18 Burst results for "Lidia"

"lidia" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

04:21 min | 3 months ago

"lidia" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

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"lidia" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

08:00 min | 3 months ago

"lidia" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Your psyche in some way. Now yeah definitely. Yeah and also when islands when i was six years old coming to this country it was it was difficult. Yeah so so. Tell me about how that have that manifest itself into the creative work that you're doing does does it does that. Is that part of what your. Because i know your first book was called humanity and and just just from the title alone. I'm thinking well that comes from that experience of being an immigrant to a country. Where sometimes you felt very unwanted sometimes villain is and all that kind of stuff So does that play into the work that you're doing it all. And if so how is it manifesting itself. Yeah definitely Well i often just look at people who have who have it harder than me Who have a more difficult. Experiences have experienced more prejudice than i have and obviously have that empathy for them. But i also i also believe that every emotion can be put into poetry not just happiness sadness anger frustration stress can be put into that people will resonate with that. And that's my goal in help feel less allowing in less powerless their strength in numbers. Where you are 'cause. I've haven't lived and spent any time in california in many many years but in even when i did though is not one of the city's i spent a lot of time in i was mostly in Southern california and for brief time very northern california. Don't really know much about sacramento. Is there a A community of support for you there. I i'm just starting to discover it Kind of getting in my comfort zone and meeting other creatives I'm just in the start of that journey but The bash has just been me and going through the world so what is The goal now. This is the latest book like this is the novel. It's called death rattle. What is the goal is to be a novelist to be a poet. Or 'cause i don't think you know. And i know it's a it's very commendable to be wanna be diverse and do a lot of different things and have all this energy and stuff. I don't think it's healthy career wise to spread yourself too thin no on into many different directions at once so And you might disagree with that. But his is there a preference or a master-plan on on what you really want to do with your life whether it be a novelist poet in musical film creator. I agree an some ways that can be a lot in overwhelming To have so many creative outlets but I think at the core of it. I think poetry is the one i'd like to focus on at least for right now. Yeah and that. That's the one. I feel most connected to at the moment and So the the novel. Tell me a little bit about this novel. I have the cover up. It's called death rattle and it's got a very interesting looks like the grim reaper. Sitting at a table table by himself in a diner standing at a. I don't know it looks like a as a sunday ice cream sunday. Any standard what is what is the gist of the book. It's a dark comedy Obviously about death and how that can come into the real world I see it as a metaphor but you can see it as you want the reader As a to fund novel. Which is what i wanted it to be are to be a nice maybe short novel. That people could read when they're when they're looking for a new friend in a book. Gotcha how long has it been out by year a year. And have you gotten Reviews about it and some feedback from it and what. What are you hearing. Yeah definitely for my followers and stuff. Yeah i have in obviously friends and people who have read it beta readers but yeah. I have had a lot of reviews. They seem to like it. So that's nice I wanna get your opinion on this. Because i think in some ways now i mentioned you're unusual because i to me because i talked to a lot of authors world closer to my age I think somebody like you in today's world a young person who is more Social media savvy so our community building savvy and building followers online has an advantage somewhat in in Gaining those files in building a community. Do you agree with that. Yeah yeah i definitely do in atlanta. I have yeah and so how are you going about. I mean for people might need some help out there and say i had no. I have a lot of people thirty forty years old writing their first book. Now who struggle with the idea of building a community. And how do you how you relate to people who could become fans of followers Got any tips for those all. The people who might not be so tuned into building community online Well it's not. It's not unknown that some social media can be very fake So i would just say genuine and be be. Don't be afraid to be real and be honest and people will see through that. We'll see if you're fake. They'll see through that but they will also see that. You are genuine person in that. You want to connect people. Just be honest about what you want from from people and you. That's how you make friends that turned into fans and all that what about your peer group because If sex me that like at twenty one. I thought i knew what i wanted to do. But You know at that age. Your friends are starting to grow. Just starting to grow up and kind of figure out their path in life or some of them are graduating from college around twenty one but Your peer group of and their reaction to what you do If you how would you characterize I very supportive from the people. Closer to my age. I think they have the same. Dreamer mindset But i also have older friends in their mid twenties. I mean might beginning also have older friends Around your age all that they seem to be a little more Cautious well that's that's interesting that you say that. Have you experienced. And i know i did when i was worried because i had big dreams big ambitions and hopes for my future. Have you experienced What i would call people who Tried to crush your dream or talk you out of it or just say you know once you get a job like everybody else. Go where we are all doing you. Have you experienced that some of that. Yeah definitely It's been crushing at times. But just random people. Whenever i tell them oh i write. I'm an author. They're like so. How do you make money from that. Little.

california atlanta Southern california twenty one sacramento first book northern california thirty forty years old sunday six years old mid twenties around twenty one one today
Houston boil water notice lifted, but other areas in SE Texas not yet clear

Lidia Curanaj

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Houston boil water notice lifted, but other areas in SE Texas not yet clear

"I'm Joe Chiro. Fox News, the city of Houston's lifting its boil water notice that's been in effect since Wednesday, following last week's freezing weather that really encompasses millions and millions of customers. So bad is moving in the right direction. Although I can tell you that million's Maura still have no safe drinking water, and so they're still asked to boil it because there, try to rig make repairs to the IMF. Structure As Texans start to thaw out nine million more bottles of water are on their

Joe Chiro Fox News Houston Maura IMF Texans
"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Times upshot column. Off tested many methods of humanely kill lobsters. Including balancing them on their heads and bellies to love him to sleep before dispatching. The latest commercial alternative is the crusts done a four thousand dollar device that looks a lot like a small metal suitcase. According to the manufacturer, the Crustacean is lowered into an electrified sailing bath, immediately studying the lobster and killing it outright in just ten seconds. Now I, do admit that arguments over how to kill an animal seem either gruesome, silly or morally insensitive, but having dispatched pigs, deer, rabbits and chickens over the years I believe that arguing about method is well a good thing. Eating meat at all is worth a lengthy discussion, but as the saying goes if you're gonNA, do something. Do it right or not at all. That's it for today. If you tuned it later, just WanNa, listen again. You can download and subscribe to most radio on your favorite podcast APP to learn more about millstreet. Please go to one seven seven milk street dot com there you can download each week's recipe taken online cooking class in order our latest cookbook. Street, Tuesday nights you can also find us on facebook at Christopher Kimble's Milk Street and on instagram and twitter at one seven seven street. We'll be back next week and thanks. For listening. Christopher Kimble's milk street radio is by Milk Street in association with W. B. H.. Executive Producer Melissa Day now senior editor was the allison producer. Andy Sensabaugh, associate producer Jackie noack production assistant. Stephanie Code Production Help from Debbie Paddock. Senior Audio Engineer Douglas Sugar. Additional editing from Vicky Merrick, Sydney, Lewis and Haley Fager, an audio mixing from Jay Allison Atlantic public media in woods hole Massachusetts. The music by Chubu crew additional music by George Brendel Egg Lav. Christopher! Campbell's Milk Street radio is distributed by P R..

"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"I'm calling from Rochester New York. How can we help you today? Well. I have a torch that I make creme. Brulee with Oh propane torch. Right, and not a Warsi kitchen torch, but big one and I have no other use for it, and I'm like. What else can I do with this thing you know I. Think there's lots of things you can do it that. Don't you Chris well? If you use a broiler, but you have a small job to do, and you don't want to heat up royal for twenty minutes because my ex up. You could pull out that torch. Do a small job something. We don't want to go through half an hour. Heating of the future for Baked Alaska right there. Right Lemon Meringue Pie. You just want to touch up the top of the MERINGUES. Browning's some crumbs on the top of something just didn't get brown enough French onion soup anything you're GONNA melt or Brown in the oven or toast in broiler at the top. Yeah, but if you have a bunch of stuff, it's just easier to throw to sheep pan onto the broiler right right, so it's small. Use It like a portable broiler. Thank xactly perfectly. Well Yeah Yeah that's right. That's you know I look so tough when I use it. That's what I really enjoy I. Agree with you. It's fun. It's showy, do it it is it is. Personal Space! Especially in a large family when you're mad at the husband, yeah, you stay in your class. I once went to a dinner party. One of my husband to participate somewhat right. We brought Creme Brulee so I taught him how to relate the custard right tricky, though and it took a while because there is a technique and everything, so we get to this party. He whips out the torchy's starts to do it off. The ladies at the Party were like Oh Jim. You're so wonderful. Look at you with your torch and isn't that and I sat there with my hand on my head. Like are you kidding me I taught him everything he knows you now. Right very annoying I did that once my first time I did it i. let the sugar on fire. So as you said this technique technique, clearly, you're good teacher. You scold him well. Yeah, yeah, but he never gave me credit you know. Bad. Land Yeah. You GotTa give me. Well I've gotten a lot of good ideas. You called it a portable broiler perfect very. I think we need to start selling those Chris just call them portable broilers. Not Propane tanks done. Yeah, all right. Thanks for calling via the out. Thank.

