35 Burst results for "Liberia"

Decades Later, Liberian Warlord Faces War Crimes Trial in Switzerland

Dennis Prager

00:31 sec | 2 d ago

Decades Later, Liberian Warlord Faces War Crimes Trial in Switzerland

"Former Liberian commander was a rebel has appeared in a Swiss court charged with war crimes 45 year old Elliot Kaze a fought against Liberia's leader, Charles Taylor, in a civil conflict notorious for its savagery. With that conflict ended. He fled to Switzerland, where he was arrested in 2014, after a civil rights group presented the Swiss attorney general with evidence of his involvement in war crimes. He denies the charges and will give evidence to the court next

Elliot Kaze Charles Taylor Liberia Switzerland
New rule to require certain travelers to pay bonds to enter U.S.

WBBM Morning News

00:37 sec | Last week

New rule to require certain travelers to pay bonds to enter U.S.

"Travel will resume from overseas and elsewhere some day. We hope And a new federal rule will be costly. For many travelers from overseas. The Trump Administration is issuing a temporary rule requiring travelers from two dozen countries to pay a bond as much much as as $15,000 $15,000 to to visit visit the the U. U. S. S. It It targets targets country's country's most most in in Africa, Africa, like like Liberia Liberia and and Chad, Chad, but but also also other other countries countries like like Bhutan Bhutan and Laos that the state Department says have high rates of travelers over staying visas. It takes effect December 24th and runs through June.

Trump Administration U. U. S. S. Liberia Chad Africa Bhutan Laos State Department
Uncommon Grit, with a Navy Seal Photographer

This Week in Photo

06:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Uncommon Grit, with a Navy Seal Photographer

"Hey welcome back to another episode of this week photo on your host. Frederik van johnson. This is going to be an interesting interview as many of you know i'm a. Us air force veteran eight years. But nothing that i ever did in the air force and i was a combat photojournalist in the air force. But nothing that i ever did in the air force comes close to my guest. Today has done in the navy as a navy seal. We're going to talk about that. We're connected on many levels. He's like my brother now. You're my big brother. So we're we're gonna talk about photography. We're gonna talk about his experiences being a photographer being a navy seal photographer and getting some of the shots did some of us just dream about getting. We're also gonna talk about this thing right here uncommon grit so. This is a book that he just published. That has a bunch of the photos that he took on that journey throughout the years. We're going to talk about all that all it's coming up right now be was going on man how you doing good man. Thanks for having me appreciate it. You know it's like you know we work with the air force again. Yes exactly so. I tell you what you'd be going. Air force base is awesome and those guys we were talking about earlier. It's like all we do is we're on deployment. Also we wanted that. Damn cheese tortellini. Mr and then you go there or face and go and do donna facility and they got damn pop tarts got doughnuts breakfast sandwiches and mike. Wow we chose the wrong service. look us. life was hard for us back then. It's like god damn you guys ever get the steak exactly right. I don't understand it. Medium rare knitted always medium. I don't understand. I know like we show up. We're like hey what can we get for this really cool navy seal dive knife like wow a semi two inch plasma screen okay. Sold as greasy work work with air force the. Pj's fantastic and those their you know what they did there Just phenomenal people. So you know it was. Yeah it s great to scrape to her. She wanted to work with you on the other side with photography which is really and here. We are right. Who knew who i keep. This book is part of my permanent collection. Now so thanks again presented over amazing. So let's let's talk about first. Let's before we dive into the book piece of this. Give give give us kind of the overview of your journey from you know not knowing anything about photography publishing an amazing book like dream that you know i. It's it's really very very very unique. Journey is just the it started with Graduated seal training and ninety six class to await from there. It went to silting to Did a bunch of deployments was silting created. Seal team ten. So that shifted me over silty mate but there were talking about like liberia. Were afghanistan iraq. So it was like four. Five combat deployments before i got a break and when i got a break that's in the navy airforce auto the air force's rotation but the navy break is five and two so it's five years deploying two years at a advanced training command. Get your senses back together train and then get back out there For me it was ten years. But when i got out there i got sent out to military freefall school in arizona and it's joint commands. Were there with like army navy with that. You know that's where my journey began this two thousand and seven and you know actually even be out there teaching free like ours. I was already a navy seal for ten years. I had to be a basic wall. Which is your static. Line basic military freefall called basic static. Line jump master military freefall jump master and then when i got out there ended up being a military freefall instructor military. Freefall instructor examiner And so An accelerated freefall Accelerated freefall coach excessive rainfall instructor essen. Tna select basic all the calls for air and then a everything. Now you're jumping out of a c. One thirty at sixteen thousand feet with With new operators never jump before and you tap on the show them the jump out and my job was just hang with them and just with the mix. You don't screw up getting getting back straight whatever they need to do and make sure they poll and and go from there and then i I started doing video because video. And what you're gonna learn at military freefall because you can't see what you're doing because you're you're free some students are all over the place you know and so do the video but one morning It was really really early. I don't know what. I think we're trying to beat some weather pattern. That was coming in and we were like literally. The ramp is open on like like probably five. Am just as the sun is like creeping up and the whole desert was just like beautiful reds yellows oranges and i was like man. I should Somebody should take a picture of this is really cool and then i'm like oh i guess i should figure that out you know are and so. That's soy started. Just google unlike the went to dr google photography you know and then that started my journey and the number you know it just you learn and then i go to barnes and noble. As a matter of fact. I went to barnes and noble at my old seal team to dive log from my last a combat dives that i did and i went all the way to the back. Full of the paged. I put my semi kids over to the kids section. You know when. I sat there like digital photography. Open up books going. Wow this is this is going to be interesting. And then i take notes and put the book back. You know. i'm that guy. Sorry i'm the guy. I would well at that time. He knows i'm in the military. I had three kids. You know with that. You're obviously for me that my life is unhappily married so to me it was. I was broke and i can feel the book. Twenty five bucks. I'm like well. I gotta take my kids to you know to the movies so i'm like i'd so it's anyway long story short right down. That's what i did.

Air Force Navy Frederik Van Johnson Us Air Force Army Navy Liberia Mike Afghanistan Iraq Arizona Google Barnes
These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

Science Friction

08:15 min | Last month

These doctors got COVID-19, now they're suffering the serious, mysterious symptoms of 'long COVID'

"Hi It's Natasha. Mitchell with science friction. I'll be the first admit that as a GP price all of I was pretty skeptical of things. I certainly had sympathy for for conditions like FIBROMYALGIA. But I didn't have the empathy that I have now. I didn't understand it I. Really didn't get it. And Gosh if I could go back and speak to myself as a GP prior to all of this, I know that I would have been much better doctor then and I will hopefully be a much stop to now. As Corona virus cases explode again in the you kind across Europe today three doctors from the UK share confronting personal experiences of what's being called long covert. I have seen too many cases on nine of people not being heard not being Nessin to. That symptoms and their concerns not being validated. I've seen heartbreaking stories of people just being dismissed of seeing heartbreaking stories of people losing their jobs. And I am very lucky that I have a platform where I can speak up and try and get long covert recognizes melnace. The term long covert is being used to describe a whole cluster of symptoms and afflictions many extremely disturbing and disabling that lingering on some people after they've been infected with the SARS Cov to virus thousands across the world are now finding solidarity on social media and in virtual support groups that are popping up and long covert. To not discriminate healthy people young people, people who apparently had a mild case of covid nineteen. And every system in their bodies can be affected up until the last a week or two. The concept of long caved has been dismissed by quite a lot of people even in the medical sphere many my colleagues have been unwell since March and have really struggled to get any kind of medical inputs until the last couple of months those weren't hospitalized with the illness would just sort of left to get on with it. It's the classic thing a suspect. It might even be a bloke thing do not for long enough it will go away. Yeah. Diminish it ignore it hope it's not their. Own I another thing to worry about uh, suspect always going through people's minds and that will include medics politicians policies such as civil servants, everybody. But they will be left with the long term consequences and in terms of the total health burden that will weigh exceed whatever acute covid to us by the time of comes on. So we facing another pandemic this one silent confusing and hard to diagnose knows a pandemic of long coverted. I'm Dr Amy Small I'm thirty nine and I'm Jay P in Lothian in Scotland a gorgeous part of the world in the Scottish lowlands and before the pandemic Dr smalls life was a when I think back it was busy and chaotic and getting up at six thirty every morning and out house by seventh day and yet as a family, we were very active and very busy but it work back in February and March. I'm in colleagues were on high alert the sense of impending doom that we felt on those first few weeks moore seeing reports of huge numbers of people dying in. Italy. In just thinking gosh you know. Is that coming away at it was just really really scary I'm Dr Natalie Mcdermott I'm an academic clinical electra at King's College London and she specializes in Pediatric Infectious Diseases Dr McDermott is no stranger to deadly infections Ebola cholera now coronavirus she's been on the front line of the Mall I was working in Liberia in in the capital Monrovia in July twenty fourteen as as cases of started spread very rapidly our more queseda flowing because we had so many dead bodies but we didn't have sevices coming to pick them up so the burial teams weren't Well. They were trying their best, but they were limited as well at during that time two of my colleagues one of whom was on medical director for treatment facility they became infected with. I saw a space about thirty percent of my patients that died in those first few weeks. I was in Liberia that he percent of them were health coworkers what Natalie witnessed firsthand was hellish but going is her as a doctor she went on to do a PhD, investigating the genetics of asa sipped ability to a bowl avars disease. And when Covid nineteen heat I was working in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Great Ormond Street Hospital. When we started to see a surge of cases of what we now who multi-system inflammatory syndrome children previously healthy children started falling very ill they come in generally unwell but looking okay and then within a few hours sometimes but maybe you set me within twenty four hours. Many of them would suddenly drop their blood pressure and they and become very touchy. It said it heart rate would become very fast at that stage it was thought children were only mildly affected by. Covid nineteen and on the whole, it seems they are but the Natalie and colleagues found all lot of them did test positive in terms of the throat swaps full cave nineteen they tested positive for antibodies to cave in nineteen either actually at the beginning of that onus or at some point Jerry net illness doctrine failing on consulting genetic pathologists to Saint Mark's hospital in Harrow in London and Sinn. Vincent's Hospital in Dublin Ireland in filing is a practicing doctor and later in the genetics of bail and related cancers collaborating with colleagues around the world including here in Australia. At the beginning of the pandemic back in March whiles looked pretty safe or think. To identify, cases in Wales. H. One about forty kilometers outside of me. So eastern West. So you get the impression whereas almost none of it about. So the odds of you catching, it must be next to nothing.

