24 Burst results for "Lifestyle Magazine"

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"I used that to my advantage. I studied the newsroom's that i was in. I really tried to figure out how to navigate them. I figured out like who are the people who actually make decisions. Who who are the people who will be my allies. And i did so much work to be able to just fit in and figure out how to move forward in these organizations. I don't really want that to be the case. Moving forward in my newsroom. I want people of all different backgrounds to feel comfortable. In in the newsroom's i'm leading and that is that is really big. Focus of mine and that comes down to the work too. I feel like no matter what your background is. D i should. Everyone should feel responsible. No matter what level therein because everyone is is working on journalism. And i think it's really important as a leader to set that as a priority in the newsroom. I think that those are the kinds of things that we're that are going to make You know our newsroom. Be the kind of place where everyone wants to work in where everyone can can thrive i- also just think that i also just think that it's so important for people to You know when we're doing when we have our reporters and editors you know covering the big important stories like no matter. What their background is. There's just no excuse to not really understand the communities they cover and i think that's it's so important to be able to You know not fall into stereotypes. Not try to really understand what the issues are. And that's how we gain people's trust one of the biggest crises journalism right now is reader trust and you know if you don't have a diverse and inclusive newsroom. You won't be able to win. The trust of people. And i think that again comes down to the newsroom culture and the standards we all said yes absolutely in lindsay. I'm curious to hear your thoughts on that as well You know coming from the fashion side of media and you know the the lifestyle Magazine kind of space. You know how is your maybe experiences coming up through that side of The media industry. How is that like influenced your approach to you. Know deion i as a chief now I'm very familiar with the fact that there is a lot of issues in the fashion industry in terms of being inclusive a race body shape Gender you know all these things. I'm really curious to hear he kind of how your experiences have led to your approach to dealing with these issues As a top editor. Now yeah i mean. This is something that i've always been passionate about. And i've spoken about time because i think they'd fashion there's so many layers in it and it's it's incredibly nuance in what we do in fashion because fashion is so much more subjective than other forms of journalism and specifically you know how we choose someone who is sheikh enough or good enough or cool enough to be uncovered to be given a feature to do a shoot with all of that really is just decided in it in a different way and i do think for me it comes to light and so many different ways of how you can actually make things holistically inclusive and not just like checking the box to make one thing and this other thing. Diverse around eighty percent of the new hires at the cut are identifying as people of color. And it's obviously something that as a black woman is really important to me to make sure that we're being really diverse in you know yes gender race sexuality abilities all of those things but really what what we're talking about different perspectives and different lifestyles in different forms of access..

lifestyle Magazine deion lindsay
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

Our Unicorn Diaries

04:09 min | 8 months ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

"Welcome to unicorn. Diaries discuss sexual encounter other. This podcast is for entertainment purposes ed mature audiences between the show. Welcome to al unicorn. Divers my name is antony in nine. Worry hi guys. how are you beautiful six. Thank you darling. spectacular. I look spectacular. Wafers thank you. You're welcome a pretty. Did to bella as the show goes on the more you drink. Yeah that's true. Pass me my drink. The drink is on that time are week so far. Well we had a birthday slash lifestyle party that we went to a lot of fun. Great food great people. We only knew two people they're the host so was it. Yeah but it was really cool. How they did it. They had everybody like prepping something you know and that way it got everyone together and talking. Yeah i thought so too. And that's how we got to really. I think we talked to everybody there. How often does that happen. Really at a party cliques and stuff going on but yes so it. It worked out really well. I enjoyed myself immensely. I saw you enjoying yourself with a nice young lady. I was spanking her. That was fun. No wasn't perfect. Joy that i would like to do that. More think she would let you. Well it doesn't have to be her. It could be any female any willing female on what is walk ups. I smack email. Ask send us a message on twitter stopping and we'll see you stop it but i did like it very sexy. Move arranged to meet for drinks a few people. Something may come with that. People you know will you will hear about obviously. Asean awards if you want to vote for the best fucking podcast in the world lifestyle. Podcast the world was our all this one of. Oh forest and antony's waffling on as usual. Yeah please. asean lifestyle magazine awards dot com slash vote. Yes it and the every day. Vote twice a day. Hell family yes. Please thank you for us. No no you use. your computer. Magazine is a lifestyle online last magazine. Pretty cool we've been in it so it must be cool nice people who were on that and also. I got my first vaccine. Yes he had. He had his first shot yesterday. Troop i know you said the baby. Oh my god very tired school. I know me to listen to you. Wine about it. And she'll begin prick on saturday. I have my prick right now right next to me boom in the so good so we'll be ready to rock and world officially if we have vaccines. We should not wear masks. yes you should. we just should look to stop it. Hide up beautiful. Stop though they'll start trouble where mass be save and now a word from our sponsors.

saturday yesterday twitter first vaccine two people six first shot twice a day antony nine asean lifestyle magazine
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

WazaMedia Podcast

05:26 min | 8 months ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on so then We decided my husband. And i decided to move to washington. Dc after all this time and we move jobs. There absolutely loved the area. And i right now. I m the marketing and communications manager for the american society for investigative at all. You have quite the history gina from from being out in in the area dealing with hurricane. So you probably have a taste in crisis. Communication does marketing. And now you're working out in the dc area here so quite a large range of experience and I am interested about how you enjoyed your time with spotify. That's that's pretty neat. Well it.

Gina washington jean laborde jr. new orleans spotify daisy Jr today two coca cola louisiana gina five katrina two publications Daisy daisy law baton rouge Exile
Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

WazaMedia Podcast

02:16 min | 8 months ago

Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on

Jean Laborde Daisy Daisy Dr Xu Lsu Medical School Gina Baton Rouge Louisiana Department Of Biochemistry Coca LSU Hurricane Katrina Lifestyle Magazine Susan Spikes New Orleans HBO
The Obviously-Going-To-Die Stocks