Creme Brulee Chris Rochester Alaska Browning New York
"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Was like our dream. Tyler Malik spend a great pleasure. Thanks for coming on milk. Street you thank you so much I really appreciate it. That was tyler, Malik, co-owner, salt and Straw. His new book is entitled Salt and Straw Ice Cream cookbook. Right now my co hosts are multi will be taking your calls Sarah is of course, the author of home cooking one on one and the star of Sara's weeknight meals on public television. Sarah. How are you I'm good Chris, but before we take any calls, I have a question. So, what is your favorite favorite tool in the kitchen? Let's start with small and large small I. My favorite tool in the kitchen is going to have to be the instant thermometer because I use it for so much. Don't use it just for meets, but don't tell us other things. If I'm baking a rustic bread I, try to get the two Oh five inside American style bread, which got fat, and at one ninety five cheesecake one fifty five, obviously accuster de 175, one eight will start to colonel. Cook I. Think it's really helpful and it's. It's one of those things that takes the guesswork, okay. How about big tool? It's my Nike knife to Japanese knife. It's a two inch high belated sort of halfway between a regular knife in a cleaver. Very thin metal, so it glides through vegetables, vegetable knife, and it has the classic Wa Japanese handle. It's in octogonal wouldn't handle so beautiful would handle. It's very light six ounces, and it's just makes life in the kitchen so much easier scholarship. Yeah, okay time to take some calls, yes. Welcome to milk street. WHO's calling. With Maureen Hi Marine. Where are you calling from? I'm calling from Bill Beach. Florida. That's a good place to be calling from how? Wonderful Wonderful Boys did not even good. How could we help you? I was wondering. What is your favorite to meal for Sunday afternoon? WHO'S COOKING? Yeah, that would be my first question cooking. Are! One of the two of you. Actually at a Sunday afternoon. I'd like to cook something low and slow. So we have it Sunday night, and then it's something I can repurpose during the week and cropper. Yeah, I don't WanNa. Do is stir fry or something sauteed. I'll do something. That's a Stewart braise I'll do black beans for example that if soaked overnight. And then I cook them and use them in lots of dishes during the week. That sort of thing, so it's usually low and slow. That's what I like to do in a STU would. You can then end up using lots of different ways. That's what I would do Sarah well, this is the answer you're looking for marine, but I just love making soup. And the husband will consider it dinner as long as I throw some protein in there, which is usually in the pork department, so it's either Canadian Bacon one of my favorites or or Or even Bacon Bacon, but then they'll be carrots and onions and fennel, or whatever else you know vegetables, I find, and then I throw in. You know some sort of being like a white being, and then maybe a potato, as well and throwing if I have a Parmesan Ryan's left, I throw that into flavor it, and of course tons of onions and garlic to begin with, and then some chicken broth, and maybe some tomato, and I make this big pot of soup, and then I take some out and puree or I use an immersion blender and puree some of it to thicken it a little bit, but I don't completely you know puree the whole thing, so it's creamy and crunchy. And then a great, some more parmesan cheese, because why not and I'll make my full garlic bread because I live in New York City and we don't have a good exhaust system, Chris, you like soup to you probably would've liked what I just described as I would have liked what you just described. I just want something in a Dutch oven. It goes into the oven for two to three. Whatever it is, that's what I would. We did a long pork shoulder recently. With me so and go to Chiang the Korean. Announce it go. Chung and it has a sweet. Spicy paste and had about four ingredients, and you walked away and came back in two and a half three hours, and that would be a great Sunday afternoon dish. Wonderful? What do you make an assumption? Now you have to. Get along well. You know I was a working mom, so funding was my data cook, so I would put something in heaven, but I could use a couple of. What I would like to do, as I would get up, be cast iron, and then I would do like mushrooms, pepper onions cooked chicken, putting a red gravy and throw that in the up and so I would serve that with Pasta. Rice, and which is perfect. Santiago when you say Red Gravy. Tomato sauce. Okay, you're italian-american. My Down, yeah? Yeah. It's SORTA Sunday. And, it was definitely better every time you want it up. Oh, I bet well. That sounds Yummy to adopt into that as well. Thanks for Sharing Marine thank you, yeah! To can't pleasure thank you? You're listening to radio. If you have a cooking question or just want to know why bay leaves, gives us a ring at eight, five, five, four, two, six, nine, four, three. That number once again is eight, five, five, four, two, six, nine, eight, four, three, or please email, said questions and most radio DOT com. Welcome to milk street. WHO's calling?.

Sarah Tyler Malik Chris Bacon Bacon Parmesan Ryan co-owner Sara Bill Beach Sharing Marine WanNa Maureen Wa New York City Florida Chiang Chung Santiago Rice
"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"As Bourbon Cherry Stout Sorbet at chicken with his new cookbook. Salt and Straw is a walk on the wild side of ice cream. Tyler welcome to milk street. Thank you so exciting. Let's just start at the beginning. You believe in community base ice cream shops. You believe in five gallon batches. You're doing very differently than the playbook for how to start a franchise of stores. Yeah I love this idea of like taking people journeys through Ice Cream, right? It's it's such a fun approachable food in this world so when you talk about journeys. Would you do in in your book? What does that mean? A unique flavor is a journey? How is it a? A Journey. Yeah, I think like the cool thing about coming into Salton. Straw is that it's almost like you're getting away for a for a minute. It's We almost relate this experience coming tasting ice cream to like going on vacation, and we take that very seriously. People take you know an hour hour and a half, just tasting and learning about all the. The different ice cream flavors that we put together and the amazing artisans that were working within the city to say we use our ice cream almost as a canvas to tell the story, so local food makers, maybe a really important food movement in the city, and also use it to talk about nonprofits in the city and some of the things that we think. Think are really important for people to learn about so let's talk to someone who wants to make ice cream at home and his had iloc ice cream is about creating ice crystals of the right size, right? That's one of the issues you've got so is the is the speed at which of crystals form important, and if so, how do you manage that? Yes for me. I think the most important thing you can start with ice cream. Is your foundation recipe and from that point it really matters what cream milk and sugar were using, and what ratio were using them in so finding that perfect foundation recipe is really the biggest challenge in the spot where I think people have the big troubles of making ice cream, and if you start with that one foundation, you can start playing with any flavor profile want which actually becomes like this amazing process like you can put a little bit of strawberry juice in. It makes strawberry ice cream, chocolate chocolates is unique. Carrot Juice in it make carrot ice cream. You know like however you want to have fun with this. It's really really freeing an eye opening, so let's talk about fat in flavor. You you you compare Gelato sorbet in how the flavor with fat last longer than Sorbet. Could you explain how that works? Yeah? Fat, itself doesn't have a ton of flavor, but what it does really really well is, it holds flavors to your taste buds for a longer period of time kind of gives you that unctuous feel, which is really really great with some of those expensive delicate flavors like vanilla extract, for example or saffron or things like that, and that's why when you see like cream sauces with saffron, a cream sauce, you know or ice cream with vanilla. That's like the most precious beautiful way. You can showcase that ingredient. But on the flip side we have ingredients like strawberries or pears or things like that that are really really light and flavor, and not quite as aromatic in so when we're working with strawberries for example and I really want that brightness of the strawberries just punch through I can take my cream level down the fat level down, because I don't want coating, our taste buds, and I can increase the strawberries so that the first thing you hit with this is like essence of strawberry. Here's a practical shopping question which is. What ice cream maker would you suggest people by? I've never had much luck with the ones where you put it in the freezer overnight. And that's probably because my freezers and called enough but. Can you make good ice cream with those freezer overnight inserts? Absolutely. Yes you can. It's a little harder, and you can only make one day or one every other day, which is actually like. A challenge for me, obviously Kim and I my cousin. We started the company just with You know a bunch of those like pre frozen ice cream bowls, and we. We bought like four of them from goodwill, because as it turns out, a lot of people buy ice cream makers and get scared and donate them and. So. That's how we started the company. So when your cousin Kim, you talked about starting this business, you sent a long list of fifty or sixty flavor ideas. You mentioned in the Book Chicken Liver Maple Syrup licorice fern, Goodwin Bone, Marrow and Bourbon Cherries and you still got hired. Were you still? visit so they of passing. Yeah, she used to go like this guy's crazy, but he's. He's Kinda creative. What was her reaction? You know I still to this day. I'm not sure what she was thinking and why she hired me, but we've somehow made it work for the eight years. Do you have odd flavors that end up actually being bestsellers? Yeah, I think for probably that one flavor that really caught and has a cult following our honey lavender ice cream. Like caught on, and now it's an all of our shops. We sell it. All up and down the West Coast and It's like one of those ones where people just cherish their flavor. Are there flavors savory flavors like the chicken liver? Something really odd ball that also has taken off. Oh absolutely well, and this is where it's fun for us. Because we change our menu every month and not month long menu is really just focused on like. What's the Zeitgeist of the moment so Thanksgiving is probably our biggest one Thanksgiving is where the flavors get a little bit more unique, and we have a ton of fun, so there is one that's actually made with Turkey skin, so we actually like rendered Turkey scan and cook it into a buttered Brittle, and we fold that into Turkey fat caramel ice cream. Only, you would think of rendering down Turkey skin and that into an ice cream. Now you're going to be dreaming about it, you're welcome. Probably there's something so freeing about ice cream in that like from a food perspective, it's the only food and the entire world where you can come in, and you can actually taste as many flavors as you want and still get you know Vanilla Chocolate Brownie. You know you can't do that at A. A restaurant you can't go in and say like I just want spoonful that bone marrow dish, and then I'm going to get the chicken. So what's coming up later this year? What are some flavors you've yet to produce? You're thinking about. Oh! We're having a ton of on flavors this year. In one of our story hunting sessions, we found this lady in. San Francisco this made making knocked oh? She's one of the only people outside of. Japan that's making NOCCO which is kind of like fermented soybean, and so we blend that with a little bit of bananas and kind of make like a not do banana, bread, and it with strawberry. Ice Cream. It's mind-blowing so cool. So you're, let's go back to the overall concept. You're you're using ice cream. A local ice cream store is a way of telling stories about the people in that community right? Yeah, I love that ice cream is just palette which you're working. Yeah, well, thank you. That's what we ever wanted I mean. To create this like focal point in a community where people can come in and kind of let the feud community be reflected back on them is. That.

