35 Burst results for "Libya"

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:35 min | 2 d ago

Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan

"At a rally yesterday the prime minister of armenia nicole passion. Yon warned of an attempted military coup. He told crowds. It was the army's job to defend the country. It was up to the people to decide whether or not he should step down. Y'all guy even hats manhattan borough. She mr young has faced protests since a peace deal struck in november. In which is our by. John gained territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave. Mr john has protests since a peace deal was struck in november in which is by john games territory in nagorno-karabakh a largely ethnic armenian enclave clashes over the region had erupted repeatedly since nineteen ninety-four drawing in russia which stood behind armenia and turkey which back oscar by john but in the end it was russian president vladimir putin and his turkish counterpart rany tight air to one who put it all to rest. Brokering a peace deal. That's just one sign of remarkable political alliance. It's picking away at the post cold war geopolitical order so i think it helps to go back to the really low point of relationship which was in two thousand fifteen. Daniel franklin is our diplomatic editor. Turkey shot down a russian warplane which had been flying over syria. Entered it's ass base and this happened. After repeated warnings to the russian pilot in the warnings became increasing urgent they were ignored and turkish f sixteen fighters that were patrolling shot. The plane down remember turkey is a nato member and had engaged with russia militarily. That's not something that happens. Often and russia responded quite vigorously by imposing sanctions on turkish products and a bombed ethnic tuchman fighters in northern syria that allies of the turks so that was Towards the end of two thousand fifteen and into the beginning of two thousand sixteen but it was a dramatic shift. If you remember in the summer of two thousand sixteen there was an attempted coup jet sopa head. The world watched in shock as a military coup and in turkey eight. Us ally a major strategic partner in the fight against isis putin was quick to call president of and commiserate show solidarity is some suspicion in turkey. Anyway that gave some advance warning to add one that his life was in danger helped move him out of the area where he might have been bombed and from that point onwards things have changed dramatically in the two men developed this kind of own tone this brotherhood of hard power. And what is it. That had changed between the downing of the bomber and this evan beginning of a friendship they first of all recognize in one another leaders who know how to use power in a full full way but there are other similarities between them in terms of that authoritarian style of leadership at home. And there's a common set of grievances against the west in turkey's case decades of not being properly accepted wanting at one stage to join the european union but being put on hold. And i think one of the reasons why the attempted coup was such a turning point for adwan is that he came under attack from his own planes and he felt that nato had improperly come to support nato countries were slow to express solidarity so he started to think that maybe putin was someone could depend upon for his own survival where he couldn't necessarily depend on nato partners and how the relationship between these two men evolved since then it's developed in some very concrete ways add one has bought from russia s four hundred air defense system. So it's a nato country. Remember that is buying russian. Ed defense system that does not delighted his nato partners. It's meant that it's been kicked out of the f thirty five fighter jet program that Nato has its face sanctions from america and despite all that it's gone ahead and on the ground in particularly serious led to kind of accommodation even though they're on opposite sides they've managed to accommodate each other's objectives in particular turkey vis-a-vis the kurds and most recently they've accommodate each other in the south caucasus. Where again they support opposite sides. The russia has played its role as a mediator. Turkey supported azerbaijan. And they've managed to end up with a result that suits them both well. Russia has peacekeeping troops on the ground. Turkey has an economic opportunity and the air that causes missed out has got nothing out of this is the west. You mentioned the word accommodating in the sense that that perhaps they're just essentially keeping out from under each other's feet or is there more to it than that. There is more to it than that because a particularly developed closer ties economically. The two economies have been struggling so they can do all the support they can get and although russia has a big surplus with turkey. Turkish contractors get a lot of business from russia. So there's the economic aspects of the relationship is particularly important and putin to have turkey as awkward member of nato driving a wedge within nato. That's a huge attraction for him and for to and sometimes to be able to play off the west and russia that's also helpful so that they play the power game very effectively by using each other and given all of that. Would you call this alliance proper and if so what should the west make of it well. It's a remarkable development given the long history between the two countries going back centuries. It's remarkable when you think of the more recent history of of the to literally coming to blows as recently as two thousand fifteen but it's far from being an alliance turkey is still a nato member that's valuable to it and it's also bristled it's fragile. Remember they are on opposite sides even where they're accommodating each other in places like syria in libya they have differences over ukraine over georgia as well so there are many places where this could deteriorate rapidly. It's rather brittle its recent depends too much on personalities with big egos so does mean that. There's absolutely no guarantee that this is going to last or even develop further so in that sense. You think the west doesn't need to worry because the alliance will eventually fall apart from. It's the concern for the west. It's certainly a challenge. One of the things that will be on the radar screen of the biden administration. It's a worry that there is this increasingly close relationship between her big important nato member and russia and although it's bristol although it could blow up in various ways it's a serious concern and worry that a nato member like turkey could drift further away from its moorings

Turkey Nagorno Nato Russia Karabakh Nicole Passion Manhattan Borough Mr John Armenia Daniel Franklin Syria Isis Putin Mr Young Adwan YON Tuchman Vladimir Putin John Putin Oscar
UN says 41 Europe-bound migrants drown in Mediterranean

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

UN says 41 Europe-bound migrants drown in Mediterranean

"The forty dead after setting off an attorney for the paper instead they found themselves drowning in the Mediterranean Sea on the quest for a better life in Europe according to the U. when the dead were among at least a hundred and twenty migrants that left Libya and the small boats and worship practice days later a commercial vessel rescued the survivors and took them to the Sicilian port town of Porto and productively initially only one body was recovered and the missing included three children and four women one of him left behind a newborn baby currently in Lampedusa the shipwreck was the latest along the central Mediterranean migration rate we're about a hundred and sixty Europe bound migrants have died since the beginning of twenty twenty one I'm Karen Thomas

Mediterranean Sea U. Libya Europe Lampedusa Porto Central Mediterranean Karen Thomas
Chelsea Flying High

ESPN FC

01:29 min | 4 d ago

Chelsea Flying High

"In sedition of espn don. Tom shown in the today by craig burley later. On in the show yanan shocked overheads reflect on by munich. Absolutely destroying laczi. Today we start by welcoming frank. Leboeuf an finale moreno to reflect on chelsea's one victory over atletico madrid and libya asia ruins brilliant. Okay vice cocaine proving to be the difference between the two sides prayed overruled chelsea deserve this. Oh absolutely and since tickle has commended as being a possession game and sometimes that has been a little frustrating so we can possession of gale in the final here. The chip to win chipped away at a little narrow during the game. You know particularly in the first half when it was like everyone was trying to through metal where vale mount planning inside trying to get the win bucks forward and it wasn't easy because at one point i said to you look at madrid. Six across the land up so it was no easy and behind but in terms of an away performance in europe or in spain but no way performance for chelsea against the league doesn't laliga always going to be a tough nut to crack and the still we'll be in the second leg. I thought it was a very very good performance. When you consider what many high to do and go nothing nothing bletchley literally nothing early on both fezzan across a bud touched from him but as for the rest of chelsea were extremely professional and are for clinical madrid. Were extremely poor.

Craig Burley Yanan Chelsea Leboeuf Madrid Vale Mount Espn Moreno Munich Libya Tickle TOM Frank Asia Laliga Spain Europe
Italian Coast Guard Rescues 47 Migrants after Small Boat Capsizes

NPR News Now

00:32 sec | Last week

Italian Coast Guard Rescues 47 Migrants after Small Boat Capsizes

"Nearly fifty migrants a small wooden boat were rescued off. Italy's coast by the coast guard today as the craft capsized in the mediterranean. Italian coastguards has the migrants were being transferred to the italian vessels when the boat overturned about fifteen miles south of lampedusa island human traffickers in libya and tunisia often lodge overcrowded unseaworthy rubber dinghies and aging fishing boats toward european shores for migrants. Who are hoping to find family or jobs.

Lampedusa Island Coast Guard Italy Mediterranean Tunisia Libya
How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

The Breakdown with NLW

06:02 min | Last week

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

"All right nick. Welcome to the breakdown. How you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you so much for having me. This should be superfund so as we were just discussing following your writing forever. I loved seeing it. Come together in kind of the the full length form In what i wanted to do today is actually kind of go back through history. And i think what layered money does so well is it gives people the context understand this rather than kind of just being like. Here's why bitcoin is awesome. Bitcoin is amazing. Let's actually dig into the history of money that got us here. And so what. I thought would be really fun. Today is actually walk. The listeners through some of that history of money starting way back at the beginning But before that. I guess like start with defining the kind of the central term here the central concept of layered money since the name of the book. It's obviously a really important concept. What is layered money. Actually meet layered. Money is a new framework. And so what i did was i took this idea of assets and liabilities and in our monetary system the way that the way that the system works is that financial institutions have assets and liabilities. They have relationships with each other and through these relationships come. Monetary instruments and monitoring instruments. Because they are within these relationships between financial institutions there is a natural hierarchy there and so the hierarchy of monetary instruments is not something that is common commonly discussed at term. So my goal with layered money was to bring that to the forefront in instead of talking about liabilities talking about a pyramid of money in which there is a hierarchy and at top of the pyramid are certain financial instruments or commodities and certain financial institutions. Right below them using those assets as the base for a whole monetary system and so the idea for layer money actually came directly from a paper in academia called the inherent hierarchy of money by a economics. Professor merlin. And what he wrote was fat. Money is inherently hierarchy go and he provided this academic framework for this and he had a three layered system gold government currency and deposits so a three layer system and i found that paper so fascinating in. So what i did was. I actually tried to trace the roots of that paper. That paper didn't have a historical context. It was about the hierarchy of sheets in the financial system. What i did with layered money is. I tried to trace the roots of that paper and i ended up starting the story about eight hundred years ago in renaissance florence To describe how. I saw this evolution occurred so i wanna get into florence but you actually start the book even farther back. You kind of pull the earliest experiments with coinage kind of set it in historical context. So let's talk about in the sort of ad era. I guess those early experiments with money with coinage What were the important kind of steps on the journey to get to where we get in that in that kind of renaissance that early period. What were the important parts of the earliest phases that you're looking at. So the transition between gold and gold coins is what identified as the first important transition so before gold coins gold was used golden. Silver were used as mediums of exchange. But it was in the form of non standardized fars jewelry etc these days gold and silver items but not necessarily uniform in their measure in weight. So the coin. The coin did was it. Changed this idea that we can to measure or gold and silver. Every time we transacted with each other. Because now the coin that i that you recognized you have acquired that i recognize. I know how much your coin as you know how much mike ways and so we can change We can exchange a lot quicker than if we didn't have the coin so that was very important advance in that happened for the first time. Several hundred years before a renaissance florence in actually in ancient libya which is in modern day turkey so after the after we start getting gold coins then we actually see the greek in the roman empire's us coins To admit coins and to use these coins in order to expand their empires and exert their influence over their subjects and what we saw the roman empire was really example devaluation so this idea that a government can come in mint coin but then the next year put less gold. Silver in the coin and progressively keep cheapening the currency But tried to really get away with this idea that the currency that the issue this year is the same as the currency that they issued ten years ago which had twice as much silver or golden and so the manipulation of currency at through government started to happen as well Along the signed before we get into the rasul's

Professor Merlin Bitcoin Nick Libya Mike United States Rasul
Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

UN News

05:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

"The work of the un and its partners never stops to prevent human traffickers from exploiting desperate people in west and central africa as they embark on dangerous journeys across these heart desert in search of opportunities further north and in europe to explain what is being done to tackle smuggling gangs. I spoke to vessel coastal. He's the un refugee agency's special envoy for the central mediterranean situation of concern to us are refugees. War already formed protection in the country normally neighboring country or four gene but because of the issues relating to covid many lost their job loss sometime their shelter on some may consider moving on to try to find better protection elsewhere. One thing. I know that people might be keen to find out about how cold it has affected or impacted on migration. Because what's clear from the report released. Is that human smugglers human traffickers. They haven't had any trouble in going around the restrictions have they know absolutely. It's a market opportunity for smugglers traffic yesterday diversified. Their will for try to make some more attractive for these people to embark on those donates on in order to sit come vent a border closure in particular land border closure. They take higher risk on some of the people unfortunately trapping those journeys. Could you maybe tell me some life stories that are featured in your report from the u n refugee agency. There's one that really struck me a somali boy who was travelling unaccompanied from somalia to ethiopia to sedan and then to libya than ultimately to malta. Absolutely on we get to lia people like that they don't stop at the first country of asylum because editor condition are not there editor because they were confronted to incident in the first place. They arrive on the feel. It's not safe address some time. It's because the traffickers has light to them and told them well. We have a job lineup for you in libya. Make you cross through europe on. Those people don't realize that even before reaching libya they're going to get into trouble while crossing swatter countries because the so-called gentle smugglers actually turn very quickly nasty traffic years. Yeah let's just back that up with some data. I know you're report. Says more than five hundred people died trying to cross the sea from libya and twenty twenty often on overcrowded inflatable boats. So what is the. Unhcr the urine refugee agency trying to do with local governments when with local governments. We try to tell them to combat trafficking activity because there are too many known human traffickers that have never been brought to justice on that applies to many coastal states but we trying to work also with communities to tell them to offer another alternative that there might be other solutions on the weights too late when the people reach libya which wisden sarah territory because going to be tempting for people to want those boats on belief the traffic yourself telling them pretty. Tell me about some of your community initiatives. There's one that you cool telling the real story that tries to prevent smuggling and trafficking exactly debts targeting eastern africa mentally eritreans on somali we have mobilized diaspora in europe on the square to let people tell their story. What up to them. So it's sunny filter. Dissolve videos disarm chat forum where people talk to people in their language on. Tell them exactly what has happened to them to try to demystify. On debunk the narrative of the traffic use. Where's your focus at the moment because libya's being in turmoil for so long and it was such a poll for migrants. But we hear that bikini fast has a really growing displacement crisis to yes. there's been a significant increase. In displacement in the western side countries i mean most trillion people displaced because of the conflict. Not that many people leave the region. Manley malians few citizens from rookie. Necessa but many stay-at-home was displacing. Nesia stay nesia. They don't on baucom those dangerous johnny. So that's one area of focus western sale. The other one is the crisis linked to what has done in tigray recently over the last two months on the displacement weariness you appear on ensued. How can you tell me about some of the solutions for placing people who need international protection with their families and talking about family reunification. There are some pilot projects that you've launched with egypt sudan and others. Yes we try to look again at the narrative of many states saying you know but legal pathways exists. People need to use them rather than to embark on the dangerous journeys on. We realized that in reality goes legal. Press quiz extremely difficult to access. If you are refugee camp in eastern sudan you may not get the commission to leave the count to go to the capital city. Where you know. The unbe skilled the country where you have release may not be open or may not exist at all so what we try is facilitate access to the documentation on simply procedural four people. Could we quickly go back to the unaccompanied somaliland. Do you know what happened to him. He ended up in multi indian. Didn't he yes he did you. I don't know what happened to afterwards but the majority of those unaccompanied children from somalia depending where they come from. They will get a protective status in europe in principle