MarketFoolery

19:19 min | 1 year ago

The Obviously-Going-To-Die Stocks

"We're going to start with the stock of the day. Don't call it a comeback bed bath and beyond has been here for years. It's just all that time someone else was running the company but now that Mark Trittin has been in the Corner Office for about a year. We're seeing days like today second quarter profits came in exponentially higher than expected. Same store sales were positive for the first time in four years. The stock is up more than thirty percent this morning. I'm assuming at least part of what we're seeing with the stock is some shortsellers saying that's it. I. Think. I'm. Probably. Bed, bath, and congratulations to march written and Beth by best buy bed bath and beyond. For this quarter, March, written formerly of target, of course, and a few other places before that, I think Nordstrom's and I believe. He had a stint at Nike to could be misquoting. This bed bath and beyond is in a group of companies retailers that I like to call the obvious obviously going to die crowd. And the funny thing about companies that are obviously going to die when they get the right mix of management decision making and in some help from the environment and you know just a little bit of because no one's more aware of a company's struggles at least no one should be more aware of a company struggles then the people inside the company. And that's when you plan your strategy. What are our tools? How can we navigate our way through whatever we found ourselves in business is not easy and certainly for this group retailers that I'm Gonna I'm GONNA hold up. Bed Bath and beyond as one Chris. But you know how about Game Stop Game Stop. The seller of video game systems and Software that of course is going to be the next blockbuster. Right if they writing that headline since two thousand and nine, how `Bout Michael's the craft store everybody knows I. Y has an Amazon run over. And the granddaddy of all of these. Companies that are obviously going to fail. They're obviously going to be taken bricks and mortar is dead is best buy which just before the podcast we were talking about how? How many listeners? Realize, that best buy has been at ten bagger over the past decade they went through some struggles they brought in new management. WHO had a plan? and. I'm sure they were mocked and I'm sure people were skeptical and they executed on that plan and best buy, which was a sub twelve dollar stock in. Two Thousand Ten two thousand eleven is today roughly one hundred twenty dollars stock. And so when you see. I'm a kick myself a little bit on dust by iron best buy bed bath and beyond his too many bees. Bed Bath and beyond. I actually did a little bit of work about a year ago as I was discussing with one of our with one of our foolish coworkers. About this basket of Taylor's who are sure to die. And we had this one. We had game stop we have Michael on the docket and I went through you know what this company's history of cash flow was and what they've done with it and how they've raise capital, and this is before Mr Trenton came on but I. It laid the groundwork for someone with. A better vision to come in and knocked the ball out of the park which you've seen today and and best bed bath, and beyond is as we speak it's now a six th bagger since March of this year and so in the a roughly a year ago when I did my work because I was vigorously debating co I pointed out that in the previous six years here was bed bath and beyond had produced four point two, billion dollars in free cash flow. They had also issued one point five billion dollars in debt and debated smart about the debt because the debts. Basically staggered I think is a ten twenty and thirty years. and. They have to pay it back anytime soon, and they had gone on a massive buyback program. They've they've retired a ton of their shares. Now. Slowly melting ice cube no one's going to want to own this business what have you. But at the time the stock was about ten eleven dollars the company is training but four times enterprise value of free cash flow. that. That is rock bottom fools that is something that is going to go away. That's what the market is telling you. Flash, forward, to today and oh positive cops. Oh. We have a plant. They've they've suspended their dividend they've they've halted their. They've halted their. They suspended the dividend halted their share buyback plan I believe in. April. But with this. With this. report, they have generated a ton of cash flow. They've deployed it smartly they took down some temporary which they had out as part of the PARCO vid. They have bought back twenty percent of that long dated not in any danger to come calling debt they bought that back at a discount. Which is brilliant. They. So they're down to their down net debt down by about thirty percent from where they started the year. They have a store optimization program, which is something that a lot of these retailers the slowly melting ice cube crowd will call them. They are reducing their store count 'cause they don't need it because they can move to ECOMMERCE, which they've done a little bit they can move to. The geography is able he served by less stores and you see a lot of. Traffic that previously went through one store transitions to another and. They are steal a Ron grosses them here they are firing on all cylinders and I'm not sure. Anyone. Thought is coming. I am I am both thrilled that they are doing this they're having success because everyone loves a comeback. I'm less thrilled that you own it and I don't. But. That's mainly because I had this in my hand a year ago Chris and I'm holding it up. The skull of York. And and I'm looking at it and I didn't at least put a little field position because as I said, at the time training for four times free cash flow that is close to no-brainer territory for me. So two other quick data points before we go to our next story. Not. Surprisingly digital sales of big driver this quarter. That goes hand in hand with the store closures so Another smart move by Trittin and his team. And also Happy to see that they're you know suspending the dividend that they're. Suspending the sticking with the we're not going to buy back shares. I'm also happy to see they're not offering guidance. Their New Orleans. No need to at this point. Let's move on the third quarter sales, for Pepsi, grew five percent and. Kind of like we saw three months ago snacks and some of the beverages particularly the Seltzer. Part of their portfolio helping to make up for the fact that somebody restaurants are closed. So many sports and entertainment venues are closed and. That's that's the stock is basically flat and this kind of flat for all of twenty twenty but. Nice to see that the the salty snack part of the business is making up for the sort of the tried and true Pepsi part of the business. Gilead household particularly the soon to be sixteen year. Old Member of the Gillies household has been doing his part to. To to help with the salty snacks portion and shareholders. Thank him. Yeah I was GONNA? Say. You know dude. There are other food groups other than Doritos. Look it was a perfectly acceptable boring quarter from a perfectly acceptable boring company and and I think you know Chris but maybe some of the listeners not know. For, me to call a company perfectly boring from for me. That's a compliment because I like businesses that are boring. Not Terribly exciting person myself I enjoy. Investments in companies that just actually do what we expect them to do, and essentially just get it done quarter after quarter. Pepsi is not GonNa. You know if you'RE LOOKING FOR PEPSI TO BE A. Ten bagger. You know anytime soon like the aforementioned by we mentioned earlier. That's not gonNA happen. They are just a steady bedrock performer for your portfolio and we all need a few of those. So we can go after the more exciting things in our portfolio. Yes. So it was it was A. It was a boring it was a boring quarter but boring is nice because boring boring says, oh, we end up four four plus percent on. Organic revenue growth total revenue growth went up five plus percent. EPS Is up ten percent year-over-year just for the quarter. It's still down for year to date, but of course, Mindy Stan why because the previous quarter? Cova. no-one no-one was new what was going on? So we kind forgive that. They are they're pointing towards the full year. They did give guidance their point point to a full year of approximately four percent revenue growth approximately five fifty core earnings. Stocks at about one hundred, forty bucks. So it's not cheap. But it's not terribly expensive, and again, this is one of those widows and orphans stocks. You can buy put it away and we'll see you when you retire. Hugh Johnston, who's the CFO at Pepsi? Granular on CNBC this morning talking about because when you think about all of the food and beverages they have across their portfolio he got granular talking about the new cheetos macaroni and cheese saying you know they're trying to keep up with demand as a fan of both cheetahs and macaroni and cheese I haven't tried it yet but I can see why it's popular. Any. Do they give any color on the? Two. Portals that they were direct to consumer sites that they launched earlier this year snacks dot com and Pantry shop dot com. Sadly, Chris they did not at least in the conference call or the press the presser maybe in the ten Q I haven't read the ten q yet obviously but. Yeah no snacks dot com I can confirm both of those sites are open and accepting offers as of this moment. SNACKS DOT COM and Pantry shop I think is an interesting one because they are. You know you are buying your you're you're buying all of your Pepsi Slash quaker products. Simultaneously in in in the various groups. So if you want your everyday Pantry, you want to get your your oatmeal and your healthy. Your healthy Chia bars and your rice cakes do people still eat rice cakes and if so why? You can get all those delivered at the same time or your snack package your breakfast package You know it's it's interesting to to have it delivered. I I'M NOT A. I I'm one of the three people in North America is still doing own grocery shopping. So I'm probably target here but I know a lot about the people how to use it and I think probably if I let my as I mentioned a sixteen year old note that this thing existed. It might be his only source of nourishment. So yeah, don't don't. On, the first time I went to that website I kind of went crazy to the point where in the box showed up to two days later even my kids were just like. This is a lot of snacks and was like, yeah I may have ordered too many but but I regret nothing. Playboy. Enterprises is returning to the public markets after nearly a decade and because I was are out of fashion, playboy is going to be doing this through a speck. Mountain Crest acquisition is a current special purpose acquisition company that is going to be taking playboy public through a reverse merger and wants to deal is done that company where the ticker is MC. ABC? Is. The playboy name and the ticker symbol P L B Y? I guess I, I saw this story and I thought, okay I'd that's one way for playboy, which is a private company and has been since twenty eleven. I. Guess That's one way to raise money. I, I, I'm hard pressed though to think that. The second round of playboy being a public company is going to go any better for the company and for investors than it did the first time around. That was my initial take as well, and you say it's one way to raise money I'd say it's one way for insiders to cash out. Tomato Tomato. The more I think about this though. I could be spectacularly wrong and it wouldn't be the first time. This might be quite this might be interesting I can see. I can see a number of thing, and I just find this interesting from a number of re. I as you point out. Yes, playboy. Is private the SPEC the Special Purpose Acquisition Company Mountain Crest Acquisition, company. It's out there. Now it's got. It's a walking wallet got a bunch of cash their stocks over ten dollars specs go at ten bucks. There's nothing you can. You can go buy today Chris if you want. And You can just sit there and wait until the transaction is completed in q one. If. You WANNA own playboy. So, playboy today is not playboy of the past for thing, magazines have died. So, there are no issues of the iconic famous magazine. These no regularly published issues and I believe they went to quarterly publishing versus. Monthly publishing before that. So what playboy is trying to be or this new iteration trying to be a licensing company and they're calling it across four major categories they're saying sexual wellness, which I'm just going to skip to the next one, which is style and apparel which is. Apparel. and accessories for men and women globally gaming and lifestyle also digital gaming hospitality and spirits. So you can get yourself some playboy-branded Bourbon. And beauty and grooming, which is fragrance skin care grooming cosmetics for men and women. Okay. That sounds interesting. They're not a publishing company more avoiding that and I guess they have a bunch of online stuff as well which. Tell people they can go look on their spare time but. They are calling themselves a streamlined high growth business. The company has four hundred million in cash flow contract through the next eighteen years. and has products available for sale and in ten thousand major retail stores. In the US, this is a brandon company. Now, now, what you think of the brand and what you associate with the brand, the iconic a bunny ears brand, of course. Is Is. is going to be probably a nuanced and varied. I can understand why some people. Would not want to do with this brand I completely understand that is not. Bend the most shall we say progressive brand in history? It has fostered some. Attitudes, particularly women that. I think it's fair to say some would find distasteful and I I completely understand why? And for those people, they're just not going to be shareholders and that's that's fine. But what I find interesting about this if this, if the licensing deal and we have, we've already had a certain dry run of this in. Do you know the magazine Maxim? It was. So it's a men's lifestyle magazine, girly pictures, and whatever it was bought by an entity called big holdings. I'm going to say eight nine years ago. With the goal of they went into change it from the the lad magazine into more of a lifestyle brand licensing deal what playboys doing. Now. I mentioned earlier it's important to have You know leaders businesses, you respect and trust big lorry holdings is not one of those businesses but I do know that they even though they're circulation sales are down significantly there they have turned that profitable on a small scale with the licensing strategy. I suspect the playboy will do a better job. And It will depend on the valuation coming out but you know when analogy I might throw up as. As a comparison is. Franchising businesses in the in the restaurant space. So a restaurant brands international, which owns importance and Burger King. Dunkin brands, which of course owns your beloved Dunkin donuts. Those are those are check cashing businesses, they they sell the franchise to a Franchisee. And then take tax six percent of their gross sales and royalties every month plus x percent for advertising they sell you a system and so those are very asset light cash-rich capital Genita- businesses. And part of me wonders here it's obviously not the same as selling. Coffee and whatever. But part of me wonders if that is what this business will look like, and if they are truly in the growth business and the cash generation business, this might be an interesting opportunity. And you just hit on what I think is the most interesting thing to watch. Once it becomes a public entity again, the high growth aspect of this because now we're going to see Now, we're GONNA see through quarterly reports. Okay. Are you growing? Because that's one of those things where we investors and the market in general get to decide what we consider to be high growth And I again I had I had your initial take which was. Oh please. Like if it didn't work the first time. It's going to work less well this time. The more I read about like. I'M GONNA keep an eye on this. Curiosity. Jim Gillies always talking to you. Thanks for being here.