Straw Kim Turkey Salton Tyler Japan West Coast Goodwin Bone San Francisco Marrow
"lidia" Discussed on Mała Wielka Firma

Mała Wielka Firma

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Mała Wielka Firma

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"lidia" Discussed on Storybound

Storybound

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Storybound

"Who could miss it? What Moron wouldn't notice? Not because they're doing anything think to us but because they're doing to near us the needle against the flash threatens us with its obscenity obscenity its mechanism of invading living skin. I carry my groceries back to my house. Clark my sweatpants sweatpants twin one across the street. Who lives with his mother and wears undersized rock concert t-shirts and the exact same baseball cap? Every day was life with a guy who inherited money from an accident on the job. The fact that now works him over into bitter Pale and beer-bellied and taught waves me from the other side of St then he crosses and stands on my lawn. Who Says No never change? It's like I always say. Say once a junkie always junkie. I feel anger willing up in my belly for an answer and I WANNA hurl. Roll my knowledge Adam Mike obscenities instead of saying shut. The hell up you ignorant asshole. I WANNA scream keats. Byron Shelley Vanguard Bacon Elliott Faulkner. For some reason. I feel a list of ams rise up in my throat Mozart smock Mark Miller Malcolm even I wanna move onto Germans Africans Latin Americans Americans Russians French Swiss periods genres. I WanNa say if we didn't have junkies we wouldn't have are you asshole but I don't I just stare earned him until he turns away and walks silently back to his yard his front door and gone anyway. It isn't true addiction doesn't make art does it. What the Hell am I worked up about is just Clark I turned back towards my own house and then it hits me? We are all alike in our silences inside. My husband is in his ad hoc studio painting just a half room. Our old falling apart house much like my writing room room carved out of the small space that would ordinarily be a kid's room. We don't make enough to rent him studio space so we do we all do we. We invent ways to live what we cannot have. I said the groceries down with relief. Not because I'm tired but because I know he is responsible for dinner because never again will I have to be responsible for dinner. This is part of my love for him. You'll never know the relief that a junkie or a woman. Can I feel when the pressure of the giant script of woman or wife begins.

Mark Miller Malcolm Clark Adam Mike obscenities Byron Shelley Vanguard baseball Elliott Faulkner
"lidia" Discussed on Storybound

Storybound

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Storybound

"Welcome to story about presented by lit- hub radio and the potty glamorous I'm your host chewed brewer. Coming up in one minute is a story told by Lydia Yukanovic with original composition by Wisden and wore Mak. Oh and make sure to stick around until after the credits to learn more behind the scenes. About how J wisden approached the score all right now. Let's I began growing up. I would always carry a book around my own private invisible world full of new discoveries these these days whether it's the weekend or my lunch break I'll stop by Powell's.

