2 Burst results for "Lieutenant Connor"

"lieutenant connor" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"lieutenant connor" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"This is CBS News business analyst Jill schlesinger. You've heard me talk about wild Alaskan company before because when I got this delivery straight to my door, I had to tell you it was an astounding discovery. Sockeye salmon, Pacific halibut cod, a variety of delicious individually portioned wild caught seafood. It was just a miracle actually. I never had to really think about anything. Not only is wild Alaskan seafood and excellent source of protein and high in omega threes, it's also quick to thaw and easy to cook at home. They're so confident in the taste and quality of this seafood they offer a 100% satisfaction and money back guarantee. Right now, listeners can get $15 off your first box of wild caught seafood when you visit wild Alaskan company dot com slash CBS. That's wild Alaskan company dot com slash CBS for $15 off your first box. 60 minutes has been looking into an alarming amount of military casualties, not in combat, but in training that involve armored vehicles. What's being done about it? All right, let's go. We found there are solutions, but an important one is stuck between The Pentagon and Congress. Oh my God. We are holding admitted patients in the emergency department for days upon days. So there's just sitting in the ER because there's not a bed. Yes. We can also pull out bed three Michelle, if you need that bed. I feel like everybody is in survival mode. And not only just us in an emergency department, I think the whole hospital is. We had an entire wave of nurses and physicians who'd worked for 25, 30, 35 years. They said, I'm done. I'm not going to, I'm not going to do this anymore. And they left. I grew up a very, very mean woman. Because of all what happened to me. You learned that here, you think. Yeah. She is not the only one. More than a 150,000 children were sent to residential schools, which Canada's first prime minister supported to in his words sever children from the tribe and civilized them. My name was number 65 for all those years. Just a number. Just the number. 65 picked that up stupid or 65. Why did you do that idiot? I'm Lesley Stahl. I'm Bill Whitaker. I'm Anderson Cooper. I'm Sharon alphonse. I'm John worthy. I'm Scott pelley. Those stories and more tonight. On 60 minutes. I'm CBS News, chief Washington correspondent, major Garrett in this podcast is sponsored by Smith AI. Clients demand an instant response, but now, more than ever, businesses, especially small businesses are spread thin. Smith AI provides businesses with virtual receptionists who handle your calls, chats, and text to unlock new business. Smith AI is friendly and professional agents can screen leads using your custom criteria, schedule appointments on your calendar and call back leads to complete your form. They can do it all by phone, 7 days a week, and also on your website through their 24/7 live chat service. They even answer text and Facebook messages, plus, they have English and Spanish speaking receptionists, real people who will block spam, yes, block spam for free, including all those annoying sales calls. Work uninterrupted. Run your business with less stress and get more leads from your marketing efforts. Smith AI can pay for itself and then some with all the new clients there North America based receptionists help you win. Never miss another lead, it's as simple as fording your calls to Smith AI. On our listeners will save $100 when you sign up using our promo code takeout. At Smith dot AI, visit smith dot AI to read 5 star reviews and be sure to use our code, take out that TA KE. To save $100 at sign up, don't let another day go by, try Smith, AI. Last month, two marines were killed and 17 injured, not in war, but in transit. Their truck flipped over on a highway outside of camp lejeune, North Carolina. And it's not as uncommon as you'd think. We found that as a parent or partner of someone in the military, you're far likelier to get that dreaded call and learn your loved one was killed in an accident rather than in combat. And many far too many of the accidents involve armored vehicles during training. First lieutenant Connor McDowell, a platoon leader in the marines, was out on a training mission in a light armored vehicle like this at camp Pendleton, California in May 2019, when he hit an unmarked ditch covered in brush. Describe what happened. He called out to his men, roll over, roll over roll over. Pushed his gunner in the turret next to him down under the armor, but he couldn't get himself down in time, and it careened into that ditch rolled over and crushed him. Connor was Susan flanagan and Michael McDowell's only child. At first, I thought that this was what happens when you train like you meant to fight. But when we went to San Diego to bring him back, I had a couple of idols, moments in the hotel. And I Googled rollover and military. And I discovered that it Pendleton a month before a marine raider had died in a rollover. So I Googled further back. The army, et cetera. And suddenly I saw a whole series of deaths in rollovers of military vehicles, all kinds, humvees, light armored vehicles, broadly fighting vehicles. And then I realized this is not a single incident. This is a systemic problem. During training? Yearning training. I can accept people dying in combat. But if you're training in your own country and you're dying needlessly in preventable accidents, this is a massive problem which has to be fixed. To fix it, McDowell kept digging. And what he uncovered, he says, was so serious and yet so routinely neglected that it led to this scathing report by the government accountability office. The GAO found close to 4000 of these accidents in the army and Marine Corps from 2010 to 2019, resulting in a 123 deaths. Nearly two thirds of which involved rollovers, and shockingly most occurred in daylight on regular.

Smith AI Jill schlesinger CBS News CBS Bill Whitaker Sharon alphonse John worthy major Garrett Lesley Stahl Scott pelley Anderson Cooper Pentagon Michelle Connor McDowell Congress Smith Pendleton
"lieutenant connor" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"lieutenant connor" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"The morning of January, 24th 1945 near the town of Hussen, France. German forces ferociously counter attack The front left flank of the 7th and 8th infantry Regiment was 600 infantry troops. Six mark tanks and tank destroyer. Smart Six. Thanks sorry. Lieutenant Connor, having recently returned to his unit after recovering from a wound received in an earlier battle was working as the intelligence officer in the third Battalion Command post at the time of the attack. Understanding the devastating effect that the advancing enemy armor could have on the battalion. Lieutenant Connor immediately volunteered to run straight into the heart of the enemy assault to get a position from which he could directly direct rich friendly artillery on advancing enemy forces. With complete disregard for his own safety. Lieutenant Connor maneuvered 400 yards to our enemy artillery fire that destroyed trees in his path and rain shrapnel all around him while unrolling telephone wire needed to communicate with the battalion command post. Upon reaching the battalion's frontline. He continued to move forward on her enemy assault to a position 30 yards in front of the defending United States forces, where he plunged into a shallow ditch that provided minimal protection from the advancing enemies. Heavy machine gun in small arms fire with rounds impacting all around him. Lieutenant Connor calmly directed multiple fire missions adjusting round after round of artillery from his prone position until the enemy was forced to hold his advance and seek cover near it behind a nearby dyke. For three hours. Lieutenant Connor remained in this compromise position and during the repeated onslaught of German infantry, which at one point advance within five yards of his position. As a German as German infantry, regrouped and began to mass in an overwhelming assault. Lieutenant Connor ordered friendly artillery to concentrate directly on his own position, having resolved to die if necessary to destroy the enemy advance. Ignoring the friendly artillery shells, blanketing his position and exploded mere feet from him. Lieutenant Connor continued to direct artillery fire on the enemy assault swarming around him until the German attack was finally broken. His heroism and disregard for his own life. Lieutenant counter Stop the enemy advance the artillery he expertly directed while under constant enemy fire killed approximately 50 German soldiers. And wounded an estimated 100 more preventing what would have undoubtedly been heavy from the casualties. His actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect reflect great credit upon himself, the third Infantry Division The United States Army. Remember what we talked about. Earlier in the show. We opened up the show today talking about.

Lieutenant Connor assault 8th infantry Regiment third Infantry Division The Un Hussen France United States officer