Playboy Chris Pepsi Mark Trittin Jim Gillies Michael Mountain Crest Acquisition Nordstrom Nike Beth Corner Office North America Amazon United States Taylor Hugh Johnston Cnbc
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Guns Lifestyle magazine on the planet. It's called Recoil, and he is Ian Harris and Ian. Welcome back to America first. Said. Hug wonderful did say from you and you're too kind. We're going to talk about all the things you guys are doing. You are burgeoning. You are exploding with content at Recon recall TV. But first I got to talk about what's happening in the market for all the people out there who loved the Second Amendment realize it's not just about white tails and hunting on you. I mean, I am Every time we get the latest background check figures for the last month, I think, Okay, that's it. It's over. The craziness is ended, and it's going to go downhill. From now on. People are going to get back to normal. But it's not know every flipping month in crazy. I know. I know it's you know, it's great to see people exercising their Second Amendment rights on doing it through the pocketbook on DH. Not only is it great to see you know existing shooter's going out, adding to their collections, But it's also anecdotally all the evidence that I've seen from some of the feelings that I talk to you on a regular basis. Anecdotally there saying between 40 and 60% of the customers coming in on new shooters, Yes, which, from a second Amendment perspective is marvelous. No, it's fabulous that with new people new Americans were being introduced this lifestyle talk to us about what? You're me. You are on the cutting edge with Recall magazine. You're reviewing the coolest stuff. Full disclosure. It is my favorite magazine. I've written for them in the past. I'm going right for them in the future. Tell us about what? What? What's exciting for those who really are, You know, gun guys like we don't know. The word is gun nuts. There's gay heads as petrol heads. I don't know what the what the The term of art is. But in the market we've got. We've got a ours up the Yazoo. We've got plastic one the nines more than we can shake a stick at what other things that you're finding exciting right now in the American market. Well, actually mentioned riffing on the whole plastic theme. There's ah, coming out. I'm keeping tabs on at the moment just brought out a parliament are 15 complete, Lewis. Which you again getting towards democratization of the Second Amendment is going to be available for about 90 bucks, So it's ready to go on DH. It's one piece could stalk pistol grip. Everything installed. And I think you might 90 bucks with a stuck in the grip of what and good figure God Papa Tube. It's all integral. On DA. It's that doesn't put the cat in the henhouse, and I don't know what will because again, it's just a way to get into. You know the rightful market, given the fact that the majority people who are coming in as new shooter's probably about a handgun, so what's next? Well, the rifle on evey a way to get into America's rifle. Then then coming Master tease like that. So that's one thing that's really in here to make the moment and the other thing that just arrived my my local F F L yesterday, which I was super excited to see. Is AH Check handgun, which is only of their end of the spectrum. And no one of those 7000 won the Super expensive one. What is it? The F K. F. K. Bruno. Andi. So, yeah, that's that arrived, but they've gone the problem a rude as well. So now it's got a brain like a clock. But I still have a really expensive top and so they wanted to bring the price down to very, very reasonable. $1700. Okay, That's not bad. I was thinking about that. That one in the new caliber. What's that? C z looking one in that? That micro caliber that costs about five grand? You know what I'm talking about? Yeah, exactly. Same company, but the they brought out a poem, a version of it and still chambered in that Fiddling heart 7.5. That's it. 75? Yeah. I said 95 grand bullet at over 2000 seat the second out of the handgun, which is insane. Yeah, let's let's talk about all these people that are coming into the gun life right now. Old school answers to weigh you start. You can't go wrong with a 20 to learn how to shoot on a 22 Maybe stung with 38 special revolver to learn the basics, but but really in a 15 Is not a hard gun to shoot well for men or for women. So people who look at this and who have been who have been, you know, influenced by the Oh my gosh, it's black. It looks military. The This is a good place to start as well as an Indian. Absolutely the other unintimidating because chambered in 556 on DH, no intimidating Federico perspective and once you have the basics down weapon manipulation. But then you know, shooting. It's a joy and you just want to go fast. Which is the problem right now. Obviously, right. Indeed, he is the editor of the best magazine Out there. It's called Recoil. You can follow them onto the at recall mag in the last few minutes we have with you e and tell us about recoil TV and the content that you are packing it full with Yeah, It's been really exciting Couple beers for us, because we've seen positioning ourselves to have our own video class ball as an alternative to YouTube. Because we know that from against a settlement with the big cheque is being clamping down on on our rights as Americans, so we wanted to offer that as an alternative, so that anybody who is generating content themselves completely..

DH America Guns Lifestyle magazine Recall magazine Ian Harris YouTube Yazoo Papa Tube editor Lewis K. F. K. Bruno Federico
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"It's okay. And they get some tweets from going out over the next couple of days from five on number two, the seriously if you agree with me here I thought Arizona look great in winning their Siri's, and they They really opened my eyes better than I've seen him play all year at night and seeing play all that much tonight. Same place, Bunch games the road. Damn. They actually got some talent and Colorado at Vegas on the ropes and couldn't finish him off. I know it's only seating and they knew they were going to be the number two. He wasn't that big a deal, but they had him and they let it slip out of their hands. I think Arizona Colorado can go the distance. I could. I could see that if if Arizona is able to contain the offense. And and the type of system that the ABS has ah, a little bit different than that of nationals. It's a little more to way kind of system for the national predators, whereas you know, especially if they're running on all cylinders, and you've got Nathan MacKinnon people rented and Gabe Landeskog playing together on on on one unit and just go, go go. It's going to be a hard line to contain. Certainly, Arizona's got great goaltending and their defenses a lot deeper than a lot of people think. I think quite frankly, it's an overrated as being underrated Defensive court so they're able to contain that. I could certainly see this being a bit of a challenge here for the Colorado Avalanche or than that many people think if that's how they're going to perform, I'm with you. I think that that's got potential. Tio certainly go. Seven will ultimately you know we'll see how it goes there. But if they can play sound, and if they're able to contain the primary unit for the ABS and being yellow and VP candidate based McKinnon, And his linemates that they've certainly got a shot at taking this far and possibly taken it. Alright, David without going in depth because we want everyone to get hockey lifestyle magazine whose the best dressed guy you've seen so far in either to to bubbles. So far so far in the Austin Matthews, Surprisingly, Ah, he's had some questionable outfits before, but he's been. I've been pretty impressed with what he's brought to the table, so I'm I'm gonna go with him in the East out West, a little bit more casual, but pretty pretty sweet in Jordan Pennington's attire. I'm liking those two guys right now. Sometimes goalies tend dress. Henrik is a good example of that. So bidding to doesn't surprise me. If you say it. Great Stop cricket. You coming on, Dave. Thank you Much. Continue the good work from up there on DH Feel free to another layer before you leave for the arena Planning everybody. Thanks so much. David Pegg, not a serious except Denny kill networked Editor in chief of hockey lifestyle. Magazine. Go to Mak tangle with you Hear on TV, A sports radio. We put the phones down for a couple of minutes. Let's get him re soak. Get aboard, now a 55 to 124227 Plenty of time to catch up on a Sunday get together here on CBS Sports Radio, A CZ you get back to business. Small things can make a big difference, like marking safe distances of floor tape and posting reminders.

Arizona Colorado hockey lifestyle magazine David Pegg Austin Matthews Henrik Mak tangle Nathan MacKinnon Denny CBS Siri Vegas cricket VP Jordan Pennington Gabe Landeskog McKinnon Dave Editor in chief hockey
Struggling United States Purchased By Private Equity Firm

The Topical

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Struggling United States Purchased By Private Equity Firm

"Some big news for the US today. The small private equity firm prospect capital partners has officially closed the deal and purchasing the United States of America. Which as we've reported has been struggling financially in the last few months the private equity firm purchased all fifty states Washington DC five major territories and various minor islands in the acquisition for an undisclosed sum. But what does this mean for? Americans like you and me for more. I'm joined by. Opr financial correspondent. Marcy Hammond Good Morning. Marcy High Leslie. Can you tell us about the country's new owners and what we can expect from them? Prospect capital partners has investments in a broad array of industries. Their portfolio includes everything from discount. Furniture stores to niche lifestyle magazines even funeral home chains and designer dog breeding services. Oh yes. I've gotten several of my teacup Pomeranian from their property. Puppy lucks but why. The United States of America to their portfolio. Well since it was already swamped in twenty three dollars worth of debt. Experts say that. Pcp was able to pay pennies on the dollar for the nation which has been renamed the United Fifty Corporation. Here's what the new. Ceo of the country. Herbert Lindgren had to say about the acquisition. We see a lot of great potential in the country in its assets water real estate energy agriculture etc as the biggest player in our portfolio united fifty is in an ideal position to capitalize on this dynamic. And I'm really excited to expand its reach. There'll be some small changes and focusing country reorganization but for the most part. We're just going to let the brand continued to create great products while supporting it. Well that sounds promising. What small changes have been implemented so far several? Lindemann is made swift moves to eliminate many inefficiencies for instance congressional representatives per state or teams as they're now called Heaven pared-down according to stay. Gdp luster running the numbers. We just move as a necessary step. Texas by itself had thirty six house representatives and dozens upon dozens of mayors but streamline the corporate structure and now the half to supervisors and a nature representatives will be based out of United Fifties. La Office and it wasn't just Texas that had inefficiencies in fact the United Fifty C. Suite identified positions states all over the country. That were found to be redundant. People in such positions were immediately removed from the country and escorted into the ocean by security. Well I guess no one ever really needed to senators anyway but martial arts some of these government positions essential to functioning United States. I mean United Fifty yes and departments are scrambling to adjust. Fill the holes while some citizens are saying that quality is definitely gone down due to the chaos however Lindemann says these stumbling blocks are nothing more than growing pains for the country. Contrary to what you've heard local officials were not laid off offered transfers to existing openings and other cities that were contract-based without benefits. We don't plan to cut our way to growth but life is about constant change. The good news is already seeing signs that we're well on our way to hitting our Q. Revenue Goals. I WANNA thank those. We've sadly seemly for their service. United Fifty and the Management Team. Here promises that we will do everything. We can to make the transition into their next chapter as easy as possible juice. These are a lot of changes. Did they know it's a Friday? Pull this shit right before the weekend. That's unfortunate I wonder. What's the new leadership goal and all this? I was wondering that myself to figure that out. I spoke to John pfeiffer professor of economics at Harvard University and an expert on private equity firms who gave me some insight into United Fifties Possible Future. Private equity was to see quick return on investment to do that. You cut costs and exploit resources to shore up earnings then. The company either sells it at a profit or if it fails to be competitive in its newly diminished form. They squeeze it into bankruptcy. I THE INVESTORS. Keep THE CASH. No matter what though. Personally I wouldn't be surprised if they offloaded the entire underperforming Midwest division to be honest now when asked to comment on the possibility of that Lindemann denied any such sale was an option. The midwest a strong acid with many natural resources and agricultural and manufacturing properties and we definitely don't see ourselves letting go of such a commodity anytime soon but we're also happy to hear out any bids that may come our way in the near future but according to a source. I spoke with inside the company country. United Fifty might already be in talks to break up the Midwest and sell it Shari Marci. I'm going to have to stop you right there. We've just received a memo from up top saying that we should stick to reporting on. What does it say here Anything else okay. Great back with something completely different right after.

