obscene material at the end of a long federal trial. He was acquitted critic Germanic Osias says Furlan goodies to greatest accomplishments for fighting censorship and inaugurating a small press revolution up until that point getting published was difficult thing if you were a radical and innovative writer, you would be rebuffed by mainstream publishers by creating this press out of nothing's city lights press. He said, look, you don't need these big publishers in New York, Lawrence Furlan giddy has always been an advocate for the underdog in part because of his own life story, and it's a tale right out of dickens. His father died shortly before he was born. And his mother was committed to a mental hospital shortly after he was raised by an aunt. And then by foster parents, his new autobiographical novel called little boy begins like this little boy was quite lost. He had no idea who he was or where he had come from Furling giddy. Enlisted in the navy after Pearl Harbor he served as an officer at Normandy on d day, and at Nagasaki after the atomic bomb that experience turned him into a lifelong pacifist. He began writing poetry at a revolutionary time in arts and music and in nineteen ninety four he still believed art could make a difference. I really believe that art is capable of total transformation of the world and of life itself, and nothing less really acceptable. So if art is going to have any excuse for beyond being a leisure class placing as to transform life itself. And that is what? Lawrence Furlan giddy has been doing for most of the century the secret to his longevity. Have a good laugh and you live longer for NPR news. I'm Tom Vitale in New York. The library of congress has announced the national recording registry class of twenty eighteen it is an annual list of twenty five recordings that the library deems worthy of preservation think of it as a kind of hall of fame for recorded sound, both voice and music and the induct these include. Jay Z's two thousand one.

Lawrence Furlan Getty Lawrence Furlan Furlan Gregory Corso Allen Ginsberg F New York Tom Vitale Furling giddy San Francisco WNYC Turkey West Virginia NPR Steve Inskeep Allen Ginsberg Rachel Martin Charleston Attorney congress
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:18 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Integration celebrates his one hundredth birthday on March twenty fourth for sixty five year old city lights books. Almost certainly the best bookstore in the United States. According to New York Times is hosting a series of birthday events, including a book released for his new novel little boy and the mayor's office has declared March twenty four th to be Lawrence Furlan Getty day, and in this hour, we're going to discuss the ways in which Lawrence Furlan Gedi has influenced and reflected the culture and politics of San Francisco. Joining us in studio is khloe Veldman reporters. K Q E news who recently had occasion interview. Furlan getting welcome khloe. Hello, michael. Hello to you. And Hello to Elaine Katzenberg link hasn't burger is publisher and executive director of city lights books. Good to have you back with us. Welcome. Thank you and Oscar via LAN managing editor 's is Uva. Who is also a noted San Francisco figure and that. Deserves a noted literary journal and he's been involved in that since well it's been publishing since nineteen eighty-five. When did you get twenty eleven twenty eleven glad to have you back on four. Thank you. It's been too long. You can actually join us in this program. If you have thoughts about Lawrence Furling Getty, if you want to reflect on his influence on you on his poetry on his politics, which had been certainly formidable in terms of San Francisco's culture, we indeed welcome your involvement in the program, and you can give us a call right now. In join us at our toll free number eight six six seven three three six seven eight six. Let me give out that number again. Thoughts and reflections about Lawrence Furlan Getty and his legacy has contributions and really has cutting a major figure here in San Francisco. Eight six six seven three three six seven eight six and also get in touch and Twitter. Facebook rat forum or Email us forum at D, And let's begin with khloe Veldman who as I said had occasion recently to interview Lawrence Furlan Getty. And he was quite spry in quite with it. I mean for centenarian he suddenly is very spry very fiery pushed back on a lot of my questions. It was a delightful interview. We talked about all sorts of things said many many stories about his adventures, and we'll sat out we talked about city lights as well quite a bit. Well, we'll talk about all that certainly over. The course of this hour recently. I had occasion interview Wayne Tibo, and I told him that he's a young man compared to Furlan Getty. Ninety eight and he's still playing tennis on a regular basis. Well, let's talk about what you manage to find out in your conversations with him. He talked about San Francisco. Good deal. Didn't he by movie some of his original mission? You know, he got here in the very early fifties. Sort of drawn to the to the west saying, it's a sort of a final frontier. A place for new ideas, you know. And when he got here he found that. I guess there was no real literary seemed to speak of. When I ride San Francisco, they were down down bookstores e closed at five pm on Fridays and wearing opened on the weekends. So the whole idea of city lights was to furnish your locus for the literary community, which we from the very beginning. That was our aim. And it did that it became kind of a stop for people of literary vent to see city lights bookstore. Just to go there. And also to hope that they would in many instances meet Lawrence Furlan Getty. Right. But it was a huge risk because unlike other bookstores around the country city lies decides to stay open seven days a week in late into the night. I mean, none of this five PM closing and not open at the weekends. And plus the other thing about it was that the business is focused on selling. Paperback all paperback book, I mean, this is a time when when the literary establishment only cared about hardbacks and Mr. FANG finally Getty said you could only get like cheap scifi novel novels and mysteries paper bags at the time. It was a massive risk. And there was also talking about risks. Elaine chasm burger, let's get into the publishing hair risk of publishing. Allen ginsberg. I'll I've been wound