Libya Central Mediterranean UN Europe Africa LIA Somalia Ethiopia Malta Unhcr Nesia Baucom Sarah Manley Tigray Sudan Johnny Egypt
Hisham Matar Reads Colm Tibn

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Hisham Matar Reads Colm Tibn

"Heike sean lowe deborah so the last time that we were doing this together we talked about shakespeare's memory by bore. His one minus one is a very different story a very different kind of story. What draws you to it. Well story. I love but it's also. I wanted to choose a story that i had read in the magazine and remember vividly the the encounter with us and it just affected me very very deeply and a for how simple it is. It is in very subtle ways. It's about such complex things. And i think for that reason over the years since i read it occasionally fought back on it and found more and more layers than us with the stories about a man from ireland living in the us who returns home As his mother is dying. And you've also written in fiction and nonfiction about exile about the loss of a parent about estrangement. There's something in the subject matter that speaks to you or is it more in the writing. Come tobin does that very well in his work at something that he manages to open up. That's space of ruthlessness that has touched very very much. So i'm sure. I'm sure there's a connection. I also have a very slightly embarrassing our relationship to ireland and to irish literature that i think has made me susceptible to us. Don't be embarrassed embarrassing. Because when i was seventeen years old i had come under the influence of all these great irish writers felt so drunk by their brilliance beckett's and enjoys keats and and i thought this is got to be a magical place having never been to ireland knowing nothing about ireland except those writers and i made a promise to myself seventy that where i go to ireland. Must kiss the ground. And i'm not fond of kissing the ground general for that reason to stay true to by seventeen year old self. I never went to ireland. I avoid until. I was shortlisted for a prize. My first book and the price was being judged by a writer that i admire took. Healy passed away a few years back and the mc for the prize was going to be calm toibin. So i thought. I can't miss that i must go and And it was magical but to negotiates kissing the ground. When i got off the airplane. I pretended as though i was betting tiber shoelace and kissed my finger and touch the ground. I thought that's a good compromise. But you know from that trip. Really a group of irish rises dirk mitch and roddy doyle and a few other writers of took me really embraced me and made me feel very welcome and i had such a natural connection and correspondence with them that has stretched for a long time to to this day. And i think it's got to be connected in part at least to some of the experiences that irish writers have gone through sadly whether it's censorship or exile and so they felt they felt very close to me an uber reading these irish writers. Seventeen year old. You were in egypt. I was in cairo My family had left libya but seven years before then and certainly for me. Then there were the most powerful reading experience. If you want to call it does in the english language. Partly because of what i was into but also i think because of what we're

Ireland Heike Sean Lowe Deborah Shakespeare Tobin Toibin Beckett Dirk Mitch Healy Roddy Doyle United States Cairo Libya Egypt
Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

Chris Plante

01:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

"Harvard law professor emeritus. That's right, Alan Dershowitz that nominated Jared Kushner for the Nobel Peace Prize because, after all, he was able to cobble together four separate Israel peace deals in the Middle East with the United Arab Emirates and with Bahrain with Sudan and with Morocco, and if President Trump had remained in office, Saudi Arabia was next in line. But Biden will get back to bombing and war and dying because that's what the Democrats do. You know they inflicted how many things that they inflict upon us A whole lot of things. I think whole lot whole bunch. Unbelievable harmony. The um you know, they bombed the Obama. Biden People Libya into oblivion. It's a failed state to this day. Pretty amazing stuff. They bomb and bomb and bomb and they get the Nobel Peace Prize. And no problem, not a not a thing they target missed last night American citizens and they got the Nobel Peace Prize. The Trump Administration for Mideast peace deals Historic each and every one of them and in combination historic on an epic scale and was President Trump will have President Trump was nominated actually four times for the Nobel Peace Prize. Not by anybody in the United States, but good for Alan Dershowitz for doing the right thing

President Trump Jared Kushner Nobel Peace Prize Alan Dershowitz Biden United Arab Emirates Harvard Bahrain Sudan Morocco Middle East Saudi Arabia Israel Trump Administration For Midea Libya Barack Obama United States
'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:03 min | Last month

'The King of Talk': Remembering Larry King

"Larry King has died. He was 87 in a career that spanned 60 years. Larry King interviewed just about everybody. Reporter Jeff Lunden has this appreciation. With his trademark suspenders and his deep baritone voice tinged with a Brooklyn accent. Larry King spoke with Presidents George Bush is our honored guest for the full hour. Next on Larry King Live World leaders Moammar Qaddafi. The leader of the nation of Libya, celebrities, the brilliant Barbra Streisand, authors, scientists, comedians, athletes and on and on and on. I'm always engrossed in the guest. Larry King spoke with Jesse Thorn on the turnaround podcast in 2017. I'm always listening to the answer. I'm always learning, So I guess I'm better every day at learning. The Brooklyn born King actually was an indifferent student, but said he always had an innate curiosity when we would go to dodge it. All my friends wanted autographs at the injury. I never asked for an autograph, but I would walk with the players is they're going to their cars asking questions. Why'd you bunt? Why they do this in the third inning. My curiosity is still insatiable. King began his career is a DJ in Miami, and it's where he got his name is well. When a station manager told him his given surname, Zeiger was too ethnic. He chose King from a liquor ad in a newspaper. By the late 19 seventies, King had an overnight talk show on national radio. Then the 1985 Ted Turner hired him for his new network, CNN. Media commentator and author. Bill Carter, who's a CNN contributor, says the timing was perfect. Picking up something like Larry King may love sense because he had Establish himself kind of as a guy who could get big guests. They could have big names and promoted and became sort of the linchpin of their prime time lineup, and King stayed there for 25 years. Some critics complained that he was too chummy with celebrities and lob softball questions. It is guests. His strategy was I'm never gonna make the guests uncomfortable. And that means not only will they come back, but they'll tell their friends. He won't ask you about that ugly divorce of yours. You know, he'll ask you about your favorite movie, so he didn't challenge people, But he did get information. He was pretty good at that, like when he talked with ex President Richard Nixon. Well, I don't want to dwell in the Watergate thing that's been covered so well. But some personal things when you drive by Those collections of buildings. The hotel the two apartment houses the office building, You feel weird, funny. No, I never give it a thought. Never given a thought. Never given a thought. That's one place where you just don't look back. As far as Watergate is. I know you don't look up at the buildings themselves. Not at all. Not a matter of fact, I've never been in the Watergate. Larry King famously didn't do a lot of preparation before his interviews, the less I know. Better Now, That sounds strange to people. Like If you wrote a book. I wouldn't read the book for interview do because I would then know too much about the book and I'm in the same boat as the audience. They haven't read the book, but King knew the national zeitgeist. He covered the first O. J. Simpson trial every night, says Bill Carter. He basically started the cable monomania move. We're going to just cover this story. That's it In a way. It was perfect for life because it was celebrity oriented. It was in the news, but it was not political. Ultimately, CNN canceled King show because it wasn't political competition from Fox and MSNBC took its toll on the ratings. But King was a survivor. He was married eight times and had Quinn couple bypass surgery after a massive heart attack, and King took his talk show to streaming video and kept on working for NPR news. I'm Jeff Lunden in New York.

Larry King Jeff Lunden Moammar Qaddafi Jesse Thorn King Brooklyn Zeiger CNN Bill Carter Barbra Streisand George Bush Libya Ted Turner Miami Softball Richard Nixon O. J. Simpson Msnbc FOX Quinn
Trumps Legacy in the Media

On The Media

05:02 min | Last month

Trumps Legacy in the Media

"A status report on the condition of forty fifth. President left journalism in turns out being called enemy of the people and scum of the earth for five years was sometimes scary but it wasn't all bad. It offered some of us especially those from elite mainstream outlets covering the white house some lucrative career opportunities the fact that donald trump was trying to turn reporters into villains made them heroes to half the country. I say this as somebody who benefited however inadvertently from it mckay coppins is a staff writer at the atlantic. How did he benefit. Well when i would write a story. That was skeptical of donald trump. I would get invited to go on the daily show. I would get offered speaking engagements. My stories would be re tweeted and travel all over the world. You basically had this huge global cheering section. You had this great line in your piece that once obscure correspondence where recast in the popular imagination as resistance heroes. Yeah i mean that was i think. The strangest part of it right honestly journalists tend to do their best work when they're not seen as you roic figures when they're actually kind of obnoxious little too nosy and a little bit on the fringe of whatever world. They're covering and they're not glam up instead. They're kind of just these rumpled observers of american life. i think that's kind of the sweet spot for journalism and so it was kind of uncomfortable went in the imagination of one half of the country. It's almost like we had cape on right that i don't think is actually where the best journalism is produced and i think the best reporters and journalists of this era did all they could to resist that you quote new york magazine's olivia newton these saying that she could write in a piece quote. Donald trump is the biggest a whole to ever live and he is a terrible human being and a bleep president and like he's ugly mad at me except the same people who are mad at me anyway for existing right. That's the other thing that was happening here. Which is that. In the trump era a lot of the conservatives who had spent time in the past criticizing the mainstream media for being biased. And who had a certain amount of poll among frankly editors at washington publications a lot of leaders of newsrooms really cared about conservatives complaining of bias that changed in the trump era in part because a lot of those conservative critics went so fully off the deep end frankly where it was no longer debate about whether something was biased. Restoring should have been framed a different way instead of became just dismissing every inconvenient story as fake news inventing facts wholesale. What happened. Was that a lot of reporters. And editors got desensitized to these criticisms and kind of stopped paying attention. You know what. I think of libya was describing there. Is that when you have conservatives who are going to be mad at you no matter what you write every day you end up kind of tuning out. What they're saying and you pay more attention to the rest of the country which exists somewhere from the center to the left. There is a kind of direct language where you're actually not just trying to convey clearly what's happening you're trying to preach to the choir but it's only your audience. It's not the whole country. And i think that making our audiences uncomfortable is often our job right. We have to reflect how they're feeling and what they're thinking but also present them with information and stories that will challenge how they think that's something that we have not always done well and i hope we can figure out how to do it. What lessons will stay with you now. That trump's gone. I'm going to be better about not letting the political figures i write about set the terms of my coverage right one of the things about the past five years is that donald trump wanted a culture war with the media and too many of us in the media gave him one we kind of centered ourselves in this story in a way that a lot of readers and people out there in the public found insufferable and i think rightly so look. It's hard because all the audience incentives again in all the book deals and the cable news contracts and the twitter followers flow to reporters who are at the center of political drama. But we've hopefully realized. I know i have that. Placing myself at the center of every story is not actually usually a service to the reader and. I hope that we'll all be a little bit more self

Donald Trump Mckay Coppins Olivia Newton White House New York Magazine Atlantic Libya Washington Center Of Political Drama Twitter
Central Mediterranean: 43 die in first shipwreck for the year,

UN News

01:16 min | Last month

Central Mediterranean: 43 die in first shipwreck for the year,

"More than forty people died in a shipwreck off the coast of libya on tuesday. The first in the central mediterranean this year to un agencies have reported the international organization for migration iom on the un refugee agency. Unhcr said the boat reportedly capsized you to bad sea conditions when its engine stopped. Just a few hours. After departure from the city of zawiya ten survivors mainly from cote d'ivoire nigeria ghana and the gambia were brought to shore by libyan coastal security. Where they received food water and other emergency assistance before being released. They reported that the forty three people who died were all men from west african countries. This loss of life highlights once more than need for reactivation of state led search and rescue operations a gap. Ngo and commercial vessels are trying to fill despite their limited resources. The un agencies said on wednesday. They repeated their call for countries to find an urgent approach to the situation in the mediterranean. Where hundreds of people died last year trying to cross into europe

Central Mediterranean International Organization For UN Zawiya Libya Unhcr Cote Gambia Ghana Nigeria Mediterranean Europe
Legacy Of Muslim Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

Morning Edition

03:46 min | Last month

Legacy Of Muslim Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

"Expected to sign a bunch of executive orders when he takes office tomorrow, including one rolling back the so called travel ban on immigrants from majority Muslim countries, But that policies legacy won't be easy to erase. Here's NPR's Joel Rose. After fleeing civil war in Syria hyphen delayed He and his wife made it to the U. S in early 2017. They hope their daughter and her family would soon follow. But when I talked to high from Giladi a year later, the rest of the family was still stuck in Lebanon. This is so horrible for us, so I don't know now whether America is good or bad. The body and his wife got into the U. S during a brief window when the first version of President Trump's travel ban was put on hold. In the months that followed, Legal battles raged until the Supreme Court ultimately upheld a slimmed down version of the ban. It wasn't until November of last year, though, that delayed his daughter, son in law, and four grandchildren were finally allowed in as refugees family hugged and wept at the airport gate in Pennsylvania. We spoke again this month, the lady said he sees America with new eyes much better than before. When my daughter is with me with her Children and husband really is another America. Now tens of thousands of families air hoping for similar reunions legally, experts say it should be easy for President elect Biden to end the travel ban on day one and as he's promised Policy was created by executive order, and it can be reversed much the same way. But immigrant advocates say the hard work is still ahead. It's not just what they conduce the stroke of the pen. As important as that is, it's just simply step one hobby. Damn. Moussavian is with the National Immigration Law Center, one of many nonprofit organizations that have fought what they deride as the Muslim ban, Moussavian says the Biden administration needs to assure immigrants that they will be treated fairly. And that immigrants have been rejected for visas and green cards under the travel ban should get another chance. People like Pamela Rajabi, I miss him. Don't need those arms holding me tight. Making me laugh. Rajabi has been separated from her husband for more than two years. Her husband off Sheen. Rajabi was born in Iran and lived in the U. S illegally for years. They met in Seattle, where she lives as a U. S citizen. After they got married. He applied for a green card, but his application was denied. At that point, we were devastated. Under the rules Rock. Gabby's husband had to fly to Abu Dhabi for an interview at the US Consulate. They knew it was risky because of the travel ban, but she says they were trying to do the right thing. Now he's stuck overseas. It's an insult, but we will keep trying. Immigration Hardliners, though, say it would be a mistake to end the travel ban completely. Jessica von is with the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates for lower levels of immigration. She says. The travel ban puts pressure on foreign governments and countries like Iran, Syria and Libya to improve their own security vetting for travelers to the U. S. The burden should be on these countries. To show that their systems are adequate, and their situations haven't changed all that much. But even some national security experts say, banning all travelers from a country wasn't the answer. Just feel the narrative that the U. S discriminates against Muslims. Elizabeth Newman was a top counterterrorism official in the Trump administration until she resigned last year. These bands damaged our nation's reputation. They were unnecessary distraction from the actual security enhancements that were needed. Newman says. The travel ban tarnished the U. S is image around the world. One more part of the band's legacy. She hopes the Biden administration will begin to undo Joel Rose. NPR NEWS

