31 Burst results for "Life Magazine"

"life magazine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:21 min | 9 months ago

"life magazine" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"W ABC, Bruce He's home your home. Oh, hey, come that almost knocked my socks off. What? That all right. You told me to stop Hardener. You never take me seriously. 6 26 WNBC radio chime time. That's amazing. All right, Let's go to our telephone. And that number is 808 48 w a V c 92 22. I'm gonna go toe Fairfield, California I think it is Cousin Dominique is waiting for me. Don't money Could he did the higher Dominique? How are you? Good evening, cousin Brucie. I'm doing well, How about you? Oh, I feel feel good. I got talking to you in California and all my cousins all over the country. I feel very, very happy. So tell me about you. What's going on with your life? You all right? I'm doing absolutely wonderful. Great. Makes me happy. So what are we playing tonight for You, Um I saying your right name right? I used you say Dominique. Either way, Dominique how do you say? How do you What do you know? What do your friends call you? Dominique? Dominique? All right, so I'm a friend. All right, Dominique. So what am I playing for you tonight? I would like to hear the twist by Chubby checker. Come on, baby. Let's do the twist. All right Now I do twist you had to do the twist. Formerly the legal way. Yes, I do. Actually, that song reminds me of the time life commercial. What kind of commercial There's this company that sells CDs. It's called Time Life, Right? Like the time and life magazine all time off your time. Life magazine. Oh, yeah, they do Those fabulous series here. They do those series. Very, very good. All right, so we're gonna do that. So so anybody in the world you'd like to twist with Who would it be? If you had you'd pick anybody? Anybody? It would have been like to twist. I like to twist with my mom and dad. Oh, that's great. Okay, we'll do that. You know, that's very sweet. Lovely answer, Dominique. You are very, very special. All right? No, I want you to start the record off normally. All right, I want you to say Well, 23 phone like that, But really, with a lot of lot of energy, a lot of goals, All right, 1234, would you do it? I will do it..

Dominique Life magazine California ABC Bruce He Fairfield
New Cameras for 2021

The Digital Story

04:11 min | 9 months ago

New Cameras for 2021

"So in the photography industry. I think we're off to a good start at least in terms of options for new gear. You'll see that. The variety of equipment. That i talk about today is pretty wide. I mean there's a wide variety of stuff and it's funny. I'm starting at the top of the list with the most expensive. And i'll be working down the list to downright affordable and everything on the list. is interesting. There's nothing on this list that i don't like now some of that. I can afford some of it. I cannot but that doesn't mean that we can't talk about right. there's nothing we can't do a little window shopping and that's exactly what we're gonna do right now just so we know what's going on right. We know what's going on. You know that way worthy experts when people ask us well you know. What do you think of the new this say for example the leica m ten p. reporter. That's the first camera. I'm going to talk about right now. This was inspired by lancashire history in connection with press photography so the m ten p. reporters a special edition range finder camera featuring a streamlined. Body design along with a characteristic dark green paint finish now. I don't know why it was characteristic. I don't know why that word is in the description but it's their price just left it out. Don't you think. The camera also supports a highly durable scratch resistant coating in his fitted with kevlar trim for even more rugged appearance in enhanced grip now this cameras parv limited edition of only four hundred and fifty units only with like us. I look at them i go. That's a cool camera would love to have it. But it's out of my price range. This camera i look at it and all sorts of things start to happen to me. Start to have these views going back in my past when When i was a kid does a young photographer. I dreamed of traveling the world and shooting for life magazine. And i could see this like a hanging around my neck as i went from continental continent reporting. You know all the good and bad things happen in this world. This is a very durable looking camera. I i love the idea that you know the finnish extra durable that they have your kevlar for the grip. I mean all that's neat. I love the color of it. And i can just see it with that. Thirty five millimeter f to lands on there. I could do anything with that camera that it gives me that sort of feeling now. One thing i might not be able to do with the camera is pay rent or buy because it's eight thousand seven hundred and ninety five dollars and that's for the body only probably that thirty five millimeter lens cost about another three and a half grand or so but for that money. Here's what you get twenty four megapixel full frame cmos sensor so a nice full frame camera the latest leica image processor an optical viewfinder and a three inch touchscreen. Lcd iso one hundred fifty thousand five frames per second shooting built in wi fi. They redesigned the shudder in. They added a built in level gauge. Now this is a stills only camera so no video with this so you're going to have to have a video guy with you as you travel the world to document everything that's going on because no video with this particular leica and again. It has a beautiful dark green. Finish with kevlar trim. So this thing is a beauty. I would love to have it in my backpack and just pull it out and shoot whenever i wanted to look cool and get great shots as well right in great shots as well so it's available now for eight thousand seven hundred and ninety five dollars body only so if you already have like a lenses then okay makes a little bit more sense for me. I would be starting from scratch

Lancashire
Interview With Ryan Herz

Photography Radio

05:27 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Ryan Herz

"Well did afternoon everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today i am talking to a member of the frames community ryan hers. Orion's work is all over our group. It is engaging it is provocative. It's the kind of work that you look at. And you're you're going to have a response to it. Personally i find it absolutely thrilling. An end fascinating ryan good afternoon. How're you doing pretty good. how are you. i'm doing great. You're out in santa monica california. Did tell me what you see out your window. What kind of day is it out there. It's pretty much seventy five degrees Another perfect Or another shitty day embarrass dice. All right well. I i envy you that here on the planes as it's gray and cold and snow ian winners coming in. You began your photography career when you were twelve years old and you came across an old range finder in a drawer. Tell me that story. Tell me how you got started in photography. Yeah i think actually it was more like it was about ten and i found an old contacts range finder in a drawer. Not being used. And i think it had been forgotten and somehow i latched onto it and i'm not quite sure how i learn to use it but i did and then a few years later there was a huge fire. One of those big california brushfires in my neighborhood. And i somehow got it together and took very poor pictures of the fire and the planes and i thought that was great in the photo bug was planted right then never left me. What what is it at age. Twelve or thirteen over that sent you out to photograph the fires versus. Just run away head you already been smitten a little bit by capturing images or what was the. What was the motivation there. I'm seventy three. That's a long time ago. There was always something about getting the images. I remembered i have one cute picture of me in my cub scout uniform with the context around my neck. My cub scout had turned backwards. So i don't know what pretended you were taking pictures. That bill was getting in the way where you go. that's right. we started the whole movement. There you go there you go. You also mentioned that. You took a two day seminar when you were in college with eugene smith that taught you as you claim the appreciation of the photo essay. Well okay i mean. Obviously we know what photographs are. What do you mean by the photo essay well especially with gene. Smith's work at life magazine. Was that former. You got to use eight or ten pictures. Basically to tell a story not a book nada along scale project but something you would go into for probably a few weeks and try and get eight or ten pictures. That convinced it all now. In his case obviously he was a master at it and obviously each composition was better than the last and medium and talking to him a little bit and observing him. Gave me a lot of input. Into what i want to do in the future and also what. The possible costs were because this is about nineteen seventy he had been fighting with various editors for basically his career and it was to the point then when he had recorded. I don't know how he'd recorded. But he ed recordings of his conversations with various editors and how they didn't understand what he was doing at the time and he actually broke into tears at one point in front of about thirty five forty people other points he was brilliant and other point see was certainly technically a master. So that was very insightful. I thought he was a rather troubled man at the time. And i had hopes for his future and lo and behold a year later he started minamata which obviously was a large-scale book project that was very very successful in lead to some of his best images. There's a good lesson. They're on both sides of success and working through the the struggle when people don't appreciate the kind of stuff that we're trying to get out there. I don't think that's unique to photography. I think musicians. I think writers. I think dancers all when they come up against a border are gonna meet resistance Border is is there because of some evolution of the form hasn't quite grown that direction. I bring that up. Because i am looking at your project called unseens which you subtitle street. Photography in the age of photoshop street photography is supposed to be the very real the documentary the untouched. And here you are really playing with that form so tell me about surrealism in street photography telling me about unseens. Where did it come from. What are you doing. Well in terms of surrealism. I've always considered myself and have a healthy dose of that. And i think a lot of the street photographers in france. Were surrealist their hearts. Certainly critize and man ray were surrealist and it was a thread that went through everything back then in paris at the time when everybody found the like and that was really the birth of the street. Photography movement my estimation anyway Unseens are a little different. They're not different than street photography in that they are not planned. They are not set up

Ryan Scott Olsen California Orion Santa Monica Eugene Smith Minamata Bill Smith France Paris
War, country shows and getting personal

Photography Daily

03:51 min | 10 months ago

War, country shows and getting personal

"Just to clear this one out for now set. Your website is room. Twenty eight fifty dot com. Why why that harks back to the day of life magazine as very loudly youngster. I used to collect them and read them. And does my photography grew. It was life magazine on magazines of the type that quite a big influence on on the type of photography that that i liked view and now to like to try and do self room. Twenty at fifty was the room in the american office of life. Magazine where hall of the photographers were in town usa to sit on meet to discuss projects or we're going to do kick ideas around and that was the room this. Those ideas were were born of some of those. You know amazing stories. I'm sure we've all say in life magazine. And i watch some documentary as the mentioned the factoring twenty or fifty thought. Yeah that's quite a good good name for what was a blog for me then and then became a website because of that i wanted to room. Twenty eight fifty still exists. Somehow i wonder what it is now. Probably being changed into apartments province. They they'll have no idea how important that room while she studied to photograph career in the army photography unit. Didn't he was how it all started. Yet that's right. I was in the army twenty two years so sixteen of those years. I was The photo observe in the royal artillery. So we used to work alongside our and armored colleagues with them do what they did. When there was a requirement to bring down artillery fire. It was responsible earth cellophane colleagues like may to bring down not Throughout all this photography debating the increase in interest. Tonight i was taking pictures and i was joyous i was teaching me self black and white film development and all that good stuff document bedroom at all been boggs over the window is all businesses and then as i pull continued through. Miami korea became aware of the army photographic trade until which point didn't navy noted that existed to be but it's a very small tree it under the rmc logistic corker podge. Under the time that. I think there was about thirty. Six people total Who all transferred from whatever units. They were in On joined his or continue. Whatever clears the hudson arizona. Job is what i did for the last six years correa a string now contributed for getty images news which which means you're images generally go to who in terms of distribution and all of the editorial subscribers to get images globally Would pretend to how the site of any pictures that i filed down to. The picture desk is a string is a string of duoyin. Well i'm a. I'm a freelance photographer. A work cell. I'm responsible for your books. You know tax returns all that kind of self employed stuff. But what i do is i look around mike. Mike switches northeast england north yorkshire through the cost of the look through. And i'll look at and find out about all say are here all kinds of events which i then tick and think will listen. Event the top this weekend be of entrusted. Get the energy. If i think so that. I'll go back to the to the person that i deal with the picture desk and say look. I've got this coming over the weekend. What do you think if they say yes. We like that will take us that. Essentially that's the confirmation of me being a string at for them for that deer so essentially you become stuff for the jewish of job so you get a wage. You're going to shift shift fake. Get your mileage expenses. You're going shoot the job at caption file In in the in the normal way to get those pictures out of the picture desk and on the goal on that distribution network potential editorial clients to say so the next day i could go and do a completely different job for somebody else. I'm obligated by contract. Fecta getting outside of that

American Office Of Life Army Boggs USA Correa Korea Miami Navy Arizona North Yorkshire Mike England
"life magazine" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

Diary of a Nation

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"life magazine" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