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And you actually end up not enjoying the chef after probably wants to come out and say I'll pay for it but heves absolutely so we're standing hostile. They go for the paper. The wine pairings hearings advice the tools of the summit. I've been to tastings in France where they have that Tastes exactly yes that silver shallow. Yeah that's from what I've seen. This not used as much when I go those types of restaurants. I don't go often to say that my experience and those higher little restaurants less but it was something that in the past was made to make sure that the wine was obviously an incorrect drinking condition. These days what you'll see somebody's do as smelling the cork above all because you're looking for cork taint so when you they make a big deal about that with the with the ritual of parking the wine. They'll smell the cork and sometimes they'll even before you get a chance to say it's no good. This is bad. What do you see in the cork? The Cork has has a company called. TCI which we don't need to get into technicalities but he basically gives the flavor of wet cardboard or mold and it ruins a wine and so if you open a bottle title and you smell the Cork and you smell those this those aromas then. Obviously you don't WanNa customer because it can be a very powerful smell that stays with you and so then the next bottle you up in which trump will be a clean line. You know that to be the first experience if you're opening a bottle cork breaks off. Is that an indication that you're lousy with the corkscrew or no. I know it is usually an indication that the cork is. It's an older bottle of wine. Yeah and then. They'll have a special corkscrew with that has a winged tip that I can slide it down. Oh yeah then then wiggle it out but apart from that I'll get out sooner or later but it doesn't mean the Weinstein bad or is no no no no no you're okay don't give exactly exactly can be just be a very old cork and even if you get a little pieces of cork in the white and it's still going to be. Okay why unless you want to filter those out. This is travel with Rick Steves. Were were becoming wine. Aficionados with Nigel Mir you're all Nigel's Californian friend of ours who now lives in Spain. Studying to be a wine educator so Nigel you've got that the ritual That's a big part of the presentation. I love beautifully presented meal. How does the ca add to the presentation with the corking? The presentation is that. What's the goal here? Well the definitely there's a formality to it in a ritual that brings along type of romance so really the service of this is to bring along this kind of this romance and this this tradition and this ritual and so they're they're obviously to serve the wind but at the same time they're there to explain the bottle to you explain the flavors to explain. Why wait a special the history behind it and I? I think it's part of the the the whole experience. It's nice to get that context right. The context between a piece of Music Symphony for sure. Enjoy it better eh. Companies that contradicts the art. Who paid for it and why you know what was going on when this cathedral built and has same thing with this work in bottle? I'm sorry I know it doesn't make taste any differently uh-huh but you appreciate it a lot more. That is of great value as far as I'm concerned now when we go to a fine restaurant. There's this decanting right inside Eh for some people that just seems pretentious. What's going on here? What you're doing is you're allowing the wind to come into contact with oxygen and that's interesting because a wine that is under court for a long time it has has to learn how to breathe again in a sentence vowing to come into oxygen? You are allowing the Roma's to open up to become more accessible to yourself as a consumer and it makes the wind really show its its full potential and so it. It's not pretentious at all. It's actually quite important in May will advise the diner the need to let this breathe right. And there's some winds that did More time to breathe some winds and ate less some wines that can simply open up and your glass little by little but some that benefit tremendously from being decanted for maybe a half hour or even longer. And how about when you have a glass. Listen you you swirl it is that you're celebrating exactly what you're doing a very good way to put it is you're kind of fast forwarding by pushing and it's not cheating it's okay no absolutely not in fact I like to smell it after I do notice that you notice that the aromas are actually stronger more volatile in the sense in cool thing about a wine glass you can swirl the heck out of it and never built. It's true. I love that now. Are you when you're trying to be a a wine expert or educator or even so may is there a natural talent that some people just stick that and go nice. Try but give it up. You're wasting your money and then I hear people say that when I give wine tastings of this I just. I'm no good at smelling. I would never do this and I think it just as a matter of practice. I think it's learning to access that Rolodex of memories that we have in our heads of smells and then putting met with theory and understanding where the smell come from and I think it's a matter of just commune yourself. So you know. I think the nose might be a little bit of neglected sense in a lot of ways because a lot of us never have an occasion to kind of go. What am I smelling right? What's the fine difference difference here and if you think about we walked down the street so overwhelmed by different smells that the noses reaction is to block out and then really continue to register? Newsman if you have a cold and you can't smell you don't taste as well. Absolutely this is travel with Rick Steves talking with Nigel mirrow. We're talking about appreciating wine and and what's behind this whole idea of a wine somme nights I've I've I've always thought that when you're traveling people are just there. They've got a budget and we want to have good wine but we don't want to waste money wind rent. What are your tips on? Just getting a good value for for my budget and my ability to appreciate it. That's a good question. I think we'll talk about Spain here. Which is where I live in one? And there's there's definitely a sweet spot. Obviously they're wonderful manage wines for less than ten years but really to get that extra special experience really. You're looking at a range that's anywhere from fifteen heroes up to maybe forty maximum years which is very high in Spain. Not Get me wrong but I keep talking to a twenty five thirty forty dollars exactly and so I think that's that's the real sweet spot. We can find some amazing wines. I was once at a at a wine shop in Greece. And I said I've got thirty dollars for a bottle of wine. What should I get and he said three bottles well? That's because apparently nobody was just saying. You're not going to get a lot more but I think in Spain. Yeah I would rather spend thirty dollars because it's a very good wine culture absolutely and you know I'm not going to appreciate necessarily hundred dollar bottle but They always say life's too short for mediocre. Wayne I don't WanNa go to dinner in San Sebastian and spend and ten dollars for a bottle of wine. I mean if I'm going to drink it for thirty dollars to me. I think one thing I'd add to that is it. Many people think by spending a lot more. They're gonNA get a better and better bottle of wine but there's definitely winds that are that expensive but they're made the drink many many years down the road and opening them early. We're actually not getting very much. That's part of the value is getting it at the peak right right and so some wines are made to drink within the first couple of years in also people aren't a sucker for the brand when you go to Tuscany. I want Brunello di Montalcino. You'RE GONNA pay double for Brunello di Montalcino something thing. That doesn't have the brand. That's just over the border and you could definitely. It takes a little bit more research. I think that by doing that. You'll find better value. It'd be nice to have absolutely absolutely i. I think there's kind of an image that red wine is better than white wine. Yeah I could see that goes through periods of time when you look back depending on what decade. You're in there as trends but it's true that red wine Over the last twenty years is kind of taken the forefront especially with the rise of Red Burgundy so. I can say that because I mean on the Rhine River. You're GONNA have white wine right absolutely in Burgundy and you're not gonNA wind depend. You might have a wonderful Chardonnay spends on what part of Burgundy wine. But it's red burgundy that's really at the fourth when I just feel L.. Like Oh man I just absolutely love this. It's a red wine. Spain France or Italy right right I love both. I think anything. That's well done should be appreciated. Yeah you're right. I like to spend extra on a white wine right when I'm in Vienna. I'll go for the most expensive gruner veld writer absolutely crooner outlander. Oh that's why noodle very white wine that's great. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're joined by wine expert. Nigel Mural and my job is a wine educator now I'm a little skeptical about Developing societies that. Say Oh this. Wine is the big new thing because they needed for their economy. But when you've got if you're going to Moldova uh-huh okay. I don't know what you're going to some some country that's not you know. Just emerging right and they're bragging about their wine right. What do you find? I mean it's Edmund in the rough at there's a there's a two pronged approach at one is local pride which is always a good thing right and they should be promoting their their domestic product. Another thing is mm-hmm perhaps you wonder have they done. Comparisons with other winds outside the richner outside the country. And when you're tasting this you can see potential Oregon see excellence. You can gain appreciative. I should've the of the heritage right many generations of wine culture and in Italy and France or Spain. You have that that nobility right in the wine right another. Another interesting thing is a society that decides we're going to pull back on the table wine and produce less in better which that's a trend across Europe. Yeah I've really noticed that because when I was younger traveler it was just great table. Wine Chianti right now. There's less of it but more than we ever younger. Absolutely people can some less these these days right and so the the trend is to make better wine and people are willing to pay a little bit more and but they're consuming less and that's actually a healthier trend as well. It's a fascinating evolution. It this it is and it's better for wine production because it focuses on quality wineries able to make a little bit more at the end of the day if they don't survive. We can't drink so as a wine expert. Nigel so I would imagine you're tuning into governmental policies and the wine industry in general regulations. And in some societies it's just a huge a few giant corporations reparations and they may put a little family name on it but it's really a big corporation and there's been invented brands. Yeah in other countries it is vibrant microbrews sort of equivalent got hired as little or none. Yeah how does that vary from country to country. United States France Italy Spain. I mean within mediterranean-europe. Obviously there's a long tradition of wine production and there many small families that still earn their living entirely from my production and United States. The United States is definitely find. There's a little bit more disposable income United States compared compared to Europe. And so you'll find in California where I grew up. Obviously people are willing to pay a little bit more but of course great prices are more expensive. Labor is more expensive and so some people complain so expensive expensive but you have to understand what the cost of production are as well and so. It's sure it's great and you find that really really good deal but then you also have to ask yourself. Is this a price that is really allowing the family to get by and so right you know. Sometimes the reality is you need the economy of scale right provide and in some cases like I believe in France the government recognizes is is the value of subsidizing the family farms. And you'll have more family wineries right. It's true and you so you have this family wineries in Italy Spain and France. But it's still very difficult business. I I don't want anybody just anybody can go in you make money. It's a struggle many countries. Let's get over there and helping absolutely all right Nigera. Thanks for helping US better understand why and appreciation as we travel. Thanks for having me travel. With Rick Steves is produced at Rick Steves Europe Edmonds Washington by Tim. Tatton is a Kaplan wallner and Caz Mahal. We get website side support from American Nicole. Our theme music is by Jerry. Frank wretched stroud read our listener travel. I cou special thanks to Larry Josephson and depth Stephanopoulos at the Radio Foundation in New York for their help this week. There's more and Rick Steves dot com slash radio each year. Rick Steves tour guides take thousands of free-spirited travelers travelers on the scooted tours through Europe. One small group to time next year you can choose from more than forty different vacations in Europe's best destinations from island degrees and practically everywhere between begin your next trip at Rick. STEVES DOT COM..