United States Lindemann America United Fifty Corporation Texas Midwest United Fifties Washington Marcy High Leslie Marcy Hammond Herbert Lindgren CEO John Pfeiffer Shari Marci La Office Harvard University Management Team
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"In the news and lifestyle magazines that talk about retirement and that is the suggestion that there's a retirement crisis meaning downward pressure as some eighty million baby boomers continue to retirees putting stress on the social security system and the notion that we have to provide for more of our own resources to get us through retirement becoming ever increasingly challenging and yet is that really true well a couple of new reports out suggests that we as Americans need to do some serious thinking when it comes to the topic of retirement planning and Pat the two GS suppose one of the big issues here is not just that we save for retirement but that we really study the question how long may we be retired and will our resources last us through retirement in those are two very vital questions we we think about the date of when it happens we rarely really give serious thought to how long it happens well the problem Craig is that we don't have a model to follow our parents probably enjoyed some level of retirement years but thinking back to our grandparents had very limited release and my family's very limited retirement years and so there's not a history of track kind of what mom or dad did a grandma grandpa did and the good news is we're living longer and living healthier longer that's the operative word and so the involves is rigorous debate about do we really have a crisis or is it just this idea to scare people into working longer and suggesting they're going to be eating cat food for the last fifteen years of their life or they're gonna get stuck living in their child's fourth bedroom that's hardly the idea of retirement for most of us there is some substantive thoughts regarding the level of preparedness in those lots of studies that support that argument one study even suggests the Boston college's center for retirement research the lady's index only about fifty percent of folks at retirement age are really prepared to retire what is I mean are they prepared well it's all about what is your concept of return the friend of my recently retired navy said do I have enough money to retire and I my answer was it depends what you want to do every time what's your idea of the best retirement you can think of it and crank the answer vary so widely that I could be actually wrong if I give a generic answer let me give you two examples one idea is only.

Craig Boston college navy Pat
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

"A sign letters and cards so it looks like out so when choosing your next vacation don't forget Fido we just a little planning the hire family can enjoy a road trip to find the best vacation spot four spot subscribe to Fido friendly the travel and lifestyle magazine for you and your dog where each issue includes is hotel and destination reviews where both you and Fido are welcome go online to FIDO friendly dot com find out what all the barkings about nita fix of a good stuff get more animal radio with the free animal radio APP for iphone and Android.

Fido lifestyle magazine
Using Tinder for Real Market Research

Trent365

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Using Tinder for Real Market Research

"Market research the last day here at the lot say in Moscow heading off to the Hilton doubletree marina later on today and I was thinking today about a presentation I saw last week at the Global Wellness Summit from the founder of ages which is essentially a lifestyle magazine curated for the over-fifties and what he did when he decided he wanted to create this magazine wanted to think about the type of content needed to put out and so what he did so if the aspirational profiles say that interested in mountain climbing and you create content around mountain climbing then guess what that audience is probably going to gravitate into that particular publication so if you're interested in particular age demographic then head on tinder and I gotTa tell you I'm perfectly honest about this Tell my wife that I've been on tinder for market research but tender for market research is actually not a bad idea what do you reckon anyone tried it let me know for the research on me do let me know the comments below I do thank you for your time and I will be

Moscow Global Wellness Summit Founder This Magazine Hilton Doubletree
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"FM. audio some by number twenty seven I wonder where the hell this came from. you see they're talking about cigar aficionado magazine that's a magazine that was founded and operated published by my really really good cigar body Marvin Shanken. it's one of the best men's lifestyle magazine does not just about cigars at what is. when it died when it debuted back in the in the early early nineties it was it was a cigar magazine but it's which way beyond that now it's men's lifestyle. and it's it's a purpose still right the greatest the guards in the country in the world and and all that. and so I guess Nick Jonas world renowned singer of some repute is apparently on the cover. I'm the latest issue. of cigar aficionado and this is upset mourned Behar. and the and the babes over at the view he's. they just got so they're not everybody is a god must smell like Rush Limbaugh. good grief fever was so growers come up I'm on their minds. let me say something because I only smoke the finest the finest tasting the finest now I can't take a number of people coming here man does that smell good I'm not talking about people smoke cigars and about women the chef comes in custom audio crew doesn't matter may come wow that smells good but I don't know I don't want what is more never been around me smoking a cigar. it's like everybody smokes a cigar my smell like Rush Limbaugh must now. was Meghan McCain by the way who was defending cigars. that was the voice there's no they're not was Meghan McCain who's next chain in Charlotte North Carolina great to have you with us in the EIB network hi it's a pleasure rushes one point real quick and you touched on it already the importance of the fact three D. I'm sorry forty inch what three D. campaigning for twenty seven months in Danville ship only for but you still want. yeah they Democrats have been eyeing this seed for all the reasons that we have been discussing here but what eight million dollars of outside money well I don't know how much of an outside but eight million dollars and then bishop didn't spend anywhere near that. and then I just heard it all just got the I don't know how. it was meant as a lot of support for for make greedy as you say behind the scenes some of it was from the really militant left wing J. donor faction from the Democrat party and they're a big bunch they they they donate a lot of money there militants and they're very very active radical leftists and they spend money all over the country for Democrats of some of their money was in there too they had targeted bishop for. obvious reason that's why I say you know that there's a lot of things for the Republicans to learn here. what did what did you think was going to happen before the results came in and your story I firmly believe well he was close the last race itself from the balloting issues that they had it I mean it was it was a tight race most people I talk to self initiate was gonna win. yeah well you know what we'll both states north and South Carolina all day for work I did I did too I thought I thought bishop was going to win I'm not in North Carolina I don't have. I don't have any inside knowledge. but it wasn't just a a reaction of hope I'm watching the media talking about it. and I don't believe I I I just don't believe that the Republicans are is hated and despised or that trump is like the media portrays and I don't believe the people voted for trump of abandonment I don't believe that they're embarrassed I don't believe any of this. at what what when trump announces going in there for a rally on Monday night in Fayetteville and going to work on it and by the way let's not forget something a Mike pence spent the whole day in there on Monday. Mike pence was doing the old fashioned. politics is local business he was called laying people on the phone and getting them out to vote which is how you would do it Mike pence was engaging in old time old fashioned retail politics and it worked. which is the point it can work it does work. and it it I I just wish I can give you the. a list of political reasons that would demonstrate my impressions and brilliance on why I thought bishop was gonna win but I can't it was just a hunch it was a it was a gut instinct and I also went when I rented a lot of people are pessimistic that a lot of people in North Carolina who wanted it to be so bad they register for calc you think you know your team's gonna lose a Super Bowl. my god I know they're gonna lose you can prepare for being this point as well that then I don't I don't fall for it and I think it's going to be a good night. turned out to be I have a quick question before we go to break. where the subject of cigars comes up. and however they smell to you and your mark Behar why doesn't the name Bill Clinton first occur to you. instead of me. I'm never around mark bay harm I waited a mod at the screening of an HBO movie Cindy Adams took made purposely to cause chaos and it did. I ran out but I gave mark a hug. she turned around though what yeah I got you and she was serious. she wasn't sure she thought. somebody really had gone wrong with H. B. O.'s security how did you get here get away. my gosh we used to work down the hall from one another in New York but I wasn't smoking a cigar that night this is many many moons ago now folks it wasn't any time. recent why did you think of Bill Clinton when she hears cigars why was it my name popped on living.

Mike pence bishop cigar aficionado magazine North Carolina mark Behar Bill Clinton Meghan McCain trump lifestyle magazine Charlotte North Carolina Nick Jonas South Carolina EIB mark bay Democrat party Limbaugh Marvin Shanken. fever Cindy Adams Behar.
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 2 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

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Ford ranger Jim Ford Jim k faces magazine lifestyle magazine sny Steve eight-year
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

"About your. Yeah. Horrible. It actually, you know, we should be referring to it. As a hog. It's actually a domestic pig. Yeah. It's not a popularly pig. It's actually like a feeder pig that has been rescued in taken in as a pet pig. So why is it there? Well, Jack was losing his testees today. Yak? Not sure how old Jack is just as rescue situation. But he was a, sweetie. He was actually in the out of his vehicle and walked into our clinic. Does Jack live with any other pigs? Why why is he getting neutered? Well, that's the whole thing. He was taken in as rescue. So the hope is that we can get him into a housing situation that could be appropriate because obviously a three hundred pound pig is not the norm for most people when they reach maturity, do they get I don't think my question was answered. Who's your question? Did I did I dodge it why would you neuter him? Okay. Yeah. Yeah. The meal pigs can be very aggressive that if they're not neutered with my quest. So he has been gentleman with us. But we actually did have a shoe injury win of receptionist. Taking video for Instagram and Facebook and her she had stepped on and her shoe just tour, so yeah, listen learn that they're very big and strong. But yeah, so you do not want either a female pig that is in heat becoming aggressive with you or a male pig being church or ill. So yeah, that's one of the reasons we spend neuter. But then also we just don't want other pigs that might be kept in the same area to breed or wild pigs. You know, a lot of areas that country while pigs. We don't want them to bust into a yard debris. Can we see this on Instagram is it the whole thing the whole Ford shoe incident on this shoe incident did not make film? I was kinda sad about that. I asked that same question. But no, we have some some cute video and photos of him. He is a he is a speedy. What is the Instagram page? Honestly, you gotta leave it to the geeky little millennials. Don't you? I do I know Facebook. But that's about all Judy says, she'll find out after the show and put a leak over at the website if anybody's interested. Do you travel with your dog? Of course, my pets are part of our family me too. I take daisy with me everywhere. Right. Daisy. So how do you find out what hotels? Welcome you're dawn. I read Fido friendly, the traveling lifestyle magazine for you and your dog sounds.