"As an <Speech_Female> indigenous person. I <Speech_Female> feel that. I can really <Speech_Female> see the route <Silence> of <Speech_Female> The way that <Speech_Female> colonialism has really <Speech_Female> caused all of <Speech_Female> these problems of <Speech_Female> that. You know america's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> very slowly <Speech_Female> trying to <Silence> confront today. <Speech_Female> Capitalism <Speech_Female> is a really important <Speech_Female> element <Speech_Female> to the <Speech_Female> conversation around <Speech_Female> racism in <Silence> <SpeakerChange> in itself. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What do you <Speech_Female> hope. Our <Speech_Female> people's <Speech_Female> take away from our <Silence> conversation today. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> First and foremost <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The only reputation <Speech_Female> for land is <Speech_Female> land. <Speech_Female> When we're talking <Speech_Female> about reconciliation <Speech_Female> and reparations <Speech_Female> and whatnot <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> native people in particular <Silence> <Speech_Female> the only <Speech_Female> thing that can make up <Speech_Female> for land is <Speech_Female> land and sovereign <Speech_Female> sovereignty <Speech_Female> and <Silence> I think <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> i would hope that people <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> recognize <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> their <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Female> collective ignorance <Silence> about <Speech_Female> The political <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> relationship between <Speech_Female> the united <Speech_Female> states and native people <Speech_Female> because <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> our treaties have <Speech_Female> been ignored <Speech_Female> for centuries <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> standing <Speech_Female> and binding <Silence> <Speech_Female> federal law <Speech_Female> you know the and <Speech_Female> america <Speech_Female> tends to break <Speech_Female> and twist its own laws <Speech_Female> in order <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> usurp <Speech_Female> the power of native <Speech_Female> people on the <Speech_Female> authority of native <Speech_Female> people time and time <Speech_Female> again and <Speech_Female> i hope that a <Speech_Female> takeaway is that <Speech_Female> by actually <Speech_Female> recognizing <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the sovereignty <Speech_Female> and supporting <Speech_Female> it <Silence> We can <Speech_Female> first and <Speech_Female> foremost <Speech_Female> Fight climate change <Speech_Female> most effectively. <Speech_Female> And i think that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know tribal <Speech_Female> tribal sovereignty <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> maybe a scary <Speech_Female> term to a lot <Speech_Female> of non native people <Speech_Music_Female> But <Speech_Female> i hope <Silence> that <Speech_Female> Is conversation <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> might convince people <Speech_Female> that it shouldn't <Speech_Female> be <Speech_Female> It's just <Speech_Female> a matter of respect. <Speech_Female> And honestly it's the <Speech_Female> most fundamental <Speech_Female> thing that we can do <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> combat both <Speech_Female> Racial inequality <Speech_Female> and climate <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Detach trophy <Speech_Female> in. Our world <Speech_Female> is to recognize <Speech_Female> respect <Speech_Female> the sovereignty of indigenous <Speech_Female> people and <Speech_Female> to follow <Speech_Female> our leadership in protecting <Speech_Female> the earth <Speech_Female> that we <Silence> know most <SpeakerChange> intimately <Silence> <Speech_Female> malia <Speech_Female> bombs awin is <Speech_Female> a contributor to <Speech_Female> smithsonian folk <Speech_Female> life magazine <Speech_Female> and the boston <Speech_Female> globe <Speech_Female> links to her articles <Speech_Female> appear in the <Speech_Female> show notes. <Speech_Female> Do <Speech_Female> you have a story <Speech_Female> or do <Speech_Female> you know someone. I should interview. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Message me through. <Silence> Social media <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> follow the podcast <Speech_Female> on facebook. <Speech_Female> Instagram <Speech_Female> and twitter <Speech_Female> at diary <Speech_Female> of a nation. <Speech_Female> That way. you'll <Speech_Female> never miss a new <Speech_Female> episode. <Speech_Female> Tell a friend <Speech_Female> to listen to. <Speech_Female> That's how we <Speech_Female> grow our audience <Speech_Music_Female> and

america life magazine facebook
WASP Documentarian Erin Miller

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

06:36 min | 1 year ago

WASP Documentarian Erin Miller

"I'm talking today to Aaron Miller. Now, Erin is not a pilot, but she is the granddaughter of a wasp that's women's airforce service pilots, and she has a fascinating story to tell. So Aaron, thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me your welcome so What I'd like is for you to to share with us what what your grandmother has shared with you about her flying story, and then we'll get to your story of how you how you made things right for your grandmother. But can you tell us how she got her starting aviation? So. My Grandmother. Elaine. Dan. For harmon was born in Baltimore Maryland in Nineteen nineteen and she grew up in the city and was born at home in her house. And had two siblings and was very independent. sporty did a lot of rotor bike and very athletic growing up and she attended the University of Maryland in College Park. Maryland for college. and. She did lots of activities there as well. She was a cheerleader she was on the rifle team swim team. She was in a sorority in all kinds of things very active and her senior year of college. She saw an advertisement in the school newspaper for the civilian. Pilot Training. program. Which I'm sure your listeners are familiar with but it was a program in the nineteen thirties to have more people in the United States prepare to get a pilot's license and Senate was I guess subsidized by the US government and it was offered through a lot of universities and university. Of Maryland was one of them. And Anyway. So they had an advertisement for this program where you could learn how to fly and it costs thirty five dollars. Or forty dollars and you got thirty five hours of flight training and ground school and whatever. So my grandma thought that would be cool. So she applied and at the time which doesn't sound like a big deal you're signing up for a class nowadays. But back, then if you were a woman, they only accepted one woman for every ten men in the class. So you kind of had to I don't I never asked her if there were comp competition about this or she just happened to be the only woman that applied I don't really know but anyway. So, she asked her dad for the money and she also had to get a permission slip signed because she was female and under the age of twenty one and not married. So her dad had to sign a permission slip and that's how she initially took pilot training lessons West, through this program at the University of Maryland. Very. Cool. So after she got her thirty five hours, did she continue to fly on her own? Not Really she I think she did a little bit but she basically that was in nineteen, hundred forty, sue her last year of college. She got her pilot's license and then not too long after that, she got married in the summer of nineteen forty one. To my grandfather, and then as your listeners I'm sure. Well, aware six months later Pearl Harbor happened. So I don't think you flying around was generally something that happened. A Lot. So at that point, my grandmother and grandfather were moving around a lot to support the war effort they lived in Ohio at one point for a while and we're kind of working at different places. And and so how did she get back into? So in nineteen, forty, three, I believe there was an big. The Women Airforce Service pilots kind of became newsworthy and there was a little bit of news about them. Newsreel. The old newsreels are in life magazine, and so my grandmother heard about this program called the WAAS. And thought she could apply and she asked my grandfather. If he thought it would be a good idea and he thought it would be a great idea for her. So she applied and she kind of didn't really think she would get in because she really the most she had done was that civilian pilot training program she didn't have a lot of hours. And she kind of applied and thought oh well, we'll see what happens but they accepted her. So that's how she ended up becoming one of the Watson. Then she started training in April of Nineteen, forty four where did she go for Carini? She was in sweetwater Texas Avenger field, which is in western Texas. About an hour west of Abilene Texas. Now. Did your grandfather go there with her when she went there No. So my grandfather was an engineer and he later became a patent attorney, but he was not in the service because he had a physical defect so he was So, he couldn't serve in the army. But he was I think recruited I would say by a company to actually manufactured airplane parts called Jack and Heintz which some people may not because I've seen their parts in the in the warbirds He got sent to Asia to work on a plan to repair aircraft for the US military in theater in the Pacific. So the planes didn't have to be sent back to the continental United States to be repaired to save time. So he got sent over there to work on that program as a civilian, and so he was gone during this time when she was trainy. tweet water. Aircraft was she trained in? So she was trained on I think they were all trained on basic plane. So things like the the steersman PT, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, eighty, sixes, bt, Thirteen's neither all planes that she was training on. And what did she eventually flawed she I assume she was multi current and flew a lot of different airplanes as wasp. Yes. So all the WAAS flu lots of different planes and there were groups of wasps that were trained to fly every plane that was produced during World War Two from little trainer planes all the way up to be twenty nine bomber. So not every wasp was trained to fly every plane obviously but they're little groups trained to fly like you know pursuit crafter bombers or whatever. So. She was trained to fly bt thirteen's to train men in instrument training. So that was her job after she graduated. So she was transferred to Nellis Air. Base. In Las Vegas. And with her best friend from the WAAS Maggie Gee and Magnesia was to- target pilot in Las Vegas. So they were transferred there and my grandma trained men on instrument training in the thirteen. And she was also has some time as a co-pilot on the B seventeen.

Maryland University Of Maryland United States Aaron Miller Las Vegas Erin Elaine College Park Women Airforce Service Carini Life Magazine Us Government Sweetwater Texas Avenger Field Baltimore Ohio Senate DAN Nellis Air Harmon Maggie Gee
A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

Erin Burnett OutFront

03:47 min | 1 year ago

A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

"And out front up next we're. Just. From one of the most closely watched primaries this year a young Kennedy on the ballot in Massachusetts but can he unseat a seventy four year old incumbent? Because it's about ideas I am the youngest guy. In. This race. Tonight and the fight for twenty twenty a usual dynamic emerging Massachusetts ahead of tomorrow's Democratic Senate primary. The incumbent in his seventies was support from progressives, his challenger young and Kennedy Manu. Raju is out front. The Hiroshima Political Dynasty the grandson of the leap Robert F Kennedy campaigning to serve in the Senate like his famous great uncles and grandfather before him the. Certainly. I think you're doing great job. Hello. The candidate he's right there. For Life Magazine. Thirty nine year old Joe. Kennedy is facing something unexpected. Seventy four year old senator who has been in Congress for almost forty four years. Has Managed to galvanize support of young voters. Ahead of Tuesday's Massachusetts Senate primary I think that a lot of young people that are our age at least. From from our town have been similarly really inspired by Ed Markey polls show Senator Ed Markey as the favourite threatening to make the four term. The first Kennedy to lose a race in Massachusetts unlike other primaries this year were democratic incumbents have been ousted by liberal newcomers. Marquis has managed to turn that dynamic on its head because it's about ideas. I am the youngest guy. In this race Alexandria, it's been murky seizing the mantle of the insurgent, touting his support of liberal causes at the green new deal and endorsement of the progressive firebrand. Alexandria Cossio Cortes such the green new deal that I introduced Alexandria Cossio. Healthcare justice is on the ballot. That's Medicare for all that I next the Bernie. Sanders. When he introduced it yet, it's been Kennedy with the badging of the party establishment leader Speaker Nancy Pelosi Allies have been frustrated that marquee has not been held to account for full record over four decades like his backing of the Iraq war in two thousand and two the NAFTA deal in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, his position on racial issues like school desegregation dating back to the nineteen seventies progressive willing to look those hurdles that's up to a progressive movement. Out. I think an awful lot of folks in many parts of Massachusetts have a different view of that records and what that means to our communities after going door to door in working class Boston neighbors weekend. Kennedy. Accused Marquis of abandoning the state. He's been less time in the state than anybody else delegation in an interview with CNN Marquis fired back there is. No real record of Congressman Kennedy in his eight years leading on issues of of generational change in Washington Kennedy has waited until late in the campaign to stress that it's his family I. Guess It's a fighting. His blood wants to continue in the Senate tried to be really clear that it's GonNa Balance It's not my father, my grandfather brothers or anybody else and. You vote for me you're going to get now Kennedy does pull off an upset on Tuesday night it could be thanks in part to the fact that he is allies have spent more on television advertising than Markey and his allies roughly two million dollars more. But if he loses what Kennedy will do next still an open question we posed that question to him he didn't want to entertain it and said, he looks forward to running through the finish line and celebrating on Tuesday night.

Congressman Kennedy Kennedy Manu Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey Robert F Kennedy Marquis Massachusetts Senate Senate Democratic Senate Alexandria Cossio Alexandria Hiroshima Political Dynasty Senator Life Magazine Raju CNN Speaker Nancy Pelosi Iraq Sanders
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Finding the Courage to Take a Once-In-A-Lifetime Opportunity

Dose of Leadership

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Finding the Courage to Take a Once-In-A-Lifetime Opportunity