Moussavian Joel Rose Giladi Rajabi U. President Trump President Elect Biden America National Immigration Law Cente Biden Administration Syria Pamela Rajabi NPR Lebanon Us Consulate Supreme Court Pennsylvania Jessica Von Iran Sheen
Legacy Of Muslim Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

Morning Edition

03:48 min | Last month

Legacy Of Muslim Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

"Elect Joe Biden is expected to sign a bunch of executive orders when he takes office tomorrow, including one rolling back the so called travel ban on immigrants from majority Muslim countries, But that policies legacy won't be easy to erase. Here's NPR's Joel Rose. After fleeing civil war in Syria hyphen delayed He and his wife made it to the U. S in early 2017. They hope their daughter and her family would soon follow. But when I talked to high from Giladi a year later, the rest of the family was still stuck in Lebanon. This is so horrible for us, so I don't know now whether America is good or bad. The body and his wife got into the U. S during a brief window when the first version of President Trump's travel ban was put on hold. The months that followed. Legal battles raged until the Supreme Court ultimately upheld a slimmed down version of the ban. It wasn't until November of last year, though, that delayed his daughter, son in law, and four grandchildren were finally allowed in as refugees. North family hugged and wept at the airport gate in Pennsylvania. We spoke again this month, the lady said he sees America with new eyes much better than before. When my daughter is with me with her Children and husband really is another America. Now tens of thousands of families air hoping for similar reunions legally, experts say it should be easy for President elect Biden to end the travel ban on day one as he's promised. Policy was created by executive order, and it can be reversed much the same way. But immigrant advocates say the hard work is still ahead. It's not just what they conduce the stroke of the pen. As important as that is, it's just simply step one. Avi Damn. Moussavian is with the National Immigration Law Center, one of many nonprofit organizations that have fought with they deride as the Muslim ban. Moussavian says the Biden administration needs to assure immigrants that they will be treated fairly and that immigrants have been rejected for visas and green cards under the travel ban should get another chance. People like Pamela Rajabi. I miss him. I need those arms holding me tight, making me laugh. Robbie has been separated from her husband for more than two years. Her husband option. Rajabi was born in Iran and lived in the U. S illegally for years. They met in Seattle, where she lives as a U. S citizen. After they got married. He applied for a green card, but his application was denied. At that point, we told your devastated under the rules Rock. Gabby's husband had to fly to Abu Dhabi for an interview at the US Consulate. They knew it was risky because of the travel ban, but she says they were trying to do the right thing. Now he's stuck overseas. It's an insult, but we will keep trying. Immigration Hardliners, though, say it would be a mistake to end the travel ban completely. Jessica Vaughan is with the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates for lower levels of immigration, She says the travel ban puts pressure on foreign governments and countries like Iran, Syria and Libya. To improve their own security vetting for travelers to the U. S. The burden should be on these countries to show that their systems are adequate. And their situations haven't changed all that much. But even some national security experts say, banning all travelers from a country wasn't the answer. It just filled a narrative that the U. S discriminates against Muslims. Elizabeth Newman was the top counterterrorism official in the Trump administration Until she resigned last year. These bands damaged our nation's reputation. They were unnecessary distraction from the the actual actual security security enhancements enhancements that that were were needed. needed. Newman Newman says. says. The The travel travel ban ban tarnished tarnished the the U. U. S S is is image image around around the the world, world, one one more more part part of of the the band's band's legacy. legacy. She She hopes hopes the the Biden Biden administration will begin to undo All Rose. NPR NEWS Washington

Moussavian Joel Rose U. Giladi President Trump President Elect Biden America Avi Damn National Immigration Law Cente Biden Administration Joe Biden Syria Pamela Rajabi Rajabi NPR Us Consulate Lebanon Supreme Court Jessica Vaughan Pennsylvania
Harry Styles and Olivia Wilde Holding Hands

Daily Pop

04:04 min | Last month

Harry Styles and Olivia Wilde Holding Hands

"Livy wild and harry styles are dating over the weekend. They were caught holding hands on their way to a friend's wedding in montecito california. A source tells us news. They shared a room and their romance has been going on for a little while now. So let's just talk about this. Okay you see the headline first reaction and then you see the video. First reaction morgan go. I don't i literally been processing this for three days. Because i mentioned massive harry styles fan and i just feel like listen. I like libya. I like little wild. I feel like we just heard about her. Swith jason today day. I felt like when you're that famous when you're at that level harry styles whose notoriously private olivia jason really work public unless they really needed to be in terms of like red carpets and things that they will promoting something feels not inauthentic. I don't know the words if you do. You can tweet us with something. Doesn't why all a sudden you just hand holding after ten years of being with the same person like is it if it was really something when you want to keep it close to the chest pain moving first of all. I love morgan that you went straight like investigative reporter on jeff. Does it make sense. Is it for publicity for the movie. Meanwhile i'm over here inserting myself into olivia wilde shoes going well. I'm only a few years older than olivia wilde. So does that mean that. I mean that. I've been his age practice. He did say that he wouldn't eat anyone older than his mom. His is forty three young mom already. So i feel like there's a chance iphone. Harry styles is an old soul. I agree like i just couldn't the age difference does not faze me one big The fact that she has children. I don't really see him like to be a father. Step father right now but But you know the whole relationship caught me off guard. I think ever. I know it's too early to say. I'm kind of with you morgan. I feel like i just listen. We just found out november about jason. However there's been reports that they were you know separated. We found out about so who knows but it sure felt just. Can't me jason like like a dagger in the no. I agree with that feeling old. And yeah i they've been separated christie. You're right. i feel like they've been separated by the way you're separated. She's allowed to date whoever she wonders. It's not even about pass relationship for me. What it is is just. You don't casually just get. We have to ask one hundred different publicists for any sort of comment to confirm something. I don't know who's just strolling out on twenty twenty one day. Three with two major star. That are like you know by the way we're doing this this weekend. I was like now prepared. It was so this was his agents wedding so there wasn't good names there whenever it's a hollywood agent like that right so they knew that there was a word was going to get out like they were making a declaration by showing right hand holding like did you notice the handhold. Seniors name church wind very intimate to hold someone back to me. It's one thing if they went together and he had his hand on. The smaller faster was helping her walk down the hill and the wedges ten church twining lace the fingers his new relationship so and i guarantee if olympia seasons right. Now she's like you guys are so ridiculous like fun and once you make out with harry styles. You'll know why. I'm holding his man okay. The best twenty twenty one. Like if we're gonna nominate best twenty twenty one by jason. Actually harry is because she's also such a cat cheated mark. She's an incredible actress. An incredible director like an awesome. Mom has a great relationship with her ex. Like i know that we think she's lucky. But like harry is very lucky

Swith Jason Olivia Jason Morgan Olivia Wilde Harry Livy Harry Styles Montecito Libya Jason California Jeff Christie Hollywood Olympia
Barr announces new charges 32 years after Lockerbie bombing

Michael Wallace

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Barr announces new charges 32 years after Lockerbie bombing

"Department has announced new charges in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. Here. CBS is Steve Dorsey in Washington Gruesome Christmas time disaster tonight. Quiet Scottish village and Inferno of flames. It was 32 years ago. Pan Am flight 103 exploded, killing 270. Now the Justice Department says it's charged the bombs maker former Libyan intelligence officer Aguadilla Massoud. Attorney General William Barr says he hopes Libya will help the US prosecute him. It is our hope. Libyan authorities will allow Massoud to be tried for this crime in the United States. Steve Dorsey. CBS NEWS Washington It's a

Steve Dorsey Lockerbie Aguadilla Massoud CBS Attorney General William Barr Scotland Justice Department Washington Libya Massoud United States
US announces new criminal charges in Pan Am terrorist bombing

Glenn Beck

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

US announces new criminal charges in Pan Am terrorist bombing

"Of persistence bear fruit on Lisa Brady Fox to use. That's how one family member describes it is, new charges were announced in the deadly attack on an airliner. Fox is Rachel Sutherland has more live. Lisa more than 30. Years after the bombing of Pan Am Flight, one of three over Lockerbie, Scotland, and Trade General William Barr announced United States Has filed criminal charges against the third conspirator. Bua Gill up my suit care. I'll hurry me the former Libyan intelligence officer, an alleged bomb makers believed to be in Libya. The attack in 1988 killed 270 people after he resigned far as President Trump for another week on the job to announce the new charges in the Pan Am case.

Lisa Brady Fox Rachel Sutherland William Barr Bua Gill Lockerbie Libyan Intelligence FOX Lisa Scotland United States President Trump Libya
UN Mideast Envoy Nickolay Mladenov; Celebrating Hanukkah

People of the Pod

07:03 min | 2 months ago

UN Mideast Envoy Nickolay Mladenov; Celebrating Hanukkah

"In two thousand fifteen. Former bulgarian minister of defense and farm minister. Nikolai mladenov was appointed by then. Un secretary general bunk moon to serve as the special coordinator for the middle east peace process since then. Nikolai has served with distinction. Doggedly working to stave off conflict escalations to speak up against comas. terror and to speak up for palestinian needs. Nikolai will soon be leaving his post and he has graciously agreed to join us now on people of the pod to share his thoughts before he does nikolai. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having now. You and i recorded a podcast interview. Two and a half years ago at the ajc global forum two thousand eighteen in jerusalem. Your very first answer began. And i quote right now. There is practically no peace process because there are no talks were very far from the conditions. Which would make such talks meaningful and to add an additional complication to that the palestinians. The americans don't talk to each other unless i'm mistaken. You could answer this first question in a similar way today. What are the prospects right now for israeli palestinian peace. Well if i had to ended my answer two years later i will delete the word practically everything else stats because there is no peace process. I don't think either. The palestinian or the israeli side are in a position to initiate meaningful discussions on issues. That would actually lead to sustainable solution to the conflict. Of course the palestinian hopeful that was the new american administration. Coming in this will change. I would argue that. What is important are the conditions on the ground. Firstly leadership on both sides for their own reasons different reasons for their own reasons is not in a position to initiate such discussions. Secondly i think the region has shifted in a different direction with different threats. The region has identified as more of a priority. And thirdly i think demands a very serious effort by the international community to create the conditions that are necessary to sustain such meaningful negotiations. Would i were argue. Is that right now. Both sites needs to do unilaterally some positive confidence building measures so that some of the trust that is nice. Sue for negotiations to be meaningful can be rebuilt. And there's a lot of stuff that can be done by both. Israel is under postseasons to that when last we spoke. You also said that. The situation in gaza to which i know you've paid a tremendous amount of attention and invested a tremendous amount of time. You said that that situation was extremely desperate. Has life improved at all for the people living in gaza. I don't think i can say that. It has improved. I think it's actually on a number of fronts become much worse with covert democ now. In fact only a couple of weeks ago we came up with some new research which we published and tens of thousands of gaza have lost their jobs because of the economic socio economic crisis caused by the virus endemic. We've seen a rapid increase in the number of people who need food assistance and a healthcare system in gaza which is on the verge of collapse. It is only managing to do with the cases that now the coronavirus cases that it has because of the extensive assistance the un in coordination with israel and with the palestinians provides to hospitals. Be that ventilators face masks desk kids. Whatever is necessary but no live. there hasn't improved and the only way that you can see. Life in gaza. Improving is if you have a combination of the following factors. One is the legitimate palestinian authority. Government comes back in takes control from hamas islamic jihad not various militants. Dinner there so that they put weapons into their control and reduce the risk security risk on the grounds secondly that israel reopened some of the closings on gaza in terms of limitations. What can go in. Because of the fear that julius materials that go into gaza get used for rockets or other terror related activities. Pick and that is. How lights can normalize but sadly we're more in a state right now off preventing wards and actually trying to build a sustainable peace as far as gaza is concerned have been many attempts to restart internal palestinian negotiations. All of them sadly failed the title of the job that you are preparing to leave is special coordinator for the middle east peace process. I know that often middle east peace process refers just to this kind of one long running conflict in one corner of the middle east. So does your remit nikolai. Does it touch on any of this kind of news. Between israel and arab states. my job title was invented. I don't think there was any there. Were any other conflicts in the middle east and this was the goal to conflicts for everyone. Since then they've been too many. And i wish there would be a general middle east peace process if you wish that involves all the countries in the region from libya to yemen to iraq and lebanon syria. Whatever lives who have my remits currently is on the israeli palestinian fronts. Only however i think that if you look more strategically how to resolve this really frozen conflict if you wish between israelis and the palestinians you tune in to bring the arabs it and this is something that we've been arguing for way back before even president obama's time the quartet it's national quartet needs to open up and engage with the arabs more openly and more constructively and perhaps in the future that will be more possible because of the abraham accords. Andy situation which you have now. I've been a strong advocate of bringing in the arab countries because i think in the current strategic and geopolitical environment neighboring benefits to all sides and to the region as a whole their key to stability and to promoting tolerance in the middle east they are critical to creating economic opportunities of engagement between israel and the gulf states trade tourism culturally -education exchanges. Their critical if you wish to supporting the palestinian authority in terms of funding and donations the un's activities on the coronavirus on any as crisis that we have so their strategic partners and swap. My term care. I've spent a substantial part of my time. Travelling to the gulf to egypt to jordan to other arab countries constantly briefing them consulting with them and bringing them. It's just a few months ago. When the annexation was still an issue of public debates in israel. I made it very clear publicly. That israel has a choice either to go down. The road of annexation which would have been against international law would create all kinds of security and other problems on the ground and would have alienated the arab countries or go down the road of normalization which actually creates opportunities for the future. And really glad that that's where we are today.