Jack Instagram Facebook traveling lifestyle magazine Ford Judy three hundred pound
How we can find common ground on climate change

The Big Story

09:14 min | 2 years ago

How we can find common ground on climate change

"When we cover climate change, and we do cover climate change on this podcast. We get feedback. We get Email. We get responses on social media, and we get reviews, and I'm going to describe for you, the two typical replies. I is probably familiar. It is pessimistic and depressing. We have destroyed the earth with our greed. There's no point in even having children the predictions are catastrophic. And they're getting worse. It's already too late and our leaders don't care and fair enough. Lord knows I do feel that way. Sometimes more often recently. In fact, the second type of response, and this usually comes on social media is either denial or anger this winter was freezing. So how can this be true? Scientists are fudging the data the earth has been warmer than this and cool to gain in the past and any way I didn't cause climate change. Personally. What does the government expect me to pay for? And no, I don't understand that. Response, but I also don't engage within because I have learned that nothing. Good comes of yelling at people about how wrong they are on the internet. So we sat down last week after another set of bad news stories that you may have heard and we asked ourselves not how we should cover the latest round of awful climate news. But if there was a way to discuss this issue that would help us have a better conversation. If we could find a way to focus on the issue that would help those among us who are despairing find some hope and would also offer an olive branch and an invitation to talk to the people who just don't want to believe because honestly right now, not wanting to believe can feel kind of understandable. Today's discussion is our attempt to do that. And today's guest is the perfect person for it. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Catherine Heyhoe is a climate scientist, she's a Canadian who's working as a professor at Texas Tech. And she is the guest editor of this month's edition of Chatelaine magazine. Of all the magazines to guest at it as a climate scientist, why a lifestyle magazine, my favorite thing to do is talk about climate change in places in an outlets where you would never expect it so people think of climate change as this green issue, or this environmental issue or increasingly this political issue, but climate change affects every aspect of our lives. And the choices we make in every aspect of our lives can go a long way towards helping us fix this problem. So in that sense where better to talk about this then in a lifestyle magazine. So give me a sense. And maybe from a broader perspective, but maybe if you have some specific examples of the way lifestyle choices can actually make an impact because we do talk about climate change every few weeks here because it's always a big story now, and one of the things that always comes up is that the little things sometimes feel too small to make a difference and the big things feel impossible that is exactly it. And so if we feel like nothing we do will ever. Ever make a difference. Then why even talk about it because it just gets depressing? Yeah. And so so what is where is there a sweet spot? I guess where you can do some things that won't, you know, won't make you change your lifestyle and move off the grid and start, you know, using one hundred percent recycled everything, but also aren't just insignificant things that actually do make a a measurable difference. Yeah. There. Absolutely. Are so often we have that perception of while, you know, if I really wanted to live in environmentally friendly life. I would move up to the Yukon and go off the grid. But the reality is I live in Toronto Montreal Vancouver or Edmonton. And that's not the way that my life is structured or set up to be. So what can I do interestingly, I think one of the most effective things that every single person can do whether they're a student or somebody who rents so they can't make a lot of changes even in their light bulbs little in their home. Whether we feel like it's really out of our budget to go with something super fancy like plugging car. No matter who you are. And where we. Live the number one most important thing that we can do about this issue is talk about it. Because surveys have showed that hardly anybody actually has a conversation about it. Because maybe we're afraid it might start an argument with uncle Joe or next door neighbor or often, we're just afraid it would be depressing. We don't have anything positive or constructive to say. And so we don't talk about it. And here's the connection if we don't talk about it. Why would we want to do anything about it? And if we don't want to do anything about it. Why would we make changes in our own lives? And why would we encourage others to do so too so talking, but it is really the most important thing. But not the science little details. Rather talking about what we talk about in the Chatelaine issue. How is climate change affecting our lives today in the places where we live if we live in the Maritimes if you live in BC, if we live in the prairies, if we lived in cities, if we live out in the country, if we live up in the Arctic how is it affecting our lives today, first of all as Canadians and then second of all. What are some things that we can do to fix it? And there's a whole range so there's individual lifestyle choices one of the most important things. We can do individually is step on the carbon scales. Google carbon footprint calculator and fill in your life. And it will tell you where the biggest bang for your buck is so for some of us if we live out in the suburbs, and we commute downtown on. We drive ourselves. It might be our commuting. That is actually the biggest part of our footprint for others of us. It's what we eat. If we eat very beef and meat intensive diets to route three times a day that contributes a lot to heat trapping gas emissions for me, the biggest part of my carbon footprint was my flying. Because I live down in Texas all my family's up in Toronto and Ontario. I also travel around to talk to people about climate change. And so I've been investing very heavily the last couple years in trying to transition I'm actually up to about three quarters of my talks to virtual talks online. And then when I do travel somewhere to give talks I make sure I have a bunch of them lined up. I was just in Indiana this past week, and I had seven talks and ate more meetings. That I didn't four days it was a lot of work, but the carpet per print of each individual event was actually quite low. What's the biggest problem that you see when you're trying to convince people that they really need to take this seriously and make those changes in their lifestyle. What do they doubt? Well, we often think that they doubt the science that the idea that somehow science is a matter of opinion, I can decide whether it's real or not. And if you follow the headlines, especially listening to politicians, you would certainly think that's the case because that's a lot of the talking points that they use. I just don't believe that stuff. It's just not real. But when we actually look at polling data across Canada and the US cross North America, we see that actually most people agree climate is changing and most people agree. It will affect plants and animals and future generations and polar bears where the rubber hits the road, though, is almost none of us think it's going to affect us personally. So it's something. That sure I would like to care about it for future generations or people in developing countries. But if it's not gonna affect me in the places where I live my family my community. Why does it matter? So I really do think that the most dangerous myth that the largest number of people have bought into is it doesn't matter to me. And if it ever does get serious or dangerous than somebody else is gonna fix it for us. Tell me a little bit about how you have those conversations with people you're a Canadian climate scientists in Texas, how did those conversations go? Do you meet a lot of climate change resistance? I think we have the stereotype up here. The Texas is deeply conservative. And there are a lot of people there who don't believe in climate change it is. And there are a lot of people who are very suspicious of the science. But today it's gotten to the point where almost anyone can point to some way in which climate is changing around them. Whether it's hurricanes getting stronger with a lot more rainfall associated with them whether it's wildfires burning out of control, greater and greater area record breaking floods or heatwaves people. Point two, something unusual. That's happening today. So today, many more people are curious even down here in Texas, then ten years ago, when we first moved here, I'm getting calls from landowners, and farmers and producers and water managers and people who are traditionally very conservative. But they want information on what's happening. So that's kind of a clue where to begin a conversation. Whether it again is with a family member, a friend colleague neighbor or somebody in our city or area who we want to talk about about making a difference begin the conversation not with something that you most disagree on. But begin the conversation was something that you most agree on. And if you don't know what that would be will then spend some time getting to know that person or that group. I figure out what makes them tick. What do they value? What's important to them? Start the conversation with something that you genuinely share with them. And then connect the dots because we both live in this location because we are both parents because we both are fiscal conservatives who care about. The economy because of who we are. Then actually were we already care about climate change. We just might not realize it because if we are person who cares about the place

Texas Chatelaine Magazine Toronto Lord Texas Tech Jordan Heath Rawlings Google Scientist Indiana Editor Catherine Heyhoe JOE North America Canada Professor Edmonton Maritimes
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So we're trying to give them motivation inspiration as well as practical advice on how to accomplish whatever. It is they're trying to accomplish Brian Hollywood of the lifestyle magazine. One thirty seven PM. Well, arguably Lucy who we heard from earlier has accomplished everything that she wanted to achieve trouble is not knowing how to stop with the company to integrate if you literally just fact it in a day off each week. No, I didn't come in yesterday. And I've come in today. And I think I went on holiday a couple of weeks ago for week. And I think I just have to is that my business went full of Paul if I if I don't check my emails every twenty minutes, so if I just take a couple of good days off, and I'm trying my best to kinda get to that point. As just when I take time off when I come back to feel more anxious than ever say, why find easier just to decent every day even on my days off. Because if I when I do finally come in I do feel quite sick, and I'll be driving to Whitfield clown. Well, but I think I think that just letting how to deal with my stress is hoping for Lucy, though, it may be a long road to recovery. Full work, all millennials like, Margaret Heffernan says fixing this for generation must start with a public acknowledgement that we can't all a human ain't persistent belief that more hours equals, greater productivity because. That seems logical the truth is that since eighteen eighty eight we've been doing research into productivity, and it always comes out with the same thing, which is humans are maximally productive for around forty hours a week. And after that productivity tapers off because we get tired. We make mistakes and the extra hours get used fixing the mess we made. So I think it's very important to start with the kind of basic science which says there is a limit to people's capacity in a week to do. Excellent work and making the more longer is not productive and author Margaret Heffernan, what do you think will we be? We will probably be returning to this theme on business daily. Again, send us your thoughts will business PBC dot co dot UK or tweet me Ed Butler too on Twitter that's been business.