Dr Natalie Mcdermott Covid Liberia Fibromyalgia Mitchell Europe Great Ormond Street Hospital UK Medical Director Dr Amy Small Dr Smalls Wales Moore Monrovia ASA Italy Scotland
A$AP Ferg Interview

Toure Show

06:58 min | Last month

A$AP Ferg Interview

"Plain Jane. Is a monster song. Thank you and I wanna hear about writing it making it is multiple take. So you punching in You know and it's an interesting vibe to it because you talk about family talk about pain and trauma but you also talk about hanging out having fun a lot of in the choruses. Crazy. Thank you. I love the fact that you broke down everything I talked about because I feel like playing Jane. People love it. I don't know if everybody knows why they love it all like if they can pull out those parts, the trauma, the the cookouts that you that we used to have to dodge gunshots and You. Know me going allow barrier for the first time and come back and feeling like I had to do more from our community Irma's link official village in our Beria that came from me spend like one hundred thousand dollars on a chain with Ben Abimbola and then going to. Liberia Sei starving kids is out there announced I came back. I wanted to give all my jury away and I was like man like a link can literally feed village area and I'll give some money to them. I was gone out there to put uniforms on kids 'cause out there like they can't. Go to school without uniforms. So going out there and put uniforms on the kids. was with. This. Brand, called uniform okay. Chit Liberty. Is My partner's name that he started his brand because when the Ebola outbreak happened out there in Liberia a lot of people were scared the by product out there. So he had a lot of materials and things like that. So he brought a factory a All of these women that an average jobs and things like that. To make uniforms out of these materials and he will use autism has influences and and just influence period to collaborate with to sell clothing. And partner. Rela. Bloomingdale's so that's what. I did I basically partnered up with him and Bloomingdales to make a line with some material. I designed a line with trap Lord and uniform. We sold it. The money went towards putting some of the money went towards putting the uniform on kids. Wow. Yeah. I WANNA talk about design because I know you're into that to like. Talk about making this record. So Plain Jane did was the beat I wrote in the studio or so I'll listen to juicy j slob on my knob like on on a cop I was in La and me and my uncle was just listening to the radio and it just came on and I'm like Yo this song is amazing like it hit me is like I had a perfectly like. Nobody did this song over? And I'm like, why doesn't this happen in the song? Check me and everybody screams I mean the whole song is like a hook. Really off bridge is sold sticky is to start with the hook instead of a lot of people start with verse and into it. But when you start with it, that's the beyonce's loves to do that right but the song don't even have a hook. It just really does suck a NIGGA. dickerson. So that comes one time and then it's like back into the verse but I don't have enough. That's really a hook and juicy J. that's his first song. That, he put out a rope. Like, which is intriguing to me because that's a huge song. So Our Rights at a soon as I got to the hotel stuck in traffic. I. Had this idea GIS Brewing, in my head. To write to the Slough Manabi. And then I was like man I gotTa, make this shit new I gotta make it feel like young the young people got to own it. They gotta be anthem for the young people and I gotta say something I had so much to say on his record because I just came back from Africa I've been traveling the world and. I'm always got the New York state of mind but I'm like everywhere. I was like Yo and I wanted to get an underdog to going to be Saga Kirk night. Okay. Yeah. To Do to be over like elbow, I got a Bangor for us to do kirk is like. He's amazing like he's amazing I I can't think of anything else like genius. And I, feel like he doesn't get enough credit on people don't even know taking can goal with his music as musicality. So when I approached him I knew he will bring me different sonics in different sounds but also understanding bpm how important Edelweiss Susannah trump's and everything like that. And I the verge down and. I recorded the whole thing I didn't even put that for the. Recorded the whole thing on my apple on my computer. My laptop in a hotel. No the. Studio. Okay. The whole process of Mea Kirk working on it

Mea Kirk Jane Liberia Dickerson Partner Bloomingdales Slough Manabi Africa Beyonce Ebola Ben Abimbola Apple Beria Official Susannah Trump Bangor New York LA
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 4 months ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
How to Unlearn Diet Culture's Rules with April Quioh of She's All Fat

Food Psych

04:06 min | 4 months ago

How to Unlearn Diet Culture's Rules with April Quioh of She's All Fat

"Go talk to April Quiapo. So tell me about your relationship with food growing up my relationship with food. What did you see? Well, I grew up in a matriarchal household like I was raised with my single mom, my two older sisters and my grandma, and so it was just like all ladies and they are all immigrants except for me I was the first person to be born in America in Minnesota, actually in the rest of our board in Liberia and the became immigrants so it was. Like a clash of cultures, types, of thing like the Liberian ideal standard of beauty is different than the American one like more curvy figure is kind of the norm. If you will back there whereas in America at least growing up in the nineties and early thousands I felt very much like I should look like Nicole richer whatever her. So so it was like being curvy trumpy or whatever was accepted to a certain degree, and I was always like fat growing up like not. Curvy but like fat. So we always were on diets together like I think it was just kind of this household were was totally normal to be like we're going on. Atkins this week we're going on weight watchers is speaking it was just like it's almost like a bonding thing like what we did together and then I didn't realize until growing up that it was like, oh, we all just like participating diet culture like as a family basically which I mean yeah, it was. Just kind of something that was super accepted in my family. So it's like in Liberia culture food is super important. It's like how people von how people grieve just like in a lot of cultures, but it was also like vanity is very important. So like we made out this delicious food, but like don't eat too much of it. Otherwise, my grandma will decided be like your fat she was just very she's very upfront lady like that, and that's totally lake the culture is. Different. Ladies assigning, hit your fat like if you ever want to get married maybe maybe not. So that's kind of how I grew up. I was always like naturally you know pretty pretty a Chubby kid and was always remembered I going on a diet when I was maybe six like very young. that. Went on until I. got to college and I was like, Oh, I'm done. I'm over it. So that was that was growing up what a dieting do to your relationship with food and your body did you have feelings about it or it's hard to like this is just how it is. I, mean I had a lot a lot of feelings about it Safina on our podcast. US L. fat talk about a lot like growing up dieting nonstop makes it impossible to know once you break out of that like what you want like today the thing I still struggle with like am hungry and my just eating like I don't even when you diet you read a book and it tells you like, okay, you eat this much foods do this and so you break out. Of It, it's hard to tell like, am I hungry? What do I really want? What is my body want from me like to be nourished? It's like that relationship between your body and you is broken because it's like I ignored what it needed or wanted for so many years. So I think that is the biggest thing that's been damaging like the whole concept of intuitive eating like. Wow sounds so great. I'm not there yet I still am not clear on how to do it because like dieting disea- exact opposite breaking free of that like it's GonNa take a really long time and so I think that that would to me has been the most clear direct result of grabbed away did but yeah I mean I was like I was tortured by my buddy growing up. Everybody in my family is plus is and I am also plus is including my body is like naturally made to be like everyone in my family is but I'm constantly fighting against it and it just felt fruitless inches felt like this project that Ozzy felt like a waste of my time was a real kid and I'm like man, I, wish I could beat the library and instead my mom's like forcing to join a basketball team or whatever. But I know choose choose just she's just trying her best in like also also was very lazy. So she's like please please just get off the couch. No but it just felt you know it was just this kind of like tortured relationship wherever I wish this wasn't that much of I, wish I didn't have to spend so much you by energy thinking about this and it didn't even wear I mean diets don't work. We all know the never worked. So. Yeah that.