"Hey welcome a dose of leadership so happy you're to in the end. This is inequity bank-sponsored episode where we have McDonald on the show, she's the owner and publisher of her life magazine. She celebrating her fifth year with her life magazine and the magazine itself has just ended its twelfth year publications. She has franchises in California New York Columbia Missouri Kansas City, she's married. They have two boys Carter Eighth Grade Ten. She's a step mom to another kid seventeen who seventeen she was born and raised in Overland Park Kansas. She attended the University of Georgia on a full ride diving scholarship in Georgia, she was a member of the NCAA National Championship. Team for three consecutive years. Education! Jay earned her masters in sports management. She's a working mom joy. Your family loves to travel ride bikes with their boys, but she chose to take a path one that was not planned, and that's the big takeaway from this lesson. I love. Has she opens up about that because I? Think sometimes particularly moms, and if there have an entrepreneurial bent on entrepreneurial nature to. To Them I think society and Culture and and motherhood pulls him in all kinds of different directions, and I, don't like the term work life balance. I think it's a myth I. Don't think it exists. I. Think it's about priorities again. Having a tremendous amount of self awareness of knowing who you are and what it is, you WanNa compound where you can best serve. And? That's what this episode is about. Tammy. Listen to her gut gutsiness. She knows who she is. He's got tremendous self-awareness. And when an opportunity presented itself, she had that self awareness because she had that self awareness when an opportunity presented itself, she took that leap. She went through that door, not knowing where it was going to take her, but having the wherewithal the big picture ability to understand that this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. And she took the lead, not knowing where it's going to take her understanding that fear and uncertainty never goes away. We talk about that all the time here in. In dose of leadership talking to Tammy. It's a great lesson in that and I think that's GonNa be the big takeaway for you. At least it was for me in this episode. It's a really great episode, and she's a really great example, particularly for entrepreneurs or people thinking about jumping into the entrepreneurship arena particularly. If you're a mother with young kids, great example show is brought to you by my friends at Equity Bank. It's been an honor and privilege to have them be sponsors coming. Coming on two years now it's been exciting and fun to get to know them over the past two years to know the leadership to see where they're going to see them. Expand to see them grow currently. They have branches in home in Arkansas, but they got plans to go even farther. They're only going to be growing, and their team knows what it takes start and grow business. They understand the importance of leadership clearly to team that knows how to lead for growth and so if. If, you're kind of tired of you. Bang! You're looking for a bank or your current bank seems like it's more of a follower than a leader and you want to work with the bank that really understand your needs. Encourage you to check out my friends. At Equity, bank, Equity, BANK DOT COM to learn more thanks for listening, and let's join a conversation with Timmy McDonald the owner and publisher of her life magazine in a special series brought to you Equity Bank here on dosing leadership. Tammy welcome dose of leadership. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me. We were talking a little bit for the recording talking about the challenges of working from home and everything else so have you. I was curious about with this her life magazine. Have you always worked from home? Or did you have? It is an opposite you went into? We are corporate office is in Overland Park Kansas so I primarily work out of there, but I also find myself working a lot from home. So tell me a little bit about the the differences. You know everybody's face with them. Everything turned upside down. What are you doing different over the last couple of weeks? well, we are trying to kind of reestablish. Our distribution model since most of our businesses are closed that we distribute to and we have kind of just. Came come together as a staff and reaching out to clients to see if there's anything that we can do to help them with, because obviously, some of them are open right now, so they're not necessarily doing print advertising so. Doing social media or You know if we can go somewhere. Maybe take once to somebody one day. Just, trying to stay positive. Help our local businesses, so talk a little bit the model of her life magazine I mean you are in your fifth year in the magazine for twelve years right, so are you a franchise owner of her life magazine? Or how does that work? I am actually the franchise war Gotcha. Oh, I own the trademark. We obviously print. Kansas City copy, and then I have franchises in Hell, New York in Columbia. Missouri

Tammy Equity Bank Overland Park Kansas Publisher New York Carter Eighth Grade Ten Missouri Kansas City Mcdonald University Of Georgia Ncaa National Championship California Georgia Kansas City Arkansas Timmy Mcdonald JAY Missouri Columbia
Benjamin Moser: Sontag: Her Life and Work

Bookworm

07:10 min | 1 year ago

Benjamin Moser: Sontag: Her Life and Work

"A biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been A controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems. Now do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book? Well I think a book about Susan Sontag. That wasn't controversial. Would NOT BE A book about Susan? Contact? I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see controversial this book. I see it more as just I hope something. Starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever man. Santiago was always associated with fashion. She was associated with With photography she was associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who have been on the cover of Vanity Fair. I think the real writers we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths. And who have these chances to be reevaluated? I can remember the first time I read. Susan Sonntags First Book. Which was against interpretation? Can you remember the first time you read against interpretation? Yes yeah I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really. I know I had read the photography stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation. I think I hadn't read the whole book. I'd read notes on camp. I'd read the title essay. Read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read. It now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again. It feels contemporary. But it's almost sixty years old against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and of ideas. That feels very exciting to me. I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read. I was astonished by it because of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh i. you'd already read that in the early sixties. She was only in her early thirties to show thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to event. Artaud Susan cared about our Dole. And in fact you know. She seems to know that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when people new things. I- slivered out some quotes from Susan. Let's hear Susan people want to be moved? Is a writer. Want to move people. I was very moved cried. Even a couple of passages that that I was riding this one line that made me laugh. Grimly where I WANNA say I say but I don't feel it's me I feel. It's the book says It it was a time when knowledge was fashionable. Philistinism was unfashionable. And I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness because the time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable and Philistine as it was very fashionable. I'm talking to Benjamin Moser. Sonntags biographer. That what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face was. Susan was from our first conversation and you consider deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines. Can you talk to me though? I think it's really funny. I think it's one of the great American questions. I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant We don't have to name names. But I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and that all the things that in her lifetime worse symbolic of middle-brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music. All these kind of things. Santi always stood for the opposite of all that crap. Now you you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her. Tell me what you mean. Tell me what that use a lot of. It might have had to do with the fact that she was physically. Ill a lot of her life when she was forty two. She got stage four breast cancer and almost killed her and she was subjected to this. Very gruesome and horrifying treatment did end up saving her life. And that's in nineteen seventy five to seventy eight. So she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient. She got more Intolerant of certain people. But I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then not dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas. I think that what we're talking about is the person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a Herman Excite Lard and she writes about her fondness for the supremes. Which at that time you take someone go take number of someone's whether it's Irving Howe or saul bellow listening to the supremes. They find it to be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life. She's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic sue criticism. No well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is. This is again. It's almost. It's more than fifty years ago in that time in that me. That was really shocking. And it's absolutely hilarious to see the reactions that she got 'cause the thing about the supreme. It's not like she wrote about this frame. She says something about how she likes. The supreme one line nobody. It followed her her whole life. You Point Down Very well and intelligently and correctly in this book that cultural conservatism is has very little to do with political conservatism.

Artaud Susan Susan Sonntags Susan Sontag Philistinism Supremes Vanity Fair Life Magazine Benjamin Moser Santiago Herman Excite Lard Writer Santi Irving Howe Saul Bellow
Luis Venegas on Print Media in an Age of Uncertainty

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Luis Venegas on Print Media in an Age of Uncertainty

"Kind of Dream. Save like well someday. I will like to do my own magazine. And since the first one zero seven that was that was in two thousand four. I mean it's like a sixteen years ago and even blocks back event. Where can starting seeing so I mean for me? There was no option. Maybe if I was thinking about when amazing today new I will start with digit or something but at that time I mean black from that the next stage to remain starting little by little. I mean he wasn't something I am not also he wasn't the thing that I will related to the time so yeah. I tried to start and I made them less now. You see you say that if doing something now you imagine it might be digital but I think what I've always loved about what you do. Is that you you honor the magazine as the Phantom jet. You know when when when I think about the magazines that I when I left New Zealand in one thousand nine hundred seventy four. I had three suitcases and one of them was full of magazine and it was. It was like my favorite magazines. It was the life magazine. Charles Manson on the front and it was very the very first issue of Fabulous magazine with the Beatles on the front and it was a David Bowie. God knows they're actually the only ones that are in plastic. I mean everything else Everywhere but the actual physicality of magazine is something that you ana That you very deliberately set out to do with candy. Which was to take your subject. You'll the marginalized people that you wanted to focus on and give them the absolute multi Vogue Treatment Make Candy as glossy and gorgeous and in disposable as it possibly could be guests douglas. The the I mean I I the I mean. When I started to plan the Doing Candy I felt like it was. It should be something white up the opposite of Dr Magazine I wanted to be glossy on his DS huge celebration of all the subjects and although modest that I was hoping to treat in China amazing show. It's not about them. Tell us about. You'll you'll subjects yet. Well as candidate is focus on what I call the transversal. A people People many people I mean the people who know can be maybe often they think is a trans for transgender magazine. But it's not only about trans or transgender people is also an Rajini stays gender nonconformity people drag queens and also The gender people who suddenly go for transformation for one day for a shoot for fun so for me but was the. That's what Games Branka exactly. The BEBOP Franco puts on the coat. Or like it's for Spanish versus kind of ask you about that is so the thing is like I. I said All of those manifestations basically everything that was like Okay go fuck. Gender Denver doesn't matter. Let's celebrate everything. Well if matters of course but it doesn't matter in a way you know as like Let's focus on everything that has to be. Celebrate the around all those many stations. And that's how it came with bursts of grants because it means going from one place another transitioning going you know and then universal transversal. It felt like okay. Maybe this is the word in a way and That's the magazine focus on. I felt like fashion was for a long time taking inspiration from all the transversal world but never pay back. You know it never it never. I mean that was very all of these aren't by Conde. Dining was something about. The people didn't really know many people who can deduct it was maybe it wasn't obscure subject before especially the younger generations. Sheds Allegra K. Let's put it all together in a magazine. Let's see what happens. Let's see he's going to explode or survive? I don't know but you don't want it to be like a political steam or something like a political statement. I want it to be a celebration. Actually a celebration of style. A celebration of awesome intelligence way on humor and everything that's related to fashioning to celebrate the although stinks and indefinitely broad broadening. The concept abuse. See as well Just making beauty side much more of an inclusive idea taking the traditional fashion magazine approach to beauty and then just In

Fabulous Magazine Transgender Magazine Charles Manson Beatles David Bowie Denver Franco New Zealand Allegra K. China
"life magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"life magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"From palm springs life magazine a magazine I still subscribe to ACS Derek **** how are you Sir great how are you Peter good I mean you're a relative newcomer to the magazine but you're not going to cover the area so what is it about this place that's changed for you because you know I still say and and and and I this goes back to my history with palm springs that for so many years it wasn't changing yeah I've been coming for probably about like ten years and either it's kind of goes both ways you want some things not to change come for the mid century architecture you come for the pools but then you come in things change call an early there's new restaurants and bars new experiences with shopping can we talk about the pools were second let's talk about him because I remember when I first came down here all had two kinds of pools not there was no one there is no middle level it was the little baby pools okay and they were like gargantuan yeah right they were sort of like the old days of town and country and slim Aarons photographer yeah yeah right yeah I mean if you want like the most high tech pool technology you come to greater palm springs date we have pools here that are chilled I didn't even know you could do that but looking to resort and club they have over forty pools that the chill in the summertime so it's never never too hot to get in there and then like to throw ice cubes in no I I'm not a Saint to southern Zach we understand the engineering behind it but I think it's just the opposite of how they would keep the pool with like coils or something like that but yeah and then like salt water pools which are actually really good for you the we have a lot of those here so it kind of runs the gamut of sort of a pool experience once a base year the unofficial poll inspector sure my resume it's looking pretty good tile but even having a pool in palm springs is sort of like you got to do it yeah you do he added and people come yeah you gotta have a nice bar or bar cart and you gotta have a nice pool those are kind of the two prerequisites in in palm springs and let's talk about some stereotypes Kennedy the dry heat you know when I was first coming down here people would say yes palm springs is hot but it's a dry heat of course my answer was yeah my other to dry heat but I don't live there right but now I'm I'm turned around I'm a big fan of the off season I'm I'm actually working on a book right now called the off season about why you want to go to Alaska in February in palm springs in the in in in August and I've always been a huge fan of traveling on the offseason everywhere in the world like go to Italy in December like go to Venice.