Rick Steves cork France Spain United States Europe Nigel Brunello di Montalcino Italy Nigel Mir TCI Rhine River Italy Spain Tuscany Nigel Mural France Italy Spain Weinstein Frank wretched stroud Spain France
"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:43 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"The is their food is good. mullets Eddie tell us about a tasty impression from your travels or maybe about your hometown in the form of an original Haiku. The radio section one of the Rick Steves Dot Com website has details for sending US yours. Here are some recent hometown Haiku. Our listeners have sent us amy. Shuman from Cleveland gets to hear travel travel with Rick Steves on Saturdays on W. C. P. N. and Sundays on. WKLS you. She sent us this Haiku about her city. Beautiful Awful City the US best. Kept secret. Cleveland Ohio Barber Martinez moved to Savannah from Chicago. And here's US on Georgia Georgia public broadcasting's WSB H. She sends us a Haiku about both of her cities city on the lake worldly artistic friendly sweet home Chicago and Nestle by the sea charming historical squares connect Savannah and Mike Mahalick from swim. Washington describes what it's like to bicycle on one of the islands near his home on the Olympic peninsula. San Juan bike touring spirit soars high and pulls me like a big blue sale. Tell us about your travels in an original Haiku poem. There's there's a link for sending them to us and the radio section of our website. At Rick Steves DOT com up next. Educator explains how to plan for sublime wine pairings and updates us on the wine industry trends in Europe cheers. It's travel with Rick. Steves with over. Ten thousand wine varietals wine wine-producing regions and more than seventy different countries. Sometimes choosing the right wine can give you a headache. The wrong flavor profiles could throw off and exquisite meal but the right wine can make it sing. Why an expert Nigel Mural grew up in California and now lives in Madrid or? He's a certified wine educator Nigel. Do you have to be a Somali gate to really understand wine. Pairings I mean what exactly is that Somebody is somebody that works at a fine. Dining establishment that is in charge of the wine list is in charge of buying winds for the restaurant in charge of training staff for appropriate. Obviously Service and obviously going over and helping customers decide on which one is appropriate appropriate to the manager of the wine. Dimension of the restaurant absolutely requires many different skill sets more than just coming to the table and say menu right. I think a lot of people forget about the background the goes up. So what does it take to become a whether different wine education programs rather world the two most common are the guild of somebody space here in the states and the what not program based in London. So the W. T. programs when I just finished when todd focuses more on the analytical approach to wine whereas the guilt some also focuses on services this is international. This is kind of an international standard. You can't say you're so mia and there's only so many of these organizations that can dane you as so many were you could call yourself that but it would actually be much better to have that background that education to complement work experience. So you're living and working in Spain right. Could somebody conceivably be a Spanish wine so may or you just wine. Some you know somebody could focus on a region or country and could really decide this really just focused on Spanish winds but typically and finding establishments they'll have international wines and so if you really WanNa work at that upper level you want to have an international range of knowledge and it seems to me there's different levels of the there's so many and then there's the super yeah I mean. What are the top race the documentary some which took place here in states? Several years ago really brought this profession into the limelight and the master or somebody is the highest rank. You can go within that program that there's only been like a couple of hundred right ever exactly hundred one good knows yeah. It's an incredible com is incredibly difficult. Now you know why enough to to know what that would take. How would you describe a master so may in a way that would just blow me away? How good are somebody that would be able to few we say breakdown of wine? It's components and locate the great variety the region the vintage obviously it's quality evaluation and its potential for aging just spy tasting the wine without any other information so blind taste black sister. I've been in vineyards in France where the Vitner will say here on this hill right. It's that and just here on the other side of the road. Absolutely it's that and it's radically exactly and so that level of education would be able to explain so the only as the master could could take a sip of that in the town nearby go. Oh that was from this side of the road. Possibly it's really a question of saying. Why does this wine taste? The way it does is it because of the climate the soil. Obviously there are multiple multiple factors and so maybe locating exact vineyard parcel becomes more difficult but they would definitely be able to tell you the climate that soil types obviously the great pride and they would know the the year by the character most of them are able to nail it down within a year or two. That's pretty incredible. That must be a fun. Challenge that but it's still you can you can do a blind tasting listing in right. I'm sure wow me now. This was originally. I guess it goes back to being the kings wine steward. What's interesting too so that leads me back to? There's the guilt Assam program here in the states and then there's the W.. Sat based in London and that was based in London because the British wine trade had educate. It's somebody isn't it's professionals. Being the major importers of the World Yup producing nation. And so that's the program that I did was the w ICT level four so the Council restaurant tours and how to make wine the top level of quality with their food. What what and also exactly JAS basically how trade works being such an important importer of understanding who the competitors are which wines are better business decision? So so it's an expertise in wine but assault expertise in the business. I didn't wind business so so me makes a lot of money. It's ultimately paid for by the diner. What's the practical value of Suomi or the practical value? Above all is having somebody come and explain to you why choosing wine a will not go with a plate BC. Andy because really. It's about avoiding unpleasant combinations. Now that is the magic bridge when you can pair the food with the wine and when we think about wine big stress point for a lot of travelers is oh. I'm having fish arm having red meat or or it's gotTa have the right connection right. Of course most people say there's no rules but there is a value of being mindful of what you're eating repairing it drink and what's actually there are rules. But you shouldn't let yourself be bullied by the rules. That's right and the rules would be avoiding dangerous ingredients like spice bitterness and sweetness old sweetness we think of course being just desserts but of course any salad dressing these days especially commercial sell dressing has some element of sweetness right all those elements that I just named are GonNa make wines taste thinner less fruity more civic more bitter and that of course it takes away from the pleasure of drinking wine so I'm having a nice bit of Kia Nina beef in Tuscany. Beautiful steak okay. Red Meat More to have well the nice thing is. That's that's a fairly safe dish and this. Is there any sauce on that. No okay so it's probably just a little bit of salt on tides it. That's fantastic because salt is our best friend. When it comes to wine zolt will make any wine taste less tannock less bitter furrier good to know or in body absolutely salt and then the other good friend is acidity so for example? If you have a lemon sauce of some kind of sitra sauce with with fish it's gonNa make a wine. Taste less acidic and fruity or in that sense. I can understand the nice pairing of good full bodied red wine of so the Nice red steak right. Especially because those fuller-bodied red wines usually have higher levels of Tannin's what you make your mouth feel kind of dry like somebody's taking the little cotton ball and draw your saliva. And so that can be displeasing for some and people and that steak with assault is actually modify that and smoothen that effect a wine expert. Nigel mural is the founder of Madrid walking tours food tours and wine tastings. He's with us. UNTRAVELLED Rick Steves to teach us how to choose wine like an expert. We have a link to his website from our radio. Page at Rick Steve Dot com slash radio. So what is it about fish in white wine right well. Fish is a delicate meal usually. It's not as full flavored for example. The state you just as mentioned in white wines have more delicate flavors there obviously are very good examples very full-bodied powerful white wines. But in general we're looking for that elegance that will accompany the fish rush and the acidity in wine which is higher than red wines is GonNa make us salivate more and cleanse our mouth expert without interfering with the flavors of the fish. You're getting a clean pal afterwards. And you're able to appreciate the more delicate flavors of fish but at the same time those flavors of the fish they with you it's a wonderful parent. In that sense. I bet saw only as a very good friend of the chef because the Soviet can make the shift sparkle absolutely and they work in tandem to make sure that the white menus with those high in restaurants where they have different plates go oh hand-in-hand and provide the greatest overall experience I was just at a Michelin starred restaurant in Iceland. Okay and I can spend one hundred and forty dollars for the ten ten courses or it could spend one hundred has been two hundred dollars for that with wine right if you're really into wine. There's some thought that goes into that and the the saddest thing is people say well. I don't WanNa taste other winds winds. I'm just GONNA stick with this one. I know in like right but then when you think about all those dishes handicapping yourself. Yeah absolutely.