Liberia Atkins Safina America Nicole Richer Minnesota Basketball Ozzy
'Ink Master' contestant Daniel Silva charged with killing YouTuber Corey La Barrie after crash

Murder Minute

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

'Ink Master' contestant Daniel Silva charged with killing YouTuber Corey La Barrie after crash

"Inc mousters star Daniel Silva was arrested in Los Angeles and charged with murder. After a drunk driving car accident that claimed the life of Youtube Star Corey Berry soul the and the Berry were allegedly both drunk when they got into the car and sped down the street in the Valley Village neighborhood of the city with Silva behind the wheel. He drove a short distance before losing control of the vehicle and crashing into a stop sign and a tree saw the attempt to leave the scene of the accident but was stopped by some local residents. Who arrived on the scene to render aid? Both occupants were taken to the hospital after the crash where? Liberia died of his injuries. The accident occurred on the berries. Twenty Fifth Birthday. The faces murder charges for the crash and is being held in custody in lieu of two hundred thousand dollar. Bail

Daniel Silva Murder Corey Berry Los Angeles Liberia Youtube Valley Village
Climate catastrophes and now coronavirus, Pacific islands in the crosshairs

UN News

12:10 min | 8 months ago

Climate catastrophes and now coronavirus, Pacific islands in the crosshairs

"The covert nineteen pandemic is wreaking havoc around the globe. The remoteness of the Pacific Islands has left people living there vulnerable in many different ways. You and resident coordinator Seneca Summer Sheena said in an interview with UN news that with borders an airport shutdown protection gear specialist personnel and lifesaving medical supplies have been unable to reach many areas in need and the crisis has only been heightened by the devastation inflicted by category five. Cyclone Herald which ripped through Vanuatu. Mr Samora Sheena overseas you and Operations Fiji Micronesia. The Salomon Islands Marshall Islands. Kiribati Palau Tonga. Vanuatu Nehru and Tuva. Lou acknowledged to Julia Dean. The difficulties in moving people and cargo has been impinging on the UN's ability to respond to the corona virus crisis. Will I think that you know? Some of the challenges are much the same as everywhere else in terms of making sure that the people are tested that people are safe social distancing action sinks in people follow the policies. Making sure that the equipment that's necessary for health workers are in place you know these are of course the challenges around the world with you're talking about New York City of Fiji but I think particularly challenging here in the Pacific as the remoteness of the locations it is also an sending that the number of people in the Pacific have different types of underlying health conditions. So if you actually have a massive outbreak with very concerned that this could have serious consequences for a significant segment of the population. I think the fact that the borders have been closed in many places and flights have stopped. Mix The issue of remoteness even more challenging so we are finding it difficult to move whether we're talking about personal protection equipment or other types of medical equipment and supplies are specialists and experts that we need in order to respond to this the movement of people in Congress very difficult at the moment. And what else is the UN doing to support the communities and governments of the UN has really come together this time and we have a range of things that we have responded. We've set up something old joint incident Management Team to look at the immediate health sector preparedness and Response Plans of countries. We received requests from the country's is you are aware. I covered ten countries in the Pacific. These requests come not only from those ten countries but from around the Pacific all of the country in the Pacific. And then we've prioritized. We look at the logistics capabilities in terms of the procuring and delivering what is being requested from us. And the the requests you know range of things from testing laboratories setting up testing laboratories to Mosques for health workers too Water and sanitation supplies etcetera at the same time we are acutely rather than multiple needs in multiple sectors whether we are talking about protecting women and children when we talk about places where cities have been locked down for weeks at a time. Or we're talking about food security right now because people are unable to work and don't have an income or you're talking about multiple disasters had a cycle of the number of countries and that compounds the crisis that Corbett nineteen is brought all the Pacific Tropical Cyclone Herald. I think is better. Four countries in as many days. Can you expand on what happens in a situation where you've got a health issue plus a natural disaster happening at the same time so on the one hand you could argue that up to a little bit better prepared here in the Pacific because we have to deal with a measles outbreak several months ago and some of these structures and mechanisms already in place to ensure that we fight the measles outbreak in fact the joint Incident Management Team? That I mentioned to you before was something that existed from that outbreak and was re purposed into dealing the covert nineteen similarly We have something in the Pacific humanitarian team functions. Here brings together all of the U. N. and other partners like the Red Cross and the NGOs are now we have government representatives and the regional organisations bilateral Austrailia New Zealand so those structures are in place and it really helped in some ways arguably to respond as will two TC herald which had an impact on four of the countries. All of them are in the Pacific quality which I support the Solomon Islands Tonga Fiji and Vanuatu by far based on preliminary analysis. Certain parts of Vanuatu are the worst hit followed by a couple of areas in Fiji Solomon Islands Tonga thankfully a not impacted significantly as went to sadly though twenty seven. People lost their lives in Solomon Islands. As a result of this cyclone-hit abort that Kept signs people washed off the boat and have one confirmed death in Fiji a six year old child. That was confirmed with just this morning. We're still waiting for the data from Anwar two areas of Vanuatu that We don't have any communication with in Pentecost Island. For instance the first teams have been going there yesterday and this morning to make detailed assessments but clearly we can see based on the aerial photography and other reports that some one hundred sixty thousand people in. Monroe ought to have been affected by this especially badly affected Guyland of Santo and And penticost lagoon. Bill is a second largest city in Vanuatu. In that's on the island of Center. We know that the infrastructure people's homes roofs blown off. We know that there has been some shortage of water. There's no electricity many pants. Also the that's the case in Fiji in terms of the deputy and we are very concerned about food security We think that if we don't get things sorted we will have people going hungry in a metro. Weeks the secretary-general Monster Reform Agenda in two thousand. Nineteen with this double crosses happening in areas of the Pacific Reform Agenda Aid situation. I can already see that happening in the past few weeks as we've been working together as one. Un system. I think it's an important change to how the UN has maybe functioned in some other places during times of disaster even in between disasters. So for instance if you you have all of the sectors coming together we know that this for instance Kobe. Nine hundred ninety s right now is something that is a health sector response or largely so. But it's not only you cannot possibly move your medical equipment and personnel from one place to another. If you don't have your logistics people work so whilst you have W at show and unit steph looking at the medical supplies you'll have. Wfp leading logistics identifying aircraft. And actually getting things for months the other you have other parts of the UN like U. N. O. P. S. O. U. N. D. P. who have existing long-term agreements with suppliers in China or North America or elsewhere who's agreements can be used to procure things that we need. You have like. Un Women the officer High Commissioner for Human Rights and others NGOs as well the very important issue of protection for children for women for people with disabilities when they're curfews when they're lockdowns as I mentioned before you have very important role being played by UNHCR IOM. We know that refugees and migrants are especially vulnerable at this time when borders of closed. And they don't have the coping mechanisms that perhaps People who are living in their homes half so these dishonor accept food security as I mentioned before is a big problem. It's not just a problem in the context of the cyclone because several countries that depend on tourism in the Pacific as you know some of those countries Fiji for instance Vanuatu more than forty percents of the GDP is based on tourists industry and people have no income. Now they have no income and as a result that have very little access to food. So there are agencies like F your and uplift be Undp looking at Making sure that cash transfers cash grants can take place now while of course trying to support the government's in dealing with economic impacts the medium-term and long-term economic impacts of this crisis Hannah seeing the reform saving lives. Yes indeed in fact I was not so long ago in Liberia and I was Impressed by how the UN First of all came together but importantly all of the other partners came together as well. There was something called the incident management team and we used to meet three times a week. You had countries like China and the US are the CDC sitting there with. The government was led by the government. So first of all you know these things work well when governments are able to coordinate all of the actors and would we've tried to do here is wherever governments have needed. A wanted our support in terms of accord initiative. We've done that. We support the government. The governments are still in the league but we support them. I think what I am seeing now in terms of covert nineteen in the Pacific as a repeat of what I saw in Liberia and sadly that was not always the case was also in some other countries during this Nami and other cyclones. But I do see that here. There is a commitment on the part of all of the agencies to actually come together in some sense you know having a different role for a resident coordinator has also made a difference speakers agencies. Feel that the President. Coordinator is a neutral entity at the same time is a person that the government knows Vagan Goto to without having to go to seventeen different agencies during crisis like this but it's also important to know that this collaboration between W A chore and the Resident Coordinator Is something quite unique. It's happening really for the first time and I. It seems to be working not only in the Pacific but everywhere around the world. And what is your call to actions? Nice listening but in the Pacific and globally. I believe that this crisis can only be dealt with if we work together. It is of course human nature when something like this happening on. One tends to think of how one CAN PROTECT. Oneself one's family perhaps wants community and by extension When country but at the end of the day we can't respond to crisis legs alone Whether we are an individual or family or community or country we need to help each other so as much as we need to ensure that the right protocols are in place that we do our best to keep ourselves and our loved one safe we must understand that the only way we can actually beat this is my reaching out and helping each as well and we cannot just circle the wagons and hope that this will pasta and we will be protected. We have to find ways. Safeway's creative ways using technology but if technology is not available sometime through physical movement but safely to get the expertise to get the and this applies to places where it's needed especially so that the most vulnerable populations are supported and helped during this terrible crisis.

Pacific UN Fiji Vanuatu Pacific Islands Vanuatu Nehru Salomon Islands Marshall Islan Coordinator Solomon Islands Tonga Fiji Fiji Solomon Islands Tonga Operations Fiji Micronesia Kiribati Palau Tonga Cyclone Herald Mr Samora Sheena Liberia Solomon Islands Measles
"liberia" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"liberia" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Zones to treat patients facing war in the middle of a bowler outbreak a helping to stem the nineteen crisis in countries like Spain. It was the intensity with which cave in one thousand nine hit Spain. That shocked the Guardians. Madrid correspondent Sam Jones. Maced of all. I mean it's been. It's been brutal hardest. Hit country after after the US behind digitally for awhile overtaken Italy. We've got almost one hundred. And seventy thousand cases here been almost seventeen thousand five hundred deaths and the pace has just been staggering and sort of unrelenting until now when he says until now. Sammy's referring to the fact that Spain's death-ray rate has started to fall. Which could be the first sign of a country emerging from this terrible nightmare? A nightmare that is brought doctors nurses who normally work in crisis zones into a country with one of the best healthcare systems in the world. It's been striving to spin rather surreal. Before came to Spain. Almost four years ago I spent two years covering international development traveling to many different parts of the world here and humanitarian crises. And the war. I saw a lot humanitarian groups at work in the field unsubtly. I'm saying one of the most famous. These medicines plenty. Msf setting up shop as it were in Spain in Madrid an Barscelona frontier which means doctors. Without Borders works under the motto. First and last out sending medical workers some of the most dangerous places on earth working on the frontline of disasters right now. That front line is in Europe from the Guardian. I'm initiatives to Stana today in focus from Liberia to Spain working on the front line.