Derek life magazine Peter
The Late George Curry

In Black America

10:56 min | 1 year ago

The Late George Curry

"The reason I do what I do because I grew up in Alabama and the first black journalists avenue with me. Get A job and couldn't get a job in my hometown newspaper so you will never be able to say you never met a black killed 'cause campuses around the country and some reading they always WanNa know what you think. What topic Us Don't ever have one called anybody who knows me knows that comes comes out but I actually have seen. I actually have a challenge tonight and I hope you make a decision tonight and my topic is in the form of a question. Do you want to be eight of Mamata or do you want to be a thermostat? Let me put it another way. Do you want to measure the temperature? The temperature the late George E curry former editor in chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association New Service Former Editor in chief of emerged magazine author and syndicated columnist. Curry died on Saturday August twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. He was sixty nine considered the dean of black press columnists his weekly syndicated column appeared in more than two hundred. African. American newspapers. Curry was a journalist journalist. He began his career. Sports illustrated magazine. The Saint Louis Post dispatch and then the Chicago Tribune where he became the New York girl. Cheap two thousand three. The National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year he is also in a BJ's list of most influential black journalists of the twentieth century. Curry was unapologetic. Stewart and champion for the Black Press and frequent need for it in the civil rights narrative. He was deeply committed to fostering the next generation of journalists of color. They became the founding director of the Saint. Louis Minority Journalism Workshop in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven. I'm Johnnie O. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late. George E curry in Black America emerged was a news magazine that was published for ten years up the year. Two thousand I was editor to the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July called the best of emerge at Ballantine books a publishing in your arm of a random house and it has the best collection of Of Our stories over the years so it's very different and quite frankly one day soon. I expect this starbucks. We got the most attention. Because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas. Random as the amount of his head and they me ram two years later. The lawn jockeying for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen. Single Clarence comes today. People mentioned that though. That's that's not the stores I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith who was arrested. Twenty four give a twenty four year. Mandatory sentence been Amman. Mine are basically going with drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she needed sold or used drugs But she was very attached as ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on and ran a couple of other stories. In addition to that a couple of years ago she was pardoned by bill. Clinton I'll Office Delay George. E Curry is best known for his heir to ship of the former emerged magazine. Most recently for his work as Airdrie and cheap for the National Newspaper Published Association from two thousand to two thousand seven and again from two thousand twelve until last year. Warren George Edward Curry on February. Twenty third nineteen forty seven in Tuscaloosa Alabama is mother worked as a domestic and his father was a mechanic. His father abandoned fan when he was just seven years old leaving him to step into the role of the man of the house assisting his mother in raising three younger sisters and nineteen sixty five. He graduated high school where he was a member of the football team and sports energy to other school newspaper and nineteen sixty six curry moves in New York City way worked for the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He earned his bachelor of Arts degree in history from Knoxville College. In nineteen nine hundred seventy fulfilling a lifelong dream. He began his professional journal. Career as reporter for sports illustrated magazine in nineteen seventy. He was the second African American hired by the publication. Curry died on August. Twenty two thousand sixteen. He was sixty nine. I met curry back in. Nineteen eighty one and N. A. B. J. National Convention in Louisville Kentucky. The following excerpts of interviews from two thousand one and two thousand and three well up up in totally segregated tuscaloosa hours can Segregate my feelings tell people that In terms of the so called gration after drink from separate water fountains right back to the bus go to separate schools and I have very strong feelings about that But at the same time when I look at my black community those black teachers black people who were supportive There's nothing in the world like it and I wouldn't trade if anything you a pretty good athlete. Bet Did all right for the country boy. I play football. Play quarterback When a quarterback call plays from the attendant Knoxville College in Tennessee? I'm Alma Mater and I'm still in the blue. I'm on that board of directors there and what sparked their initial interest in journalism and The newspapers Emma wouldn't do the newspaper hometown the only time they wrote about black people when they were suspected of crime committed crime plan football it being an entertaining and I thought they were so many other stories out there. It'd be told and since they won't go and tell them. I decided I had to be the person to tell them now. What is interesting is that I could get a job my first job out of Knoxville. What is that sports illustrated so I can get a job at Lodges Sports magazine in the world but couldn't get one in my hometown. Newspaper reminded me that every time I go should be sending a thank. You note saying thank you for not hiring me so I can go out and see the world but that meant that meant a lot. I mean that could not get heart my hometown paper and And whenever I go back I remind them how Tuscaloosa be. I was back a couple years ago and they gave me a key to the city then told me it was fine but you didn't open anything. And secondly I wanted to the bank and combination to the vault. But they haven't done that yet. Former editor in chief of emerged magazine. Tell us about that. Publication well merge was a news magazine that was published for ten years up to two thousand. I was editor of the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July call. The Best of emerge at Ballantine books are published in the New York arm of Random House and it has the best collection of Of our stores over the years so it was very different and quite frankly one day soon expected starbuck and what was some of the highlights of of that publication well We did a lot of things and we're proud. We got the most attention because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas Random as the amount of not hit and they may ramp two years later. The Lawn Jockey for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen single Clarence Thomas. Today people mentioned that though. That's that's not a lot of stories. I'm I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith. Who WAS ARRESTED? Twenty four and give it a twenty four year mandatory sentence. I've been Amman mine of exit. Basically go over to the drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she neither Seoul nor use drugs but she was very attached ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on it and ran a couple of other stories in addition to that and Couple of years ago. She was pardoned by bill. Clinton in office and So we're real proud of that story. I'm proudest of is One of my staff members. I fortunately I feel vegetable about young since college lower. Hit a little little experience. Laurie Robinson was all right how she was on my staff and And it really shouldn't be up the whole Staffan certainly are and she's a graduate of Spelman in Atlanta and There was a allegation at Morehouse being raped. Spelman woman and only because laureate toby. She wanted to write a book about her experience. I suggested that she go back there to her alma mater right about that and then we've been home person experience with it and it was just one powerful story and those are the story. I mean a lot of store them reattached. But those are those are the real special with you on the immediate past. President of the American Society of magazine editors in the first african-american Elia and also not from New York. Right right they kinda you gotta be from New York and got to be life. Magazine's the worst newspaper in terms of diversity but They did in all fairness did let me president and it was indeed a Han and You know in fact. I'm coming from a black magazine representing the magazine industry so I was so pleased with that. Your current position as editor in chief of the National Newspaper Published Association. Give us a brief history of that organization and your responsibilities with black presses. About one hundred seventy six years old gotten around fighting against niches slavery and everything else. I have been here. Two years. Essentially is a federation of more than two hundred African American newspapers Most of them weekly and essentially what I do is provide news out of Washington and and National News as well For a member newspapers. And so we've pretty much such service. Washington bureau founders for audience. That aren't really familiar. That are not African Americans. Why has the black press particularly organization the two hundred or so Weeklies still viable in this country today. Well I wish having spent thirty three years journalism most of not into black press. I wish that the media was doing this job. And there'd be no need for the Black Press a Hispanic Women magazine but it but it is not doing. It does a terrible job and still a worse job. I think when I came to business thirty three years ago. So if you're going to get in order to be well informed you have to read from a variety of sources in the first place you know you just can't read just to Austin space when you just read just you know Dallas Weekly. Just can't you gotta read from different sources and so So would ask an American perspective gives you a different look at some of the same national issues and then he's going to be really inform. You need to reap the black newspapers and go out website. black press. Usa DOT COM

Black Press Editor In Chief New York Warren George Edward Curry Clarence Thomas Curry National Association Of Black Sports Illustrated Magazine Emerged Magazine National Newspaper Published A Alabama Knoxville College Starbucks Random House FED Editor Kemba Smith Tuscaloosa George E Curry Amman
"life magazine" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"life magazine" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"It was pretty much then and there is fourteen years old I decided I was going to be sick I interest for a couple reasons one is because I thought well maybe I could do some good where I saw no good being done and secondly psychiatrist seem to understand what the hell was going on Anderson was going on in my family and my world and so for me being in the family therapy session with my parents announced understandably if they had enough and they were taking my sister of the hospital I thought this this guy he was a guy psychiatrist really understands things I want to join his ranks Sir you tell the history of how the mentally ill are dealt with in the United States talk about that through de institutionalization and what we're seeing today of the mental asylums of our country are this nation's jails and prisons that's correct the the jails are the the fact of mental asylums of the day you know de institutionalization began in the late fifties early sixties well meaning individuals that a president Kennedy among them we had and these new drugs thorazine and coming on to play lithium come into play and so for the first time people with serious mental illness were able to leave the asylums and they were able to live outside the asylum's the silences time with dreadful places for the most part we're people not getting care and there were quite a number of scandals about them in fact life magazine ran an article in nineteen forty six with the title I have some that's what the thing that was our life magazine called it an exact actually about a mental hospital not that far from where I live it's called Byberry which was closed so one four wheel from well meaning individuals and probably for the best reasons the institutions which were close and mentally ill people went out and hopefully president can he said would be welcomed into the what he called the welcoming arms in the warmth of the community well unfortunately that warmth never came and certainly one of the men the community mental health centers that he built never came and when president Reagan took over as the money for the community health.

Anderson United States Kennedy fact life magazine president president Reagan
'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

Bookworm

11:15 min | 2 years ago

'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

"Today I'm very pleased to have as my guest the very brilliant Benjamin Moser who is the author of two biographies of Women Writers The I was a biography of Cou- reese the specter which did a good deal of bringing the Specter a writer who spent a good majority of for life in Brazil to the attention of American readers and the second is the biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been a controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems now what do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book well I think a book about Susan Santa that wasn't controversial would not be a book about Susan's contact I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see this controversial this book I see it more as just I hope it's something starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever Monsanto was always associated with fashion she was associated with with photography associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who could have been on the cover of Vanity Fair I think the real writers that we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths and who have these chances to be reevaluated I can remember the first time I read Susan Sonntags First Book which was against interpret Tation can you remember the first time he read against interpretation yes I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really I know I had read the Auger fi stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation I think I hadn't read the whole book I'd read notes on Camp I'd read the title essay I'd read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read it now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again it feels contemporary but it's all most sixty years old you know against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and ideas that feels very adding to me I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read I was astonished by it because Some of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh my you'd already read that in the early sixties choose only in her early thirties to thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to avert Arto Susan cared about our toll and in fact you know she seems to no that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when p do new things I- slivered out some quotes from Susan let's hear Susan people want to be moved on is a writer want to move people I was very moved cried even a couple of passes that I was riding this one line that made me laugh grimly where I wanna say I say but I don't feel it's me the book says it was a time when knowledge was fashionable Philistinism was unfashionable and I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness has a time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable Philipson as it was very fashionable I'm talking to Benjamin Moser son tags biographer that what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face with Susan from our first conversation and You considered deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines can you talk to me that I think it's really funny I think it's one of the great American questions I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant we don't have to name names but I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and the the all the things in her lifetime worse symbolic of Middle Brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music all these kind of things Santiago always stood for the opposite of all that crap now you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her tell me what you mean tell me what that means a lot of it might have had to do the fact that she was physically ill a lot of her life when she was forty two she got stage four breast cancer and it almost killed her and she was subjected to this very gruesome horrifying treatment that did end up saving her life and that's nineteen in seventy five to seventy eight so she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient she got more intolerant of certain people but I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then AH dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas I think that what we're talking about is a person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a her renewed ix of art and she writes about her fondness for the supremes which at that time you take some on won't take any number of someone's whether it's Irving Hauer Saul bellow they're not listening to the supremes they find it be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life she's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic criticism no well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is this is again it's almost it's more than fifty years ago in that time and in that year that was really shocking and it's absolutely really hilarious to see the reactions that she got because the thing about the supreme it's not like she wrote about this frame she said something about how she likes the supremes in one line nobody it followed her the whole life but you point down very well and intelligently and correctly in this book the Cultural Conservatives awesome is has very little to do with political conservatism. Well this is another idea that I think has been forgotten sondheim comes out of a world where out of me education where what she means a small C. conservatism is starting off with Plato and Aristotle and going up to Dante and Shakespeare through the great modern poets and that love that syllabus that Canon that became extremely unfashionable and now I think we're in a world where people aren't reacting against Beethoven you know they don't even know who Beethoven is Dante Shakespeare and so both the people who wanted to modernize that and expand it for example to feminist African American authors those people lost out just as much as the people who wanted it closed for political reasons from the right wing and what happens in that song tag is very perceptive about time and time again it said it all lose out to money it always is out to consumerism and so what happens is you know famous a great painting becomes an expensive painting a great song becomes a song that gets a lot of play on the radio a lot of clicks on the Internet and that's the thing we're in now come talking once again to Benjamin Moser Susan Sonntags biographer in a book from Echo called Sawa tag do you think that you're writing a biography of Susan or in addition a biography of her times well I think both the book is called Sante her life and work and those are two things that are complementary but I'd really there's a lot I'd like people to remember that people don't remember people don't member for example that it was quite common for women to write their husbands books as happened to attack yes fascinated yeah I had no idea will I didn't either I've inhabited this world of the great female intellectuals having done Clarissa Specter before and then Sante it's a world that generation of my grandparents grandmother's generation that I'm familiar with and so about three months ago this piece came out in the Guardian announcing that I had discovered that Sante had actually written the book upon which her husband's career was based book called for the mind with moralist and this piece went viral everybody was talking wrote me and they said are you kidding this happen to everybody nobody wire people so surprised and the reason they're surprise is that I think feminism has made so many gains is that people have forgotten what it was like so when you're talking about a history of her life and times when she applied she's got Souza's very brilliant student and she comes into the World king world and she applies for a job at a magazine and her friend a male friend says well the fact that you're a woman is a real problem but we're going to try to help them get over that and that was a totally normal thing to say to a woman at that time now you would get sued and you know rightly so a lot of the ideas that we think are able in in our culture whether you think about the position of African Americans do you think about the position of women are homosexuals or all these things they've changed really radically and one of the things I think a book like the biographies and Sonic can do is trace the evolution of these ideas so that's the part that I find fascinating because sometimes she's ahead of things and somehow she's behind wind and sometimes she's struggling to understand new ideas as they come into the world it's a fascinating

Specter Benjamin Moser Writer Sondheim COU Three Months Fifty Years Sixty Years
Mary Ann Van Hoof and Her Marian Apparitions