Margaret Heffernan Lucy Brian Hollywood lifestyle magazine dot UK Twitter Paul Ed Butler twenty minutes forty hours
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Animal Radio

"This has been an animal radio news briefs. Get more at animal radio dot pen. Do you travel with your dog? Of course, my pets are part of our family me too. I take daisy with me everywhere. Right. Daisy too. How do you find out what hotels? Welcome you're dawn. I read Fido friendly, the traveling lifestyle magazine for you and your dog sounds perfect for planning our next vacation, right? Daisy. It is their motto is leave no dog behind and they have great hotel in destination reviews. Where can I find the magazine? Go online to Fido friendly dot com. I will for sure come on. We're off to find our next adventure. You're listening to animal radio bones are open at one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five. It's radio. We love our pets here in edible radio. They eat better than us. We worship them. They're all our screen little. Little better supplements than us. And I think my dog has more clothes than I do. I think you're right on that. Surely, not as many shoes as joy Villani has in his to shoe closets. So we're a little crazy about our animals. And if you are, well, then this is your show, and we'd love to hear from you one eight six six four zero five eight four zero five and here's a little handy tip. If you can't get through on the phones right now. You're busy right now. You can download the animal radio app and ask you questions right from the animal radio app. Just like that it is for Android, iphone, and blackberry in it's free..

Daisy traveling lifestyle magazine Fido joy Villani
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Z104

Z104

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Z104

"Was still don't know. There was so awkward. But the not so reliable lifestyle magazine said that after two less than two years. Ryan Seacrest wants to quit live with Kelly and Ryan sources Kelly knows he's getting homesick for the west coast. He's been talking about it a lot ladies. She flat out asked him if he's trying to leave and he told her he would onerous contract but on the day. He's probably still looking for an early. Wait. You know to get out of it. That's not what you want your co host to say like if you ask your coast. Are you thinking about leaving you want that you're close to go? No, I could never leave you not I'll honor my contract. Yeah. It's not make it sound like he's happy their friends. He just went through that break up, and he moved all the way across the country for this job. Yep. Girlfriend that he was dating, you know, she moves to New York for him as well. But I guess she went back to LA. Maybe he's. Yeah. That's part of it too. Kelly Ripa has become that friend. You have where every guy who dates her dumpster, and you start realizing maybe it's not the dudes. Maybe it's her. Yeah. She sees that friend, right? But it's hard to find another co host and like after reestablish another relationship so long just to get Ryan other vibe. Yeah. And now he contenders they could easily released I know let's not get into. Again. So hopefully, it's not true. All right that coming up on the next on the Z. We'll talk more about the college admissions scandal after another actress was arrested yesterday seven thirty two. And in three minutes, we've got something in the water tickets. So get ready. Shine. Insurance. Fans. As a. John. Five. Khalid. He did good on SNL last. I wonder if Khalid is the type of guy who gets the chubby cheek thing a lot, you know. Those big dimples..

Kelly Ripa Ryan Seacrest Khalid SNL a. John LA New York three minutes two years
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Down wrist fingers. Legs. What's one describes you as an entrepreneur? I think. Relentless. We have to be nowadays. Right. Well. You have to be. Anyway. But yeah, I mean, yeah. Just period. Survival. But as I progress, there's this one gentleman that was mentor to move for a long time. When he said, you're you're very aggressive. You need to be more like a tiger. And that's something that I worked on got older, and you let make sense. It's good to have a mentor your favorite mentor. He's he's probably one of my only mentors. That I'm going to work with from the last probably eighteen years. He find your did you find him. It was accidental car going to a destination and it just happened. So I mean, I think that it's kind of like finding my wife when it's supposed to happen. It's going to happen. You know, finding parking spot with a big truck. Could it in there? So we're here to inspire inform connect with community of entrepreneurs this Business Rockstars Myles Kovacs is our guest the co founder and president of dub magazine, trendsetting magazine. Now, it's online and everything, but where are you? Now as far as the magazine, you know, there's all these different niches that are kind of coming back or resurging so car culture is kind of like eighties all over again. So we have the magazine which is a celebrity automotive lifestyle magazine. Title with unraveled, which is custom trucks, big trucks and stuff like that. So you know, as far as the magazine business. I mean, he wanna lose money and magazine. Right. Exactly. That's that's it. But now, and I'm a car freak. So. But now people understand what they have. Yes. Thanks to you. And then used to be able to go on the communities or somewhere in the mid west and find a beautiful forty eight Chevy pickup from thousand bucks. Now. They all know what they have. Right. Absolutely. I mean, yeah, they realized that when the car manufacturers made lamented productions or things like that they know collection car now. So it educated everybody. Let's really what media does it educates. A consumer on kind of what what is that they maybe should do or not do and also the price point. So it gets you definitely get you run smart. Consumer. Now, I go back to the mid west, Mr. city slicker here, and they know me. A couple of grand for that. Dress Wadsworth fifty. So I blame you for that. How's your attitude has a CEO? What's the cultural company that lead, you know, and and invite their people on a journey and they're senior returning personnel. Wants to involve everybody on the jury you rely vice of others or your micromanaged. I'm a little bit of both. So what I do is I'm I'm a thinker. So our take all the information. I get and just just crunchy crunch and country. But one of the things I'm a problem solver. So as long as there's a solution faced issue, I could find that the solution. And then bring it bring it out today. A lot. You know? I mean, I have two kids, and you know, they're both some college teenagers, married. I got the businesses and things like that and partners, and you know, diarrhea swallowing problems. You know, growing up. I mean, you know, I was almost legally buying any Levin lost my vision. Totally blind in my left eye when I was twenty five when I started the magazine, and you just get to a point where it's like, you know, like you're here to do something. So I've always kind of had that shoulder. My whole life figure it out, right? Yeah. This one gentleman learning by braille. So it's like he's seen me hit the wall. So many times I try to figure it out that learned. Learn for the left side of the door. That's it. And then you have to be willing to again make mistakes. I think the biggest thing is with you know, people that are control freaks like myself. I was really really bad. And I changed that was. I can only do so much myself too. I got people that are better than me when I can take the credit for it, anyways and take some time off. That's right. How many people they have working for twenty six point six hundred? When you hire them winning look for Pasha in the past. I used to look for. And stuff because I want to brag like, oh, we got this guy. Former exec. This and that, and you know, what I realized was I just want people that share the same mindset people that laugh a good work ethic that really believe in whatever we're trying to achieve. But most importantly, I want people that are knowledgeable in that field. I wanna hire experts. What about friends and family, friends and family, I got higher than what a higher them. No, okay. And I learned that the hardware almost everybody. Sits in you chair says that why boundaries are problem? But I think a lot of it is. You know, when you try to lead the group that has to be some kind of like. Aspiration like they wanted to be in that position, friends and family show things expect to be in that position, which is strength as a CEO. My strength is a CEO is really identifying my weaknesses. But focusing on my strengths. So what I mean by that is I don't read and write well, I'll sell so I learn how to read by actually reunion, low rider magazine, which is a car culture magazine, not by going to school. So because I was never passionate about it. So for me, it was just I was trying to right people like. I feel like I'm just putting puzzles together every day, we need this piece that I know that person, and you know, put that person what did you learn from.