Spain Guardians Madrid Stana Sam Jones US Europe Sammy Liberia Italy
Fact check: Did coronavirus originate in a Chinese laboratory

Glenn Beck

09:52 min | 8 months ago

Fact check: Did coronavirus originate in a Chinese laboratory

"More western governments now agreed the virus likely came from a Chinese laboratory not from exotic food markets I don't know if this is good news or bad news I mean it's good news that people are needing that soup but it's but it's bad news that it came from a laboratory we can add now Great Britain to the growing list of governments who are confirming that sars coded to virus likely came from the Chinese Communist Party backed viral research lab the US UK Israel Canada Australia Taiwan and Germany have all reached similar conclusions the virus behind Gobert nineteen was most likely laboratory grown that's farther than we went last night on our special last night we did a great special on the Chinese Communist Party and how it's just killing the world I wanted to play a little piece of from that special where we we went over the evidence that it was actually N. confirmed by the Chinese Communist Party before the outbreak that they were doing experiments with these particular bats very close to where they said the bat soup was watch in February two researchers from the South China university of technology published a paper that was immediately taken down she I wonder why take a look at their credentials their resume looks pretty darn impressive joint international research the research laboratory South China university of technology has long university of science and technology Wuhan university of science and technology I mean they're not slouches they're not exactly a couple of internet bloggers in their mommy's basement well maybe they didn't have a big name supporter maybe they just went rogue but it says here they actually had the support of the national natural science foundation of China okay so why did this get pulled a cheesy their scientific data went to counter the propaganda it was a question the Communist Party didn't want to be asked their report detailed that not one single horseshoe bat was sold at the Wuhan animal market let me quote according to municipal reports and the testimonies of thirty one residents and twenty eight visitors the bathroom was never a food source in the city and no back was traded in the market in fact the bats responsible for caring the corona virus come from an area over five hundred and fifty miles away from the animal market so if the pattern from that area and there weren't any of them being sold in the market where did the outbreak come from because the data which now comes from multiple sources is in supporting the Wuhan animal market the two researchers screen to the area and they found two locations near the market where both were known to be studying corona virus one of them is only three hundred yards away from the market that's the length of three football fields that sounds like a good possibility what's the location the one center for disease control and prevention the same exact place the researcher was gathering up horseshoe bats in the video that's where they work now at this point it seems pretty obvious but the researchers sum up their conclusions here quote in summary someone was entangled with the evolution of the twenty nineteen cope with the corona virus and in addition to origins of natural recombination and intermediate host the killer corona probably originated from a laboratory in Wuhan end quote what's amazing about this is we showed you the video last night from the Chinese Communist Party where they have the researchers going out and collecting these bats and saying Hey we got to be really careful don't get it on your skin or anything because these are this is highly contagious it's very very dangerous they were saying that and it was broadcast on the Chinese television by the official state television R. E. N. I think was in November or early December and those are the people that work in those caves taking those bats saying how dangerous it was they work and brought all of that stuff back to Wuhan then there's the breakout fascinating it's seems pretty hard to refute but right now the Chinese are saying that it was an American military that brought it over to Wuhan and they have proof because the so called Wuhan virus was over in South Carolina last summer and the United States government brought it over to China doesn't sound like we're headed for any place nice but we could have seen this coming back years ago on this program we talked about epidemics what year was this from students two thousand eighteen may two thousand eighteen okay and it's rand Wilson his book was epidemic we talked to him just to add nothing it wasn't like a big thing breaking out at the moment there was little talk about the we were right just after the Ebola thing that could be another one of being a bowl of patients that came in we were in United States even here in Dallas for were broadcasting and we we brought him on to kind of talk about what what the next threats could be listen to this clip with the with today's context so this is a P. P. bowl you know I think we're we're sitting here and there's really kind of two schools are two camps one that roll their eyes and like okay well it is everybody always panics and it'll it's always fine and the other side that is like we're right for a pandemic we're all gonna die we heard where it is where are we which side is is more accurate well I think the we're right for a pandemic is probably correct although I don't I don't think we're all going to die there but there are definitely reasons to be concerned about the state of the global public health system it is not adequately prepared to deal with a pandemic whether it's something that comes out of you know the Congo River basin like a bola or whether it comes out of a you know a bird market in China like like and a new flu or something like that in like a bird market in China it could be anything new flow something like that all okay yeah all right really bizarre to listen back to that he also went on to talk about one of the things that was that worked really well during the Ebola situation was it by you know if the wells in a bowl a situation to break out R. K. can work out is that it did get X. expanded in areas where we were well received Americans could go in and help right and try to fight in him listen to this clip about that situation the United States effectively created Liberia back in the eighteen hundreds as a a refuge for slaves and former slaves who were returned back to Africa and the the the big room with the big moment when three thousand American troops arrived you know the U. S. favorability rating library like ninety nine percent he was seen of this blessed moment when the the great savior in common and that really was going to help turn the tide on this virus imagine what happens if this virus pops up in Pakistan or Indonesia or or China even place the know a place where the hundred and first airborne would have to fight its way in before it got to fight the virus I mean you can the context of you talking about this at the lab and how they hit all these results this is exactly what he was talking about right there was no way for anyone else to penetrate that society to find out what the hell was actually going on so the rest of the world became completely unprepared and did not deal with it and honestly like this you notice this the countries that didn't deal with it well like a South Korea for example Taiwan are the countries that trust China the least right they were CS that they doubted them so strongly so early that they knew this is going to have to be prepared went crazy at the very very beginning and they shut everything down and they were tested it initial everything down and some of these big caught it early enough to be able to do the whole test and track thing not all that could be done here of course but it's interesting to see that because it's exactly what he was talking about when the United States couldn't it's gonna be involved like we were in a place like Liberia we we this thing blow out of out of control really found we we thought we were involved because we had the WHL yep and we pay the W. H. O. far more than any other country for its you know for its salary and so we thought that we would be able to trust them a lot of them are Americans etcetera etcetera we couldn't trust them they were deeply embedded with the Chinese government and they were lying to us and lying to the rest of the

Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

Science Friction

09:45 min | 9 months ago

Acclaimed 'Beasts of No Nation' Author, Uzodinma Iweala, on Science, Power, and Race

"Living on the time of the Cova epidemic or corona virus. I just read something that made me laugh because someone said something like the Covet Nineteen virus which came out of China's an intelligent. It's not like he bowl which is rather dumb virus now. Obviously bullet comes out of the continent of Africa just like just think about that framework and that construct and what has been printed in a major magazine virus from Africa dumb virus virus from China. Smart virus you know. I say this about the corona virus like virus had emerged in the Netherlands. Just think about the way it would have been reported from the outset. Think about what would have happened. If it had merged in on the continent of Africa and the American President Donald Trump has been gratuitously coaling sods cove to the virus behind the current covet non epidemic the Chinese virus. Let's be clear your respective of what species and what place a virus might have been forced to take the dean pandemics. Have NO ETHNICITY. Science tells us that medical history tells us that but as we're about to explore xenophobic conclusions drawn from scientific observations can have an enormous impact on the course of history and on people's lives while is a novelist. He's a doctor a filmmaker and a whole lot more in his early twenty while still in college studying literature. He wrote the critically acclaimed novel baseds of Nine Nation which tells the extraordinary story of a child soldier. A little boy recruited given again and sent to wage a war in two thousand fifteen. That book was turned into a film. Don't like really look into my eyes since my nose picking is because I can't be explaining myself and leaving a damn not like be I am leg. Oldman try to talk to me about movies variances. I saw this an idea there would is. It would seem that some sort of this on Devon all this. I also having us I was really lucky to have the opportunity to write that novel diving. Into the stories of child. Soldiers around the world but mostly specifically in countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia which had just kind of come out of their own internal conflicts at the time and then of course going back and talking with relatives. My parents my grandparents aunts and uncles great aunts and uncles about their time during the Nigerian civil war from nineteen sixty six really sixty seven three thousand nine hundred seventy and trying to understand not just what it's like to experience that kind of turmoil from the perspective of a child but also what. It's like to have everything that you thought. You knew that you understood blown open tournament and and unfortunately that's an all too common and all to universal subject after painting beasts of no nation Dima went on to train as a doctor right more books including speak no evil and Al kind of people. He worked for a time as well in health policy in Africa and today he's of the Africa Center in New York City. A storm speak at last year's will conference of Science. Journalists Center. Really wanted you to have the opportunity to he him too. So he joins us from the radio art studios in the heart of New York. You had such an interesting childhood. Born in Washington to Nigerian parents mother a former finance minister of Nigeria. And growing up. I get the sense that you very much spent time on on both continents and I'm curious to know. Have that shaped your sense of self as a as a boy and a young adult. My parents took it upon themselves to make sure that we could always get back to Nigeria. That this was to be so much a part of who we were growing up and it really did actually provide us with a really interesting way of seeing the world. You're not from one place near not from another place. You're from both places. It's kind of a glorious thing to be able to grow up knowing that there are multiple perspectives on everything in the world. What someone sees for example in the village that my grandparents grew up in is necessarily going to be from what somebody sees in suburban Washington? Dc things might be a little bit more difficult in Nigeria. But at the same time everybody is still living. I think that's something that a lot of people who only grow up saying in industrialized if we WANNA use that term or you know United States type or western context don't have and therefore very afraid of the wider world beyond. We just grew up not being afraid because of exposure and I think that's so important. Oh that's such a potent comment about FIA holding back so much dialogue and possibility in the world. Why a medical degree trying to be a doctor? Why did you save that time in your life as a part of any decision? I think there are multiple reasons for why you do something and not all of them are the most. I will freely admit that I did medicine because my dad's a doctor and you can kind of see okay. This is what a doctor does. You see the stethoscope. You see the medicines. It's already very concrete. You know in the little kids mind and as as the kid of African immigrants. There's this thing where you do. The practical like you become a doctor. You become a lawyer and then you think that the way that you have impact is through those practical professions. I think of course. There's this idea that doctors save people and that you can have a profound impact on on a person's life and so you know with all of that. It seemed like a natural choice. I think it became clear to me that one of the things that was missing was for me in full form. Was that creative output that flow and that ability to render the world as I saw an as sort of my talent allowed me to and I think one person can have an impact in multiple ways. Interestingly in many ways you work and your books have connected with how history in politics and in Dade Science and medicine in Western societies read and interpret and Judge View African bodies. If we think of the base of nomination also your your book. Our kind of people sharing stories from people living with HIV is in in Nigeria. That lenses interested you. It strikes me in house and I. I think you can't grow up in a black body and you can't occupy the space as an African person. Occupies space in this world is offering person or as a black person without thinking about the gains that is upon you because in in many ways that gains does and has adversely affected the lives that we all live both again in a very individual way and also on the macro level and so understanding. How black bodies move through space are interpreted? I think is something that's really important to me. And I say that not just from the Games of the other but also from the the way that we look at ourselves and this is where you presented last year at the World Conference of Science Journalists in Europe and gave extraordinary address on racism at the heart of modern science and medicine. What did you want that audience of journalists and scientists and? I was one of them in that room to think about to interrogate. I think oftentimes we just assume that the structures we operate within our for one solid and somehow especially when it comes to signs that they're they're vetted and true and one of the things that became increasingly clear to me. As I wrote the book I wrote on HIV AIDS was just how much quote unquote scientific. Ideas were grounded in people's biases and prejudices about black bodies and how that impacted the quote unquote science or signs. At least that initially was dedicated to trying to stop the epidemic and in some cases may have done more harm than good. Initially I think back to a lot of the articles that when I was writing my book I read about HIV AIDS academic articles about sort of the linking of the spread of HIV AIDS and promiscuity. And the idea that Africans were having sex like monkeys where promiscuous like monkeys like which came up in published scientific papers and then is it makes its way into the journalistic mainstream this idea of like African promiscuity as it relates to the spread of this disease you know things about like Africanness and and being unable to quote unquote keep the time why early. Hiv treatments which required like large. Regimens of pills like wouldn't work for people. And that was you know story that made it into major publications impacted policy that impacted the way the epidemic was dealt with you know these are things that are important and people need to be responsible for the way these stories are told and need to think about the frameworks in which the stories are