Retropod

05:31 min | 2 years ago

Mary Ann Van Hoof and Her Marian Apparitions

"Just before noon on August Fifteenth Nineteen Fifty Mary Anne Van Hoof stepped out of her farmhouse in the Cedar Wisconsin and who then knelt before a statue of the Virgin Mary but she wasn't alone. An estimated one hundred thousand spectators leaders had gathered outside of her home according to life magazine. These spiritually fanatical and level-headed citizens king came from all over the country by chartered buses and specially routed trains there were around seventeen thousand cars parked on the farm. They filled that Wisconsin field to hear a message from Van Hoof who claim she had been visited by visions of the Virgin Mary six times over the last few months and today the saint was poised to appear again uh as van who shifted her attention the crowd hushed then she spoke into a microphone and Shared the Virgin Mary's latest revelation she urged the people to pray do penance and sacrifice she issued warning about Korea in said black clouds are coming to America the pessimism wasn't totally warranted the Cold War loomed the Soviet Union had detonated its first atomic bomb and earlier that year Senator Joseph me carthy said Communist had infiltrated the State Department. The New York Times reported that Van Hoof left the scene in ears and while observers saw nothing unusual the Associated Press reported that the faithful were satisfied and believed the virgin Mary had been in their presence Van Hoof Was Philadelphia Native who later moved to Wisconsin religion scholars say she was baptized Catholic but not reared in the church her mother a spiritualist believed the spirits of the dead could communicate with the living in the nineteen thirties van hoof answered an ad for housekeeper you're placed in a publication called Wisconsin farmer and agriculturist the ad was placed by devout Catholic memed Godford in who they married four months later then who've said the Virgin Mary first appeared to her on November Twelfth Nineteen Forty Nine the Lacrosse diocese initially held back judgment Van Hoof saying it needed time to investigate her claims but it took a dimmer you as the crowds in the sita grew and pilgrims made claims of miracle cures in one thousand nine hundred fifty one van Hoof was ordered to stop spreading pamphlets about her visions and to dismantle the shrine she built known today as the Queen the Holy Rosary media tricks between God and man she refused but the following year she agreed to undergo a Wendy medical exam the Church's request Di she's officials condemned vanhoose claims in nineteen fifty five but that didn't stop her father there's a new investigation was ordered in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and her claims were condemned again the following year still then who her supporters continued hundreds of families from around the country uprooted their lives and move to Sita to be part of the shrine community they believed in time church officials would change their minds in one thousand nine hundred seventy five The Diocese called the group Occult emplaced Van Hoof in several followers under an interdict meaning they were denied sacraments from outside the church according to dicing records then who said she continued to receive private revelations from the Virgin Mary until her death

Mary Anne Van Hoof Van Hoof Virgin Mary Wisconsin Sita Cedar Wisconsin Life Magazine Korea Senator Joseph Me Carthy Soviet Union Associated Press State Department The New York Times America Four Months
Why does the federal government provide comprehensive care to those with end stage renal disease but not to those with other life threatening illnesses?

Second Opinion

04:02 min | 2 years ago

Why does the federal government provide comprehensive care to those with end stage renal disease but not to those with other life threatening illnesses?

"This is dr michael wilks with a second opinion in one thousand nine. Hundred sixty five medicare was enacted as a piece of social legislation to provide health care for all elderly as the legislation was being modified congress added one last minute amendment that provided care for all people with end stage kidney disease out of all the diseases for which the federal government could provide comprehensive care. Why did did they choose end stage. Kidney disease to cover will to understand this. We need to go back to the nineteen fifties. After world war two researchers in europe and the united states began to develop a machine that would function as an artificial kidney a process that would soon begin to be called dialysis <music> by the end of the nineteen sixties those with end stage renal disease who could afford it purchased this life prolonging treatment. The problem home was that few could afford it and it was not covered by private insurance in addition. There were not nearly enough dialysis machines for all those who needed treatment usually three to four times a week for life in one thousand nine hundred sixty to the dallas issue became front and center owner after shayna alexander journalist for life magazine published an article detailing how this new remarkable technology was is being rationed by a committee which decided who lived and who died based on a person's ability to pay the idea of rationing a scarce and expensive life-saving technology was abhorrent to american society of the nineteen sixties. The public press press the federal government for a response the v._a. Was the first to respond it opened thirty dallas centers for veterans but others had no no access to services and besides the federal government had no legal authority to pay for the care of other americans an expert committee that was convened recommended that the federal government start a national kidney treatment program because as they explained kidney failure failure was the only condition we're money separated people from life or death will in fact it was not the only condition but the concept had traction unfortunately at that time we're in the midst of the vietnam war and large amounts of non defense department money was scarce ears but several legislators both democrats and republicans pushed hard for coverage for stage kidney disease senator scoop jackson action from washington state learned at a close friends life was prolonged by dialysis and other constituents didn't have access to the same treatment so he pushed especially hard for some sort of universal coverage for several years in a row he introduced legislation nation until it finally passed in one thousand nine hundred seventy two so it has been since one thousand nine hundred seventy two that the federal government's medicare has cover for dallas's and transplant services for nearly all people at that time government and the public fills the moral cost of allowing the americans to dive a treatable condition was far greater than the actual cost of care now today we have so many clinically effective treatments including expensive medicines that are a matter of life and death and many are simply not available to the poor or even the middle. It'll class. What we seem to have lost is the bipartisan moral compass to tackle these difficult problems. This is dr michael wilks with as second opinion.

Federal Government Kidney Disease Dr Michael Wilks Dallas Life Magazine Congress Europe United States Shayna Alexander Scoop Jackson Senator Washington
"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Can email me at Gina G. I. N. A. at whole life magazine dot com or they can also taxed text the word whole life two four two eight two eight here in the new technology on we try four two eight two two eight that's correct that's like a little phone number but it's a number you just texted with the whole life that is the message right that's exactly right that's exactly how you do it and the email again is emails Gina G. I. N. A. at whole life magazine dot com thanks Gina you do a great job with us and I'm sure you do a great job with the whole life times magazine thank you George those of you who are looking to even look sharper and better when you go out in public this is a no brainer science has come a long way in helping us look younger now we have an amazing product to give you near instant results with bags under your eyes fine lines wrinkles crow's feet and pours it's called instantly ageless and less than two minutes see dramatic changes to your looks no needles no pain instantly ageless is a cream applied lightly and allow to dry look younger and in turn feel younger and do it in minutes even doctors agree instantly ageless works like this from the Rachel ratio are certified dermatologist Dr would need looking to try to turn back the clock on a budget you in the privacy of your own home actually there's some recent technologies emerging almost like changes the behavior of this wall it sits on the we're going to try what age less it'll go backstage will test you literally just put it on so we'll put on a really thin layer and we're going to see if it's sort of like and then she went off to try a product called instantly ageless instantly you could see difference even the cameraman were like wow look at.

Gina G. I. N. A. whole life magazine George life times two minutes
"life magazine" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"They can go ahead and email me gina g i n a at whole life magazine dot com or text the word whole life all one word to four to eight to eight hundred not a free digital sample yes what's that text number again the text is four to eight to eight you just text the word whole life that's all one word and you've got some great people who help right for you including glenis mccann's right glenis has written several articles for us wonderful wonderful people who work on the magazine with us good luck to you know thank you so much successful again you can get to it by going to coast to coast a._m. dot com looking for ways to regrowed hair here you go the market is full of hair growth products but none like brand new reveal for women and men from healthy looking dot com dr nathan newman who brought us luminous for the skin has spent nearly a decade developing a better hair growth product utilizing poly peptide technology with numerous natural botanical to help your existing follicles strengthened to a full-body soft shiny head of hair reveal is free of parabens sulfate silicones dies and his nothing like we've seen before reveal is what you would expect to see at an exquisite salon but reveal can be applied from the comfort of your home here's dr newman reveal haircare system is that next big thing that we've created a started losing my hair and i've tried about everything except for hatred plans to get la- habit of trees a lot of patients who lose a hand they lose confidence we've created unique set of polly pep which we call hair poly peptide technology six h petit six the key six contains the poly peptides from six different plans they.

whole life magazine dr newman glenis mccann dr nathan newman
"life magazine" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