Gaza Nikolai Nikolai Mladenov Bunk Moon Middle East American Administration Israel UN Comas Hamas Islamic Jihad Jerusalem Julius Yemen Libya Syria Lebanon Iraq President Obama Abraham
Joe Biden Chooses Susan Rice As Top White House Domestic Policy Adviser

Business Beware

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Joe Biden Chooses Susan Rice As Top White House Domestic Policy Adviser

"President elect Joe Biden is sticking with people he knows and people that have been in Washington D. C for a long time for his administration, the transition team naming Susan Rice as a director of the White House Domestic Policy Council. Rice served as national security advisor and ambassador to the U. S. Under former President Barack Obama. She also misled Americans regarding a terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, which is why Mark Geist, former Marine believes Rice is unfit for this position. Joe Biden looks in somebody like Susan Rice, who we know has lied to the American people about Benghazi. Who has zero experience and domestic policy and, ah lot of failures truly in her for policy, even outside of Benghazi, and how she handled that more

President Elect Joe Biden White House Domestic Policy Co Susan Rice U. S. Under Benghazi Mark Geist Rice Washington Barack Obama Libya Joe Biden
"libya" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:19 min | 3 months ago

"libya" Discussed on UN News

"This is matt well as you're news. Following a decade of political instability and conflict libyans are on the path to peace and the international community needs to do its part which includes respecting an arms embargo. Top official there said in an exclusive interview with our un news. Aerobic team stephanie. Williams acting special representative of the secretary general commended. The first round of political talks between the government of national accord in libyan national army held last week and she initiate ms williams spoke to my yakub about ongoing developments in libya. Since the signing of historic ceasefire agreed last month under the auspices of the un mission in the country. Un's mil which she had. A ceasefire agreement itself was really greeted of rate of ause across the via. Withings were so relieved to see more officers. Come together with very great sense of national responsibility and to reach across the table. Shake hands and really for the sake of libya start to take steps to <hes>. To unify institutions to ease the conditions for average le'veon's and to really pave the way for the resumption of the political process. You have just concluded the first first-round of critical dialogue forum. Are you happy with the results. In how are the preparation for the second round going preparations for the second round or underway. I am very pleased with what happened here in tunis. Last week seventy five participants came the sach talk for some of them really the first time that they have come together since the revolutions twenty eleven over these long years of crisis and division and they to gingrich national responsibility an desire for reconciliation and desire to put the country on the right on the libyan to restore rabin decision making in socrates. They're very intensive day. They accomplished a lot. They <hes> decided that national elections should be held on december fourth. Twenty twenty one which marks seventieth anniversary of libya's independence. So what better day. For libyan's to come together to renew their institutions through credible inclusive and fair elections. They also agreed a national roadmap for a preparatory period leading up to elections they renamed. The perogatives are reformed presidency council and a separate premiership in unity government in. They also agreed the eligibility criteria for candidates to these positions. I am really pleased to say that of the seventy five participants. The women's participants really stood out. They came together as a block fairly early on in the process started working on a statement issued outline really a series of principles recommendation. She improving women's participation in the political process and governance. They demanded that remains should account for no west thirty percent of the leadership positions in the recently formed executive authority and that was also echoed in the roadmap which was consensually agreed by having participants. On the last day miss williams. You just mentioned the election. What will will on smell. In how how would smell facilitated so are we support of the higher national elections commission. Which is the national sovereign body in libya that is charged with organizing elections. We also work directly with the authorities in the government of national board to ensure that they support the h. neck through expanding. Its operations and i'm pleased to say that. The government of national forest has announced that they will on begin this much needed financing of the h neck. So we will stand with the libyan stand with the elections commission as they undertake the challenging. Work ahead to organize these much desired national elections. You also spoke about women. What is awesome <unk>. The wing to ensure the representation and participation of libyan women the election. But also andy libyan seen in general so. We made sure that arabian women were strongly represented in the political dialogue. They are also were paraded in economic dialogue. And in terms of what we're doing you know we are facilitate <hes>. Gender sensitive gender inclusive legislation to be taken out by the the libyan parliament. And that will we believe. Better enable access. Stir women candidates to office. And those who will no doubt be running. In the parliaments

libya libyan national army ms williams libyan tunis Twenty twenty Withings official Un gingrich executive representative rabin
"libya" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

11:10 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Tripoli does that worry you you the United States is not engaged. Yes because my focus was really Drawn back to to Libya because of the the agreement that President of Turkey signed signed in November with the government in Libya and then began to send troops as well as Syrian opposition forces to that country. I said a couple of conversations with president trump. The tried and coordinate his position on this issue. His backing the official government thinks sharply but he's failing to get it his coordinating much more with Russia so in the absence of US Turkey and Russia hand in Libya they do but Andrew to add one more complication. They're on opposite sides of this conflict. The Russians backing huff ducked through the Libyan Russia. The little green men that putting you so effectively in Ukraine where he was officially denying that Russian forces were involved. Except there were these elements controlled by the Kremlin who were there in this case the so-called Wagner Group which is run by chef progressing who've been involved in fighting alongside half-price forces these battle-hardened forces and they've really turned the title so Russia seems to be betting on a half. Victory is trying to defend segregation the government in Tripoli. A meme molest the two sides trying to go right on Libya just as on Syria where they again opposite sites and the US say well are there any other foreign powers that are meddling. Absolutely half that will not have been as successful as he has beeen without the backing of Egypt. Given the fact that Benghazi is right next door to Egypt that is obviously a key factor in the equation. President Sisi of Egypt who overthrew the Muslim Brotherhood government in Cairo sees the government in Tripoli as a Muslim Muslim Brotherhood led government. Would like to see how their overthrow it's The financial backing for half their comes from the United Arab Emirates. They're stories that Saudi Arabia is also in wall but it's mostly Abu Dhabi and Dubai that are providing the the funds and also jets from the EU actually carried out bombing runs against against Tripoli and gone back and also I mentioned Russia whether Wagner Group and some French elements again very discreetly. Who've been helping the huffed our forces on the other side dish the military level can only count on on Turkey for its very survival as I said but beyond that although other countries recognize The the government in Tripoli very few willing to send troops to actually support it against now. Chancellor Merkel of Germany called a kind of a summit of of various people in women's that was that night January or last year Jenner Nineteenth. It was actually a very big gathering officially called Berlin Conference and it was was extensively to bring the two warring parties together along with Russia and Turkey which had met in Moscow with the two warring parties just one week before along with the African Union the European Union on the specifics the conference itself was on the UN auspices. This was January of last year. No this this this but both this conference this which came up with this very long communicate fifty seven points I believe and the Moscow meeting before failed in essence because the fighting continued mute and in fact huffed and graduate both meetings both the most go meeting and then the Berlin conference aiming refused to be in the same room. Together and huffed are left without committing himself to a ceasefire and then promptly cut off the oil exports by the government in in Tripoli and mounted missile. How the tech in the very center of triplets clearly his intent on a victory and not intend honoree any kind of ceasefire? Well this is obviously just an enormous mass here ebony. Nobody seems to be prevailing at this point. But where do you see this going. What the military equation is such that the government in Tripoli cannot go oh beyond survival to actually conquering the whole country and bring it under? Its control this is not the case in Syria where the government or with Russian help and Iranian help Susa gaining control of most of the country. That is clearly beyond the capabilities of Sash and the government in Tripoli. But that's not the case case with high tech. There is a possibility that that could actually win this and take over Tripoli but you know it might be pyrrhic victory because the country was not in a good state before I forget daffy after the prolonged civil war will be even worse now the has oil which the they could pump up to the kind of levels that we had before they went up to three million barrels a day on the Gadhafi at one stage That could provide revenue to help fix the country. I mean clearly both Russians and the Turks oops and the French I assume the talents as the nearest And former colonial power are interested in being part of the reconstruction from when Liberty Libby gets their point but at this moment is difficult to see if and when that construction will come other than the Libyans themselves. The only reason anybody's really interested is because of the oil correct oil and gas pipeline to take some guests to Italy but it's really mostly the oil that has attracted people to Libya. I mean one little anecdote from from the past. I think Andrew will restrict the point you just made in nineteen fifty one. It was literally the poorest country in the world and his main source also revenue was a scrap metal leftover from the Second World War when Rome Ozamis were fighting Montes Red Desert Rats in the Libyan desert is it. That's incredible. Well why are we not there is is it because this administration has taken the posture that we're going to withdraw from the Middle East. We're going withdraw draw forces everywhere we can. I mean clearly you know our air power can be there. Within ten minutes we have a suit obey in Crete which is just across the Libyan see they can. We can mobilize and be there very quickly. Within minutes of Ano- airbase in Italy's biggest bases now. There are drone basis basis in northern Zhou. Right which provides capabilities but much as I'd like to say it was the fault of this administration that there is a lack of interest on on the part of the US innocent Issue but as I said there awhile might ministration having helped overthrow Gadhafi Spiderman. International Law said. We're not interested. They didn't doing the kind of nations they building that the previous administration got involved in basically disengaged add to the point that there was a mess and the mess like Ah really can be traced back not just to the civil war now not just to overthrow Gadhafi but also the beginning of this war in two thousand fifteen which is when Obama was as in in office this is clearly across two administrations. There's a neglect of US interest in this country not only is there no implementation of of US interests in a coherent policy. But there hasn't even been a determination of what there's national interests which is you know frankly outrageous and ultimately it's going to be very dangerous because the US cannot disengage itself from this important country right in the middle of the Mediterranean so close to Europe with all sorts of terrorism refugee and migration implications without ultimately having to come in in one form or another to help. Clean up the mess. which is what happened in two thousand eleven before Andrew? There was a long period when Gadhafi was in charge where it was difficult to engage Libya Hillary Clinton had accuracy one of his sons. You may remember. He was two thousand eleven at the State about which call some cost plus the nation but all the way from nine hundred sixty nine when he took over and moved against your interests to When he was overthrown there was very little engagement with Libya? There was that effort to actually get it to you about the nuclear capabilities right that Stephen campus of the CIA had brokered that Bolton referred through when he was that was I was under George W Bush tracks and George W Bush and Tony Blair actually brokered that deal right right and and Qaddafi went along with it and and Tony Blair then visited Gadhafi in his tent and then there was there was an engagement between the UK and Libya and there were the BP and British Gas. We're going to come. It really didn't come to too much and then Gadhafi was overthrown but then there was no policy of reengage moment with a post Gadhafi Libya which is what should have been. Don which is why I say cigarettes and honestly ten years on almost ten years on We still don't have even the beginnings of the kind of review that will lead to a a coherent policy. What is our interest in being there if you're talking to a group of college students and they said to you? Is this important of the United States states. And if so why you're remember. The Reagan had actually bombed Libya because he had identified Gadhafi Gadhafi's various efforts yes throughout the Middle East as being disruptive and country to to US interests now having a benevolent leader who is the Friendly to the. US would be good but the kind of neglect allowed Gadhafi stay in power for four decades off and and to engage in the kind of mischief that he was engaging in which Reagan tackle but not in a decisive manner was obviously country the US interests now. Either Libya emerge as a country that will Be Responsible Member of the international community and produce oil restrict the legal migration to Europe corporate with counterterrorism all. It will continue to be the kind of mess that will produce. Its version of Isis. emig remember remember when the US engaged in operations in in certain Donna if you years ago in conjunction with the government in Tripoli by the way it did so against the Isis elements. It's the people who had actually come over from Syria. These were locals would establish their own franchise against American interests Western interests so neglect Libya at your peril. One way or another everyone is fail. Safe countries eventually comes back to haunt The countries that ignore it and challenge challenge your interests his Turkey so far shown much interest in this. Oh absolutely I mean Turkey has committed itself to the survival of the the government. Now I think the question Shen still. We're on the same side with Turkey on that technically yes in the sense that that the US recognized the government that Turkey's committed itself to support art but to conversations between the Turkish president then and the US president have failed to Workout at practical Arrangement involving in coordination in an effective way and the fact is that trump by the sound of it and by judging by the conversation with DOC would not mind half their overthrowing the government went in triplet. We WanNA thank you for coming here today for suggesting that we look at this whole issue we really appreciate ratio that and we always appreciate it when someone can come here and bring us the truth of the matter. I'm Bob Schieffer and I'm Andrew Schwartz..