Nigeria Africa China Washington Aids HIV Donald Trump Cova The Netherlands World Conference Of Science Jo Oldman Journalists Center Sierra Leone Liberia President Trump Africa Center United States Dima
The Monoliths of Lalibela

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:41 min | 11 months ago

The Monoliths of Lalibela

"Going to be discussing a particular of example of construction. That is really just as amazing as you know. Making all these giant blocks bringing them together and building the pyramid but This particular example is also going to buck the traditional steps that we've discussed here and we're going to be looking at century's old Christian temples in Ethiopia that were we're not built from blocks of stone that were quarried over here and then brought together and then assembled into a building. No these are free reese standing monolithic churches that are each hewn from the solid. Red Volcanic Goria under laid by dark gray a basalt standing tall in the quarries from which they were sculpted so basically these were hewn out of solid stone. The quarry becomes the courtyard. Yeah it's a building that is not built but released from the earth. subtractive manufacturing of Marvel's it it is. It is amazing. I was not familiar with these until just last week when I was looking around for an episode For us to do and I was initially thought. Oh why don't we do Petra the the ruins in Jordan you know with the where the architecture is built into the side of this this kind of like ravine a situation right if you think you've never seen these these rock hewn Buildings you probably have their featured for example in Indiana Jones and the last crusade the show up in several several movies pet petro specifically in this case right so so is the no. Petro would be a good Episode started looking roundabout indie Petras fascinating. Perhaps we'll come back back to it but then I I was just looking around at other. Examples of of buildings had been hewn from stone. And then these just really stood out as the prime prime example like the most extreme example of what you could do with subtractive manufacturing of an entire building to bill to construct a building by not even constructing it by just carving away at solid stone until it is there with no need for bricks or mortar or would or nails or any of this architecture. Protect sure as sculpture. Yeah so where will you find these will you will find them. In lally Bella Ethiopia Ethiopia is of course the nation in eastern in Africa and they stood there at least since the late twelfth century CE though probably get into some of the dating in greater detail later later but I just a few notes about Ethiopia. In general modern Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world and the second most populous African nation after Nigeria Copa is also considered one of only two African nations never to be subjected to Long Term European colonization position the other being Liberia and to be more specific it was it was never it was never call an is during the nineteenth century period where so much of Africa was though it was occupied by Italy of during the Second World War but not not long enough for there to be like true lasting cultural change because it still throughout its history. It certainly came into contact with foreign ideas and influences. And we'll be discussing a major one here today because because one of the things you noticed about Is that it's majority. Religion is the Ethiopian Orthodox Taylor Hato church what's known as an Oriental Orthodox Christian church and it dates back many centuries. There's also a sizable Islamic population in Ethiopia followed in popularity by Protestants traditional faiths Catholicism and Judaism. Now of course there are other fascinating things about Ethiopia's well for instance. Ethiopian cuisine has certainly traveled well around the world. I think thing is widely believed to be the origin. Place of coffee is coffee and Okra is well. I was I chatted with Anne of our fellow. PODCAST here in the Atlanta offices saver and I said Hey. Have you guys done anything. I need the OPN cuisine because we could mention on the podcast and they said that had not yet though they both love the food but they have done an episode Okra and they've done an episode on coffee that get into those origins and say those are two of my favorite plant based foods. Are you an ochre fan or would you one of those people who thinks that slimy. Oh I love Okra and I love it because it is slimy especially in Gumbo. Does it acts as a thickening agent so I I want there to be Okra present in media dish buses great. It's great fried. It's great escape pickled Yeah I'm an Okra Fan for sure. Okay we're on the same page. I like all those ways to. I also really like Okra in Indian food. Yeah it goes really good with Indian spices who I had it in Indian food before but maybe not recently enough for it to really struck a chord. I'll have to seek it out. There is a restaurant here in town. That made a really amazing curried Okra and then then they went out of business. All right well. Let's talk in greater detail tale about Ethiopian Christianity. Then because since we're focusing in on Old Christian temples that were carved out of the ground in Ethiopia. We should in describe how Christianity came to East Africa. Sure So I was looking at a scientific paper that will make a brief reference to later in the episode and the authors of this paper Ethiopian scientists AGFA Wilson S Rot. And you did. I do They point out in the background. Section of the paper that the broader tradition of rock hewn churches in Ethiopia is historically associated with the coming of a group of figures known. Is the nine saints who were alleged to have journeyed from Egypt and Syria during the late fifth and early sixth centuries to preach the gospel of Christianity in Ethiopia Propia and more specifically to spread and promote the monastic lifestyle. So I was digging into this claim I wanted to learn more about the nine saints and this eventually led me down a path where I found a really awesome entry about Ethiopian Christianity in the monastic tradition. In a book called the encyclopedia the of Monasticism edited by this story and Will Johnston with this specific entry on Ethiopian Monastic Christianity written by the Ethiopian American philology Lalla Gist getachew highly. I was reading this as well. And it is quite Quite a fascinating entry. I just had no idea just how imported the monastic tradition was for just Ethiopian. Culture General. Yeah Yeah so highly writes that Due to the proximity of Ethiopia to the Middle East some Christianity entity probably began to spread their organically as soon as the religion was founded but highly also claims that Ethiopian Christianity is a form of the religion. That's it's kind of uniquely shaped by monks and monastic influences. So what exactly would that mean well. Monasticism is the tradition we associate with with monks and nuns. It's the strain of faith that calls for a radical lifestyle of religious devotion often including things like vows of poverty or vows of chastity or vows of silence or fasting General seclusion from secular life. As you know the priest or preacher within the religion might usually live among the society preaching the faith meanwhile the monk shakes in some way to live outside the society rejecting many of the comforts and pleasures of dorm life making their day to day habits and living conditions themselves kind of a radical demonstration of

Ethiopia Lally Bella Ethiopia Ethiopia Ethiopian Orthodox Taylor Hato Ethiopia Propia Marvel Red Volcanic Goria Africa Reese Petro Middle East Atlanta Indiana Liberia Nigeria East Africa Petra Anne Will Johnston Jordan Egypt
Celebrating the power and potential of volunteerism

UN News

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Celebrating the power and potential of volunteerism