up in court one the censorship. Right. Well, Lawrence was really excited by Ginsberg's poetry and above and beyond. Any other reason that was? Why he published how was because he really recognized that something poetically important was happening. And he wanted to be a part of it. He's it was always a smart publisher. And he wanted to be part of the cultural just and to make things happen. But he was aware of the fact that some of the content in how might be problematic for sensors, and he had enlisted the ACLU before he was even arrested to put out feelers to see if they would be interested in taking on this case for that to happen. Indeed it did. And he was arrested and sent to jail and could have lost the business and all of that was a great risk. But change the whole nature of censorship. Really? Well, it was an important piece of of law that was passed that you open the door for further litigation. And. Yeah, definitely. And can you talk a little, you know, a lot about his life and have been with him. So many years in a good ally and partner and all that. He he said when he first came to San Francisco, it looked like Atlantis to him. It was a magical city to have made a great deal of difference in his view, not only politically as we've discovered, but also just as aesthetic. Yeah. Well, you know, approaching San Francisco from the bay, which is what most people had to do back. Then people forget that most GI's came through Treasure Island. Lawrence came through Treasure Island. Just like other people did. And when you see San Francisco that way as your first view of the hills. Now, it's it's sad. It's mostly obscured from that view, but most of us who are older came to San Francisco, if you look at the city, you'd see the hills covered in little white white and pastel buildings, and that's what he describes. He describes something that sounds like a I view of of of Greece or something. And it was much smaller back, then obviously, height wise and size wise in general. But I felt that way about San Francisco when I first saw too I have to say, yeah. Likewise to I'll do that. And we'll talk more about Lawrenceville and get his life and his earlier life, particularly says he has this Novela which is somewhat quasi autobiographical. Although he said he compared himself modestly to Joyce in portrait of the ours is a young man. It's a different version of me or something along those lines, curvy alone is with us here too in studio, managing editor 's is Uva, and that's been a literary journal since one thousand nine hundred eighty five and Oscars at the hell now, ask her, you know, I can remember my brother had a copy of Coney Island of the mind having effect on me as a young, man. My brother who later on would be called the widow of San Francisco by hurricane no less, but that book really transform many people, and it had an enormous impact on so many of us. Absolutely. Did. I mean, it's not it's not unusual to hear particularly among. Not just poets, but musician's musician people like Tom waits, and folks like that will tell you how much they love Coney Island of the mind and the type of influence that had on them. I think it's sold a million copies. Something along these, you know, something along these lines, and it's still been in principally from the first came out. I think new directions is is the publisher behind that. But yeah, you know, I think. This kind of relates to what Elaine was saying about these first impressions of San Francisco. There's a there's a sense of freedom of the spirit in those in those poems. There's a sense of finding yourself. That's the say of life beyond whatever the conventions are before you would you've been given. And I think it's if someone wanted to look into it. More. There might be something pretty fruitful in seeing. Why was that this wonderful poet writer artists? Lawrence Furlan Getty would be so apt for San Francisco at that time. I was talking about this earlier with Elaine that the one of the things I think that the Lawrence represents or has represented for me. And I think for the city, and this is not just there is writing. But through the bookstore. The through the book line is this bohemian ISM and by building. Unisom. I don't necessarily mean the idea of you know, we're all living rather shabbily, although that can be part of it. Now, rather the idea that you don't live life. According to strict conventions that you know, you go to where the hard needs to go in that you live this sort of life of the mind. I think that's that's I think that's why Lawrence's writing. Resonates. But I also think that's why we're so happy you're looking forward to this weekend for the hundredth birthday because that sort of perspective if not values has seemed to really inform our perception of what the city is. And who we are you might distinguish between bohemian ISM and beatnik ISM. If there is such absolutely. San Francisco is definitely ready for a Bohumil human leader. But he was also a beat Nick leader. And we associate and perhaps singularly with the beat movement as much as we do Ginsburg or care Wak or any of those figures. I read someone recently saying thing was Silverberg who is a fairly close friend of Furlan, gettys and. He was saying in the journal called selene that he's the last of the beat poets. Well, we have Diane into prima. So he shouldn't have said Gary Snyder avenue still be poets around. But what he began to stand for was a sense of really keeping that bohemian spirit alive. And it is still I hope alive in San Francisco, although he's been saying let me go back to you on this khloe some things especially when he became poet laureate. And you about the corporatization and Millie loss of that bohemian spirit. Definitely I mean, I think he feels that San Francisco has definitely changed in recent decades. Little boy was quite lost. He had no idea who he was. Back when I write nineteen fifty Shan Francisco was shared the last frontier from the literary point of view, or as generally speaking today, it's been absorbed in the general culture of American is no longer so special. Lots about. Things like car culture, how much he dislikes what he calls auto getting in the way that everyone's getting in that 'cause and following these same source of commercial patents. He was very interesting. When I asked him about talk about what again altogether altogether and a little bit. He became very very passionate about that. Again. Sweeping the country..