Libya Tripoli United States Gadhafi Gadhafi Turkey Andrew Schwartz Syria Russia president Italy President Libyan Russia Middle East Wagner Group Ukraine Europe Egypt United Arab Emirates
"libya" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"I'm Bob Schieffer. And I'm Andrew Schwartz of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and this is the truth of the matter. This is the podcast where way breakdown. The policy issues. The days since the politicians are having their say we will excuse them with respect and bring in the experts many of them from CSIS people who have been working these issues for years no spin no bombast no finger-pointing just informed discussion. Get the truth of the matter on what is happening in Libya. Today we're going to talk with. CSIS's Bulan Ala Reza Strategies Strahl Arrays as the founding director of the Turkey project at CSIS previously. He served as a Turkish Cypriot diplomat in New York and in in Washington galleries. A thank you for helping us getting to the truth matter on this particular issue and I give you full credit for bringing this to our attention you stop being the hall the other day and said we really are at start taking a look at what's going on in Libya and that's kind of the mission of this podcast in that is to alert people to news that may be brewing under the surface and is getting no attention mainly because there's other news it's just crowding off the front pages And and the TV news and if ever there were a case when this is happening during this impeachment each month period This is certainly yet so tell us why we should be thinking about what's going on in Libya. Because if I were to run a survey I I would guess or not many people in America right now who are thinking about well you know. I visited Libya in the first decade of Gadhafi's rule which lasted for over four decades. And I kept my interest in in Libya but recently it peaked. Because all the escalation of fighting over there which not too many people say have picked up on and secondly the embattled government in Libya which is officially recognized by the United Nations some secured the backing of Turkey which became its main backer essentially the guarantor of his very survival. So I mean that this piqued my interest I wrote ACS commentary on according the and frankly. I think that more people should be interested because I mean this is strategically located country This is a country country in which the longtime dictator Gadhafi was deposed by a NATO operation led by the United States. Backing died Thousand Eleven now. One can't say that there was stability on the Gadhafi. During the time that he was in charge it was sort of the the piece of the grave whoever oppose them and was either killed or forced into exile or imprisoned but that has not be instabilities since he's been overthrown and the Arab spring a which the change of regime in Libya was a pot has really turned into an air winter from one end of the Middle East to the other including in Syria. Where there's still this ongoing civil war and the outcome of the of the current conflict in Libya I think as I said is more attention for a number of reasons? I mean one is sir. Whoever controls that will be a player in the Mediterranean basin? And we'll be able to Either lead the country through stability avoiding the kind kind of problems that the country has created for its neighbors in the Arab world as what is For its neighbors to the north beyond train like uncontrolled illegal migration terrorism and it is effect there in the oil picture The Libyan sweet crude oil is is important wouldn't because of its proximity it is cheap compared to through other sources of oil that come from elsewhere and we'll see how how much attention it will get as the situation worsens American presence there still. I mean we all remember Benghazi and the awful things that happened there. When Americans died became the nation the two thousand sixteen campaign and is fact is still an issue for the trump folk? WHO's there not too many Americans? The killing of the Ambassador Ambassador Ambassador Stephen Security in two thousand twelve. He had actually gone out to Libya even before. The civil war was over and had established a presence in in the country and became the first ambassador. He was directed By the administration the Obama Administration to go to Benghazi to find out what was going on and and it was killed by a mob Bob and that led to the disenchantment of the Obama Administration retract. It was not that interested in staying in Libya beyond the the overthrow Gadhafi Greeley. It was the origin of the phrase leading from behind that the Obama team kept on using Expand their foreign policy now subsequently confirmed or admitted that Not Remaining engaged in Libya was one of his biggest Regrets the US maintained a presence for a little while longer the US embassy in Libya was relocated outside the country while places Malta. Believe it or not. There was some degree of interest in counter terrorism operations nations so there were special forces that were sent drones were used both and and in Darna to workout and eliminate isis elements limits. But even that is now being taken off the board they're a some Oil companies still maintain an interest there although the engaging minimal minimal activities because of the of the civil war now you remember all the way back Some of the biggest companies like Exxon and Nelson bunker hunt from Texas. Were involved involved. Occidental was very much involved in Libya before Gadhafi and after Gadhafi but There isn't much when American presence there now Andrew. Thanks Bob can you explain to us who are the warring factions in Libya right now who are the opposing factions. What do they want and who does the US support yeah? What a great question But unfortunately it doesn't have a simple answer for the sake of argument and for Simplicity Sake we could say there are two sites. One is the government of National Court Based in Tripoli to the west of Libya under a man named Sir and that's the officially recognized the government amount of Libya but that recognitions almost meaningless. Because the writ of the government in in Tripoli doesn't go far outside Tripoli which is in fact besieged by the forces of the other side which is led by this very interesting character by the name of who was in general in Gadhafi's army me was captured in Chad The then Spirited him out of the country brought him to northern Virginia where he stayed became a citizen season and was overthrown. he flew back and he lived in northern Virginia for like twenty years or something right Yep. He contributed to political campaigns and he Voted in elections and to this day retains an American passport that he refuses to give up. People used to talk about him as he was an asset that he was an asset. Never tonight in fact he got involved in an effort Secret effort by the CIA over Gadhafi Right which failed he continued. Get to live in Northern Virginia right up to Gadhafi's overthrow and then he flew to Libya or simply as he says without the blessing supporter of the of the and then mounted this operation and put together these forces which he calls the Libyan National Army Ellen. A which is the other side Andrew drew of the war and he's actually captured most of the country and so he's based in Benghazi and he's working his way towards Tripoli as we talk well you know. Libya is a very the country. I mean we don't have time to go into history but it's really made up of three different pots. which as I said very different to each other? I mean there's triplet Tena Tripoli a plea to the West is the capital of the recognized government. They're Syrian Ikea to the east Next to Egypt With Benghazi as its main city and then there is the present the third province which really has much more in common with A sub Saharan countries like music and Chad Ben with the rest of of Libya and essentially what we have is a war between Syrian AK- Were half there is based and because all the way back to the Romans and and finishes these. Two provinces have never really got on battalions Invaded the country in one thousand. Nine eleven put them together. That's where the name Libya comes from. The talents called the fall short. It was their real crown jewel of their impact on the Mussalini and then the allied forces took over in nineteen forty-three rennet and then gave on the US independence due to Libya in nineteen fifty one. But honestly you know you cannot really. I understand the the fighting between these forces that reference through its past where Greeley this is one of the most improbable states certainly in the region if not in the world so who does the United States back if anyone in this clash and well that's the complication One of the competitions I refer to comes from back in April president trump called Halifa off that at the urging of presidency of Egypt whom president trump called my favorite potato gave full support to him in his effort to root how these slammers terrorists in SS backing his campaign now the State Department in fact the US Supports the human backed Government in Tripoli but given the fact that there is extra received this call from The president's he really has taken onboard any of the advice that's has been given to him. By various officials the cease and desist from the fighting and he believes that if and when he does capture Tripoli he will do so with his discreet support of the president in the United States. Let me make sure I heard you right. The United States backs one group and the president of the United States is called the leader. You're of another group and said he supports him while he put in a phone call to me in April two thousand nineteen what began. The push is brought into the outskirts of off Tripoli and saying as a halfback publicized. I support you in your effort to root out the terrorists from your country the US government still continues news to recognize the UN Beck Government in Tripoli which has the seat at the United Nations and which has an embassy in Washington DC. Well what did they say. Say about the president's call whether they were very annoyed and that needless this I would think so. Yeah but they had actually muted their criticism because they're continuing to maintain a dialogue with the United States. They send ministers over to to Washington who failed to get the kind of A high level meeting that halfback had at least telephone level. So we can say is the policy the US policy towards Libya like with many other countries is is confused. Confusing is your chance at hopped are what arrays name is. might be asked to investigate the Biden's rock in so far as I know there's no connection with Libya and ask. Oh you know this is not it is. I don't know why should be surprised by anything these days what is the. US is beyond issuing declarations nations. Once in a while that the the US would like to see a ceasefire lasting ceasefire and political settlement involving the parties and for Libya to return to stability which just proved elusive Ever get daffy was overthrown. There's not much. US involvement. Like I said there are no. US diplomats no US troops even of the covert kind no covert operations of the kind we saw against the terrorists and the the oil workers that were there are not there so the US this is. Lois committed as Certain two thousand eleven to the future of Libya. And that is worrisome. Much more to the government in Tripoli which wants backing from the United States because after all the recognized government then to doc who thinks that the US will not mind if it takes over..

Libya United States Gadhafi Greeley Tripoli Benghazi Andrew Schwartz CSIS Bob Schieffer United Nations Turkey Center for Strategic and Inter Tena Tripoli president Bob Washington DC Egypt Reza Strategies Strahl Arrays
"libya" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Clear that wildfires like those that have ravaged Australia recently or exacerbated by climate change hot weather and drought make fires more likely to happen and more devastating when they do and alongside the danger to wildlife homes and human lives. Some of Australia's cultural cultural history is also at risk earlier this month for the first time the National Gallery in Canberra at closed due to smoke saying that it endangered the public the staff and even the art works and selves. Now around the world museums are working out how to protect their own irreplaceable artifacts from a changing environment because of climate change rising sea levels frequent while advise and storms off a lot of the world's greatest and most precious this offense at risk ritual dobbs reports for the economist said the lose flooded in July two thousand seventeen which damaged a very very well-known painting. Ironically not go the full seasons the feet together in Florence such close during a heat wave during the biennial in Venice last year. There's very heavy flooding which meant that. Some of the expedition's had to be closed down in volunteers had to salvage affects various places so as these weather events and disasters become more extreme. I'm more frequent. These objects are increasing risk. But as you say other Infrastructure is at risk coming. What can museum ziems specifically do to protect what they're supposed to protect so museums are actually ahead of the game in this respect and how good for a long time because they have always had you think so Catholic about how to look after the objects that are in that CAF international organizations which have been running for a while help museums capacity for disasters guides them in what they should do? That is the organization Blue Shield which is describes the cultural equivalent of the Red Cross sign often often a disaster they would come in and help institutions remove that ultra facts restore them that kind of thing but they also help with the replanning for those kinds of evacuations making sure the museum's collections know today. There's also the International Council of Museums. which is the the body that kind of overseas and helps with all aspects of Kotal heritage preservation and they very recently in November established a committee four for disaster resilient museums so the aim of that committee is teaching museums how they can make themselves but protected to disasters to such as floods all bald size and so in that sense there are already museums out there that have have made? The changes have prepared themselves for what seems now inevitable. Yes there are definitely museums. The have prepared incredibly well. Four the impact of climate change wipe bring particularly because they've got a lot news news. So example is the Getty Center in Los Angeles which because there have been years of wildfires in California. But they won't incredibly hard tomake the Getty Center essentially fireproof so the wolves are all made from limestone and cement steel. The rooftops are all of crushed stone. In which is not flammable. The works are housed within sort of self contained watchos. It's like a building within a building and have air systems which will keep smoke back out to smoke is one of the things that could be damaging to walk and not fats so if there is a wildfire raging they just completely shut it down succulent the themselves and make sure that nothing gets gets damaged. The extent to which getty is now. Five roof is so strong that that social media people released a blog saying why getty is the safest place in California Nya during a fire during the wildfires. This also the Whitney Museum of American art which is in New York offer Hurricane Sandy which is in two thousand twelve of which was actually the time at which the Whitney was being built. The museum decided that Take the risk of flooding credibly seriously. It sits on the banks of the Hudson River which does make it particularly vulnerable. And so it's been built. Essentially a fortress to withstand several meters funder. That is a seven thousand kilogram flood door which was designed by the engineers who make the patches on US Navy warships which can withstand a storm bashing up against and also also any of the things that still might throat such as a truck that is floating down a high-speed I mean that's that's all well and good for big and established and well Oh endowed museums. But that's not museums. No it's not aunt whilst these museums are doing a fantastic job. That is a real worry that the implementation of this kind of disaster planning will be on even because the institutions that have less money. Find it much harder to put up. These kind of defenses are also also obviously coach institutions. Uh spread out of the large areas. Such is the biennial in Venice. It will be very hard to protect all of that from something the flooding and yet there's a worry that small poll institutions and coach will be disproportionately damaged which is both ironic and already Saad because often those are the places that have the heritage of poorer or indigenous communities who themselves more risk of exchange. Rachel thank you very much for your time..

Getty Center Venice getty Australia Whitney Museum of American art Canberra CAF Florence dobbs Hudson River Kotal National Gallery Blue Shield Saad Los Angeles International Council of Museu US Rachel Navy
"libya" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Yesterday Germany hosted an international conference aimed at bringing peace and stability to Libya for actors said they would again respect an arms embargo after nine months of intense fighting. The summit failed to secure a lasting ceasefire the conflict in Libya has festered. Ever since Moammar Gaddafi was toppled in two thousand eleven margin. McShane is are Middle East editor today on one inside you have the. UN backed government in Tripoli on the other you have Khalifa Dr a renegade commander who controls much of the east and south of the country and many of the country's oilfields oilfields in reality. Both sides are really just collections of militias and both draw heavily on foreign support. The Tripoli government is backed by Turkey. I'm and half doors backed by Egypt. The and Russia and as things stand on the ground heft ours. Forces are knocking on the doors of Tripoli but they have been since April and the frontlines aren't really moving that much. So that was a situation on the ground lenient to these talks in Berlin. It's a standoff. That has again drawn the attention of western Western powers who had taken a step back from the turmoil but the diplomacy in Berlin didn't go as far as it could have. The sides did not agree to a ceasefire. And that's a big deal but the foreign powers that back each side did agree to stop arming the combatants which is to say. They've agreed to stop ignoring a decades old arms embargo put in place by by the UN and that is meant to start the longer negotiation over a peace deal and will that work. Well that actually get closer to peace. T think it's the most helpful whole thing to happen in Libya in some time and yet I'm not very hopeful at all. Each side has just too much at stake. Here start with the foreign powers. You'll get Vladimir Putin. He's trying to build on. His success in. Syria extends influence in the eastern Mediterranean. And he thinks by backing Khalifa Abdur. That's the best way to do it now. Turkey on the other side has has even more on the line. Which is why it sent troops to Tripoli this month before all the chaos Turkish construction companies were heavily involved in Libya to the tune of something like twenty billion dollars dollars it would undoubtedly play a big role in rebuilding where peace ever to break out in Libya and signed a maritime border deal in November with the government in Tripoli that gives Turkey a decisive Zeiss of say in gas exploration in the eastern Mediterranean? Now these construction contracts that border deal these are things that get ripped up if half hour winds so Turkey. Rickie has a lot on the line and backing the government in Tripoli and let me just say word about half Dr here because he is the definition of a spoiler. I mean he's the reason why so you don't have much hope for Libya he's completely uncompromising believes Libya needs a strong man and of course that it should be him. He walked out of a conference in Moscow. The other week and we we said to be acting in the same usual stubborn way in Berlin he did not meet with fires. All Suraj the Prime Minister of the government in Tripoli and on Sunday his forces closed down to big oilfields in the southwest of the country. That was an attempt to show what kind of leverage he still holds over the government in Tripoli and so why has this come to a head now I mean dental half stars moves have been going on for some time and now it looks like there is this grand. International push for reconciliation think European countries have gotten more involved volved now because they see things getting out of control and they really want to stop that from happening and they want to do that because it's in their own interests to keep the conflict from really spiraling their. The biggest concern is really migrants and Libya had become a jumping off point for African migrants heading across the Mediterranean to Europe and there has been a downturn in the flow since two thousand seventeen nineteen when we got more involved and I think now they don't WanNa see another uptake and that's why you're seeing more action from France Italy and Germany also like Turkey. France and Italy have big energy interests in Libya and until now that has actually put them sooner on opposite sides of the conflict but recently they seem to be singing more more from the same hymn book and I think it's also for Germany and for Europe a test case of whether they can take a leading role in world diplomacy. And so. That's that's what the Berlin talks are all about you also saw at these talks. The European Union's foreign policy chief even hinted that you're might be willing to put troops on the ground if they're able to negotiate a peace deal and what about the Libyan people themselves which they make of all this jockeying for power and the international interest I mean Libyan. They really just want the fighting to stop. That was the main sense I got when I was in Tripoli last year people are just tired of a decade of chaos and instability. But they also see weakness in Tripoli government I mean fires Al Sir Ause the Prime Minister he is hostage to the militias. Who are supporting him? He doesn't have any real power and so many seem resigned to the idea that Libya I can only be ruled by a strong man and they're not so much rooting for Khalifa. Dr They just wanted to be over and think that will eventually come out on top. And what about the prospect aspect of Mr Half dark coming out on top as you say he's entirely uncompromising and seems to be the spoiler for multiple sets of talks here. How does this play out? If he's just simply not going to play the game. I mean you see this sort of grinding siege of Tripoli and I don't think he consider win this war on his own. He's been at the Tripoli since April so he needs foreign helped it all comes down to whether sort of Russia continues backing him and sort of how involved Turkey actually gets on the side of the UN back government in Tripoli if if the foreign powers cheap to the agreement reached in Berlin. Then you could see an end to this quite quickly. I don't foresee that happening. I think this war is going to go on on for some time yet and I think the foreign powers are going to get more involved from here after. Perhaps a momentary lull on the back of the Berlin Conference. Roger Thank you very much for joining us. My pleasure Every twenty five seconds. Someone is on the world's roads annually. That's over one point. Two million people more than are killed by malaria. HIV and AIDS. That's striking total has hardly moved since the turn of the century. But it disguises. A lot of change both for better and for worse in individual countries seems to be a sort of relationship between development on road. Death Joel Bud. Is Our social policy editor. He's been to Thailand to meet some of those who bear the personal cost of these tragedies. Thailand has more or less the highest road death rate of any country with half decent statistics. There's a lot of driving in Thailand. It's naught shameful to go to a bar and have three or four days and then get behind the wheel of a car or gets on your motor by lots of people. Don't wear helmets. Comments on the roads are very smooth and as a result you can go along them pretty quickly. As part of my reporting for US I I. I went to Bangkok and one of the people I went to see. Was the mother of a goal cold. I type out Santos. Aaron who about a year ago was crossing crossing the road near her school when she was hit by a motorbike rider and a few days later she died of her injuries. And you say in Thailand. That is not an uncommon story. No not at all so. The girl's mother teaches in a small private school and when I went to see her they had just come back from holidays holidays and she said that a child had turned up on on the very first day with a with a serious head injury and she asked this boy. How did you get out? And he said Oh. I was in a road accident on one of her fellow. Teachers didn't turn up at all and this was because She had been walking along the side of the road when she was hit by motorbike and was knocked down and she injured her shoulder and.