"Opens doors and impact peace and development throughout local communities as well as on a national and global level according to the chief of U. N. system affairs and the New York Office of U. N. volunteers. UNLV now dreary said in an interview with you a news ahead of International Volunteer Day. She knows her way around the UN system having previously served with UN women and the UN Development Program UNDP in Iraq Yemen. Another hot spots seeing first hand. The difference volunteering can make moves dreary began by telling Lewis Kathy. What the U. N.. Volunteers program is all about the U. N. V. Program is the UN organization that promotes volunteerism to support peace and development worldwide. You envy is one of the first common services of UN system every year about more than six thousand five hundred volunteers including about tousands. Volunteers contributes to the effective delivery of the peace and development interventions of the United Nations system. Actually this year in November we have reached a number of eight thousand U. N. volunteers who are serving worldwide the United Nations system. Many people think the U. N.. Volunteers are mainly youth. Is that true. Not that's all actually the average Asia. Few and volunteers is thirty five years old. The total number lot of the youth volunteers yearly is about a thousand out of six thousand. Five hundred or seven thousand for instance. I can give you the figure for two thousand eighteen. We had only twenty five percent of the volunteers were under Asia to one thousand nine and two you need to speak languages to be a UN volunteer or it's Sir great asset to have the languages the more you on languages. Have you have the more possibilities of serving the UN system all over the world so definitely. English is a master. And then you. If you're going to be serving in Africa in Francophone Africa. Then you need the French. If you're going to be in Latin America then yes Spanish so yes languages rate asset to have. What kind of activities do you want. Volunteers do all kinds of activities. We are partnering with more than forty entities all over the world and it's more than a hundred profiles and fields that the UN volunteers are serving actually worldwide involved peace and in development and when you join to be a UN volunteer. Do you request what area. You would like to work in it. Definitely when you put your profile in the system you will put as well the area of your expertise and then when you're selected. It is based on the area the of expertise that you have long. Have you been in this post in September. Actually that I have taken the position I came in in August but then I took some time and yeah so effectively I would say in September and and before that before that I was also would United Nation volunteer but in Bonn I was had in the human resources section section if I was there for four years and before that I was with you when women and before you women United Nation Development Programme with U. N. D. C.. You were never actually a UN. Oh and volunteer yourself. No I have not served as you and volunteers but I have seen the UN volunteers in action in the field. All over in and when I was in Liberia when I was in at work when I was in Yemen it is actually the UN volunteers who are doing a lot of contribution a lot of the work of the you went system so I have seen it firsthand definitely. What is International Volunteer Day. Oh yes the International Volunteer Day. Fifth of December it is the international observance day was mandated by General. Assembly in nineteen eighty. Five these actually offers an opportunity for volunteers and end volunteer involvement organizations to promote volunteerism to share the values of volunteerism and contributing that they make to their communities. It is it is a day to celebrate the power and potential of volunteerism. And also we coordinate and we promote the issue year building on the impacts that the volunteers make in their communities nationally and globally for peace and development. The focus of five five. This year is not only celebrate volunteerism in all its facets but also to highlight the role that volunteer volunteerism play a to strengthen solidarity and inclusion. This year's theme is volunteer for an inclusive future. Yes how relevant is inclusiveness in the work of UN volunteers regarding the sustainable development goals volunteering provides opportunity for people particularly those often excluded excluded to concretely impact their own lives and play a constructive role in their communities by volunteering. Their time and skills through volunteerism arisen communities around the word often experience strengthened solidarity an inclusion. And that is why this year. DVD Two thousand nineteen we. We have chosen. The theme volunteer for includes a future to highlight is digi ten and the pursuit

UN International Volunteer Day Asia Unlv Lewis Kathy Yemen Undp Africa United Nation U. N. Liberia Iraq New York Latin America U. N. V. Program Bonn Twenty Five Percent Thirty Five Years Four Years
Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

Past Gas

07:38 min | 1 year ago

Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

"It all started in in nineteen twenty five. Henry Ford was having lunch and his Dearborn Michigan Mansion with his good friend business partner entire magnate Harvey firestone Harvey. RV and Ford had been friends and partners since Ford started building cars decades earlier. So yeah just remember like he invented the model t which I like cheap car and basically he brought the car to the mass. Exactly Mr Firestone had begun ranting this time primarily focused on the impending rubber cartel that had been proposing England by one Winston Churchill. I am not a crooked. You know that payments de Yeah with a cigar and he's like on this day I I am not a crook and it will live in infamy. Yep that's him. The purpose of also the was Churchill. The king no the purpose of the rubber cartel was to limit the export of rubber in order to not overextend national resources. In case there was another World World War One thousand nine hundred eighty five probably a good idea but harvey firestone didn't like that idea. He believed that rubber prices were going to spike in the US as a result and therefore negatively affect firestone tires. Not some things never change Harvey firestone was not alone in this fear even even presidential candidate. FDR feared the effects of a rubber tariff. Remember was viewed. As the automotive industry's chokepoint seen as even more crucial than oil it's crazy. The the automotive industry relied on vulcanized rubber for literally everything from tires to hoses gaskets. A price increase of any kind could sink the young business so there there was a legitimate fear of turtles. Pain passing seems somewhat reasonable. Also it's it's it's kind of like okay here newsflash guys. If you're listening to this this might lose some you know in. I believe in climate change. And it's SORTA like yeah making some changes like you know not dumping tons of poisons into rivers and stuff might be more expensive for some people but in the at the end of the day. It's good not to have poisoned rivers and it's also probably good to have like rubber to defeat the Nazis. Yeah Germany was totally destroyed and they were afraid of something all of Europe. Yeah they're afraid of something like that happening again because those wounds had not been healed all and Churchill was just saying like hey fellers hello. Hello how does he talk. Talk like this is how are we talk again elegant. Listen listen fellows. That women's of all are still fresh insulting. I say that maybe we just save some of US supplies in case of fruit bikes out to again rubber. Blow Hurrah. Yes that's always saying always saying. Hey guys the whole world was just at war four. I think it might happen again. Maybe we should just like chill and be ready and these guys are like a money so harvey firestone was fed up with living in constant fear of their so he decided the best course of action would be to grow his own rubber smart. This wasn't the first time he had some some crazy idea. In fact Harvey tried to declare economic independence from the UK and fly rubber under the American flag. A few years earlier but that was truly the ramblings of a madman who doesn't seem to understand that you can't just not claim another country's resources by saying this cheaper so I'm just going to say it's it's American now although now that I think back on it that's kind of how we did a lot of stuff so yeah but harvey actually had a plan. He decided that he was going to start his own plantation in Liberia where the conditions were almost perfect for growing rubber trees by keeping the production in house he could avoid all the access fees associated with importation from other countries. Henry Ford had also tried growing his own rubber a year earlier. In one thousand nine hundred eighty four he had purchased this large quantities of land in the Florida everglades only to eventually do nothing with them. It was cheaper for four to import. The rubber. The idea of dramatic price is increase was still only speculation. But Still Harvey's plans had peaked and reports interests and after the lunch meeting was over. He requested that it's personal aide aide Leopold would find out where the best place to grow rubber Leopold come over here boy. Where's the best place to go? Rob A AH go find out how Liberia was the obvious choice. Harvey firestone discovered. It had the perfect climate when he put his plantation there but unfortunately Henry Ford word was very very very racist and he would not dare step foot in such an uncivilised and African society so they came to the conclusion. I mean that the rubber should be grown where it originated in the Amazon. So rubber comes from both vines and trees and you let it grow and then when you chop it you squeeze the vines and Latex Literal Latex comes out trees yeah so it's a liquid and then they they put out onto like big flat drying areas than when it dries. You can pull it up like a sheet of Latex and then you take a bunch of latex yeah stack stack into bales. And then that's what gets shipped out to like Volkan Ization plants and stuff like that. So these plantations are really only concerned with drawing the vines and extracting latex from okay okay and Liberia had the per client. But what about the Amazon Amazon also. Very clearly great. Climate only problem. It's a lot harder harder to get into the rainforest than it is in Africa. Got You throughout the nineteenth century. The Amazon River Basin supplied all of the world's rubber and made up forty percent of Brazil's exports sports at the height of the rubber boom in the second half of the nineteenth century but the Amazon's rubber room quickly turned to bus as plantations in Asia and England. Were able to go. Rubber and much denser populations and much more efficiently in Amazon many natural species that are not present in other countries limit the growth of trees so but organizing united plantations and other countries the efficiency was greatly increased. Henry had another incentive to go to South America besides his racism in End Theodore Roosevelt's book through the Brazilian wilderness. He accounts his experiences traveling through the Amazonian rainforests. One of his most significant observations is that many fast-flowing rivers could provide an almost perfect power source for any industry bold enough to be born there. He claimed that the right kind of senators such his enterprising businessmen of foresight coolness and suggest city who would be willing to put migrants to work for an advantage that would be mutually beneficial will give rise to a a great industrial civilization money. If anyone thought they could fill that description it was Henry Ford art now. Henry Ford did not really make cars. Henry Ford thought that he made men the maker. Men's like me. This builder of meant the cars they produced produced were simply a byproduct of his training. He was praised as a sociologist manufacturer. If anyone could reshape the native Brazilians into prosperous factory workers it was Henry Ford. They don't want to be or so he thought they don't want that.