14:23 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on WTVN

"And we are going direct to Nashville Tennessee, Tony joins us on the wildcard line. Tony, good morning. Welcome to coast to coast. AM. Good morning, Richard. Excellent interview with Lucy Pringle on the crop circles, that's really a hard. To tackle and you did a great job. Thank you. Yeah. I wanna talk about a secret UFO vortex in middle Tennessee. That was featured in life magazine. In the year two thousand March issue. I got sucked into this four techs because of art bail. He had a guest named John, bro. Written an article. In titled how to feel new of those in your own backyard. The so-called solar Blida ration- technique where you block out the sun. Using you know, while out of the house or aboard or whatever, and I started getting all these UFO footage in matter of fact, Dr Steven Greer said my with the top three in the world in nineteen ninety nine oh. Is that right? Wow. Excuse me. I have to differ with your previous your first caller who said that aliens good. You know, I do agree that the. Our guys in protectors of the. But they don't take against everything. There are still bad ones. But even some of the good ones that I came in contact with head supposed, contact with, and I can explain that I had my third Bigfoot sighting, and place where we'll springs, Tennessee. But. The big foot was running along at forty miles an hour in my truck was doing forty and kept up for about two miles. And then when I got back to Nashville Bellevue, Tennessee. Three UFO's out of eight that were these commonly seen. They've been they've been at Stonehenge. They've been if the Olympics these pink or byu Esso's, right? And they call themselves the current had later contact with them. I've kind of been dancing everything because long story short, it's possible. The high intelligence in the universe. And they, they have, you know, through a friend of mine, who's a psychic and Chandler giving information that there's no way in the world. They could have known, you know, I mean, they it's very specific information that no one could have known other than you know. No one could have known about what about you or about about what? Right. Well, this friend of a mutual friend of me, and my of no, we public, health and wellness magazine in Nashville for years. It's about the name, Debbie had a boyfriend who she had bought a truck for. And he, he took off with the truck and getting away with that. And she was trying to find him. And so I told my friend I wanted to ask the current is what they call themselves where he's at. And they told us that he was living some -partment behind the factory mall and Franklin Tennessee. With a Hispanic woman. So sure sure enough data goes in hits in the parking lot, and weight. She's the truck, and she waits for the man to come out and he comes out with the lady, and they had into current also mentioned the secondary location that he was at sometime near the hostel him in this lady, they get in the truck, and they go to that second location. So there's no way they could have known, you know, that was just very specific information. Okay. Let me ask you that let me, let me play the skeptic here. Okay. I mean, who's to say that this individual isn't simply Scott psychic which is phenomenal. You know, but it could be why does it involve? Why does it have to involve an alien communication? Well that that's that's who she claimed, you know, she's communicating, but one of the best psychics, he doesn't even she doesn't, she's not open about being secret. Okay. Kill people about it or anything. She doesn't make money off of it because of the magazine she didn't want at that time. He doesn't care now because he doesn't have the magazine. Dealing with a lot of doctors and stuff that, you know, she didn't want to have that image out there and make the doctor's not in the magazine anymore. So. Yeah. But back to the regional story. I went to this so-called vortex. If you tried to them, you have there around the area, the case, which looks like a UFO landed and the camera, the red light, we've come on, and then a couple of seconds later turned off and outside different. Figuration tried to hook it up, the different electrical sources, etc. Couple hours couldn't get it to work. So I just gave up to go to gatherings at this place. Right. They had parties potluck dinners once or twice a month and that went on for about a year and then life magazine was coming, and they were only going to places or the UFO issue, and that was Roswell New Mexico and this secret vortex steel. They call it the field field of dreams. Kind of a nominal happen, not just UFO's, but the main thrust of it is about UFO's and the people coming there were contact as and at keys and that type of thing, and I was just a guy who feels you believe me, I was looking for just scientific nuts and bolts evidence. When you saw you saw craft in the sky there, but for whatever reason you're a Queant wouldn't work, right? But when I found magazine was coming, I had lots of footage from other places of, but when I life. Well, let me try again, at the vortex and see if I can get something to show them other than these just wild stories in the context as in the abductees. And so I did. I got some really amazing footage. It's one of the top rated so videos on YouTube, it's called Dame crest. And there's this giant energy beam coming down, and there's UFO's flying around, like some desks, these lipped shape USO's that are one of the one and it kind of seemed like it, it's close to the energy Behmen it draws the energy from the Bain and changes color from a light blue to bright gold. What's going on this Tech's this, this article in life magazine was back in the early two thousands? I think you said what's going on there? Now. Pictures in the centerfold, all of us are in. There's what five or six of us that were? What's going on in this vortex? Now, is it still active? It's still there. They're not having the gatherings as regularly every now and then they'll have a gathering, you know, they might have to see no party or whatever, you know, but yeah, there's definite Bigfoot activity. It's a location where the trail of tears went through and Stephen Gaskin, who founded the city farm in Tennessee. It's over there close to bonnaroo. He was from California. He claimed that this was the center of the known universe. I don't know how they hit these determine that. But they wouldn't fill in the property because they thought he was too weird. Two friends of mine ball to property later. And they were former Mormons one lady had been excommunicated because she was having meetings at her home. You know, and just talking about things spiritual thing. They, they thought she was teaching different things on the church. So they, they kicked her out and then her friend quit church also. And they bought this property may had two houses in front of this mountain any top of the mountain, it's like the size of twenty football field last night, brought out stadium size lights. I mean it was like huge. They spent a lot of money to life is place up at night. Sounds like the final sequence in close in counters. Yeah, exactly. They, they told us doll standing circle. They were really trying to make us look like a bunch of hillbillies to be honest. But I told everybody just different directions. If you look inside the Centerville you'll see everybody standing. Randomly facing different ways so that we don't live like some kind of cult or something. Tony. What, what is the connection between Bigfoot and, and UFO's? Well, as far as these currents, you know what the information we got from them. And I've got a video on YouTube UFO connection. I, I had I tried to become the art bell of Nashville radio show came at TV show. And anyway. So when we started talking to try to ask them, I'll kind of trick questions, biblical questions where did you get your name Turin? You know, the Koran you know, and they claimed it came from. E so now the Chandler lady had no knowledge of the bible whatsoever. Really? And she, she kept saying it sounds like see, so, but she they claim that he saw gave them the name as in Jacob's, twin brother, right? He was a giant himself anyway. They claim giant. I don't recall that in the bible, each being a giant. I could be wrong. But I that doesn't sound familiar. Yeah, he's he's like a hairy guy. That's really well. He was he was a Harry guy. That's for sure. That's. Yeah. And then Jacob, of course deceived, is it can and received the blessing. And, and he saw walked away, very bitter, man. A giant in the bible. But I believe is other sources that it does say that, like all right. Anyway, they told me I asked this said, what is your connection with Bigfoot, and they claimed that they have a relationship with Bigfoot Bigfoot Ivan ears on the ground? And that type of thing that they do certain things for the big foot to, they give them food. And like if it's really cold, if they're in a cold place that they, they can go into some other dimensional thing, where they can go to a warmth. Place. But so was the inference here that, that big foot is a descendant from the line of e saw was at the idea. Well, I mean that's just that's just something after it. Speculating about. I don't know. Okay, far as that goes, but. They, they claim that these big foot were from a different planet, actually, it was like two planets to twin planets. It would be an attack and they brought these big foot to the earth at a certain point. But they they. The ones in this area, more humanoid like I think there's a lot of different irritations of Bigfoot. There's not just one particular species, or saying the ones here, the human type faces look just like human I had scientists go with me, a microbiologist friend of mine because I wanted somebody credible and I show her, you know, locations where I had a previous siding and different contact and stuff, and, and we had a five minute. Encounter with a eight foot six male Bigfoot, and literally was about thirty five yards away any photos and videos, Tony. Oh, no, no. I, I never tried to take. I just wanted to prove it to myself, I wanted to, you know, and I believe they are highly telepathic, and it is indicated if they were mystic. They were eight men with mystic powers of telepathy. Invisibly. And I believe that one hundred percent and that's been my experience. I mean, they say rocks at a oaktree right beside my head, and they bounced off so hard sounded like a gunshot. But after I said, you know, hey, I'm, I'm just resting on his tree, stump, and we're getting ready to go eat. So let's start hitting me. I'm I'm city for a minute. And it stops Tony. I gotta run along. But that was a great call. And, and I'm gonna I'm gonna go back and reread some vague writings and see if I can find something in there about Bigfoot, that's fascinating. And I appreciate you telling me that let's see. John is in Virginia Beach. John, welcome. Thanks very investing tonight, but I have a story to go story and as long as you pay this caller, but any of that it's happened in eighteen forty my bait, they had a plantation on the banks of date, dismal the genu-. And he, he was having problems with runaway slave and ran away. First time he would get again. The way for second time he would be taking up the post wasn't changed like in the morning and they go back next morning..

UFO Nashville Tennessee Tony life magazine John middle Tennessee Dr Steven Greer Lucy Pringle Jacob Richard YouTube Franklin Tennessee Olympics Stephen Gaskin Chandler Debbie Queant Scott
"life magazine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:48 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You're waiting shore. And as you Wade ashore with the water as it's receding you're getting shot at by my machine guns by mortars and other kinds of weaponry. It's a recipe for disaster. And so aware of this tactical challenge. Cross coral reefs alerted the marines to try and study this problem the challenge for them was they weren't able to convince the navy that this was a problem. And so we'll see how that works now. So we could pose this question. How would the navy and the Marine Corps reconcile their opportunity costs and the resource constraints to meet these requirements for mechanized amphibious assault. Well know that after World War. One concludes. We talked about the Washington conference, and how the US navy was restricted by treaty regulations and prohibitions on how big the surface sleep could really be. Well, in the midst of that budgetarily austere environment for the navy is appreciating how much is Evaporating out of their hands. Terms of worship tonnage. The navy was the Marine Corps was approached by an industrial designer we've highlighted him in another class named Walter Christie, and he built this amphibian tank on his own time with the hopes of securing war contracts. And there you see marine testing it in the Caribbean in the early nineteen twenty s and the Marine Corps would have loved to buy one. But for want of a nail for want of a dollar the navy at this precise moment was not inclined to spend any money whatsoever on the Marine Corps, especially on an innovative unproven box. Ultimately. And so the marines had to turn down this opportunity to build what they thought might actually provide them a means of defense as well as to create some firepower to roll their forces ashore, they had great hopes for it. Note that they weren't building it themselves. An industrial designer on his own dime. Had come up with it. With the navy rather build ships like the Zona, you bet. And so in that era, very much Marine Corps, appropriations budgetary programs or new types of programs were subjected to alternately navy whims. Just like Walter Christie, another industrial designer an innovator who's actually not looking to make a buck because he's already rich. His name was Donald Roebling, and we can see him in the end set in the middle. He's got the dark pants on a close to the fellow in the white. But here we have a couple of different designs that Roebling had built prototypes of what he considered to be a swamp. Rescue vehicle. Where's Roebling living at the time was living on the Gulf Coast of Florida close to Tampa? And the he lives in a town called Clearwater. But the reason he's wealthy has to do with a lot to do with his engineering inclinations than aptitude Roebling family had already constructed the Brooklyn Bridge. They were engineers inventors had built steel cable suspension systems pioneered their construction and so young Roebling retired to Florida. And there in the nineteen thirties in the midst of the great depression there were series of hurricanes displaced people and stranded them in the middle of swamps. And what Roebling came to appreciate was that. It was difficult for rescuers to say drive a truck through swampy terrain or to get a boat through some of the mangrove root systems. And as a result people died that didn't necessarily need to die for want of a rescue amphibian Roebling took his own money and invested in building this contraption and earlier models in the backdrop and then later models, which he would cannibalize and improve continuing designs. Ultimately, this vehicle is built for saving people in the Everglades saving people in lake Okeechobee. It's it's not for military purpose. That's not his vision. So happens that life magazine portrayed several page display of Rowling's contraption diving off the seawall off of Tampa Bay air into the Tampa Bay of climbing up in the swamps and around rugged terrain and low and behold, the fellow who reads it is a navy Admiral in San Diego. And that Admiral had been working with the Marine Corps for for some years on landing processes on 'em fibia operations, and he was alert to the possibility of the marines could make use of this. So what does he do passes his copy of life over to Marine Corps, general felony general Louis McCarty little and he says, hey. This might be what you're looking for. What is general little do? He sends it to headquarters Marine Corps in Washington DC. Hey, we need to investigate this Roebling design. It could be the alternative for the Christie vehicle. We never built. And so life magazine opened up a new door. And alternately know that at precisely the same time that life magazine, would would publish this expose the Japanese imperial Japanese forces were in the midst of conquering Shanghai invading China in a goal to concrete. So if anything that the acute sensitivity. To the prospect of war in Asia was inflamed. At the very moment that Japan is invading China. And then the marines understand that there might be a technical solution to this ongoing unresolved problem, how do you cross a coral reef at low tide? The challenge, of course, was how do you convince somebody to make a war machine if they haven't made it for that purpose? The team that actually arrived at Donald rumblings estate in Clearwater, Florida. Discover that Roebling was more than happy to talk to the Marine Corps is very cordial. But he didn't want to turn his machine into a war machine. It built this force while rescue not for carrying soldiers marines shore. And so he demurred. A year later as war clouds continue to darken into nineteen thirty eight to thirty nine and it was obvious that war in Europe or war was engulfing Europe. It had already engulfed parts of Africa. It was stretching across China Roebling consented to allow the navy and the Marine Corps to use his design with the goal of mass producing it. The challenge was he built one. Yeah. He built several prototypes. But he just built one. And when the navy approached him and said why why is it nine feet ten inches wide? Because the navy's always concerned about the dimensions of craft and whether they can fit in the holds of cargo ships, whether they have cranes that can support the weight of a particular vehicle or craft and lower it down or whether there's an elevator big enough to to help it to basically put it into the sea rolling answer that question fairly simply it's nine hundred ten inches wide because the gates of my outside my estate are our ten feet and the the my garage is opening his ten feet wide. So I gotta drive it in there need a little in Chinese side and he's series. So in that sense rumblings understanding of design was very much like what we could call a Silicon Valley designer building say a computer in their garage rumblings built the empha- the and tractor garage. He's tested it in swimming pool. He's tested it off his beachfront estate very much a scratch built in endeavor. He doesn't even have blueprints. Whereas. He got the parts. Whereas you've got the talent to build it only add some of it himself. But he orders parts out of automotive catalogs. He contracts with a local firm to scratch build other machinery that he needs. He hires a team of engineers and spends a lot of money in the great depression. I might add now with respect to this vehicle rumblings built one and I've highlighted in the bottoms of the side that wants war explodes in Europe. Shortly after Poland is conquered by by by Nazi forces invited by the Soviets to the bureau of ships allocates money for the Marine Corps to acquire one one vehicle. That's it one. Over the next year as things and even more. The bureau of ships Roebling will agree to build two hundred the challenges has no clue how to build them. He signs the paperwork without any idea whatsoever of how do I make two hundred in my garage, the challenge then for the navy and for Roebling is to actually deliver on the contract. Two hundred enough. Probably not. Very little on American history on C span radio talking about innovations and American manufacturing during World War Two. So this pathway of mass production was initiated in part. Due to the observation of one officer of something in life magazine. Was it inevitable that the Marine Corps would actually have an empathy and tractor by? No means you could call it chance or providence. Ultimately, we need to figure out this dynamic of why the navy would choose to invest in the MTV and tractor clearly for twenty years in the Marine Corps had made a point that it wanted to have something like this and the navy had proved indifferent. By the time of nineteen forty one. By the time of nineteen forty one Nazi forces control, the continent of Europe. And it was clearly evident to the navy at this point that if they're going to find their way in Europe, again, they have to the American forces will have to fight their way ashore. So the navy comes to appreciate the need for specialized landing craft and landing vehicles and the needs of projecting power ashore. It's a lot more acute at this moment. And it so happens that at precisely this moment the budget skyrockets defense appropriations in the United States go from a hovering in the realm of about a billion to more than six billion dollars virtually overnight. So the navy has money to spend, and it has the awareness that it needs to provide its amphibious forces, the means to get ashore. But how do you mass produce something, especially when the one design that you have has been scratched built in a garage. Enter a food machinery corporation or F M C. And this map. Here depicts basically FMC's operations various industrial plants and facilities had about this very time. Donald Roebling had worked with FM see in the nineteen thirties to scratch, build some of these parts for his prototypes. Now, what does FM sea food machinery, I might add with headquarters and operations in citrus? Glow of rich places such as Florida and southern California, especially also what builds is pesticide sprayers. Irrigation. Equipment machines to harvest and pick fruit and package them. But Roebling has a pre existing relationship with FM. See they have a small facility in Dunedin Florida, which is really close to Clearwater. And so he and the navy approach. FM? See you're a corporation. You have factories you mass produce things could you retool perhaps and build a war machine? You never provided defense contracts before or any defense needs are built a vehicle. Could you do it? And to his credit Paul Davies, the then president of FMC depicted in the upper left Paul Davies on opportunity to serve the nation. And to serve FMC's interest as well shareholders. And so Paul Davies said sure we can build this thing, we'll partner with Roebling and the navy will mass produce the landing vehicle tracked or LV t the Amtrak as it came to be called. Davies appreciated that FMC had no experience in building vehicles. He has a few key people that work in the industrial belt in in facilities. Such as in Lansing, Michigan. But he'll hire people out of the automotive industry to help FM FMC develop these mass production techniques and develop the resident expertise one would need to build war machinery. But one of the key misconceptions about war production is usually that you can only do one of two things it's this or that either or you can do guns or butter and the case of FM see in one sense it's involved in the butter industry is involved in agriculture..