Tripoli Libya Tripoli government Turkey Berlin UN Thailand Germany Russia Moammar Gaddafi editor Egypt Prime Minister Khalifa Abdur Middle East Vladimir Putin Mr Half McShane
"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Miller and finally on today's show at this admittedly early stage of the new decade there are indications that the twenty twenties may prove a golden age for inexplicably revived old folk songs with vaguely unsavory nationalistic edges last week in the UK. In what would have seemed like quite turn up most of the nineteen seventy S and nineteen ninety S. The I tunes chart was topped by the Wolfe tones. Come out ye black interns and admittedly stirring pro. IRA anthem launched up the charts as a protest against a proposed commemoration commemoration of Early Twentieth Century. Irish police forces this week. It appears to be the ton off royals in the form of death Younes ammo heath currently I tunes. UK Number One. It goes like this. Ah and joining me now to explain. How this has happened is Monaco's Toronto? Bureau chief Thomas Lewis whose qualifications to comment may be gleaned from his accent. I cannot help but suspect. Today's producer reese. James may be in on this as well Thomas. First of all to a non Welsh Ashley. Listenership who is death even well devotee. Wine is often described by non well speakers as I guess. The Welsh language is answer to figures. Like Bob Dylan Joan Baez. You know he was really the sort of voice and the singer of the Welsh languages protest movements from May when he was in his twenty s in the sixties was convulsed by its own protest movements like there were around the world as well but he really is an iconic feet figure to Welsh Welsh speakers and Amal Heat. And I can't deny your had you know has at the back of standing on end hearing that close to anthem as you get really for. Lots of Welsh speakers is one of those. There's rare songs for well. Speaking people there is songs like this many countries around the world where no matter who you ask wherever they are they will know that you and they will know the chorus for certain and it really is something whether you agree with the politics of the song. That really is something quite universal among among Welsh speakers. And it's been a welcome under the real surprise that it's now hit. The U K I jeans charts is quite a quite surprising thing. I think philosopher s what will having established that. It's basically the Welsh equivalent to minute. Minute works down under and the role that fulfills the my people. We'll talk about the the content of the song shortly but the fact of it being number number one which is why we're talking about. How and why has this happened? Well it's happened because of a sort of nascent. I suppose kind of campaigns look at the the idea of Welsh into patterns now Welsh independence as a notion is quite different to say sort of ideas of independence in Scotland. Free example given that in Wales's for for decades been tied to the language itself and that's why figures like. WD One who wrote them. All he have become such tokens really and in such towering figures for many Welsh speakers because the idea of an independent Wales meant living and thriving language a language that campaigners will tell you that for for for centuries you know various invaders of Wales and the English I among them try to stamp out and kill off and Amal. He'd means we are still here. What divy they wanna saying there is the language is still here despite all the attempts to kill it off entirely so this new campaign trying to to raise awareness for for wash independence used it as the theme music if you like For for a television campaign they've launched and it really has gained gained traction in this with people far beyond I suppose the remits and musical terms at least the remits the target audience that he was trying to get at. I suppose I mean as I noted in the introduction it does through bizarre happenstance follow to the top of the charts the Wolfe tones. Come out you black and tans which is fairly unmistakable in that sentiment not least because it is in English but this song obviously is Sung in Welsh in there for the subtleties of it may be lost on non well L. Speakers but is is there the same kind of belligerence underpinning a to resist a different kind of vision of independence. Nationalism when is basically basically a roll call of the injustices that have been carried out against the Welsh people by the English over the centuries and the big scene. If if you like in the song is the nine hundred and sixty nine investiture of Prince Charles. As Prince of Wales which was a hugely controversial moment for Welsh speakers across Ross Wales given that the optics of the son of an English monarch now gaining the the crown of the historic. Welsh principalities With something to be fought again stand. There's a long and rich history to the militancy and the the sort of protests that surrounded US prevented nine hundred sixty nine. This was written in one thousand eighty one and released in nineteen eighty three. And since then given the Wales has had varying agreeing sort of fortunes. If you like at the hands as campaigners would say of of london-based governments it has gained various different. Guises over those. Yes I think Back in two thousand nine signed the first Welsh language record label celebrated its fortieth anniversary and the crowning of those celebrations is a big concert in the closing. Number of that concert was d'avray one with all joined by a huge roster of the current great and good of Welsh folk and pop singing all sang this song together and he had tears in his eyes and there was a real moment. I think for Welsh speakers. At least that really saw that. This song is kind of a universal thing really no matter. What political era you find? Find yourself head. Thomas Lewis in monocle Welsh embassy in Canada. Thank you very much for joining us. That is all for today. The briefing was produced by reese James Bay H on yelling Goffin. It was research by Nick. toomey studio manager today was Louis Allen. I'm Andrew thanks very much for listening and.

Wales Welsh Ashley Thomas Lewis UK L. Speakers Amal Heat IRA Bob Dylan Joan Baez Ross Wales S Miller Prince Charles Scotland Bureau chief US James producer Louis Allen Wolfe
"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Now to take a look the latest business headlines and joined as usual by Bloomberg's and bugs you and pots We will start with optimism in the world of microchips. Andrew Yes t s MC may not be a company which you know a great deal about apologies if you do. Taiwan semiconductor manufacturing is the world's biggest contract chip maker and it's today being issuing some rather punchy projections quarterly revenue growth now having some concerns amongst investors. The world's largest chipmaker could have problems with the tightening tightening restrictions on hallway. The Chinese furniture the leader in mobile technology and the rollout of the new five G.. Networks has been facing increasing pressure from the US and its allies concerns over ten tech security which the company denies but the Chairman of M. C.. Today saying that if it should lose holy business then those orders can very quickly replaced from other customers. Currently about ten percent of the company's revenues to Kuala Away Apple is also the apples main chip maker to apple comes really banking on the roll out of these fifth-generation enabled smartphones during twenty twenty and over the next couple of years northbound money being spent building these new networks a real boom for TSMC. It's a pretty interesting business chip business. According to one estimate the whole thing's worth about four hundred ten billion dollars. It's an enormous sector but it's very very cyclical worse than a lot of other sectors. Twenty nine team is not a good year across the sector. Revenues dropped by about twelve percent but Taiwan's having sully optimistic about this year. Cohort of people possibly less optimistic one with one thing and another mobile phone operators in India. Yeah I think Vati certainly a fair to say. Thirteen billion dollars is the cost to them of a co- case just been settled in the Indian Dean Supreme Court now. This has been rumbling. On for as long as twenty years the big mobile phone operators in India including Bharti airtel and Vodafone I dea have been challenging the way the authorities calculate their annual adjusted gross revenue now. That number is used to work out the amount of money which is paid hi to the government in license and spectrum fees and they've been disputing the way it's worked out but it's finally reached the top of the Indian court system and they have ruled in the government's is favor and this bill could be or we know it is as much as four billion dollars for Vodafone's India venture for three billion dollars for Bharti airtel title. Thirteen billion dollars across the sector. A lot of money is just the latest setback for mobile operators. India it's been a really really rough place to be running a mobile business back in twenty sixteen the new entry by Billionaire really disrupted the industry by offering free cool and cheap data not welcome by the other players at all so it's been a really tough place and this is not welcome news on top of that you and pulse. What's at Bloomberg? Thanks for joining us. You are listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty.

India Bharti airtel Bloomberg Vodafone Taiwan semiconductor manufactu Apple Indian Dean Supreme Court US Taiwan Andrew Chairman Indian court Vati
"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Monocle Rolex. Renew the pioneers. The pine fine as a brand new series that tells the stories of people improving the planet. A heroic supports the innovators with whom they share a passion to safeguard in the F for future generations gain precious insight into the fresh thinking that is disrupting received wisdom for the better and learn how Phyllis action continues to be the crucial driver of change. The pine his in partnership with Rolex. You are listening to the briefing with me Andrew. Camila it's time now to take a longer look at some of the day's other big stories on joined on today's panel by Alex Fong Toman The historian author and screenwriter and Mary Leconte political journalist and author. You should by all of their books as soon as you finish listening to this. First of all four an unprecedented two days running news panel is going to look at the internal machinations of the Vatican. Yesterday we address the apparent disagreement between the current and previous pope over taking a more flexible approach to priestly celibacy. Today we'll look at what an apparent Seidel away from another cornerstone of the Church's thinking which has long held that while women may have their uses. They're not really cut out for senior executive office. However ever Pope Francis has for the first time named a woman to the Vatican's secretariat of state? which handles the churches diplomatic relations she is? Francesca Giovanni Johny A long-serving Vatican lawyer Murray Festival are never quite sure what the correct acknowledgement is when a somewhat ossified institution drags it so kicking and screaming into the eighteenth century in this respect do we give them A. Is it Maury round of applause or a slow hand clap I would probably go for the slayer Ham club. I feel at people saying that. This is a big victory of massive move is it. Is it really the singular woman really to a job you know that that's another is relatively senior but is not. He'd need that no. I'm not impressed. I'll be honest Alex and you. I mean there's a similar question I guess it's always an we've seen it a lot in the coverage of this regarding you're describing Pope Francis says progressive. I mean these things are always relative but but seriously I mean it's within an institution that really does move as glacial pace over the centuries and not always in a forward direction or progressive direction to An I mean you know good. I suppose we're still quite a long way off sale woman becoming poke for instance Yeah good I suppose. I'm glad we didn't hang out the bunting and Organiz fireworks for this one. I mean the fact is the well seem. It's the fact I've never been pope in. It's it's it's unlikely I will be asked for a variety of reasons but I suspect one of the things you do have to take into consideration that trivial relatively vo. This seems there's going to be a significant noisy cohort of his flock who are going to find some way to be outraged by this. Probably and obviously there's a huge quite conservative conservative presidents within the church. Vatican's why do you think that you know pope. Francis could not have to select turn up and said by the way from now on Hoffa workforce of the Vatican will be women woman identified. It could have worked out. Second me crude. He kids whether that would be a good decision vision for the future of the Catholic in feature. I'm not entirely sure But then as I do think you know may maybe actually were being a bitchy snarky and maybe actually it. It is eight seven the right direction but all say the pace at which they can realistically move on that thought again. It's a it's a wide to question which which gets raised by things like this. which is that? Are we still for all that. It is now the year twenty twenty and this is supposed to supposed to be an age of reason enlightenment and so forth are we still generally actually too indulgent of any sort of ultra conservative backwardness when it is presented as religion religion. I mean if this was any sort of other major bureaucratic or governmental organization this would be regarded as outrageous. Yes and I mean the kind gold status that this situation has because of course the Catholic Church as a church can really do what it likes. I mean if people want to join US conservative. And that's really their business religion agents a private matter but it is also in terms of the Vatican. It is a state It it obviously has power that extends beyond the borders of that state is well particularly in parts of the world in Latin America and Southeast Asia. Various places that have large Catholic Christian populations parts of Africa as well This has a huge influence policy. So it's it's a bit different from a source of regular religion in terms of its institutional power on the other hand. It's complicated to say whether that makes accountable because the structure of religion is not a democracy. I mean people of course all free to leave it. Should they not like what it's doing. And there are sort of internal battles over at me and we've really seen that with Not Sir refers cinematic version even the two popes The currently hey around You know and and Rats and together former Pope Benedict you. Know has certainly not being quiet about his more conservative failings in the face of these enormous forms Like possibly rethinking that regional priests should be allowed to marry which obviously some people find very threatening But I think it's it's complicated ballots and I still feel that in a way outside just like me. I mean I'm not a Catholic there's limited extent to which I can have opinions. I can talk about it but you know none of my business. Marie is is there a thing as well and this is the second question. I'm going to put which my son on vaguely sympathetic to Pope Francis. It is a strange job. He has but he is their thing with any church. Like I guess other institutions which were founded centuries ago somehow persisted light royal families that if you modernize them past a certain in point you kind of end up on the morning the point of them. That's a very tough question. You have forty I'm not sure that that's I'm not entirely sure what to say to that. I suppose that again you know. I didn't think that I think that there has been revolutionary popes in the past things in this area as well for them so I think that that has appointed kind of moving slow pace and again you know I think when you compare what trump's France's actually has done so far with the way it's being covered you know it has very much been covered you know. He's sort of like great. So basically Seychelle Justice Warrior when again you know. He's done things like appointing one woman. I think he's really playing it quite well. Okay well let's move along somewhat but persist with the the theme of secretive and old fashioned institutions tiptoeing nervously into the sunlight and into the future for the first time television cameras are to be permitted into Crown Coats in England and Wales trials will not be televised as such broadcasts would be limited to the sentencing remarks of judges in criminal cases of significant public public interest so courtroom sketch artists need not seek alternative employment. Just yet Alex we will come along to the various Strictures being placed on this development but in general where are you on televising court proceedings in general. I think I've heard mixed views from the people that are actually involved. You Know Lawyers Bar Council and so on I mean I I think actually you know an Olympic context. This is about sentencing remarks. It's not about the whole trial trial. So everybody's cautious trying voiceover J Simpson Spectacle. And I think that's right. Try Avoid I actually think this could be quite a good thing on the basis that you know what we quite often here is simply the verdicts in any given Trial especially high profile ones often all sentencing remarks which really make a lot more sensitive verdict if you read them but they don't get the kind of publicity often that the simple verdict does so you're going to be coming out with all incredibly light sentence so oh you know this is up and actually without the context. It's sometimes quite difficult. I think to communicate that so I think it could be quite good potentially public communication to actually you know in the public understanding of the Lord engaged Gagen with the law to put sentencing remarks out. There I know there are some reservations in the ball council about it leading to attacks on individual judges And unpack sort of intimidation of them I mean if they feel that their faces gauge beyond the tally Does that somehow inhibit them I mean it is a concern but I think these things have to be balanced against each other in terms of their benefits and cost. Marie USA is something in that this idea that broadcasting broadcasting the sentencing remarks at least will remind people that it is often more complicated than it might look that just life in general the Lauren in general because it is something I have observed in my years of living among the British. I can't claim the destroying immune from this is that is that the the general reaction certainly certainly the online reaction to Basically any conviction for the most trivial crime is that the person does convicted should be probably drawn quartered beheaded remains locked up and the key thrown ceremoniously away. Would it help this. Perhaps take a encourage people to take a more nuanced view of justice. And I would hope so because I do think I've seen it was so many court cases especially on twitter and I'd like to think that I actually kind of nerdy on the nerd year end of the bubble media media but still. Yeah the amount of kind of decisions coming out and people criticizing them hugely and then two nephews people normally barristers kind kind of new meekly tweeting saying but you know actually if you would read what I can actually read i. It will make a lot more sense so I do think that everyone in and I'm sure I've done as well. It's very crazy to look at sentencing and just have opinions. I think forcing that putting into context. especially if it's going I think the purpose of it is to show On the news on Telly I think having being you know being able to have that segment of at an even eight thirty forty seconds of the judge can explaining something I would hope would help but as I said I do think that there there is one concern about the safety of judges especially in licking kind of You know the headlines. I think we've had over the past year. So I think enemies of the people being the obvious example Temple We do live in very polarized times. So whether that's actually going to be a warrior no I'm not sure I I'd like to thank you will not be. I do think it it it. It may end up being a problem down the line. Alex what do we make of the restrictions that so far at least two going to govern this development because as you the noting early it will just be the judge on camera. They won't be the victims. No jurors no witnesses no lawyers and so forth. Are they taking this slowly. I I think almost Vatican Spin I think the it's it's a cautious move and I think it's probably right to be cautious me for exactly the reasons we've been discussing if there is a kind of backlash to this. If there is trouble if it does get difficult I think they want to be able to move back from that and I think that's quite difficult school to feed gone the whole way to then reel it in. I think it's easier to bring it out bit by I think say quite seriously and I mean we already..