Harvey Firestone Harvey Firestone Harvey Henry Ford Amazon Winston Churchill Liberia Ford Firestone United States England FDR Amazon River Basin Dearborn Michigan Mansion Partner Florida Everglades Germany Europe Africa
The promise of  renewables in remote Central Africa

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:09 min | 1 year ago

The promise of renewables in remote Central Africa

"Than half the population of Africa can can rely on just flicking on a switch light or heat or cooking and that also limits technological advances in banking education and healthcare a recent International Energy Agency report says skipping over the fossil fuel heavy grids the most of the rest of the world relies on and turning straight to solar and micro grids or even wind power has real potential for accelerating development particularly in Central African countries. Michael at the University of Pittsburgh Researches Energy Policy Policy and he says that renewable I approach can work with some caveats. I've seen myself attempts to almost helicopter. Drops solar panels in rural areas. And without any kind of local button. This doesn't work very well. Because one challenge for instance is that many people would like like ideally to have access to the great and feel that the smaller systems do not quite provide kind of services. They were hoping for. I think think what really needs to happen is a lot of bottom up involvement from these local communities to tell other people what their needs exactly are so that these can be met met the best and most effective way as possible in your experience. What is an effective installation on maybe a household or village or town level? Just exactly what would that look like. So these needs very quite a bit across very different settings and I think that's precisely why renewable off great technologies are potentially so powerful is we can really use them tailor them to match what people really can use them for. That's the big difference to the grids because the grid rid is one size fits all type of approach right every house here in the US. For instance once you're connected you have about the same type of services that you can use. They're in somebody's countries. It's going to be very helpful to be able to adapt the kind of technology to their financial means and as a result you can really make the best use use of that without having to go through the high costs imposed by extending the grid so obviously some countries like China that makes solar panels see a potential new mark here but other other global economic gains that we could see by the transition to a different type of electrical infrastructure. This has really serious consequences says on how these families these villages how much they can really produce think about any kind of business if you have a small grocery and you WanNa Fridge Ginny power you need artificial lighting to be able to operate after nightfall so I think what is really going to be. The more and more transformative effect of these technologies can come from allowing places that would otherwise be fairly unproductive from an economic standpoint to suddenly really be able to use their potential and they become much more productive. That way Michael. At Clinton University of Pittsburgh the report says the continent of Africa could by twenty forty meet the energy demands of of an economy. That's grown to four times larger than today's but used just fifty percent more energy and now some related links. The report is worth reading. It says Africa is going to become increasingly influential in shaping global energy trends over the next six two decades. And that's because it's undergoing the largest process of urbanization the world's ever seen the number of people. Living in Africa's cities will grow by six hundred with million. That's more than the increase we've seen in China so the energy demand will grow. Brookings also has incredible visuals and a report on Energy Africa which which are worth clicking through to. For example one graph highlights the cost burden of powering a refrigerator for a year as a percentage of GDP per capita in the US like France UK and other developed countries. It's basically zero in Liberia it's forty-nine percent and really it's all those central African African countries at the expensive end of that chart and we just talked about micro grids on marketplace tech earlier this month

Africa Michael International Energy Agency United States China University Of Pittsburgh Brookings Liberia Clinton University Of Pittsbur France Uk Forty-Nine Percent Six Two Decades Fifty Percent
Off-duty cop wrestles thieves for stolen tip jar in NYC restaurant

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Off-duty cop wrestles thieves for stolen tip jar in NYC restaurant

"Counseling for two thugs who tried to steal a tip jar from a small restaurant Chelsea and I ran away with it were not for an off duty police captain who was sitting in the restaurant when he saw the thieves grabbed the jar the officer follow them outside to confront them they ran away without the tip jar seven Friday afternoon and Matt on some of them live in Liberia surveillance video of the tempter thieves they're hoping someone recognizes them and pass along the info to

Chelsea Officer Matt Liberia
Explainer 185: Bobi Wines red beret

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 185: Bobi Wines red beret

"The current experiences of the United States should you would think they'd all nations for roll time from allowing celebrities usually entertainers or sports folk loose in the political sphere. It should of course be noted that the US is not not presently unique in succumbing to this fully Ukraine's. President is a comedian Liberia's of football Pakistan's. Prime Minister is a cricketer later. Dozens of lesser offices around the world are held by people who were helped into them buying name recognition acquired in other fields. Well let me tell you something. The answer is clear for the people to win. Politics as usual must lose so things considered it is not that all surprising that a popstar should fancy himself president Uganda Amazon Robert Trigger Alani Santana who performs under the name bobby wine was elected elected to Uganda's parliament in two thousand seventeen he stood as an independent in a by election in Dondo East and one big. I've come the parliament at a very sensitive time. I've just taken an oath to defend resolve and protect the constitution of the Republic Sleep of Uganda and that is going to be my major major goal right now since then wine has positioned himself for the next presidential election due in two thousand and twenty one among the symbols identifying his movement is the red beret worn by whine and his appearance it bears an emblem of of a clenched fist over a map of Uganda and the Motto People Power Our power but not for much longer if a new rule announced by Uganda's the government is observed a useful regulation has been discovered under which it is against the law for civilians to sport military clothing and some units of the Ganden People's defence force notably its military police wear red berries therefore the wearing of the red beret by non soldiers is henceforth punishable by up to five years in the clink. Bobi wine is among those skeptical that this decision is exclusively motivated by a desire to protect the integrity of the Ugandan army's insignia. It is wind said a sham. It is a blatant attempt to suffocate a successful threat to the autocratic status quo. This is pretty obviously correct. It also prompt the interesting question of exactly Walt Uganda's powers that be scared off at which point joint a recap of Uganda's powers that be or more accurately is this area peaceful full in spite of the nobody would start with a piece of Uganda Yoweri Musevenei now seventy five has been president of Uganda since one thousand nine hundred eighty six and plans to run again in two thousand and twenty one by the standards of Ugandan presidents most of any hasn't done a bad job but those standards were set by Idi Amin and Milton Obote both mad and terrible men Mussolini any to his credit played a considerable role in toppling both however as is invariably the case with overstaying and under challenged leaders. Musevenei has become complacent and his government corrupt Transparency International's global corruption index ranks Uganda slightly less bent than as a John which is basically owned by one family and slightly more so than the Central African Republic which is barely governed at all Uganda's population is young young more than three quarters of its people have been born during Musevini's rule and did he is restless certainly sufficiently so to take its chances with sorry pop singer. It's what they bring me. Wine can and claim reasonably that the leap from musician to politician is not in his case a long one. He has been keen campaigner on several issues and many the songs he has recorded in his studio in Cam. What you're a disheveled neighborhood of Kampala have addressed social injustice to the extent that in August he he was charged with intending to alarm annoy or ridicule President Musevini. Yeah this is not the only legal jeopardy presently hanging over wine he also faces charges of incitement to violence and treason and potentially a life sentence. If convicted wine claims that these charges are politically motivated and it would be very far from the first time that Musevini the people acting on his behalf have attempted to arrest opponents into submission invoking article twenty nine of the Constitution. We've got Dante's every citizen the right to assemble and demonstrate we are going to do this peacefully and take me on on the clube wine says he and his supporters. I will continue to wear the red beret. This is arguably a missed opportunity wine cooed by choosing something else. Just striking have have highlighted the silliness of Viennese edict and jettison the baggage associated with this particular item of Hillary in non-military circles. St Red Berry is an almost invariable choice of revolutionary posers and or populist scoundrels from Hugo Chavez in Venezuela to Julius Melena. Amo in South Africa wine would be within his rights admittedly to retort that it costs more of a dash than the disheveled floppy brimmed Bush hat long favored favored by Mussolini and also if it comes to a rap battle on the strength of Musevini's endeavors in this realm wine will up. I'm monocle twenty four amount.

Uganda Uganda Yoweri Musevenei Walt Uganda President Musevini Bobby Wine President Trump Ugandan Army United States Mussolini St Red Berry Liberia Ukraine Prime Minister Robert Trigger Alani Santana Pakistan Hugo Chavez Kampala Hillary
STEMinists: Mae Carol Jemison

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:07 min | 1 year ago

STEMinists: Mae Carol Jemison

"To space and she's also a physician volunteer entrepreneur and teacher. Let's talk about the multitalented Mae Carol Jemison they may Carol Jemison was born in Decatur Alabama on October Seventeenth Nineteen fifty-six. She's the youngest of three siblings and she was three her. Her family moved to Chicago. May's parents maintenance worker at an elementary schoolteacher always encouraged her curiosity and desire to be a scientist in one interview may set her parents were the best scientists. She knew because they were always asking questions. mm-hmm. May herself was inquisitive from an early age. She spent much of her time in her school library. Reading about astronomy and other sciences by the time may was in highschool. She'd already decided to pursue a career in biomedical engineering. She received the national achievement scholarship for Stanford University and left home for college when she was just sixteen years old at Stanford may studied chemical engineering and African American can studies she also participated in dance and feeder and served as the head of the universities Black Student Union in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven she completed pleaded her degree at Stanford and enrolled in Cornell University's medical school she studied and worked abroad in Cuba Kenya and Thailand after Cornell now she worked as a general practitioner before serving in the Peace Corps in Sierra Leone and Liberia when may return to the US. She went back to work as a general zero practitioner but it wasn't long before she decided to take a shot at a childhood dream. The space shuttle Challenger's five astronauts sleeping now in nineteen eighty three may watch to sally ride became the first American woman in space but as the Challenger climbed today carried American woman astronaut astronaut Sally Ride into space and into history may was inspired decided to apply to NASA's astronaut program she was selected as one of only fifteen candidates out of more than two thousand applicants may join the Astronaut Corps in nineteen eighty seven and after drew extensive training took her historic flight on September Twelfth Nineteen ninety-two ever lower the locker visors world twelve good luck on conviction that bill on the past x Ray in the visible lending at our planet earth in the neck copies. Thanks on that day. She became the first black woman in space she traveled on the space shuttle. Endeavor or three three two one booster ignition and liftoff of space shuttle Endeavour on twenty-first-century mission placing Earth back on the Mac doc may was the mission specialist of the journey. She conducted bone cell research as well as experiments on weightlessness and motion sickness. The Group of seven seven astronauts took one hundred twenty six orbits around the Earth and the mission lasted eight days after as time and space she left NASA in March of nineteen ninety-three she went on to teach environmental studies at Dartmouth College and founded her own company called the Jemison group you a technology consulting firm that seeks to incorporate solutions to social issues in the design of Engineering and science projects. She's a vocal local advocate for greater inclusion of women and people of Color in stem and she's also an advocate for comprehensive science education for kids. She contributes to efforts provided dance technology to schools worldwide. We all need to be stim- literate just to work our way through the day we need to be stim- litter may has also also taken over leadership of the one hundred year starship program the program which was originally established by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency works to develop means for traveling beyond the solar system within the next one hundred years. It's aims to benefit many people on Earth as possible along the way in case. You weren't impressed enough already a leave you with some parting fun facts about the Amazing Mae Carol Jemison final frontier she she speaks three languages other than her native English Japanese Russian and Spike Ely voyages of starship enterprise. She also appeared appeared on Star Trek the next generation making her the first real space goer to play a character on the iconic show boldly go where no man has gone before. You're all science. All space exploration everything we do in the world is about imagination in using your creativity to expand beyond your the Obama join us next time for the story of another