Rick Steves US London Savannah Chicago assault Cleveland Madrid WSB Europe Rick Nestle Georgia Shuman Ohio Nigel Mural Spain Rick Steve Dot Michelin Mike Mahalick
"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"You can listen to our interview on that topic in the travel. With Rick Steves archives at Rick Steves DOT com slash slash. Radio Look for program number five forty six from December twenty eighteen lydia when we think about Italian food. I think it's the case. In a lot of cultures in America we learn about the cuisine of land by the people who bring it to us and the people who come into our country are oftentimes the poor and the the desperate corners of those countries. Consequently they'll bring a lot of the cuisine from the poor class or from the poor regions in America. Would you say that fair. That people came from the poor parts of Italy and we eat a lot of recipes. That would be For the lower classes absolutely correct you know and that's how the Italian American cuisine was porn. It's which is quite different than the regional Italian cuisine when you go to legally and eat and that is precisely that at the end. How still exactly talk just specifics? Because I get sense that Americans think this is Italian but no it's it's actually Calabria nor or wherever these people came from. Well some of the first the first the influx of Italian immigrants at the end of the eighteen hundreds came. I'm from basically three regions. which is Sicily Calabria income pioneer? where Naples's those three regions were the first immigrants as those were the poorest region and they came on their boats not bringing anything much of anything and they came to a new country? They bought the memories of what they cooked but they had. None of the ingredients in the cuisine is very difficult to transport. If you don't have the right ingredients. So they adopted the ingredients that they found in America and with the memories of how to cook them and this new cuisine. The Talian American cuisine was porn as I'd like Spaghetti with meatballs meatballs because I don't think of that as Talion as much as American. It's not it's very much American so the Spaghetti of course yes. The sauce absolutely in Italy do but when they came to America this immigrants what was abundant in America was meat and meat signified for this. This this people celebration abrasion you know. And so when they made their Sunday sauce instead of making making it a mere Marinara tomato sauce with a little bit of pork. They put a lot of meat in it because that signified that they came they lived well now so when an Italian makes his source of meatballs go in there. Sausages go in there now the italian-american and Spaghetti and meatballs spaghetti with some sauce. Were not enough. The meat polls were added just to show. Now we live well. So that's said Declaration of success we are immigrants and now we've got lots of meat. And when you have your tally in past it's GonNa come with more meat than any Italian ever saw back in the old country exactly and so the evolution of the Daniel American cuisine weigh-in until the ingredients did start to come in and the titans began to grow their own products addicts. You know. California now produces so many of the Talian Vegetables Broccoli apology choke scarlet. All of that is necessary for the Italian cuisine. I love this idea. Yeah that a Lotta Times. This is my own personal theory. That immigrants keep alive some of the most sort of humble in in hardscrabble dimensions of the Kazan just to remind their grandchildren learn how tough it was back home in Norway. We have a few in Norwegian culture. We have a few dishes. That are dislike reminding us of the hardship of our of our forebears There's a lot of food in Italy REBA. Lead to for example is just a celebration of of using yesterday's bread creatively today. Isn't it absolutely and now actually. It's almost chic to return to those values and as a chef. You see a lot of the chefs really kind of Sprucing up a few will all those poor dishes and they have a message that comes along with it and you're right you know through generations. Actually it is very important to share the culinary heritage within each family within each. Because it gives you strength it gives you identity to who who you are you know we are yes I we we talked we are all this is America but all of us are from an immigrant source chef Lidia Bastianich sharing during her favorite regional comfort foods of Italy right now on travel with Rick Steves. Her website is Lydia's Italy dot com. Let's go a little wider on this lady. This it's such a beautiful thought to to wrap up our conversation with when we think I've been talking about my Norwegian heritage. I've got friends who are Filipino. Ethiopian Mexican can I wish they all have this deep seated need and joy of of remembering their heritage through the food that they eat. Tell tell me how you as a as a person without with a wonderful family that came to the United States and it's the beautiful immigrant story. What is food mean to you you? As a way to remember your roots food is my way of sort of honoring remembering and transporting my my roots through my future. Generations might children my grandchildren for me. It's very important that they understand. You know what my Okay Grandma Cook. With my mother cooks the flavours these are the flavors of their roots. Are there autism. What it does it gives them strint to relate to food at the table when the holidays come and you have the cookie? That's been on the table for five generations. It there's a common common bond that happens. You feel like you belong. Your this is your clan in a way and everybody loves to belong and food desktop food transcended language. You lose you lose within first second generation unless you make an effort but food and flavors transcends three or four generations and more. When I was a child I remember? My Grandmother. gave me this chrome cock iron where you'd make the famous Norwegian cookies and I didn't realize it then but it was a ritual for her. She wanted me to have have that iron so I could remember my heritage and I was recently in Verona in Italy and I stumbled onto a festival and asked the people what's going on and they say every the summer on this day we gather and the older kids teach the younger kids how to make a good Ravioli and I just thought this is worked into that society. They WanNa keep those traditions alive so they can remember from where they came. And that's exactly what you're celebrating in your work. I think yes I am and I sense you know even the the people that that come to that have that are three or four generations Italian when they watch me this all this. My grandmother used to make it. You never give me the recipe. I'll thank you. They re live through my recipes. Whatever their Rome life their own heritage Lydia Bus Janet? What did the late to talk with you and to celebrate this culture? Sure to celebrate your work Best wishes with Lydia's Italy. And congratulations on your new book. Your autobiography my American dream. Get Rick Tauber Bona votto so as we say at our house changing and do the job.

Italy America Lydia Bus Janet Rick Steves Rick Tauber Bona votto titans Sicily Calabria Calabria California Naples Talion United States Lidia Bastianich Grandma Cook Norway Verona Kazan
"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Shep Lydia. Backyard shares her favourite hometown tastes of Italy next on travel with Rick Steves. I've long founded lead to have some of the tastiest food. You'll find anywhere the amazing bratty of simple fresh ingredients and traditional recipes. Appease will vary from region to region. Thanks in part to its long coastlines and Italy's proximity to neighboring Mediterranean Slavic and Germanic cultures. Let's explore some of the comfort foods of Italy right now with talent. Food expert and Chef Lidia Bust yardage Lydia has made a career out of being chef television host author. End Restaurant tour. She was born in what used to be an Italian enclave on the Istrian Peninsula. Her family escaped. Tito's communist regime during the ISTRIAN EXODUS and eventually settled in New York. City City Linear writes about her family story and the recipes of her childhood in her book. My American dream a life of love family and Food Lydia. Thanks for being here. Oh my pleasure rick. So how long have you been doing your Lydia's Italy's show now in public television. This show is on twenty years now. So it's been awhile well before that you were I understand. You were a master chef guest on Julia Child. Well how it all happened was when I opened in nineteen eighty one. I became the chef there. We had restaurants before but I wasn't the full blown chef but when we open for the I decided that You know you. Tagging American cuisine was the cuisine. Then Sil is now in its delicious but I was going to regional Italian cuisine. Italy has twenty regions. And you you know. Italy is smaller than California and yet it is so diverse You know in its topography and geography and dialects in songs but most of all in its food food and it's just so much to tell about Italian food and that's what I started doing it for the DEA. Let's let's talk about that just for a minute because this is a travel show and we're all dreaming of going to Italy and of course we know what art to see and we know what museums in know what hikes to take. What about Sort of a food agenda if you were planning manning. Somebody's trip to Italy and they were going to many regions talk about some of the most distinctive regions. And what we'd want to be sure to enjoy while there to eat that beautiful slice of Italian cuisine and enjoy it fully. Well you know. The Italian cuisine is straightforward simple. But it is very seasonal so I would travel seasonally through wittily and certainly You know fall. You got to starting P. amount that you have the truffles you have the cheese you have the good barrel of wine and that will keep you going your your census going but you know if you go in June July you go down to Laguardia a lot of fresh Basil Vegetables Vegetables Green. You can imagine good as Green Pesto and that's why a lot of blue fish sardine stuff's design of that and just down. No Oh lady here. Piedmont is up in the north. Right Piedmont right around big cities. Piecemeal Piedmont is north west of Milano. It's right underneath the French. Okay and you just go down from there. It's if you will in the left armpit armpit. That would be gentler. Exactly that's Laguardia the region offense general and the Chink era. I remember in the ching-kuo tear. They're so proud of their pesto. I guess the Liguria Guess Doe came from absolutely absolutely all kinds of herbs Greens and a lot of of the Bluefish Dean and all of them in Tuscany rusted cuisine. You know beans. Big Pieces of me to Bread do you know chunky bread. So if you're in a mood for a good wine beautiful scenery and the wholesome food you know delicate food but it's really kind of already food. Yeah Hardy Tuscany around Florence for people around Florence and the hills folks but then. If it's nice summer July I would go to Sicily. Sicily you know has the island of Sicily eggplants tomatoes all the the swordfish. It's beautiful the summer really Sicily explodes with flavor. There's an intensity in the products in Sicily that you find nowhere our else and at the same time by the way Sicily here before we leave that beautiful. That's the football at the end of the boot of Italy. Right and exact and Sicily is different than a lot of Italy because it has this layer cake of civilization so many conquering civilizations coming through and many of them left a little bit of their food heritage. Didn't they and we enjoy that today. They when we eat in Sicily. Absolutely if you're talking about you know rice Raisins peanuts oranges dates. They all came from from the Middle East through Sicily into Italy. So Italy was under the Spanish rules so it has a lot of that kind of Mediterranean ringing lower Mediterranean in Spanish flavor. And then you just cross over this threat to Di Messina which is that little piece of water and you're into Calabria in in Columbia is wonderful. It's wonderful in the summer and into the fall it has this explosive use of pepperoni Chino. It has wonderful pepper and Chino. Wonderful Licorice liquid. What is Chino pepper is pepper? It's you know it's like the Italian version of Tabasco few will You know it's like an unduly Andrea's in style now is that kind of red paste that you spread or that's Calabria. Wonderful Woods cheeses uses. Collaboration has a lot of the Greeks. You know the Odyssey's and all of that story. That's the travels to Colombia and so it has a lot of the Greek influence Linson. It's cooking and you move over to the heel of Italy which is pull ya also a lot of Greek. Because it's right over you know. When the wars in Greece The Trojan wars escaped into into what is now polio vividly. There what they have wonderful fish of course because it's the little he'll hasn't awesome water all around but it's all about lagoons Checchi beans lentils about Chicory. You know those those Boom thyroid is if you will chicory salads a lot of a lot of tourists. They think they're getting a plate of spinach. But it's it's chicory actually isn't it. It's it's the healthiest green for you. And of course the Barato now everybody knows them. That's where it has its origin and then you know if you go all the way up to where I come from. I'm from Really is is a combination as it has in. Its cuisine the Austrian Hungarian and of course the Slavic Polenta. It's right on the hills of the outsold lot of great cheese north east of Italy and and that was near where you grew up. And let's make it very clear if you had these the giant cultural tectonic plates coming together. You've got three of them. We've got the GERMANIC world. You've got the Italian romantic world and you've got the Slavic and what's an example of Germanic Slavic and Italian Heritage that mix together in that northeastern corner of Italy. If you have the the the Germanic you have the petals and the pack. which is the smoke bursch? Delimited up in the Dolomite Mountains. Elton yes yeah exactly The the Slavic is they they make up a rather there which is a pickled turnips and then they shredded and it's like Sauerkraut and they used this pickled turnips as a vegetables in soups. It's bother with Mussa. Thumb was Saito. Is this delicious sausage. That in Emilia Romagna they call it the KENO. That's very very kind of a lot of those cured meats so the German Slavic and then of course the desserts that are kind of again a mixture of the Austrian. We make their an Anouk called susie know which is a potato Yorkie but instead of the loan your kisses a big not. We put a plums. When they're ripe or plum gem I I love it? I want to go there and we cook it. And then we roll it in cinnamon and breadcrumbs and it's so delicious and I have people that are Austria even even as forest forest. Check out our assistant. You know my mother used to make that I said well we make it up in a tip Julia and you know right now when I go home we have our home near Chevy. We dollars in free only the Medieval town of Tree Dolly the freely which is beautiful so I get involved in the in the regional cuisine. We have a a little Winery there and we also have a little. BNB called Sony. There are guest right now on travel. With Rick Steves is celebrity chef. F- In Food Entrepreneur. Lydia damage you've seen the host of Lydia's Italy on public. TV Lydia's also written fifteen cookbooks including her latest. I with recipes from her flagship restaurant fee. Lydia in New York City Lydia also tells the dramatic stories of her close knit family and how they eventually settled in the United States. I called my American dream. A Life of love family and food..