Pope Francis Alex Fong Toman Marie USA Rolex Phyllis Catholic Church senior executive Mary Leconte Francesca Giovanni Johny Organiz US Africa Southeast Asia twitter Murray Festival France Lawyers Bar Council Hoffa Latin America
"libya" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"libya" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The standoff it's a situation in which you have people on board the justice cape torture comes in libya and now they're again in custody windy and cold other kids had no other chance then trended deport because of the situation was deteriorating people were threatening to strode himself overboard yet medical emergencies that had to be evacuated but could not just wait for every single person to become a medical emergency before shanta support ruben have you had a chance to speak with captain recanting or any of the migrants who were on boat i have a chance to speak to co lead she's fine she's pretty happy about the judgment because it's a clear sign for solidarity and it's a clear sign also to all other kept on the mediterranean sea doesn't make sense extra to follow the international law and the law of the sea and to respect human rights for people in maritime distress it does sound like this could come up again perhaps not with captain rocket day but likely with another ship rescuing migrants at sea do you intend to keep fighting italian government on this of course we will continue to enforce human rights on the mediterranean sea we will continue to follow the international law as we always do it because it's not a crime it's not fighting the government to rescue people in distress it's got one men fighting basic human principles if you're criminalized see rescue so what will happen to the migrants who were on the sea watch three there now inland producer they might be distribution to other european countries now it's not pretty clear but the most important thing is they lead but they are in safety in the day and not have to electric ruben annoy bauer with watch thank you very much for speaking with us you know the deadly fire on board a small nuclear submarine is front and center russian president vladimir putin pope francis expressed his condolences for the fourteen sailors who died in the incident tomorrow boot and has along scheduled audience with pope francis at the vatican in the background of that meeting is a deep divide between the russian orthodox church andy ukrainian orthodox church an rome's own role in the politics of these two religions arena do ken was a research fellow of georgetown university's berkeley center for religion piece in world affairs up bruton and the pope have met two times before wire they meeting again what do they actually have to talk about my impression is that puts in a meeting with pope francis is part of a larger italy but also it so happens there are issues for to talk about statistically the situation in ukraine and also as i understand it the situation in the middle east because in terms of the letter both the pope and puts in that position elders people who are particular literally worried about the fate of middle true christian what do you think is pollutants motive behind kind of representing middle east christians i mean russia's intervening in in the war in syria do you think he's trying to kind of burnish what they're trying to do their oh sure of course russia credits darkly strong relationship with the christian population of syrian palestine in general you know the reality is in the middle eastern christians are in trouble and for whatever reason the government is real strategic point of view i used to soft power just like recourse here you know just trying to be friendly a nice and you know forget they're dropping newman or they met in twenty fifteen a second time and at the time of pope francis urged everybody all the parties in ukraine and conflict to kind of make a sincere effort for peace what what will the pope to help hooton about eastern ukraine and crimea you bet you'll listen to this time well honestly i think he'll say something about peace and i think nothing's gonna happen i don't think we're gonna listen to any anything you're where the in ukraine there is a situation around the ukrainian in.

libya
"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

22:10 min | 2 years ago

"libya" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"The Halloween the cabins doctors nothing. We netted. Many people would argue that off the various uprisings and revolutions across the region in two thousand eleven in fact, Libya was the one true revolution in that. It wasn't just the fall of dictator. It was the collapse of his entire regime, but again Gadhafi's regime was not a dictatorship in the classic sense of the word. It was a regime that was run on a very ad hoc basis. Layers of patronage decisions being made by Gadhafi sometimes at whim changed from one day to the next there were institutions in Gadhafi's Libya, but they were not solid institutions. And for example, one of the challenges that has really been deviled Libya's transition is the fact that in two thousand eleven Libya didn't really have a proper army to speak of because Gadhafi having come to power in nineteen sixty-nine on the back of a military coup. He participated in always feared that military offers Sirs would attempt a coup against him. So what he did was he hollowed out the Libyan military. So by the time two thousand eleven rolled along what you had was less Libyan army, and instead battalions that were commanded by Gadhafi's own sons that lack of a proper military in Libya has really been one of the major challenges post two thousand eleven because instead the security vacuum was filled by those who consider themselves revolutionaries in two thousand eleven who formed brigades on that basis, and those brigades evolved into the multitude of militias you see across the country today. What's happening in Libya is very much a proxy war. You could say that actually that proxy war elements started manifesting itself during the uprising of two thousand eleven in terms of rivalry between various Gulf states in particular. And what we've seen since two thousand fourteen which was the year that Libya tipped into a civil conflict is a rush of those external actors in to the Libyan war theater. If you like particularly on the side of Khalifa after the powerful commander who's based in eastern Libya who began an offensive fund on Tripoli two weeks ago. His key backers are Egypt and the United Arab Emirates more recently Saudi Arabia who buy into the narrative, he is tried to impose on Libya and a narrative he is used to project himself as a military leader who is trying to purge Libya of Islam assume, all shades from designated terrorist groups, but. Also political Islam, including the Muslim Brotherhood who have participated in the democratic transition. They've taken part in in elections in post Gadhafi Libya. That was Mary FitzGerald. You're listening to the foreign desk. Monocle twenty four for more now on what is happening in Libya, and what might happen on joined by an alga Mati and Mohamed El jaw on us or go. Mattie is the founder and director of the subject institute, a non governmental think tank based in Libya's capital Tripoli. He joins us here in the studio in London and Mohamed El jaw is co-founder of Libya outlook research and consultancy based in the eastern, Libyan city of Tabuk, he joins us from Amman and as all start with you. What are your friends and family and colleagues in Tripoli saying about what has been happening over the past few weeks? Also. Yes, so I guess it's been terminated by a number of highest concentration of military Tech's of becoming from the south west of the city. That's no having much more of an impact on Valentine Tripoli over the last few days when there has been a grad missile attack in a densely populated neighborhood called Highland this out in the district. Now, that's. Led to I think six or seven casualties. Twenty three injured in the numbers still growing. So it's it's nab beginning to have much more of a humanitarian impetus we have two hundred and five of the lost count from the W H O two hundred and five killed twenty thousand have already been displaced. So the numbers are Clarendon bad. And I think it's it's tested me to those numbers. They're getting so much higher. Given the absence of diplomatic pressure on leave after just up on us. What's the sense you're able to get off how well Tripoli is being defended. And who is defending it, and whether the the nominal government awfully beer is actually in charge of that defense. Yeah. There were three groups that had been tasked with with securing Tripoli over the last three years skew arrangements that were made by the UN into those and sixteen now that was the official designated groups that came to defend, but given the degree to which author has kind of polarized and put many people in Libya into this kind of existential threat. Many of them are scared that he's trying to recreate states that they'd lived on difficulty. Two years. The the return of mood. Rule has really coalesced than mobilized not only the groups that had fought against Daffy, but has mobilize people that put their weapons down into dozen Evans. There was a rush of blood to the head this tens of thousands of people that have now mobilized and come in from to these like Misratah from Zambia from Amazon non-arab cities from ethic, or is it's a huge coalescing of different groups. And I think the idea of control is going to be a very tough one for the government. They can control necessarily over those groups, and that's what the preparations have lit like over the last couple of weeks. It's been operation rooms in establishing or an attempt to establish some form of control. But many of those groups are still unified in that basic principle that they do not want the country to return to material, and they don't believe this myth of authoritarian stability Mohammed bring you in at this point win Kelly for half tars offensive is viewed from the east of Libya. Is there any particular great enthusiasm forward among the people in the east of Libya? Do they understand where he thinks he's going with this? After his main support base is definitely in eastern Libya, and obviously in eastern Libya, people have seen his successes in Benghazi and in Darna in defeating extremist groups that have been designated by the international community as as terrorist groups, some of them were responsible, for example, for the killing of the US ambassador in Benghazi, and obviously the the price for that has been really big in terms of destruction in terms of the death toll. And in terms of the displacement that has happened in places like been Rasi and in Derna since two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen sixteen it only started to come down in two thousand seventeen and eighteen however, right now, people appreciate the fact that there is a sense of security stability and normal. Life returning to the cities that have previously been plagued by extremist groups such. Unsorted Shetty out or dies or other ideological groups it cetera. So I think in eastern Libya people really understand where Holly fa after is coming from after living in chaos under the threat of the spread of extremist groups under the mercy of an umbrella of militias of different backgrounds, criminal networks, etc. And the other issue that we would need to keep in mind is that typically is important in that old the governing institution, the actual governing institutions of Libya are based there and these include the central Bank, and the national oil corporation that manages the oil sector, and I believe that the way that it is viewed in eastern Libya is that armed groups in typically and politicians in Tripoli, no matter where they're from necessarily from Tripoli, but they control these assets. And they have been coercing the state. They have been squandering the. Public funds it cetera. So there is that view in eastern Libya that this is happening. And in addition to that Holly fa after launched his offensive only, let's say about ten days before a national conference that was being brokered by the United Nations, and many people are asking why is he doing that? Why did he do that part of the rationale on relief aside is that we do not have any military prisons in western Libya and near the capital or in the capital Tripoli? How can we ensure that whatever is agreed in a national conference or any political agreement can actually be implemented on the ground? And how can we safeguard our interests? When other armed groups have presence or other political groups or armed groups have presence in Tripoli while we do not. And this is one of the rationales one of the reasons why Khalifa have to want to mobilize before the national conference. So that he could actually have a military presence in. The area and similarly Royston imagining they might be a little bit less enthusiasm in Tripoli and in western Libya four that disciplinarian oil on fist of Holly. Fa after even if it does restore a measure of peace and order, this is of course, an argument, which has been made by by similar strong men in similar circumstances for well for centuries. Really, well, the piece in an order argument. I think is a bit of care that we've already seen the last couple of weeks, but also the operations that if after and Muhammed was referencing in, but as in where he promised to take four days, but took four years, and then left the city with a huge number of people that have been displaced, I think the idea that eastern Libya and its western Libya, they're against this is a bit of a myth people that own from one hundred thousand of them were displaced in this pretext. This narrative that Muhammadu actually arguing for an I believe that's an over exaggeration. There are extremist forces everywhere that you go that do not oppose highly for half the authors forces, actually, Libyan national army is in self at this. Mation campaign. Many of the groups that fight for the Libyan national army, aren't Libyan. They're not national because I have a presence everywhere else. And if you use the word OMI have twelve inch beards that mentally salaries that are radicalized that have Saudi shakes on the front lines with them in many of their operations this pretext of fighting Jihadism of fighting a foreign threat. I think is a bit of an overstretched, and I think that's been used for too much. Now, it's very very little mileage left in the second argument that they're trying to defeat those that have been absconding with public funds is also interesting when the central Bank if after has a very interesting relationship with his son Saddam after that he sends into Tripoli the first brigade the one six brigade, according to the UN panel of expert reports went into the central Bank coffers in eastern Libya and walked out with cliff three quarters of a billion dollars in cash. Let's still unaccounted for in Hamadan writings over the last few days is actually published that full billion dinars around two point eight billion dollars is still unaccounted for. So the idea that they're trying to free people from those that are pillaging the public offers as again. A bit of an overstretched given their relationship with pitching in the public offers in eastern Libya. So the idea of stability, I think is a bit of an overstretch. I think many people now in eastern Libya reports now the people in eastern ABI are no longer allowed to put up comments on Facebook. So I don't know what kind of stability. It's being imagined over this certainly of the authoritarian flavor, the people that are in in Tripoli in western Libya, an all celebrating the fact that many of those groups have come under and have have ever pillaged the public offers. I think what they're arguing for is don't give them an -opoly on that term legitimate. Use of force. Don't call them an army if you call them an army, that's them for life. You know, you can't get rid of them. If you call them, an armed group is designated under the ministry of interior, you can investigate them, you can potentially get rid of them, but it's constantly used as a pretext and extremism is the one that has constantly pretext. I think it's a bit of a slow Detroit to consider the two point seven million people that are based in Tripoli and in the surrounding region. Many of whom mobilized against military rule are somehow labelled as extremists or a tighter extremists the presence of some is absolutely in. No doubt. There may be presence of around seven or eight leaders that we've heard, but they've got it this term of any meaning, and it's it's a narrative that is not only in eastern Libya in western Libya. But it's definitely promoted by the Gulf. I mean Saudi Arabia, for example, cold, atheism and active territory, recently highly for half. There's Eleanor spokesman called the president of Libya, the UN president a terrorist, then whether or not that word has been given any meaning anymore. It's been overstretched. The news so much as a slur a thinly-veiled slur to acquire political parrot and make it paragraph grab, and I think we should call it that Muhammad when this conflict is being reported in most western media is being framed as an incipient civil war between west and east is that how it seen within Libya do people in the east of Libya where your based see people in the west of Libya as great rivals divided by geography or other divisions different from that now in eastern Libya, contrary, for example, to what NS view is of the Libyan national. Army in eastern, Libya, people actually view the Libyan national army as national and indeed the Libyan national army is not only made up of members from eastern Libya only know, there are actually officers and soldiers from Tripoli from and from the south so from all over Libya, so as I said the view in eastern Libya now, this is a national army that has been deprived from national resources. For example, has not been supported that is an arms embargo and has been fighting terrorism in been rising in Derna, and it has been let down by the international community that has been for years since twenty eleven trying to look for a governance system in Libya and a political solution to the to the problems in Libya protests failed miserably until now and increasingly people find themselves on fortunately between two options. Either the chaos of militias, division and instability. Or a strong memorable. Unfortunately, these are the only two applicable options. I know that there are people who are pushing for the idea of a political solution that would lead to elections in a democratic rule in Libya. But unfortunately, people do not have a lot of faith in such an such an argument given that we already had three elections in Libya since twenty eleven and we had a number of governments. But unfortunately, the failures are too. Great Muhammed use the phrase air in reference to eastern Libya, let down by the international community. Is there a sense of that in western Liberia in Tripoli at the moment because there has been at least. So it seems to me a curious silence from the international community at large in defensive what he's supposed to be with you like it or not the internationally recognized government in Libya. Is there a feeling among people in Tripoli more should be done to assist? Government. And if so what number one at least calling things by their real name highly for half their launched and naked paragraph in Tripoli, the the UN special Representative to Libya essential call today a coup. And at least he's calling Cuban the UN Security Council is still unable to use language. It's constructively vague to ask both parties to urged restraint from both parties. And I think that's where symptomatic of something that we began into dozen Levin. It comes back. I full circle in the UN resolution. Some doesn't was passed was about the responsibility to protect civilians, their responsibility is still there, and they're still not protecting civilians from not only a naked power grab and an offensive has killed civilians and displaced twenty thousand already in Tripoli, but has also not protecting them from this ton of return to military rule that they fought against them. They rose up against eleven. So I think what we really come into here is and it ties into what Muhammad is saying. But this idea of either is going to be chaos and anarchy or it's going to be authoritarian rule. It's really about the stories. We tell us about who we are. And it doesn't eleven many Libyans. Many Arabs north African citizens Egyptians Syrians. Yemenis baharan is all rose up and wanted to tell different stories. This story's what about chaos and anarchy in in rioting, angry Arabs? And it's that kind of narrative, which would be careful of because it's a dog whistle to the far ROY in Europe, the foro in your wants to view the world in this very simplified, overly simplified, dangerous binary of autocrats and jihadists or autocrats and terrorists if you don't have as it's going to be ISIS. I think Libyans are are the Arabs north Africans and middle easterners, Sandra. Eighteen million of them could come up with a different solution. But this idea of forcing is there in this other story, the story that is not told about brave her activities that once about a life that wants to enjoy very vital freedoms that you need now in the twenty first century econ military rule is is not only as an incompetent way of ruling. But it doesn't allow for the very color the vibrance of people's grievances that respiration there needs in the twenty first century modern well to articulate themselves and ask for that. Demands the idea that is being promoted by another side by the authoritarian can of cleanser they make America. Great again mega. It's making a photo isn't great again. Ready? The Saudi UAE Egyptian brokered narrative is if you don't have hours, it's the jihadists and that law in has come at the expense of thousands of civilians. It's two thousand people that were killed in Egypt Antos and thirteen in a single day of protests in Libya already hundreds that have already been killed but go back to fourteen after launch two coups. And if we speak about Philippe after then we have to think about as history since nineteen sixty nine till two dozen might teen fifty years his defected from the king of Libya Gadhafi from Gadhafi to Hebron Chad from Chad to Langley Virginia where he was working with the CIA to the Libyan opposition where he defected in seven in issue. He devoted to another opposition into doesn't on four. He reconciled with Gadhafi inquirer. He turned his back on good Daffy in Cairo. And join the Libyan revolution. In two thousand eleven who defected from an launch a coup in February two thousand fourteen against that. I let parliament. And then reneged on a NAS they'll now until the nineteen anyone that takes his west seriously is it's just not serious in my mind. We are unfortunately running out of time. So I want to conclude by asking you each in turn, basically, how you see the next few years playing out in Libya, and I guess to focus that a little bit. I'll ask when you talk to your friends, family and associates in eastern Libya, are they still thinking of Libya in terms of something that is or should still be one country. Is there a prospect of an actual formal split of Libya? Do you think I think people still see themselves as Libyan for sure? But unfortunately, the continuation of the instability and the the conflicts and the low level civil wars that Libya has witnessed will definitely close the social fabric in Libya to rupture. So example, is we look at the conflict in Tripoli. It is being used by various groups. That are grappling for for power in Tripoli political. Islam would be those that support the LA and various other groups you can see that. There is a lot of hate speech where you sometimes talked to think are we really one country the way that people are speaking about each other. Unfortunately, this might be a minority, but with social media, this is being amplified a great deal. So the way I see it is that, unfortunately, if the instability continues, and the lack of governing authority in Libya continues, we will see more conflicts, and we will eventually witness the fragmentation on the complete disintegration of the country that wants was cold Libya are just to try and conclude this on an optimistic note if everything that could go right went right over the next four five six seven years where could he be a be? I think we honestly were it's such a beautiful country with natural resources, but more than anything. It's people. It's. People have spoiled for something that they put the lawyers on the law in force. And I think in that respect there's so much that could be done. But there are so many obstacles there, and I think the first of all who is the notion of truth and reconciliation. We need to be able to kind of make an established bonds with one another again, and that means people returning from places they were displaced, but also being honest about their grievances, honest about their aspirations and making sure that people that Muhammad refer to as those are using or that have agreed in their hearts and not masking that greed by using people's grievances the acquire power, so I think that's very very important. But for truth, you need freedom of expression. And I think it's still vital. These are vital components of not only a of a place like Libya that in it needs this kind of injected can a fuel. But it's something that we need in the twenty first century. So that's that's the first, but the second is so important is now that they have to establish the international community must establish an arms embargo and really enforce it the number of arms flying in and flowing through to eastern Libya through the UAE, which established overseas airbase in Libya in eastern to be an according to people on the ground. Has thought launch drone strikes and western over the last four hours is perilous. I mean, the number of civilians civilian casualties that could and displaced people that can take place because of this uptake and almost immune use of of of an air force is really really dangerous establishing a fair rules of the game immunizing Libya for more weapons that could ripen those actors not only to work together and talk into another which they have to eventually, but also trying to find a way a common path going forward, and a common path is not gonna come through guns and drones it's gonna come through truth and reconciliation and talking to one another an alga Mati and Mohamed El thank you both very much for joining us. That's it for this episode of the foreign desk where back next week and look out for the foreign desk. Explainer available every Wednesday. The foreign desk is produced by Yolene Goffin and Bill Bill also edits the program. My name is Andrew Miller. Thanks very much for listening until next time. Goodbye.