San Francisco Lawrence Furlan Getty Lawrence khloe Veldman Lawrence Furlan Gedi Lawrence Furlan Elaine Katzenberg Furlan Getty Lawrence Furling Getty publisher Shan Francisco Allen ginsberg managing editor United States New York Times Uva michael Twitter ACLU
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The next few weeks. We'll tell you the surprising origin stories behind the fortune cookie. The my tie and Santamaria barbecue. Little boy was quite lost. He had no idea who he was or where he had come from. That's poet Lawrence Furlan, Getty reciting, the opening lines of his new autobiographical novel little boy, he helped change the face of literary culture when he founded city lights bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco back in the nineteen fifties. He's turning one hundred on March twenty fourth. But as khloe Veldman tells us in many ways, Furling Getty's always been a mischievous little boy until recently Lawrence founding Getty was vacationing in Mexico popping into the city lights in working on poetry. But the last couple of years have taken their toll on his almost hundred year old body funding Getty's nearly blind. He spends a lot of time in bed and longer does. In person interviews an echo in my phone. I'm not getting your voice, very clearly that is seen as his assistant adjusts. The volume on our coal failing Getty's like a formula. One drive leads me in the dust have an engine. It doesn't run on petroleum. He says it runs on pure energy. Actually, finally, get to use a lifelong critic of American car culture calls. It auto Gaidon auto getting is sweeping the country. And.

Furling Getty Lawrence Furlan khloe Veldman Santamaria San Francisco Lawrence Mexico hundred year
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The secrets really in all three combined with the sausage cheese the dough and then just fresh up the hot Cheetos, and then we bake oven. And then afterwards you put the regular original hot Cheetos on their hikes. This people see the photos of the hot Cheetos, pizza and social media and come from all over to try it. So of course, I couldn't leave without trying some myself. All right. I'm gonna take a bite. But the most surprising thing to me about the story of flaming hot Cheetos. Besides the fact that people are putting them on pizzas is Richard Montana's story it hasn't been co opted by big companies claiming the invention as their own, and it hasn't been Mitha fighter. Whitewashed Gustavo says this is pretty rare when it comes to Mexican food. There is so many origin stories myths, really. And almost all of them are fake almost all of them are just a bunch of lies. And so the flaming hot Cheetos origin stories one of the very few. That has actually been verified not only is it verified. Richard Montanez has written autobiography there's a feature film about him in the works. Arianna says Hollywood doesn't have nearly enough stories featuring Latinos in a positive light. But Richard's life is kind of the perfect inspirational tale featuring an incredibly unique snack. What flavor is flaming hot is not a flavor. It transcends flavors. It transcends food. That's why. It just hits people, and it stays with people so much. For the California report. I'm Bianca Taylor. Flaming hot Cheetos are just the latest California creation. We're digging into for our Golden State plate series all about iconic snacks drinks and dishes that got their start here in California. Check out some of the other stories, we've cooked up the MARTINI. The piece goes sour the friendship and salad. Dressings like green goddess and ranch. You can check those out at California report dot org over the next few weeks. We'll tell you the surprising origin stories behind the fortune cookie. The my tie and Santa Maria barbecue. Little boy was quite lost. He had no idea who he was or where he had come from. That's poet Lawrence Furlan, Getty reciting, the opening lines of his new autobiographical novel little boy, he helped change the face of literary culture when he founded city lights bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco back in the nineteen fifties. He's turning one hundred on March twenty fourth, but as KiKi Moody's khloe Veldman tells us in many ways Furling Getty's always been a mischievous little boy until recently Lawrence founding Getty was vacationing in Mexico popping into city lights and working on poetry. But the last couple of years have taken their toll on his almost hundred year old body funding Getty's nearly blind. He spends a lot of time in bed and no longer does in person interviews echo in my phone. I'm not getting your voice, very clearly that is seen as his assistant adjusts the volume on our call. Failing Getty's like a formula. One driver leads me in the dust ever Nanjing. It doesn't run on petroleum. He says it runs on pure energy. Actually, finally get he is a lifelong critic of American car culture calls. It auto Gidon again is sweeping the country. And there's no stopping it. Nah. Well, yes. Can be done, but they would be revolutionary in the United States isn't ready for revolution signing Getty's rejection of capitalism. His doomsday worldview drive, his approach to life and literature. This is the best advice he has to offer the young duck and run for cover. I had an unhappy childhood. I saw Lindbergh land I looked homeward and saw no angel. You can hear the one two punch of adult world wariness and childlike fun in this vintage recording a and Getty reciting, an excerpt from his best selling nine hundred fifty eight poetry collection. A Coney Island of the mind. I got caught stealing fence from the five and ten cent store the same month. I made eagle scout. No question. This little boy had to grow up fast and become a man. He was born in one thousand nine hundred nine in Yonkers New York in his new book little boy, the also talks about his early years in distanced that pass invoice. He was with Emily. Me love very much about how his aunt had volunteered to raise him because his mother who already had four.