CEO car culture magazine automotive lifestyle magazine dub magazine low rider magazine Myles Kovacs Chevy Mr. city Levin Pasha co founder president eighteen years
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Much. Finally today is dishing of the stack we're getting update from another old friend dog magazine, if you're unfortunate enough to be amongst the uninitiated dog is in its own words, a modern lifestyle magazine, exploring the presence and influence of dogs and their owners in society each issue centers on the specific breed as selected by dog founder, Julian Victoria, and the team welfare discussion about the latest issue. And to give us a general update on what's being getting tail's wagging? I was joined a little earlier by two members of the dog aditorial team, Emily Rogers and Hannah fit Simon's. We just used to start a conversation about lots of other things. So it's not necessarily just for dog owners or people who are crazy anybody who really loves those by anew magazines and exploring bookshops who hopefully not the magazine about in terms of wants division starts to take shape and how I guess. Issue five. Now how closely to your ambitions in curatorial almost then when stuff's come. In shoots features kind of thing the point now where the need for some of the shore people who understand your shorthand almost some of your contributors. They just they know what you mean. Without you, having to almost say is that kind of more more we have people that we work with more or less every issue. Don't rely Laura feces. One of our writers us, commit your. He's one of the illustrative what with now for few issues. So that's great. But then it's also about keeping a balance between finding new people who have, you know, maybe don't know who we all can bring something really fresh. But now that we're on she five I think that does really help because people have more of an idea of what we're doing. And what we want my suppose what about I mean? Terms of how Dr Sawyer obviously has sort of. I think what's nice as a definitely recognizable look and feel and yet there's always a prizes. The issue to shoot in terms of how the storytelling happening the coin registration the balance for the station's phobe toga fee to writing the rest of it you fairly prescriptive in terms of how you want that balanced Bill. You let that unfold little surprise yourself in a story that you envisage happening ways, very different. And actually, a kind of always feels like that was the right way. How does that work? We have sections that we always intend to have in every magazine like revisit every issue that's kind of in our plan. But then especially with this issue things just get pushed out at the last minute. We've always done a map, for example. But then we took him out because we had a really great interview come in at the last minute, which was the sign Simon Stevens one. It's tough. Like her a good idea if I k- this is what we want. But then you have to be really open to. Okay, let's lose this. Because this is this is great and not be scared to change up each issue. And that's kind of nice about being relatively small. There's a sort of fleet of about how you can do that. Maybe some bigger publishers. There's a slightly more hamstrung by while. It's been since the since the get go is there is there was sort of perfect fighting wait almost in terms of the balance of being small labels make decisions quickly, but having the resources to tell stories how you want to tell them, I think because so many of us on the team quite easy to talk over those things and decide the unit I guess, it's a measure, I suppose that's a bit of a tradit- some of the traditional editorial virtues. Really, they're different skill sets taking the time to do things properly and again, a high suppose on this program. It was come back to which is are people getting the chance to learn from doing but having good it's working with them getting red panel. We often talk about how the digital domain doesn't. Maybe a Ford aspiring journalists or Ella street is the chance to cut their teeth in that in that way. Is that something that you're mindful of is important to you? I agree with that premise, I guess I agree with it. Yeah. The main focus is the magazine for us. And we like to do the traditional thing of getting in the articles getting them decide whether to be illustrated or get photographer, and and we do very much choice of the printed matter really, that's really interesting. Because now when you look at what traditional job titles, like editor, Yuna, achy editing. You're probably managing a team and dealing with like getting in freelancers or having to Soltau all sorts of managerial things so actually being an editor and doing the editing is great. We all get involved in in different areas outside of our roles. Traditionally are like, you know, helping to range shoots and all sorts of things. But that's why I love doing this because it is basically doing the editing doing the interviews doing the writing as opposed to if it was maybe for like a really large corporation with the title editor it might. Actually, be doing all. And that was a Hannah Emily from Doug magazine, joining us on the stack. And that's all we have time on this week's program. The shows produced by Nando Gustav checkout, edited by Cassie Galvin and Kenny scholars any comments queries. Are welcome line t Fernando you'll find him on. Monaco dot com. Gets join us at the same time next week. That's the stack on Tom Edwards until next time. Goodbye. Goodbye.

editor Hannah Emily Simon Stevens Emily Rogers founder Julian Victoria Monaco dot Soltau Dr Sawyer Nando Gustav Laura Doug magazine Tom Edwards Fernando Yuna Cassie Galvin Kenny
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:19 min | 3 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"O'Brien Myles Kovacs guess the president and Kohl ponder dub magazine dome. Everything a does. So. The magazine's online. We have social we have toy cars. So like the hot Hot Wheels. So back in two thousand one I went to Mattel and said, hey, we want to make a miniature of Shaquille O'Neal's escalator something like that. Right. And they're like we'll never make that will never make an urban toy ever like that. And we ended up doing it with another company based on Hong Kong, and we sold twenty five million dollars. So basically, we urbanized Hot Wheels. Because I was like I never grow with car with flames on it. Five engines that's kinda weird. But I want to come through every now, and then, but I wanted to spinners I wanted speakers and things like that. So all we did was give the consumers what they want. Then in two thousand five we did a video game called midnight club. Three w we sold nine point six million video games with producer rockstar games. And it's the same thing we took what we did with the tortoise and now we animated it. We put it on the video. How did you is gonna work? I didn't. It's basically a child by fire suicide. No. I mean, it's it's one of those things where I think at the time my goal was to make car culture, socially acceptable. That was it. I wanted people have come Rams are big rims on their cars and not be considered a drug dealer pimp, or whatever it is. Well, everybody wanted love the cars. These did not get in absolute right or wants a cool factor. You know? So what we did? That was different was we got celebrities to endorse our brand and be on the cover. So it was a celebrity automotive lifestyle magazine. So it's like our first cover was the atrocity wild Shaquille O'Neal. We I mean, we've had Kobe Bryant all these top stars on the cover of magazine really gave us credibility. What what's next? What's next for us is we just actually launched? We're watching new products. So we're looking at different industries, and we just launched a new wer. It's a luxury window tint. So when you think of windows ten you think of the darker is the more he rejection and the more UV rays, the blocks. So we have a really light film that block sixty percent of UV NRA's. And so what we're working on? Now is let's seek us. Just, hey, this looks cool because you have dark windows, what if you have an I condition like we and you need to have some UV are blocking illegal. It's legal, and we have different shades that are legal the front windshield is not legal in some states. But I do it because you know, what it helps me is. And then also skin issues and things like that. Like, my wife has rose Asia. And should we put it on her car and her rose Asia cleared up? So it's it's more of less of a, hey, this is a cool thing. But this is more. Medicinal product that could stretch outside of just dub car coach world. And the reason why that product came out was there was no one really doing that correctly in the marketplace. We are here to inspire inform and connect the community entrepreneurs this Business Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien Myles Kovacs good guess, what was your deal with Pepsi? What happened there? So at Pepsi. We did sweepstakes within the second largest, we do right, Pepsi cO. They us through an agency in San Diego that was looking for kind of niche. You know, they're always looking for were skateboarding culture. So we happen to come up, and we did a partnership with with Pepsi, and we end up doing the second largest sweepstakes and Pepsi history are dubbed logo WGN logo was on one point six billion cans of Pepsi for two years. We gave away seventy cars and seventy days for two years. One the first year with Chevy with the Tahoe. And Jeff, Gordon and exhibit the rapper. That did up to number twenty four on all the cards. No, it was an option. A NASCAR deck. Oh, you could do different things. So that was really really significant and for us. It was like, wow, you know, all these Pepsi cans with our logo on it. I was in like Sweden, and I saw a vending machine with our graphics on and stuff like that. Yeah. I was like man I want to take that home mountain dew. Sierra mist all they all kind of fit together. Right. Yeah. I mean all the soda industries right now. We're actually partnered with monster energy, which is the number. One course energy drink in in the US, and they're attacking it nationwide. So I mean, I think I look at monster logo on your wheels. Right. We have a monster. We all monster energy wheel. And then we have our own monster energy drink as well. You really kind of driving that only the millennial but younger generation as well. Right. With ideas has got to be a gold mine at some point. Well, you know, this is already I mean, you know, there's no lack of ideas out there. There's usually lack of how and I think what the experience that. I have I'm looking for kind of those next ideas and trying to coordinate them and do different things I've done a lot of licenses and with large companies and things like that as well. Give me the numbers has a million on your website, right? Or the readership is million readerships about six point five million on the magazine website gets about five hundred thousand unique users among our social only that about three point five million dollars. I saw four point eight on this round half nine. But I mean, that's huge. Right. And you've been able to monetize that. Yeah. I mean, it's we've been blessed, you know, just so working again when you give the customers what they want. They're going to react to it. So for us, it's like creed impact, and then create a movement. So we we accidentally created a movement. People wanted me involved with this culture. So it makes it cool. What made it easy? He made it easier because they wanted to send me involved were coming to be involved. How do you find the right employees? That's a great one. I learned you just have to kind of try it out. You know, there's different people that are going to fit. And then what I've done. Also, I'd take somebody in marketing that supposedly is a great marketer. And I might make him a salesperson. I take a manager that sucks it management that supposedly is good and put them in another position in names. That's really what it is. It's like, you know, identify their strengths in most people in life. I like I tell people I don't focus on my weaknesses. I really focused on my strengths now. Because if I want to be the best in the world, I'll have to do is really focus on one strength. But if you want to be mediocre focused on all your weakness is the best thing just to be absurd. I mean, they're your east LA. Not really part of the crowd. But wanting to be absolutely observing these cars, just right? Well, you know, what it is? I looked at it. And it's kind of like what made me emotional those cars made me emotional. So it's like I want to be involved with that. Plus, it didn't hurt that the guys that have nice cars. Hot chicks. Right. So that was one of those things I said, you know, what we got a nice car. So I could have a girl, right? Learn how to drive with your hands or with. At what point will dub magazine, be relative? The magazine while you know, it's funny. I just had the discussion with my kids, you know. And they're like oh dad does for twenty years. And I said don't just wait because we're the we're the next Mamie boomers. So we're going to be driving those cars like I'm looking at like Honda civics and stuff now that I drove in high school or this or that so history will repeat itself. So Doug is going to go and do what it's doing? But in probably ten fifteen years. Everybody's gonna want to run a dub sticker because it reminds them when they were twenty. I wanna dump secret narratives, we're going to put a sticker and the window Tim in your car. I mean when when you put this new window ten burn when you're driving and get that burn. It eliminates that or takes down. Another thing too is the the feeling of their conditioning and all that stuff. Like, I was just in Arizona's one hundred eighteen degrees. I can feel it because it's like putting sunblock on on your windows and beautiful idea. Thanks for joining us. Thank you. Much sicker. I'll.