Libya Tripoli Libya Gadhafi UN Muhammed Libyan national army Valentine Tripoli Saudi Arabia Derna Muslim Brotherhood Army Mohamed El founder and director United Arab Emirates Egypt UN Security Council Zambia military Tech
"libya" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"libya" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Ryan Seacrest. Iheartradio music, you should know featuring Libya damn. Kaunda? Really care. The truth comes out. Yeah. Four. Maybe this is. Shoe? We can. Sure. Got you. As a thing. It was. Got. Okay. We can. Real bad. Create your own custom station with iheartradio. Download.

libya
"libya" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on The Daily

"So on january twenty seventh a joint american british team removed from libya fifty five thousand pounds of uranium hexafluoride centrifuge equipment and other materials they brought all of this material along with libya's detailed nuclear weapons designs back to the united states for valuation testing and destruction and what is it coffee demand in return for that he wanted to have sanctions lifted he wanted to be readmitted to international organizations a seat on the united nations security council when it was libya's turn he basically wanted to be readmitted to the club of nations and importantly although this was a subtext he wanted to be guaranteed that he wouldn't face the kind of fate that saddam hussein faced in iraq he wanted some security guarantees as well colonel qaddafi correctly judged that his country would be better off and far more secure without weapons of mass murder the bush administration presented the libya example as the ultimate good news story for disarmament good things would flow to the libyan's libya would find itself more prosperous more widely accepted old hostilities do not need to go on forever and i hope that other leaders will find an example in libya's announcement today and they hoped and we're very open about saying that the libya model could be a model for other countries other nuclear states including at the time north korea that if they followed this model they would reap the same kinds of benefits so this seems like a possible would map for north korea and denuclearization.

libya united states united nations security counci iraq murder north korea club of nations saddam hussein colonel qaddafi libyan fifty five thousand pounds
"libya" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"Libya is the view new abc news i know the armie hammer is there whoa since whoa whoa the.

Libya
"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

"Five of them we're working to improve the others and my plea to the government was first of all let's turn these let's separate the men and women and turn these detention centres and to open reception centres and eventually not put them in detention centers at all we taken home about fifteen thousand from the detention centers we've done about ten thousand flights and we're continue to do more what about social media i know the written that you know a lot of the common tree around this crisis is not helping what do you mean well you're absolutely right i mean the smugglers themselves are using heavily the social media tried to tempt these people to come into the into their area you know it's a very lucrative business i suppose you probably one billion to one point five billion a year it's much easier than running drugs or guns and almost as profitable so we've got to try to break the smugglers business model and for that we we need to be back in libya all of us and just finally i mean they you are in geneva and you know the climate against refugees and economic migrants that is in europe today and not to mention here in the united states i mean where do you realistically see all of this ending up where you're absolutely right we have a very toxic atmosphere right now migration has become a very negative word and we need to come back to a definition is much more historically accurate the one point five million who came north in two thousand fifteen is less than a half percent of europe's total population of the 28 states is a perfectly manageable issue it's not a problem to be solved it's a human reality that we all have to learn to manage we wish you luck ambassador swing thank you so much for joining us thank you very much your.

social media libya geneva united states europe
"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

"We can absolve an organ eye on suffered than what they have seen here daily believe me make fee and paying for them they come monday study suspicion case feud do it there was abusing them fuels they could this called them money have have you you people oh my honestly we hear the global but nothing is obvious and of course we don't have a evidence but we now do cnn has delivered this evidence the libyan authorities who have promised to launch an investigation said that seems like this i returned to the past gnamin batasuna libya so in addition to the libyan authorities cnn is also passed the evidence to the international criminal court and name a joins me now from london nimitz so shocking but obviously what really can the libyans do when you pass on this information to them the reality is very little you saw that what kind of resources that working with some of those people that you saw in that detention center the libyan authority that the libyan supervises at the sense of what we are actually paying towards their meals out of their own pocket this is the reality of incredibly fragile state of state that's been allowed to topple towards failure on europe's doorstep the question has to be why isn't the world doing what can the world do well you know you have seen a lot and emma this obviously clearly shocked to what what went through your mind as you're trying to do this job of reporting there this is a story that you know we've discussed a lot that we across cnn of trying to pin down for for years now we were hearing these rumors we were hearing these reports from for migrants arriving in italy and we just none of them wanted to go on record because even on the shores of europe they.

libya europe emma cnn london libyan italy
"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on Amanpour

"Support for npr comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage let you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process foley so you can be confident you're getting a right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash i'm on poor yeah big strong dooley's for from what he said seven hundred seven hundred robert a the numbers role in these men are sold with 1200 ludian pounds full hundred delays tonight modern day slave auction in libya name a baggio with an exclusive look at the horrors that migrants face their plus we're going to wake up america the world is going together and trump better get on board or get out of the way the governor of california jerry brown tells me that america risk being laws if it doesn't change course on climate good evening everyone and welcome to the program i'm christiane amanpour in new york a dark chapter in human history playing out in northern africa libya a failed state since the fall of more maga daffy has become a chokepoint on the deadly trail of migration from subsaharan africa over the sea to italy flooded by migrants who carry with them horrific stories of beatings kidnappings and yes even enslavement according to the united nations international organisation for migration as many as seven hundred thousand migrants are in libya fleeing conflict and poverty at home more than one hundred thousand of them have made it to italian shores this year another several thousand rest made it to have died on land and sea but as europe cracks down on migration tens of thousands of men women and children trapped in libya in.

npr foley dooley new york libya italy united nations california jerry brown america christiane amanpour africa europe
"libya" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"libya" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Then the margaret trove will come to you because it's privatize the militias are just basically from coming people smugglers and european countries are willing to babies militias in order to stall the migrant flow but an just shifts to other militias that are not paid off everybody starts raising the price so it's it's it's a business and it's a very dirty business people are the victims of it but but i still have some hope because simply because people's do still accept that there is a political process and people heavens didn't as hasn't hurt reached a level and the generality throughout the territory that people have started leaving in great numbers so we need to work from the basis colin it seems to me that libya for some reason has remained off the radar screen of most americans and it wasn't a place where the pottery barn scenario held it wasn't you break it you bought it the us famously led from behind but it was clearly a powerful player and toppling the ghaddafi regime you spend time in the obama administration maybe you can give us a little insight as to why the problems inherent to libya were so vexing for the white house sure well look i think initially separate apart from the leading from behind comment the yeah i don't know i was annoyed us at the time no seriously i dunno i guess if it if i was i couldn't tell you look i think there was an expectation president obama has been explicit about this and somebody interviews that he gave toward the end of his 10year that at least he had the expectation that the europeans we're going to take more of a lead in the aftermath in and that there were was also some fundamental constraints.

colin libya white house obama president 10year