Getty California Richard Montanez Richard Montana Santa Maria Richard Mitha Gustavo Nanjing Bianca Taylor Emily Arianna Yonkers Lawrence Furlan Coney Island United States San Francisco Hollywood Lindbergh
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pizza secrets really in all combined with the sausage cheese. And the dough. And then. Crush up the hot Cheetos, and then we bake oven. And then afterwards, you put the regular original Paci goes on their hike says people see the photos of the hot Cheetos pizza on social media and come from all over to try it. So of course, I couldn't leave without trying some myself. All right. I'm gonna take a bite. But the most surprising thing to me about the story of flaming hot Cheetos. Besides the fact that people are putting them on pizzas is Richard Montana's story it hasn't been co opted by big companies claiming the invention as their own, and it hasn't been Mitha fighter. Whitewashed Gustavo says this is pretty rare when it comes to Mexican food. There is so many origin stories myths, really. And almost all of them are fake almost all of them are disa- bunch of lies. And so the flaming hot Cheetos origin stories one of the very few. That has actually been verified not only is it verified. Richard Montanez has written in autobiography there's a feature film about him in the works. Arianna says Hollywood doesn't have nearly enough stories featuring Latinos in a positive light. But Richard's life is kind of the perfect inspirational tale featuring incredibly unique snack. What flavor is flaming hot is not a flavor. It transcends flavors that transcends food. That's why. It just hits people, and it stays with people so much. For the California report. I'm the Taylor. Flaming hot Cheetos are just the latest California creation. We're digging into for our Golden State plate series all about iconic snacks drinks and dishes that got their start here in California. Check out some of the other stories, we've cooked up the MARTINI. The piece goes sour the friendship and salad. Dressings like green goddess and ranch. You can check those out of California report dot org over the next few weeks. We'll tell you the surprising origin stories behind the fortune cookie. The my tie and Maria barbecue. Ooh. Little boy was quite lost. He had no idea who he was or where he had come from. That's poet Lawrence Furlan, Getty reciting, the opening lines of his new autobiographical novel little boy, he helped change the face of literary culture when he founded city lights bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco back in the nineteen fifties. He's turning one hundred on March twenty fourth. But as key khloe Veldman tells us in many ways, Furling Getty's always been a mischievous little boy until recently Lawrence founding Getty was fake hastening in Mexico popping in the city lights in working on poetry. But the last couple of years have taken their toll on his almost hundred year old body funding Getty's nearly blind. He spends a lot of time in bed and no longer does. In person interviews an echo in my phone. I'm not getting your voice, very clearly that is seen as his assistant adjusts the. The volume on our core failing Getty's like a Formula one driver lease me in the dust. I haven't engine it doesn't run on petroleum. He says it runs on pure energy. Actually only gets. He is a lifelong critic of American car culture calls. It auto Gaidon on again. Sweeping the country. And there's no stopping it. Well, yes, things can be done. But they would be revolutionary in the United States isn't ready for revolution. Funding Getty's rejection of capitalism. His doomsday worldview drive is approach to life and literature. This is the best advice. He has to offer the young duck and run for cover. I had an unhappy childhood. I saw Lindbergh land. I looked homered and saw no angel. You can hear the one two punch of adult world wariness and childlike fun in this. Vintage recording and Getty reciting an excerpt from his best selling nineteen fifty eight poetry collection. A Coney Island of the mind. I got caught stealing fence from the five and ten cent store the same month. I made eagle scout. No question. This little boy had to grow up fast and become a man. Getty was born in one thousand nine hundred nineteen in Yonkers New York in his new book little boy, the also talks about his early years in distanced that pass invoice. He was with Emily me. Love very much about how his aunt had volunteered to raise him because his mother who already had four sons couldn't handle a fifth born a.