Italy Sicily Shep Lydia Rick Steves Food Lydia Julia Child Laguardia New York Istrian Peninsula Calabria Piedmont Tito Mediterranean Lidia Bust Wonderful Woods City City Linear Sil
"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"But I'd like to make a case for the town of Gertie. I grew up in wetland a much bigger town of thirty five hundred people about a half our way. We were fortunate enough. Is School kids to take field. Trips to the Oregon trail ruts and register cliff both of them landmarks. Not far from our town. The pressure from so many wagon wheels actually left grooves in solid stone. Another thirty minutes away. We'll take it to Fort Laramie national historic site whole cast of actors. Helps this world come alive. During summer I still have vivid memories of eating hard tack and of hearing that Working Howitzer even for those who aren't history buffs being in small town Wyoming and surrounded by rugged sagebrush country makes one appreciate all the hardships. Those early Americans faced when they headed west. Thanks page for the report. On what sounds like a beautiful corner of Wyoming Craig's calling in from Chicago Craig. Thanks for your call Rick. It's great to talk to you. Yeah you too. What do you have in mind? Well I live in Chicago. And when a lot of people come here they go to certain popular spots such as Wrigley Field the Sears Tower Navy pier. Those are Nice but there are a couple of things that people miss one of my favorites to recommend the Garfield Park Conservatory. It's the world's largest under glass. Conservatory was built in nineteen eighteen eight. The landscaping was designed by Johnson. The famous landscape architect your typical under glass conservatory. You could walk in the circle and it's like ten to fifteen minutes the Garfield Park Conservatory is so large. It takes an hour. And that's just walking and without stopping so trig Bay Conservatory. Is that like a greenhouse. Fill like a a park underclass at five acres under glass. Whoa oh and is it different little environments? Would there be the arid area and the temporary in the rainforest or is it just lush garden. They have plants from every every part of the world from Africa from Asia from Europe from Australia in some of the plants that were planted in nineteen. We know we are still growing. That sounds like a great thing to put on your list Garfield Park Conservatory. And how far how did they get there from downtown Chicago. Chicago has the elevated train system or eight lines. The Green Line runs near there. In fact there's it's called the conservatory. Stop Stop and it stops right there. You go down and the entrance is practically stern you in the face. So that's over one hundred years old. What else is from that? Around the turn of the twentieth century that would be sort of a a little look at the elegant life of Chicago and nineteen early nineteen hundreds or late eighteen hundreds another another one I'd recommend is the misnamed auditorium theatre when you hear the word auditorium and think of something from you know school days as you go to the school auditorium. This was designed by Louis Sullivan was opened in eighteen eighty nine. It's stunningly beautiful. Has Your proscenium arches and would you go to a concert. There were Do they have a certain kinds of performances as it turned into a popular venue anew. Or what kind of art would you hear there. They specialize in dance performance. The joffrey ballet is that's home. They have the joffrey offering. has its own building but they always perform at the auditorium theatre interesting history. To the first time a sitting American president president came to Chicago was when was to open the auditorium. Theatre was William McKinley doctorate at the theatre in eighteen eighty nine and it's going strong one hundred and forty years later. That's a long time later. Craig thanks for your tips to talk to you. Thanks a lot take care. Thank you. Cheers collect tears..