navy Marine Corps Donald Roebling Europe life magazine Roebling Florida Roebling design China Roebling United States Clearwater FMC Walter Christie Caribbean Wade Paul Davies
"life magazine" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"The average theme pace fifty percent of his income in consumption and income taxes. That's right. I said fifty percent why earning. Fifteen percent less than the average American auto taxes. An average American has a twenty seven percent higher disposable income than the date. Don't get me wrong. Gray windows, aside, then my has much to recommend it. It's just that being a socialist paradise isn't one of I'm entrepreneur Peterson economists send up starters in Copenhagen Denmark for junior goes to notice he said one in five parent has his or her child in private school. That's twenty percent. That's twice the percentage in this country. If it's such a paradise. Topi? Why would so many people opt out of the government school system? And put their children in private education. If the universal health coverage is so great. Why is private sector medicine growing rapidly in Denmark? And I've told you about the time Bernie Sanders went to Sweden was in the airport and was talking to young people and ask them how much do you pay for college that we we don't pay anything? How much you pay for education? Must you pay for for health care? How much you pay for childcare? We don't pay anything. That's too bad. Not too bad free. It's not free. Speaking about the private sector this article in the hill called this Earth Day reflect on the environmental progress made possible by human flourishing. Today is the fiftieth anniversary of Earth Day. It was two years after book came out by guy named Paul Ehrlich called the population bomb bestseller. Predicted that unless governments intervene rapidly to reduce the number of humans who are being reproduced. Hundreds of millions of people would die every year by the end of the nineteen seventies. Life magazine that same year? Predicted that city-dwellers will have to wear gas masks to survive air pollution by the end of the decade. Well. Nineteen ninety that percentage of people living in extreme poverty has fallen. From thirty five percent. Ten percent. Next because of capitalism. Free markets in places like India, and China, although China will call it something else. Quote, rather than famine we have experienced one of the greatest miracles in human history of two billion people have escaped poverty of quote. Regarding the gas mask stuff that life magazine predicted city-dwellers would have to wear by the end of the nineteen seventies. Didn't hesitate the adoption of the catalytic converter. Grammatically reduced small here in Los Angeles. It was a cap and trade program for sulfur dioxide. They created a market incentive for industries to reduce the pollution that led to what was called acid rain. Demand for electric hybrid vehicles, reducing air urban air pollution, even further. Quote. What's been the overriding theme of these improvements? He writes, human prosperity rather than being a threat to the environment. Frees us to pursue our environmental values as a scientist, grow wealthier. They have more resources to dedicate to recovering species improving air quality and water quality and responding to climate change close to the.

Life magazine Denmark Bernie Sanders China Paul Ehrlich scientist Sweden Los Angeles Peterson Copenhagen India fifty percent twenty seven percent thirty five percent Fifteen percent twenty percent
"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"To do send me an Email. George Gina g I n a at whole life magazine dot com. Take advantage of it. When free is free. Take advantage of it. Gene at whole life magazine dot com, folks producer Tom here. The other day, I was on the web looking at the coast to coast AM store and all the amazing fun items that are available signature mugs for you. Coffee. Drinkers v neck shirts for the ladies. Baseball, caps, bathrobes and more. It got me thinking about where all these great items come from. So we now is Jeff Schwartz. Jeff is the CEO of Schwartz promotions in the creator of all these neat merchandise. Jeff, how do you come up with all the ideas for the coast to coast AM products? Tom, thanks for asking. I try to come up with items that are both useful and fun. And some of my ideas, even come from coleslaw. Listeners and what's really need is. We have new products and promotions all the time, and how long does it take for people to get their items we ship all orders twenty four hours. So they get to you in no time. Well, there you go convenience shopping and shipping click to order your favorite item in it'll be on the way in no time. These items are must for any coast listener. Here's what listener Angelina has to say, I can't tell you smiles. I get from people. I coast to coast baseball cap. I even got one to give birth. They get for French. She loves it too. And that was really stylish. Well, there you go. Here's your chance to get that perfect gift for someone you love or maybe treat yourself and show everyone you're a member of the coast to coast family by supporting your favorite coast merchandise. It's easy by the item. You like click in it'll be in your hands before you know, it jump on over the coast store and check out what's available. Go now to coast to coast AM dot com. That's coast to coast AM dot com..

Jeff Schwartz AM store Tom whole life magazine Baseball George Gina g Angelina CEO producer twenty four hours
"life magazine" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Life magazine dot com. Simple as that Gina at whole life magazine dot com. Lots of great contributors, including many of them who are coast to coast guests Gina at whole life magazine dot com. Paranormal day dot com is available for you. It is a growing website for people wanting to meet each other who simply get it. And if you go to our website look at the highlight reel, they're all those little dots down there. The second one from the right click that you'll see the fifteenth second commercial. It was pretty interesting. I think you'll like it how big foot goes on a date with an alien gray. I kid you not. Instantly ageless that's the way you can preserve youth. Science has come a long way in helping us look younger. Now, we have an amazing product to give you near instant results with bags under your eyes on lines wrinkles and pores, it's called instantly ageless in less than two minutes to manic changes to your looks. No needles. No pain is still ageless is a cream applied lightly and allowed to dry look younger and intern feel younger and do it in minutes, even doctors agree instantly ageless works like this from the Rachel Ray show, certified German-Polish actor Whitney are looking to turn back the clock on a budget in in the privacy of your own home. But actually some recent technologies emerging almost like changes the behavior of the scan on this kid. We're going to try a product. You know, go back stage will literally just put it on. So we'll put on a really thin layer. And we're gonna see a sort of. And then she went off to try product called instantly age ageless instantly..

whole life magazine Gina intern Rachel Ray Whitney two minutes
"life magazine" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Philvalentine show. How long have you? All we got some doozies. Jussie smollet thing. But we also have the polar vortex may have killed ninety five percent of stink bugs, and they're worried about that. Now, one Martina Navratilova says it's Schranz women which are men, by the way. In women's sports is cheating. And boy, they have all. Josh they've gone nuts on this woman. We also have a British theme who join ISIS gonna ever citizenship revolt and vandals spray paint. Hashtag me to on the statue of the World War Two sailor kissing the nurse. The iconic thing for my was life magazine or time or no like look, look looker life or whatever. Six one five seven three seven nine nine eight six instant Email. Philip Phil Valentine dot com. Web address Phil Valentine dot com. And after this hour up you have my permission to listen to the pod goats podcast and be what what exactly is that supposed to be. I mean, he's doing all these these foolish covers on the front. I mean, you know, latest one I've got a beard, and I'm planning to get tired. You're listening to find out. It's serious stuff. But it's also funny to it's sort of like the show, but without politics. Yeah. It's it's it's the Phil Valentine show. The next generation the Phil Valentine show. You say that. But I'm not. Now, there was something that was gonna tell you. Oh, yeah. Mad Maxine says that if you're for the wall, you're unpatriotic. Oh. Really mad magazine says you're unpatriotic you'll love this country. Trae impact how lowered. Excoriating Americans who support constructing the wall in a speech given against President Trump in Los Angeles. L spoken fold the president this from the blaze. So that anyone who supports the border wall is not a patriot. This president is trying to key campaign promise to all those people that he swore. He would build a wall. She told the on. I'm not gonna keep that up. I mean, you have to tune the way you're going on my gosh. Isn't that? Great. Well, that's the way. That's, you know, can you imagine living in her district. Oh my gosh. I can't imagine. I can imagine they vote for they've probably vote for to get her out of town. Hey, Maxine move OFI. Just go to Washington will you as far away from California's you positive again. She says those people who want the wall and not patriots. They're not people who love this country. They're not people who stand up for what's right now. What the heck is that supposed to mean? You're not a page. You don't love the country because you want to build a wall to keep people from invading it. I don't understand this. But this is where we are with these people, and look they're plentiful there. Oh, by the way, you see this hold on the update. And here we told you that Liz Warren is proposing universal childcare funded by a wealth tax. In the meantime. Four people are not allowed into Alexandra Cossio Cortez's luxury apartment complex. These self-described socialist, by the way. I thought of this too. I was going to tweet this. You've heard of the democratic socialist. They say the democratic social isn't that redundant? Okay. I just thought I'd throw that out there. I'm a democrat now massages, but I repeat myself anyway..

Philip Phil Valentine Maxine Martina Navratilova president mad magazine life magazine President Trump Schranz Alexandra Cossio Cortez Liz Warren Josh Los Angeles California Washington ninety five percent
Sailor in iconic 1945 Times Square kiss photo dies

Gary and Shannon

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Sailor in iconic 1945 Times Square kiss photo dies

"The US sailor from the iconic life magazine photo known as the kiss has died. George Mendoza was on leave in Times Square in nineteen Forty-five. When the news broke of America's victory over Japan. He grabbed a nurse. He had never met named Greta Friedman and gave her a kiss Friedman died in two thousand sixteen Mendoza died yesterday at a nursing home in Rhode Island. He was ninety

George Mendoza Greta Friedman Iconic Life Magazine Times Square Rhode Island United States America Japan
"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"You know, I can understand this. I mean, more and more businesses done online, and that's going to be the best way to do business. And if this is going to be less available or blind people get ready, get ready to lawyer up because you're going to get hit the internet has been great for those in the in the visually challenged world, the blind community here in Austin, the internet has been great. However, they got to have access to it. Yeah. They do and more and more. You're going to have to have access to it. And believe me, this is technology that blows me away as far as making the internet work for the visually challenged. But it's they're doing it everywhere. A lot of it involves audio every company. That has a website potentially could be sued. Yeah. That's right. You better get on it. Yes. It's common. I don't know how expensive it is to fix your website to make an acceptable for the blind, those visual ios reading tools. Maybe Sean, the president of bats could give us a call. And tell us more about how this technology work with the blind association that Totta Don show. Exactly exactly tog refer Alfred Eisenstaedt. He was German who took that picture for life magazine. Okay. Okay. Alfred got it is instead well done saying that wrong the name as instead it looks right? That's okay. Sean, he's German. So I said it that way well done well done. My dad remembers being he he was out on the street when the day the war ended he was down on congress avenue interviewing.