Furling Getty California Paci Richard Montanez Richard Montana Coney Island Richard Mitha Gustavo Lawrence Furlan Arianna Maria barbecue United States San Francisco khloe Veldman Yonkers Hollywood Emily Lindbergh
"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

15:56 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on KCRW

"Represents something that I love about was Angeles. I think shortly after I I knew him he became the director of beyond baroque, and he was doing their weekly reading series. I was going at that time practically every week and attending the wonderful workshop at beyond baroque, which was oh bomb. Flanagan was one of its leaders Dennis cropper, Amy Gerstner. We were all there showing the younger four one poetry was every Wednesday, very true. And before us Tom waits used to go. There used to go there, and John Doe of x oh wild generation of general generation, Venice was considered to be a place where lots of beer. Poets were stone living. Yes. Was not only a figure at beyond baroque. He went on to become the buyer at one of the best bookstores in town during its years book soup. Yes, he now does buying for an art gallery bookstore or a little bit of buying specifically books are by did the buying bet like for art book at housing worth. I delivered the buying but the toutes dafter purchased the books. I have to give them credit. Tosh Berman is the son of Wallace Berman who is perhaps the best known name in the art scene of his time for his work doing the semblage or as we in the east said assemble gosh. Blah. We've got soon. So the wonderful city lights bookstore has a publishing company and sitting nights publishers has published Tosh growing up in Wallis Berman's world. Yes. And to some extent, I moved to Los Angeles and grew up in Los Angeles that was Tajiks world. He was making sure that the books they needed could be found in the bookstores or that the poets I wanted to hear would be reading and beyond blue. Yes. This book is the meeting point between the art world the film world. And Los Angeles's literary world music as well and music as well that my father was extremely Chris Matic. He could walk into a room and attention will be towards him without a Saint a word, and he was friends with a lot of the interesting actors of his time among them dean Stockwell, Russ Tamblyn, Billy grey, Bobby Driscoll who was an early Walt Disney actor and Dennis hopper. Hopper. And he more or less introduces these men to the idea that they don't have to be limited in their art. They each of them start doing photographs. Yes. Doing assemblage? He says you can be an artist. Yes. All these other except for Dennis all the other actors were child. Actors. So there were raised in the Hollywood school system. There were raised to be working very young age. And they really I don't believe they had really had a life outside of making movies are being outside the Hollywood school system. Like, I know like dean and Russ went to school was Lisbeth Taylor, for instance. So so that worlds are very small private world. When finally when they became adults. They all worked as actors, but they had a struggle from the childhood era to adulthood, didn't you remind go to high school with Carol Burnett. Yes. And she knew my dear deported friend, Carole, Eastman, and her brother, Charles, Eastman, Shaughnessy admin. Carol road five piece. Yes. And she wrote it for Jack Nicholson. Yes. And she likes to say that without five easy pieces. Jank would have been an eccentric. But that this made him a romantic hero five piece. I think that's true. That's that's an interesting commentary. I mean attack has been a business, you know, he did all those like horror films in the sixties. And then finally it was easy rider. Dennis hopper. Easy rider got purse breakout role, and then by Z piece of let that breakout role was a novelty wrong is a grand eccentric in in in in five easy pieces. He's romantic lead. And I believe you probably notice to leave that that character is based on Carol's, brother. Caroline. Caroline, charles. Are there was something of a sibling war about? Who story? Wasn't fact tell oh, why didn't it lasted most of their lives and fat interesting. But I loved Carol Carol would talk to me about your mother. And so did the woman who hired me at this radio station. The general manager of the time was Ruth Hirschman later known as Ruth Seymour half. And she was friends I believe with both of your parents because the poet Jack Hirschman was friends with them. So we're talking about a time in LA with the poetry community the acting community and the heart five the famous five easy pieces team were Jack Nicholson says in the was Karen black at the at the diner. And you're talking was the waitress. The other two women who are like, I think playing lesbians characters that was twenty thousand all and Halina Halina, of course, and Helena was a burly dance. And Helena was at a relationship Mary to Billy gray pair of my parents that I didn't have other knows best fame and pride bud and Toni basil at the time was with dean Stockwell now. Tell me your father was run over by a car. Yes. Independent hit by drunk driver. Dead years before he ought to have been. Yes. And isn't turn fifty the day. He died the very day and his reputation has only grown. So if you the listener. Read the book Tosh growing up in Wallis Berman's world, you know, everything you want to know everything about the transition everything between beat culture. Yes. In LA, and counterculture, sixties culture. And also keep in mind, it's written a view of a child in a teenager. Because I was I mean when I was born with her the height of the beat era, and is my point of view on what I