Pepsi Shaquille O'Neal dub magazine Myles Kovacs Hong Kong Mattel Kobe Bryant US skateboarding automotive lifestyle magazine Chevy Honda San Diego NASCAR Kohl Asia Pat O'Brien president rose Asia
"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:31 min | 3 years ago

"lifestyle magazine" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Of entrepreneurs. This is Business Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien. Thanks for joining us. I guess is miles clawbacks miles. The president co founder of dub magazine, which is a trendsetter for a long time right for the almost eighteen years now. Yeah. I'm forty magazine. Say we're anomaly online as well. But we'll get to that the demand joys wanting to be an entrepreneur. I never thought I'd be entrepeneurship. I always thought growing up, you know, being from east LA, I'll be there dead or in jail because that's what I was told. So I didn't really have big aspirations for myself. And neither did like my family and stuff like that. So I live way past whatever you wanted to get out. All right. Well, you know, what I just I never knew those away out. I never knew that was it out. So when you're sitting there, and you feel trap. You don't you're not looking for a way out. You don't know any different right? Exactly. You're saying your neighborhood and that's air. You know? So how did you get out? Well cars BMX. Yeah. Ri- motorcycle skateboard. So those things were transportation. But you know, there are also protection in just kind of being around different people. I think one of the keys for me. And I hated this at I was I'm Japanese Sangari. I grew up amongst, you know, Mexicans and African Americans and stuff and I wanted to be Mexican so bad. So bad, but let me not be Mexican probably kept me out of the gangs. Really because I never fit in. So I think that's also helped me in business because I'm the chameleon I could go on different environments and fit in because I'm different. Your first paying job was what delivery driver for local wheel and tire store. Whittier California and just doing deliveries picking up dropping off. Rams that was kind of where like I really cut my teeth and businessman 'cause I figured out how much the tire costs where was made how much the wheel costs and. I was intrigued by that. I was like, wow. This is amazing. What's the worst job you ever had? I've been lucky. When I was younger. I would say, you know, my dad had like a plumbing business, and I would go and clean toilets that that was pretty rough for paid, right? Yeah. I know. Underage, right. It was the legal arrest. My dad. He's a guy you're fine. How many hours you're today? Now. Well. I'm probably sixteen hours plus nine to five one, right? There's no such thing as nine to five. And you know, what I realize is Newsweek recognize me for my thinking. And I was of changed my landscape. And I was like when you're thinking, and you get paid to think you're working all the time. So I'm probably more than that. Because even when I'm dreaming. I'm thinking. Depends on what you're dreaming. You're constantly dry. And it's an evolution things. You know, there's all these what I call like business messages and things and just kind of lessons that I learned whether it's in my head or actually happening. The only hobbies what do you do for my biggest hobby is motorcross dirt bikes. I ride motocross and the of all your bones. Have all Marino. What I've been fortunate. I haven't bone in my body. So yeah, you're the first one I've ever met. Yeah. I've had concussions and knock myself out and things like that. But. The clavicle the goes. Femur everything wrist fingers. Legs. Once one describes you as. Entrepreneur. I think. Relentless. Well, you have to be nowadays. Right. Well, you you have to be. Anyway. But yeah, I mean, yeah, just period is survival. But as I progress, I mean, there's this one gentleman that was mentor me for a long time. And he said here bore you're very aggressive. You need to be more like a tiger. And that's something that I worked on as I got older. And you know, what it makes sense? It's good to have a mentor was favorite mentor. He's he's probably one of my only mentors. That I work with from the last eighteen years. Did he find you? Or did you find you? It was accidental happened to be in a car going to a destination and it just happened. So I mean, I think that it's kind of like finding my wife when it's supposed to happen. It's going to happen. Finding a parking spot with a big truck play out. Parking spot hoping that angles works. So you could get it in there. So we're here to inspire inform connected community of entrepreneurs this Business Rockstars Myles Kovacs is our guest the co founder and president of dub magazine, really a trendsetting magazine. Now, it's online and everything. But where are you? Now. You know, as far as a magazine, there's all these different niches that are kind of coming back or resurging. So car culture is kind of like eighties all over again. So we have the dub magazine, which is a celebrity automotive lifestyle magazine, and we just launched a new title called Lifton leveled, which is custom trucks. I big trucks and stuff like that. So you know, as far as the magazine business. I mean, you want to lose money do events in magazine. Right. Exactly. That's that's it. But now car freak. So, but now people understand what they have. Yes. Thanks to you. I mean used to be able to go into communities or somewhere in the mid west and find the beautiful forty eight Chevy pickup for thousand bucks. Now. They all know what they have. Right. Absolutely. I mean, you know, they realize that when the car manufacturers made limited productions and things like that they know what the collection car now. So it educated everybody. And that's really what media does it educates. The consumer on kind of what what is that they maybe should do or not do and also a price point. So it gets, you know, definitely get you, very smart. Consumer now go back to the mid west, Mr. city slicker here. They know me. And I said I give you a couple of grand for them as well as worth fifty. They know they know people. Definitely no, I blame you for. You for that? How's your attitude as CEO, what's the culture, the company whether CEO's that lead, you know, and invite their people on a journey and their CEO's they take people on a journey. I'm a person that wants to involve everybody on the journey. You rely on the advice of others or your micromanage color. I'm a little bit of both. So what I do is. I'm a thinker. So our take all the information. I get and just just crunchy crunch crunch it. But one of the things is I'm a problem solver. So as long as there's a solution face issue. I could find the solution. And then bring it bring it out today. A lot. You know? I mean, I have two kids, and you know, they're both in college. They're teenagers married. I got the businesses and things like that a partners and diarrhea quality problems. But you know, growing up. I mean, you know, I was almost legally by nine eleven lost my vision when totally blind in my left eye when I was twenty five when I started magazine, and you just get to a point where it's like, you know, like you're here to do something. I've always kind of had that Philly my whole life. It's kind of figure it out, right? Yeah. One gentleman told me learning by braille. So it's like he's seen me hit the wall. So many times freight to figure it out that you know, that's the only way I learned for the left side of the door. That's it. And you have to be willing to again make mistakes. I think the biggest thing is with people that are control freaks like myself. I was really really bad. And I changed that was. What I realized I can only do so much myself too. If I got people that are better than me than I could take the credit for it, anyways and take some time off. That's right. How many people they have working for twenty six point six ninety? When you hire them what you look for in the past. I used to look for credentials and stuff because I wanted to brag like we got this guy this former executive and this and that, and you know, what I realized was I just want people that share the same mindset. I want people that are, but a good work ethic that really believe in whatever we're trying to achieve. But most importantly, I want people that are knowledgeable in that field. I wanna hire experts. What about friends and family, friends and family? I got to hire them what hire them. No, okay. You know? And I learned that the hardware almost everybody. Sits in jersey says that why boundaries are problem? Why I think a lot of it is. You know, when you try to lead the group there has to be some kind of like. Aspiration like they want to be in that position friends and family show that they should expect to be in that position strength. My strength is always really identified my weaknesses. But focusing on my strengths. So what what I mean by that is I don't read and write really well still. So I learned how to reeboks reading low rider magazine, which is a car culture magazine, not by going to school. So because I was never passionate about it. So for me, it was just always trying the right people. It's like I feel like I'm just putting puzzles together every day. Hey, we need this piece. That's I know that person and put that person. What did you learn from low rider magazine? I learned that. They have always had bikini clad in say. Say. One thing that I really loved about. It was it was expression. You know, that was kind of my first kind of foray into like art. I was like, wow. These these cars are like canvases, and we could go and create our own Picasso's we could do it through colored old hot rod magazine. That's all. I mean people want to give me credit for starting this genre of dub movement. All I did was copy Robert Peterson and Alberto Lopez. So bad were the Petersen publishing which hot rod? And low rider magazine. Since cars. He's he's amazing. I mean Robert Peterson was visionary. And again, all I did was take everything that he did and.

dub magazine low rider magazine CEO president co founder Pat O'Brien Robert Peterson LA car culture magazine automotive lifestyle magazine Chevy Myles Kovacs Ri Whittier California Newsweek Marino Petersen publishing Mr. city
Nancy Sinatra Sr., Frank Sinatra's first wife, dead at 101

Dark Secret Place

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Nancy Sinatra Sr., Frank Sinatra's first wife, dead at 101

"Ten pm kfi am six forty more stimulating talk michael should pay with the news the griffith observatory was evacuated because of a suspicious package for several hours lapd officer mike lopez says the bomb squad was called out the scene after the item was founded about one this afternoon the all clear given about three hours later at four earlier this week more than two thousand people were ordered out of the observatory and its surrounding park griffith park because of a wildfire a bus rolled over and crashed on the ten freeway in downtown la and chp officer roberto gomez says the bus with thirty two people on board rolled over on the ten at the one ten connector at about four this morning that were transported nonetheless considered major injuries that was point from palacasino in route to create most of the people riding on the bus were asleep at the time of the accident the says they're still looking for the reason why the fiftythreeyearold bus driver lost control of the vehicle frank sinatra's first wife nancy sinatra senior has died her daughter nancy sinatra junior says her mother passed away peacefully last night she was one hundred one nancy barbados sinatra was born march twentyfifth nineteen seventeen in jersey city new jersey she was the first of frank sinatra's four wives and the mother of his three children they got married in nineteen thirty nine in divorced in nineteen fifty one after frank had a string of affairs about six thousand people are celebrating what he this weekend in oklahoma akina oklahoma normally has three thousand residents but the population has grown to six thousand this weekend as music lovers gather for the woody guthrie folk festival that celebrates the singer best known for this land is your land reformers this year include grammy winner jason mraz and arlo guthrie daughter and woody's granddaughter antigun three festival organizers says people come from as far away as scotland and australia for the festival which continues through tomorrow land was made kfi new brady's of the world or going extinct marsha middle kids won't be around because millennials don't want three children anymore all the time women's lifestyle magazine the cut says middle kids are becoming a rarity as family planning trends from the nineteen seventies have essentially reversed pew research center says in nineteen seventyone gallup info showed having three children was the ideal in the late seventy s more than thirty five percent of moms between forty and forty four had four children are more.

Brady KFI Australia Arlo Guthrie Jason Mraz Grammy Guthrie Jersey City Fiftythreeyearold CHP Officer Lapd Pew Research Center Lifestyle Magazine Michael Scotland Woody Oklahoma Nancy Barbados Sinatra Nancy Sinatra