Sean Alfred Eisenstaedt Austin life magazine president
"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Tremendous amount of authority and traffic around the currency of photos to again to two instruments and some of the others and and and facebook and whatnot and i think that they they missed a real opportunity and they didn't sort of look out at that time you could see instagram taking off you could see what was being shared on facebook mostly pictures right so the currency of communication now is almost entirely photographs the things you text to each other the things that go viral their pictures and the need for a place where you can see the best pictures of the day and the best photo stories of the day and the photos that will move you and make you feel something in some way i think that exists but can online certainly but in print form what would be what would be necessary to get people to go to the magazine and open it up and look at their best photos in i think it's i think i think the way magazine's going mostly they're super niche so if you're a horse person and you want to see the best photos of horses you know that might work but i i i have some trouble believing and not just about there's nothing do with photography any general and the sort of broad interest magazine i think it's just too right now i wish that wasn't the case because i'm kind of a magazine lover but with the exception of the new yorker you know it's it's getting hard it really is getting the justify going to newsstand buying a magazine i again iron my living for a million years photographing for magazines hurts me to say that yeah that's the fact that's that's what's happening yeah you know for for example california sunday magazine something keeping keep your eye on doing great work they really are yeah so let's talk a little bit about your other work because you got a lot of the stuff going on during that time and since you've published a few books and we have in front of us what we keep which is the most recent and as you mentioned i guess it does share a little d._n._a. with some of the project you were doing the life magazine particularly the one about the times square was in your pocket roughly that so so can you explain the book a little bit well yeah i have i have this feeling in my body that objects tell stories and so my co author naomi waxen i spent three years going around the country and talking to people at the single object in their life that has the most emotional resonance and getting the stories behind those so we we spoke with people like melinda gates and tana esi coats and cheryl strayed and you know joss weeden and you know and also you know quote unquote regular people and the stories are just you know really really moving and in the book there's there's the photo of a photo of the object and then the story that goes along with any common threads you pick up along the way well one of the things we found is that no one chosen object of monetary value you know it's like our hearts are not accountants we go from the meaningful not not the monetary so that that was a little surprising to us in that anybody just come come with the picture and say this photo of something is the my most treasured item or did you rule photos off the table that's good question so there was an an artist name radcliffe bailey who's an african american pretty celebrated artist who's terrific he his his his object or series of tin types of his family from the eighteen ninety s which has grandmother gave to him when he was just out of art school and he was sort of he describes it in history looking for direction and looked at these pictures and started to find his direction so these were meaningful not only because his grandmother gave them to him before before passed away they're beautiful pictures because there has relatives but because it was also sort of a fork in the road and these pictures gave him the steering that he needed to kind of reach the heights that he did it's funny that you mentioned people having objects that that have meaning in their life i can't help thinking back to jamie his hell being here where he had a building full of things that he's found in every single one was a story to him and project to him but literally hit fifty five rooms full of things that had meaning we tried to narrow down and did you were there any did you hear of somebody's item and said we want we gotta find that story are we gonna get this person in the book or was it i mean how did you find the people that you ultimately included so great question there were some people that we just thought were so interesting that we wanted to include you know like i i approached the great photographer neil lifer because he's seen so many things over the years and he had assigned muhammad ali boxing glove and one of the reasons neil got to where he was is because he photographed had such a great relationship with the champ but a lot of people we just interviewed and we thought about who would have the unique relationship to an object okay with somebody who's doing a long stint in prison you know would a cloistered nun would counter fitter who makes fake things you know what would have put a buddhist who's not supposed to be attached to anything so we asked we went after people like that and and ensure enough they had some pretty interesting stories to tell and while we're here let's just throw out the other two books well how many books have you done that way four all of this has come since life dot com closed doors and you walked away or some of them were in verse book was in two thousand seven so that was around the time that life magazine was closing and then the keith richards book i think was two thousand fourteen i think so cool is that you went from an online product to doing books i love it for me for me it's all about the idea and i'll find whatever medium is best to tell that story you know at at life dot com we decided to do an app for the tablet which was kind of all the rage and it was a great medium for that because you could bring in sound and move you know an and film interviews that have been done with some of the great photographers over the years and you can have a map and you could say oh i wanna see pictures of belarus or wants to pictures of alabama and and go there and that happened that being number one in thirty three countries and so it's really about what's the idea and can you marry it to the right medium so in some ways i'm kind of you know media magnetic in just what what's the best marriage for the idea and what we keep it being good podcast let's think i meant talks

facebook million years three years
"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Together had had done great stories and more than anything else and liked each other and had fun and wanted to keep doing it but more than anything else it was life it was life and we and we all felt like me especially we went it down we felt that way let's you've got using your and you are i mean it really is i the way you just put it again it was it was it was a it was a you know i've had a few hard moments in my life but the other ones were personal gotcha and this this was really this is really a moment and what was the timeframe between that meeting that you had with your boss and the final issue coming out and these conversations you right well that's another so we and so we had this conference so i don't know was maybe three days from when my boss told me and then i told my top people and then we had this meeting and then we had to put out one more issue and that was really hard but it ended up being you know yeah goodbye issue did you did you form it that way or no it you know it wasn't we had some i can't i can you know i remember as we had a story by elizabeth gilbert who wrote eat pray love in the issue and she wrote a beautiful story about a swimming hole and and that felt like fitting goodbye okay we're gonna take a short break and we come back more about life the magazine and life dot com with ill shapiro stay tuned we hope you're enjoying this edition of the h. photography podcast send us a tweet at be h photo video pash tag h photo podcast okay we are back with bill shapiro so life magazine as we knew it comes to an end in two thousand seven and then chew years later rises from the ashes as life dot com what was it like coming back into that office with i imagine in that two years the atmosphere and just the dynamics of time life changed dramatically so i had continued during that period of working time i was called a development editor and i was helping to develop new magazines to launch or overseeing sections that were kind of being reimagined in different magazines so so i was so i was still there in and being creative and this idea for life dot com started to sort of percolate and we developed it and kind of a skunk works you know like could this work how what what's this idea there was nothing else like this with in time life that you kinda modeling is on this was the first of its way the way that it was conceived was really interesting so there were about twelve million images in the time life archive in the library extraordinary number of images all of these taken by life staff taga offers going all the way back but life had copyright on all of these everything that was shot going back was owned by life so that's that's a great and not simple question a lot you know the images owned by staff otographer were fully owned by life but there were lots of photographers who did not start off on staff and so there were we had them in the archive but did we have full rights and maybe they then then became staff and then they left and so there was a lot of figuring out a lot of gray area who what but but by and large you know with with with some exceptions we had a ridiculous number of high quality photos to look through but they were not digitized so andy blau who was my on the the president of life magazine in my business partner who i launched life magazine relaunched life magazine with had the idea of getting was google to have them digitize all of these photographs or huge portion of them so that got underway we also contract or contract and we worked at a joint venture with getty images for life dot com because they were interested at that point in having a consumer facing product so in the end we had this really great partnership with google with life and with getty to create a website that brought people in amazing number of high quality images on a daily hourly basis like a perfect storm of dynamic strong yes hooper strong and was there an attempt to kind of format this as a magazine or as a weekly or any kind of like a issues coming out we we we sort of felt like coming off of a shuddering the magazine and this was even two years after that that we were going digital there was no thought of going print at all but not even printed let's say a digital magazine we're now we've put something out there was no thought of that it was going to be an ongoing feed we thought that by using the getty images and the getty feed we could capture search for various news items so it's the oscars if it's a sweaty got into car accident if there's a sports moment if there's something going viral with a panda bear we could be all over it and talgo between the news cycle and these great photos from the life archive which we did a lot so let's just say there was a you know ten panda bears escaped from a zoo in china and getty had the photos we would go back to the archive and find other animal escapes through history and tied together and you know so that sort of thing and how were you getting people to come to the site then was it the just the word of mouth in general they knew about it subscription that

two years three days
"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Mindset we were going to be much smaller right at at somewhere between sixteen and thirty two pages so those were and i maybe most important we were uninvited guest in people's homes in other words life magazine on the newsstand you plunk down your five bucks you like puts on the cover you pick it up if you don't like what's on the cover if it was something a grisly image from world war two or too sexy you you you pick it up next week not here so we had to be careful that what that anything in our magazine would be fine for you know your six year old daughter to come across or else we'd be getting letters from readers and from the editors of the newspapers in which we were bundle was there any cut in louis with with let's say you know life from at this point the sixties and the seventies where there were there staff holdovers or their decision makers saying you know what we used to do it this way you should continue doing it this way or or not that's a great question so sixties and seventies i'm not a hundred percent sure well yes so bobby bobby baker boroughs was a photo editor who had been at life for years she was married to man name russell boroughs whose father was the great legendary life talker for larry burrows sure who died on assignment in vietnam yeah so you know his pictures are extraordinary and bobby had amazing connections through all of years to that with photographer gordon parks david duncan douglas an honor on bob sullivan so bobby was on my staff bob sullivan had been managing life books he had been on the life staff when it closed in in the ninety s or or two thousand ahead of managing books in the in term he's he he went on my staff but i hired some amazing people you know i hire the most racially diverse staff at time inc. because again we're going out to america in america was no longer white so my director photography is the the late great george pitts who had been first rector photography vibe and in fact had an amazing amazing amazing man and in some ways he had developed a visual vernacular for rap and hip hop you know that we still see today richard baker was the creative director he came from premier and some other places he had also been vibe and maggie murphy from entertainment weekly she she was the one who brought that celebrity experience that i was mentioning earlier life in its heyday from the late thirties until the early seventies was this weekly behemoth or unless right word but you know this giant in the industry and then in the eighties and nineties it became more of a monthly more or less the same at a to'real vision in the same royal sense a little less newsy listening because on a monthly monthly calendar you can't have the pictures taken in in germany vietnam or wherever and and have them you know four days five days six days later you know it's going to be you typically close a monthly magazine you know weeks if not a month in advance okay we'll even weeklies ad it's challenged because magazines like a life and look magazine they would essentially close at about three o'clock on thursday in order to get all of the artwork and art boards to the printer so that it could be on the new stands monday morning those about a four day lead time back in the sixty seventies and some of that's been improved now because there's printers all over the place and everything is split but but at that time back in that time yeah -solutely so so so so what you cover changes a little bit and in life in the later years had to be less newsy but i think it was interesting that again i remembered life from its its heyday and even though it was a weekly publication i would say that it had the same weight as television as far as its content it was an event when i think showed up at your mailbox frizzell was big it was a tabloid was giant and had a thorny at yeah that was it it had credibly and everything and when i think showed up it was this is what happened last week it was a nice summary of what happened last week in the pictures were premier other magazines had photographs but they supplemented the text life magazine was about pictures and the text complemented the photographs and i think those a big difference the pictures told the story bingo yup that's it so in two thousand is when it it ceased its regular monthly publication and so there's this four year period before you came involved were was always a conversation about let's get life bag let's do something with this and then so during those during the fallow years they they published life books right so you know the secrets of jesus and and you know the manson family and and that kind of stuff so there was so so life existed and the head to do that in part to keep the trademark always at time inc you know it's the time in a life building there was a great love of life

hundred percent five days four days four year four day six days six year
"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"life magazine" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"You're listening to the beach taga fee podcast for over forty years being h has been the professional source for photography video audio and more for your favorite gear news and reviews visit us at b. h. dot com or download the bien h app to your iphone or android device now here's your host alan white's greetings and welcome to the beach photography podcast during the second half of the last century the best indicators for products value with tags recipient of the good housekeeping seal of approval and s seen in life magazine the plenty of magazines on the stands back in the day but as a photographer if you wanted to say you've arrived nothing said it better than having pictures published in life magazine for almost four decades life was the weekly goto publication for general news lifestyle and entertainment and of course photography and its height it sold thirteen and a half million copies a week margaret burk white w._g._n. smith robert capa gordon parks cardio brisson dorothea alang and alfred eisenstaedt were among its osteen roster a photographers with america's attention switching to television by the late nineteen fifties in eventually away from print media in general life slowly became a remnant of another era but its influence on photography is still immense and today we're gonna be talking about life magazine and particularly its reincarnation and ultimate switch to life dot com joining us is bill shapiro a writer in editor bill was the editor of life magazine from two thousand and four to two thousand and seven and the founding editor of life dot com he's also a photo curator and the author of other people's love letters the children's book gus in the on which he collaborated with none other than keith richards most recently he authored what we keep for which he asked a hundred and fifty people about their most treasured objects and included a photograph of each of these objects with an essay folksy spoke to for the project included the cheryl strayed comedian hasan men hush the musician amanda palm and many others welcome to the show thank you i am so glad to be here with life magazine but in many ways today's topic is going to really talk about print media in general in how all of that has changed dramatically all of this meaning the collapse of advertising in print media that's a good starting yeah that's that's an upbeat place to start i mean you know even even last week we saw some of the biggest websites buzzfeed huffington post yahu you have to make staff cuts of their editorial team so you know i think what we're seeing unfortunately is the distribution channels facebook etc that's where all the advertiser money is going and the people who are making the content aren't really walking away with the spoils the sort of equivalence see would be if during the say the life era instead of life magazine making the money the u._s. post office was making the money or the delivery trucks who were bringing it to your house were making the money that's right there was a whole support system essentially that sure it will happen that's all gone now in a way yeah i mean that's that's gone but but we can the distribution platforms now are the ones who are making the money as opposed to the content creators so let's back a little bit too when you got involved in life what had you been doing and and how did life become part of your life so i had had a quite varied career up until that point making magazines for lots of different audiences parenting magazine maxim magazine self magazine i started a business magazine for m._b._a. students that was kind of like the equivalent of i dunno rolling stone in a car crash with fortune you know support those that you have the opportunity to do that back then that's right the the the opportunity to start a new magazine from a blank slate or reinvent magazine is an unbelievable experience which i've been fortunate enough to do many times including with life so so yeah and so all those all and i also for time inc i also ran a division there where we made magazines custom content magazines for advertisers like ford target merrill lynch etc so i was used to making magazines for lots of different audiences and when you come to life and you're talking to the entire population of the united states right black white rich poor old young all sorts of demographics and political persuasions the ability to speak to all different kinds of people was important in a way life magazine if you want to compare it to the

four decades forty years