saw during that era as a child and as a teenager later in the sixties Tosh Berman, how old are you? Now, I am a very young and handsome sixty four years old. That's okay. Very young and handsome sixty six team. Generation. Yes, we are. I I've known Tosh for years. Tasha has been dutifully rining. He wrote a book of poetry, the plumb, and Mr. Bloom's, putting we share something. No one's going to be surprised tarnishes favorite. Well group is sparks. So don't have to do your -nificant theme song so greatly. Well, it was Taj who made it possible for me to have Ron and Russell mail on my show is a worshiper. Yes. But I had never met them. Yes. It was through Tosh that I got in touch with them. And they've been on the show since which is for me one of the greatest honors of doing the show is talking about songwriting. There's mail you have gone on. In addition to edit tempt him books were you've published several volumes in translation of the French surrealist Boris vian. Yes. He wrote a book that we know winning is moving to go. Yes. Or in England. There was another translation has brought on the daydream. Yes. Fourth of the day in my version is foam of the day's DAC. Yes. And I ended in a grove precedent when it was called mood indigo which was the title of Duke Ellington, you've been arranging for the publication of translations into English of Boris vian. And you suspect that Boris vian was something like your father. You know? Yes. Yes. You know, when at certain times of my life, I cannot deal with my father's. History or his death. It was very traumatic for me and dealing with Boris beyond was away of away talking about my father because the on and my dad were of similar age young born in nineteen twenty. My dad was born in twenty six one that was American very American and beyond is French, but very sympathetic to American culture, pop culture. Well, not only that fee on imitated American pop culture. Yes. In the same way that your father had been influenced by French surrealism. Yes. And Veon so much ranked as many do film Noir. Yes. And so he writes a book called I will spit on your graves, and he writes it under the name Vernon Sullivan, and he allows it to purport to be an actual Noir novel. So here we are talking about Tosh growing up in Wallace Berman's world by. Wallace Berman son Tosh Berman, and I found the book to be. Very moving. You remember things in it? It's as if you've decided that the world of the senses will dictate this books. So you tell us what aftershave lotion. Yeah. Reminds you of your father, what was it English line? After aftershave lime aftershave called the Royal line. Marvelously Tosh is married to a Japanese woman wasn't until traveling. Yes that he found. Of Royal line after shave in Japanese porn town. Yes. Yes, brought back these memories like that. Art, Marcel Proust's knowing having a I cook the smell brought everything back to me. If your parents happen to be in their sixties, and you wanna feel like Charlotte would felt like to them as they looked onto their parents who were in turn bohemians actors. Well, Tosh is really the book for you. Your food. There wasn't very interested in magic. But he had friends who considered themselves to be witches Cameron to be specific to be specific. Yeah. Cameron. And at the time the writing of Alister Crowley was making its way into America. A my parents met Cameron at her home in Pasadena when she was married to Jack Parsons who was as brilliant rocket scientists by day, but by evening, he was like a warlike a witch and under Ulster crawly, you sorta like the west coast Representative of Crowley at the time as I understand it. He was also integral to the formation of Scientology. His his notes. Yes. Became the basis for L Ron Hubbard on Hubbard very much part of that circle. Give a huge science fiction community at that time writers Arthur Clark. Y'all straight a man by Ray Bradbury. Thank you. So it's like there's a lot of like science fiction writers writing for like be better science fiction, and they will get together and along with Jack Parsons because he was a science fiction fan and certain parts of that group were totally into a magic Crawley. And therefore, you know, and and and my my mom telling me about going to the hospital first time, and it was a afternoon party as basically all Jack Parsons rocket scientists brands and Cameron the very friendly to that side of the world. She saw my father mother and sadda- fellow artists. Our fellow weirdos Bohemia's nor Hemans yesterday were Hemans. Your father seems to have been a found of artistic morality. He didn't want to give interviews he below. The art should speak for itself almost militantly. So and he did not believe he stopped believing very quickly enter his first solo show which involved an arrest for censorship saying, although they quoted pornography, he didn't have another solo show for in his entire life. I gather he's he had his own shows that he does own studio not often does very little a time bet that was his first and last solo gallery show when he was alive he would only sell or give his work to friends. Yes, he had to like ban people who owned his art. Yes. And you know, he started one of the first of the art scenes, it was a magazine called seminar seminar, and your mother is on the cover. Of the g the iconic beauty up. I think issue number one number two. I it could be two or four on Michael silver Blagden. You listening to bookworm from the studios of KCRW. I'm talking as I said with Tosh Berman. The son of Wallace Berman about his book Tosh growing up in Wallace Berman's world book continue after this short break. This is KCRW. It's to sixteen coming up the daily we'll have the latest on.