Garfield Park Conservatory Chicago auditorium theatre trig Bay Conservatory Wyoming Oregon Gertie Craig Fort Laramie Louis Sullivan Wrigley Field Rick Sears Tower Navy pier Johnson Australia Africa Europe Asia
"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"lidia" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Know my favorite country exploring Europe is Italy. Think one reason is because each region of Italy has its own character even its own foods. What's on your plate can even tell you about the town's history since they specialize in what's fresh and in season local chef Lidia bus shares? Some of her favorite comfort foods from the regions of literally and justify bid on today's travel. With Rick Steves and later in the hour wine expert helps us know what to look for and making great pairing with. What's on the menu for tonight? I first let's get excited about a few places that are closer to home in fact what is it about where you live. That makes it feel special. What would you recommend a visitor due to feel like part of Vr community? What are some of the lesser known gems? That people might overlook about your city. Our phone number is eight. Seven seven three three three seven four to five. And you can seamless at radio at Rick. STEVES DOT COM sanders calling in from Toronto. Sandra thanks for your call from Ontario. Yes Hi how are you. I'm doing great. Thanks for calling great. It's fun to do. I was just in your beautiful city a little while ago. I give it away and it was wonderful. I have your book and I knew you were in town that day but I couldn't make it. I'm so sad I must this so it's nice to have you calling in. And what do you want us to know about beautiful Toronto trying to the the big city. So there's lots of doing a big city but it's the lesser known things that I think people might WanNa know about such as for places to stay stay. You know you can get the large hotels and it's going to be very expensive because Toronto's very expensive city but there is a great place called the Rex Hotel which I think people it's affordable. It's simple but the great thing about it is. It has a jazz bar at the bottom of the hotel Jasbir anybody would be comfortable dropping in there then Oh anyone can go to the to see the giants but if you WANNA centrally located place. That's probably affordable and a fun a place to stay. Well what's so good about being centrally located something that's more it's better known but you can take a small walk around the corner and you'll be up through Chinatown and from there. You can go due to the art gallery of Ontario which is a really world. Class Art Gallery has during exhibits and lots of Canadian art. If somebody from the United States wants to go up there and just feel like they're connecting with quote the locals. What do you do to connect with friends and people? Well Toronto's really great for being multicultural though there's lots of great places to eat. You could go along with that hotels located it's Queen Street. You can look up some of the women streets and you'll find restaurants Dr Cafes and bars and you will find a lot of the locals in those places and what else is something that you'd want to have on your eating list when you come to Ontario to be sure you in the local cuisine I think most people might snow. The Canadian foods like Putin or anything that has maple syrup flavored but We have so many people from different parts of the world that you can try food from all over and it can actually be a nice blend of two cultures too. So you'll see like you know maybe something. That's Middle East but mixed with Canadian because if you want cosmopolitan you probably don't go to Saskatoon. Well we advise people all over the country but Toronto I think is a place where people from all over come when you come here you will see people from all over. That's it's amazing. All Right Sandra thanks for your call and from the same city we have Adrian colleague from Toronto Ontario Adrian. Thanks for your call. How are you? I'm good how are you doing. Great thank you. Were you listening. When Sandra was talking it was great to hear someone else from Toronto? So she talked about it The the wreck so tell and wondering around staying right downtown. What is your TIPS FOR ENJOYING TORONTO. Well my favorite thing to do in the city would probably be going to the Evergreen brickworks so it was an old wreck factory. It was kind of deserted for a while but they really read done it recently. So there is Farmers markets there. There's art galleries. There's restaurants and there's really amazing trail which I love to do on the weekend. I have a hard time envisioning this. It's an old brick factory and now it's still not tails and art exhibits it's Kind of in a bit remote from downtown. Maybe like a ten minute drive but definitely doable is kind of a derelict. Old factory that all sorts of creative people moved into absolutely. That's exactly what it's like. I love that stuff so you would go there and it's like a park and it's UC. You see crafts. I would imagine. There's a like a weekend farmer's market or something. Yeah Yeah there is. There's a bunch of trails while there's even ones where you can go up kind. It's like the top of the cliff and you have really great. Use All of downtown Toronto based for kids to stack bricks. No I don't know about that Do you have a lot of activities. The family as well. It's a really big God. I mean there must be some family activities. What would you do with kids? Yeah I know they have some community gardens and things like that that was really great place to spend some time. Okay okay so the Evergreen brickworks that's sort of a surprising angle of Toronto. It seems like yeah. Yeah it's pretty different from any other spot in the city and then if you were going take me out to dinner. I guess we wouldn't necessarily go to Canadian food. I mean wouldn't have Pancake Syrup Building on what would we do. Well so multi cultural. It's hard to pick one place. I think one place that I just went actually last weekend. I'm pretty popular. It's called by reveal It's Spanish toughest food and and it's so busy it's such a hot spot for Torontonians that you can't even get a seat. You're honestly just standing in the bar. kind of maybe like you would do in Spain And the food is just amazing thing and is there one area after dinner that you would just want to walk around which you just see all sorts of exit and liveliness both on the streets in in the bars. Yeah I'd say Kensington. Market market is probably the best place to to walk around and spend some time is just such a hub for all these different cultures that you can just go. You know. There's a restaurant from an Asian restaurants and then you go somewhere else and there's Mexican food so it's just such a mix of culture there and it's really creative space as well so it seems like Toronto is the dominant city and candidate in so many any ways but if you were going to go somewhere outside of trump I think is really happening and exciting. What's most impressive? These days. What was actually lived in Halifax thanks for six years? That's on the east coast of Canada. I'm it's really charming city Lots of good seafood and it was on ocean. It's really beautiful so I definitely commend that but a two and a half hour flight from Toronto and I've always wanted to ask a Canadian. This but why would anybody live in Edmonton what I've never been to Edmonton and I don't really have a desire to go. So it's like you know take. Minneapolis is cold in the winter. And that's like the tropics compared to Edmonton then. Yeah I I don't know people you know. Want Nice people. They're my grandparents homesteaded. There hundred years ago. Cool but I just WANNA know of all places why would you put your tent stakes down in Edmonton. I'm not sure I've heard there's a really big mall. I've heard that's a small well. There's a big. There's a big mall in in Minneapolis. Also so that's maybe what you wouldn't it's just godforsaken outside critic huge mall all right well. TORONTO JOE is the Canadian. Great City. Your Okay Adrian. Thanks for your call. All right. Take care we're finding out. What makes the town where you live? Feel special enough for the rest of us to visit right now on travel with Rick Steves where at eight seven seven three three and by email radio at Rick Steves EAVES DOT COM page in Buffalo Wyoming emails. US This pitch for where she lives. She writes Wyoming usually isn't on anybody's top ten list list excluding our beloved Yellowstone National Park..

Toronto Rick Steves Sandra Ontario Great City Minneapolis Italy Europe Lidia bus Middle East Edmonton giants Rex Hotel United States Wyoming Dr Cafes Class Art Gallery Jasbir Chinatown Putin
"lidia" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:44 min | 3 years ago

"lidia" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for fresh air and the following message come from the Showtime original series. I'm dying up here, a drama starring Oscar winner. Melissa Leo and following a group of up and coming comedians. Trying to make it big new season Sundays at ten, nine central beginning may sixth only on Showtime. From WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross with fresh air weekend today singer and songwriter Tracey thorn dome with me dome babies. We'll talk about motherhood feminism in music thorn was half the duo everything, but the girl with her now husband Ben watt. They stopped touring soon after their twin daughters were born twenty years ago. She has a new solo album. Also, chef Lidia busty on it is known for her restaurants, cookbooks, and PBS shows in her new memoir. She writes about how her family became refugees after World War Two, when their region of Italy became part of communist Yugoslavia. She escaped with her mother and brother followed by their father. My father escaped the border, walk in about fifty kilometers crossing the barbed wire fence. They were shooting at him, but he made it and marine cardigan reviews. Zora Neale hurston book published for the first time. Support for this podcast. And the following message come from goose online test prep for the ACT and SAT Magoo help students improve their scores with a platform designed to be effective and enjoyable. Perhaps smart, go far and enjoy the ride at Magoo dot com. My guest Tracey thorn is a singer and songwriter who says that she's always written songs which chronicle the milestones of a woman's life, different ages and stages. Different realities not often discussed in poplar IX. She records solo albums now, but from nineteen eighty two to two thousand. She was half of everything, but the girl with her boyfriend been what who became her husband. They have three children. She left performing to raise them. She writes, I've been in the charts out of them. Then back in again, been signed, dropped re-signed, mixed and remixed. I've seen myself described as an indie darling, a middle of the road, nobody and a disco diva are rock critic. Ken Tucker described her voice as a deep throaty sound that is at once a comfort and Adair a challenge to the listener to be as honest as the singer. Thorn also writes a column for the British publication new statesman and is the author of the memoir bet, sit. SCO, Queen and a book about singing called naked at the Albert Hall. Her new album is called record. Let's start with her track sister. Dome with me. My baby's comfy. You can choose. You. But I'm not sure. It gets a skid. That sister from Tracey Thorn's new album record. Tracey thorn welcome to fresh air. It's really a pleasure to have you on the show. So thank you. What's the story behind the song? We just heard. Well, I wrote sit ofter. I went on the women's March in London, lust, January, you know the same day that those much is happening around the world. And the one in London was huge and I went so fat day. You know, like a lot of people feeling a mixture of frustration, desperation thinking, you know why we still have to protest the same stuff, but I found that day it self Brady inspiring. And you know, it made me feel very positive, seeing that number of people out on the streets protesting and clearly angry about the same stuff. So you know, when I came home, I wanted to write something that catch it something if that spirit. And I saw a couple of people carrying a banner with the slogan fight like a gun on and I thought, well, you know, that's that's a good lyric right there. That's my starting point. And what is the line? I am my mother now mean to you. I think it's to do with that feeling of, you know that that bombed that sisterhood between women you're literally related to and other women who you just feel that sort of radical sisterhood with. I think as I get older, I feel more more that sense of turn into my mother absorbing some of her spirit. She's gone now. So it's partly me countering up her memory, I suppose, and fading myself becoming ever closer to. And you've, you've become the mother. I mean, your children

Tracey thorn Melissa Leo Zora Neale hurston Terry gross WHYY Oscar Ben watt Albert Hall Ken Tucker Lidia Philadelphia London Italy Yugoslavia Adair fifty kilometers twenty years
"lidia" Discussed on See You Next Wednesday

See You Next Wednesday

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"lidia" Discussed on See You Next Wednesday

"No the projector seen yeah oh boy that was scary that i really thought sillage junk about that scene of the jury lidia i didn't like that driller it looks so fucking cellular a mommy is a scary clown but benefits from the caught the tone of the rest of the movie yeah absolutely richer and and then there's just some thursday just the right amount of silliness that's where i fell off on the movie a little bit villainous was that i felt like the performance in pennywise and the execution of pennywise nephew scenes just did in rubbed me the right way wang when he when they are doing that when we near the end of the movie when he's doing that like the go on the stage and there's that kinda like weird like rotating camera cgi views like zoom in i was just like this is fucking terrible but he's put any white into dancing clown highnose to but it looks dumb he's supposed to be less to point of like yeah but it the but it was never ridiculous those moments for me were never ridiculous to the point of lego it was ridiculous to like come on noticed dumb but it was only in moments and there was only like a few times are crossed satellite i felt like it when dome on purpose and and and i was in the air i felt like i was like i see why were the um.

wang lidia