Tosh Berman Wallace Berman Wallis Berman dean Stockwell Boris vian Dennis hopper Jack Nicholson Jack Parsons Cameron Los Angeles Ron Hubbard Jack Hirschman LA Royal line Carol Carol Carol Burnett Russ Tamblyn toutes dafter KCRW
"lights bookstore" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I might start gambling wins in Cincinnati. But, but you know, one of the most poignant stories in the book, though is about Kelly. Yeah. Don't think you've ever told that story before in one of year writings and Kelly was someone who was in the program. Distances her from it is this inability to give a sent you a higher power. I mean, the Jesus thing or the God thing totally turned her off to twelve step programs. And so she begins to isolate. And I mean, it's rather tragic story. But do you think it was related because she couldn't kind of assent to a higher power that? That's what was it not bad at all. I believe it was this is a really dear friend of mine who got sober when I did. And she was a successful realtor. She grew up very wealthy in the society pages of San Francisco, just fabulous and had had a horrible bottom as an alcoholic and she she loved being sober. But she said, I don't believe in. God. I think it's infanta Leising me. They're not talking about God. They're talking about a higher power anything there. Number people. I've known we have a small mountain in our county where the coastal me walk worship. And people have turned to the mountain her name is mount camel pious, which was the sleeping maiden and turned to her as a sacred site. And it's clear it could be anything except for your own good ideas. It could be anything except for your own pinball machine of a mind that is trying to get other people to change. So that you can be more comfortable. And so anyone who loved her would say, this you could use you could use the doorknob you really could anything that your own best thinking because your own thinking gets you to a bottom where you might be able to accept love and help and she stopped. Being in groups if so where people and just started, but she's doing fine. She's just a lovely exuberant person. And then just she had lost one hundred pounds when she got sober. Sergei back didn't want people to see her. Right. The most important thing as an American is that you look good. She wouldn't let us here in little by little by little. She ended up. She had two vodkas kitchens on a Tuesday. Most of a bottle on Wednesday splitter head open on a Friday and ended up at Oakland general, which is actually called Highland hospital is really really depressing place, and I went to see her. And she said I said, you know, let's get back. Let's get back with a caribou herds that speed together with the caribou. She said, no, you know, the gossiping really doesn't work for me. So what can you say what you can say is? Okay. I'm hearing you say that. And I accept that. And I love you. And I will I I never tell you operate. Good for you. Said I love you, you know, and everyone prays for you. And you're you're the best I love you can't wait to get to go back home. And she ended up blowing your brains out from the green light bookstore in almost everything notes on hope. She's speaking with father Edward Beck and with. So interesting I bought the woman upstairs in love not romantically, but alcoholic with another very big woman upstairs in her apartment, and it was what I always tell people the love of your of your dog or cat is probably the closest you're gonna come to experiencing divine. Love all your here chief down this woman upstairs, and they watch TV together. And they drank together, and they meet each other laugh. And to me that was a path that she chose to away for her to hook into something bigger than herself. Which is what they mean by harbour, something big and beautiful that left your unconditionally. She had value. So it wasn't God. As I understand God. Or God in any kind of goodness. And it was it was love goddess beautifully. Put new book for Kelly. God was the old woman upstairs. God was all upstairs. I thought that was such a beautiful of just distinctly saying, let's talk a little about family, which we all can relate to another wonderful, quote that you include as Ramdas if you think you're in lightened, go.

Sergei Kelly Cincinnati Ramdas Highland hospital San Francisco Oakland Edward Beck one hundred pounds
"lights bookstore" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

"Tell nine hundred ninety eight on Goth and Lombard. Okay. The marina in the first place. I stated San Francisco for my brother's wedding and eighty eight and I remember thinking this is the most beautiful city in the world and like Goff and Lombard is shitty. Terrible corner. I mean, that's okay. It's not a terrible corner. But it's not a great corner. It's not like anybody's taking pictures there and going this is classic San Francisco. But it wasn't until I moved here that I really started to understand how beautiful the city isn't so many layers. Yeah, I've had there's a place that my uncle took us two years ago city lights bookstore chain love and in the basement of that bookstore. There's a door in between shelves. So it's just bookshelves right up to the end of the store and the doors painted, and it says, I am the door. And I I love that. And I went back home when I was probably like sixteen or seventeen and I painted it on my bedroom door. So my bedroom door back home where I grew up has this replica from my visit to San Francisco like, you know, almost. Eighteen years ago. Tastic say do envy tourists. I envy that federal nature of their visit and perspective. They see I know when law people travel the wanna live like a local, but it never is the case, right? Like, I I I read the online blogs, and the how to live not the touristy part of town get Airbnb, but still it's still the fact simile of the experience because my eyes are still kind of wide open. I'm still I'm pursuing the experience a little differently than I would be what. And there's also so much of San Francisco San Francisco to take in if you're gonna stay in their BNB in the mission. That's one experience Glen park is another Pacific Heights is another laurel village. I mean, all of these different places would give you completely different impressions of the city. I talked to a Kiwi in New Zealand a few months ago had visited San Francisco and they had walked the length of Polk street because the hotel they got online was on pulp and they walked up and down Polk street, and they were like San Francisco is ugly. Today I've ever seen. There are parts. You chose a particularly rough street. Yeah. Yeah. What else? Oh, love I guess now that you're in San Francisco, you'll never have to go to Alcatraz that locals never go to other YouTube. That's the point is you should take your relatives there because Alcatraz is no joke. Legit amazing experience. I still haven't been I I've been to some of the the less touristy places because I have family around here. But I haven't been Alcatraz my point is now that you're here don't take it for granted. Because so many locals do when the when I lived in New York I used to go to the prostate building about once every year really recod- because it's a standing it's notably amazing experience worth doing. So I'm a fan of the in-home tourism. Yes. Yes. And also one of things I love to do is just the look back at what the city was like then ten years ago twenty years ago, which is something I never think about doing. I think about the city as it is today. But if you're going to be a local a nice new way to explore the city you're in. Whether it's San Francisco is is to find what it looked like in the movies. Oh. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, what was the one that sticks out to me? The most is guest is coming to dinner. Okay. Katharine Hepburn Spencer, Tracy. It's about their daughter bringing home a black man for dinner, but they live up at the top of Lombard. The semi what? Yes, any party, and they live over the top of Lombard, and there's all of this all these scenes of the movie take place on Lombard up there on mel's drive in. All these locations is driving people complaining getting into accidents. Yep. Same with a bullet, blah, a great San Francisco movie and vertigo is other co a classic the mission. Dolores features heavily in vertigo. I liked that recently on a plane had Hitchcock on an airplane. But it was in San Francisco. Yeah. And that's the thing the stairs that he's that's that's the mission. Dolores? Oh that puts a totally new perspective on that movie. I'll have to go back and watch it again and midges apartment is in a fictitious building over in north beach..

San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco Lombard Alcatraz Dolores Airbnb Glen park Hitchcock north beach Goff Tastic New Zealand Pacific Heights YouTube New York Katharine Hepburn Spencer vertigo mel Tracy
"lights bookstore" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"lights bookstore" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Tell nine hundred ninety eight on Goth and Lombard. Okay. The marina in the first place. I stated San Francisco for my brother's wedding and eighty eight and I remember thinking this is the most beautiful city in the world and like Goff and Lombard is shitty. Terrible corner. I mean, that's okay. It's not a terrible corner. But it's not a great corner. It's not like anybody's taking pictures there and going this is classic San Francisco. But it wasn't until I moved here that I really started to understand how beautiful the city isn't so many layers. Yeah, I've had there's a place that my uncle took us two years ago city lights bookstore chain love and in the basement of that bookstore. There's a door in between shelves. So it's just bookshelves right up to the end of the store and the doors painted, and it says, I am the door. And I I love that. And I went back home when I was probably like sixteen or seventeen and I painted it on my bedroom door. So my bedroom door back home where I grew up has this replica from my visit to San Francisco like, you know, almost. Eighteen years ago. Tastic say do envy tourists. I envy that federal nature of their visit and perspective. They see I know when law people travel the wanna live like a local, but it never is the case, right? Like, I I I read the online blogs, and the how to live not the touristy part of town get Airbnb, but still it's still the fact simile of the experience because my eyes are still kind of wide open. I'm still I'm pursuing the experience a little differently than I would be what. And there's also so much of San Francisco San Francisco to take in if you're gonna stay in their BNB in the mission. That's one experience Glen park is another Pacific Heights is another laurel village. I mean, all of these different places would give you completely different impressions of the city. I talked to a Kiwi in New Zealand a few months ago had visited San Francisco and they had walked the length of Polk street because the hotel they got online was on pulp and they walked up and down Polk street, and they were like San Francisco is ugly. Today I've ever seen. There are parts. You chose a particularly rough street. Yeah. Yeah. What else? Oh, love I guess now that you're in San Francisco, you'll never have to go to Alcatraz that locals never go to other YouTube. That's the point is you should take your relatives there because Alcatraz is no joke. Legit amazing experience. I still haven't been I I've been to some of the the less touristy places because I have family around here. But I haven't been Alcatraz my point is now that you're here don't take it for granted. Because so many locals do when the when I lived in New York I used to go to the prostate building about once every year really recod- because it's a standing it's notably amazing experience worth doing. So I'm a fan of the in-home tourism. Yes. Yes. And also one of things I love to do is just the look back at what the city was like then ten years ago twenty years ago, which is something I never think about doing. I think about the city as it is today. But if you're going to be a local a nice new way to explore the city you're in. Whether it's San Francisco is is to find what it looked like in the movies. Oh. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, what was the one that sticks out to me? The most is guest is coming to dinner. Okay. Katharine Hepburn Spencer, Tracy. It's about their daughter bringing home a black man for dinner, but they live up at the top of Lombard. The semi what? Yes, any party, and they live over the top of Lombard, and there's all of this all these scenes of the movie take place on Lombard up there on mel's drive in. All these locations is driving people complaining getting into accidents. Yep. Same with a bullet, blah, a great San Francisco movie and vertigo is other co a classic the mission. Dolores features heavily in vertigo. I liked that recently on a plane had Hitchcock on an airplane. But it was in San Francisco. Yeah. And that's the thing the stairs that he's that's that's the mission. Dolores? Oh that puts a totally new perspective on that movie. I'll have to go back and watch it again and midges apartment is in a fictitious building over in north beach..

San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco Lombard Alcatraz Dolores Airbnb Glen park Hitchcock north beach Goff Tastic New Zealand Pacific Heights YouTube New York Katharine Hepburn Spencer vertigo mel Tracy