Mae Carol Jemison Sally Ride Amazing Mae Carol Jemison Nasa Stanford University Jemison Group Alabama Astronaut Corps Decatur Peace Corps Scientist Chicago Barack Obama Mission Specialist Liberia Dartmouth College Spike Ely Universities Black Student Uni Defense Advanced Research Proj
"liberia" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on World Cafe

"So that's a Louis singing from the perspective of parent during the refugee crisis, but in real life. He came to Scotland as a refugee himself when he was kid was born in Liberia and then. No, civil war and then moved over. Because my father was in Scotland Alicia left Liberia when he was four and a half years old. We literally. That seems thing that's been happening. No, it's been happening since fricken whenever you know. And folk redeem were falling off the board and stuff in everybody's com. Don't because everyone was killed made it out safely and ended up in Ghana. She we wouldn't have teacup folk. Scotland's dight. And they think it was must have been late ninety to ninety to ninety three. Mother was trying to get in touch. So she's been through so much. And I guess everybody says their mother weather, but. And. So. So she's be a of stuff, and I think immediate immediate easier for me. They have more coverage, you know, doing stuff whatever skipping still I was still do it just because she can. And do you know, she she's reading this life was different for a Lucious when he got to Scotland five we'd be in in the plea is blowing the head blue eyed girl. What was it wasn't any? She's like. Do you teach lake chocolate? And I was like, I don't know. And she took mine and looked it was eight of what is that Trump is like, no, I was like well, do you like milky witty in issues an institute mile? It was like that. So it's kinda like I can understand from not. So it points that kids trying to understand and gruffly things. Allie grew up in Scotland. And when he was teenager, he met his friends and really his future musical family chaos and Graham today, we meet them at their creative home in Edinburgh. The studio where they made all of cocoa sugar. The studio is on the corner of this brick road the outside walls are painted black and the windows have either white curtains bedsheets, I didn't ask..

Scotland Liberia Trump Ghana Alicia Allie Lucious Edinburgh Graham
"liberia" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"As Hayes is helping his team made up for second. Now going back down to his knees. I kick in the ankles even accidentally he's never fun when it gets colder out, it feels that everything's things a little bit more. But how just is impressive. What I was not here to get it to three to. I think they never gave up on their defense. They never gave up on that press that that that's really what kind of kept them going the ability to swarm on the ball. And just take the ball away in good spots. We're set to go the free kick sent towards that chip. Retired again. Liberia has Paul even. That's amazing. I mean Liberia again, they just had that quick strike capability. They they have that ability to fine goals. Just off offer free cake, which I spoke about earlier they got under strengthen the final last year. They were able to score from three able to create a lot off of there. And they finally did it here. Eugene Denison front of the net tied at three thirty seconds away from stoppage-time and certainly more like it could be over time as well. Think we're headed there. Although the goals coming rapidly. So not the clearing overtime. Just yet. John Ivory Coast, send up ahead having said that. Ivory Coast working zone. We have now entered stoppage-time. And it is data's who gets the goal. So the clocks freezing frozen at ninety minutes as a passive grab by morning. He'll work it up ahead. Wine into the far side back in why because territory. Chance now for Liberia would stop Eckstein. It is three three match won a match. This has been. The ball continues to roll into Ivory Coast territory. Here comes Liberia work it up ahead. Getting tripped up and take it down. My nothing called. And Ivory Coast will control. Yeah. We do not have the amount of time has not been announced. We will wait for the officials. Whistle. Allie battle for seven field of foul is called chance for Liberia stoppage-time continues. I mean Liberia just cruising to their second straight title Ivory Coast up ended this a couple quick goals. But Liberia just again with that quality in the foul. Third day could just create something out of nothing and managed to do it. Try to create again headed towards.

Liberia John Ivory Coast stoppage-time Hayes Allie Eugene Denison Eckstein Paul three thirty seconds ninety minutes
"liberia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With the case in liberia samples of blood urine saliva shipped to the cdc's headquarters in atlanta the samples were screened for heavy metals insecticides and dozens of infectious agents finally the cdc lab isolated the culprit bacteria that was causing meningococcal blood infections in the end the mystery was solved but only after thirty one people got sick and thirteen died tolbert yan swat the director general of the national public health institute of liberia says this is a rare disease for his country and prior to this outbreak liberia didn't have the sophisticated laboratory equipment needed to screen for it it would have been difficult to be setup loudini have the capacity to do that and so see dc comedy was very helpful now liberia has the equipment that needs to test for this disease in the future currently the cdc has one hundred and forty nine epidemic intelligence officers in the two year program they're just as likely to get called in to help with an outbreak in ohio as an africa last year other cdc disease detectives probe the cause of food poisoning at a chili chowder cook off in virginia they tested cooling systems in new york city for legionnaires disease they analyzed exposure to merge virus among workers at a cattle market in the united arab emirates caitlyn casa boom got sent to investigate a massive wildlife die off in the middle and she had to take tissue samples from bloated rotting hippo carcasses even just with the few carcasses that i was working with the smell that's really incredible costume helped confirm that it was actually anthrax that was killing the wildlife she brought a new anthrax diagnostic machine with her like so many of the disease detectives she got hands on experience with a rare infectious agent namibian officials got helped with the investigation and access to cutting edge new diagnostic technology and that sort of sums up with.

cdc director general liberia ohio atlanta tolbert national public health institu dc africa virginia new york namibian two year
"liberia" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

"For ben it was such a revelation for we are he did something he could have never imagined just a few months earlier he traveled to monrovia liberia set aside is doubt and distrust and opened his mind to the very real possibility that someone he thought was a bitter enemy i know you might actually be a friend in disguise oh how you doing man to good see to you see you see you first thing ben learned was joel never saw himself as a scam joel saw his trolling more like a friend search relinking for friend or were you looking for somebody to give you some money got to be my friend before he before i'll give you some money money somehow you found ben on this phone on that old dinosaur got facebook on their jewel used to send facebook messages to strangers hoping to find some way someone to help him out of poverty how desperate were you i'm what despots because i'm the i'm gonna follow seven to feed the kids a lot of teams run into your mind like what maybe go into this iran thing it is fortunately by degrades guys the book it never came to that the book the made it all happen they've now sold nearly six thousand copies which means this unlikely pair must now come up with a plan for their publishing enterprise some of the profits will go toward joel's basic needs like keeping rain out ran new roof looks good man but they decided most of the money should be reinvested in the community liberia is one of the poorest nations in the world half the country survive on less than two.

liberia ben joel facebook monrovia iran
"liberia" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

Off Camera with Sam Jones

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Off Camera with Sam Jones

"Area and these women are sort of almost four archetypes of that i was able to relate to having never been liberia having no knowledge of the war i felt like by the time i finished this i knew these women liberia was just a completely new people that's what amazes me and maybe that's why i'm connected to ideas of dispersing all the myths around africa because it is such a diverse continent and liberia was just recovering from the war when i got there you know it was at the same time such an amazing people who were very very willing to embrace my hope to connect with them that deeply and i just met some of the most astounding women they're like literally the coolest most bowls i most fascinating dominant powerful women i've ever met are in liberia well what's what's amazing to me is how relatable it is too white guy who grew up in southern california and i think that's the true accomplishment of the plays that it does prove that you can take a story about a culture and a place and an event that i have no connection with and make me see it just as other human beings but did you wonder when you were writing this is this going to connect i think that's always been the the goal you know from me because i you know i sit in between these two cultures right and i see them both as deeply relatable to me so i always marvel at how it feels like you know i'll watch someone take information or share information about the continent and i'm like that how you saw it you know it's like it's like i'm so different to has to be a way of breaking that and creating a bridge where it's very clear the similarities and the humanity shared and the even the the life perspectives shared between these two seemingly different peoples and so that that's.

liberia california africa
"liberia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"That that that's only about it like i want at this year's show i should let you read the show i'll go if i if i step on youtube i know that i should be ice rebecca idler as they are what is needed big solid tracy go in time you'd go first do you want at the conference he's going to go for our system our walk is going to open out yeah chris were wachira let's was ideal lineup here well we're just go to watch the show we're going to go watch again god knows so is just christopher we're want to open for cragg if if we can get your listeners to get the bear that chris raw kid over the official handover craig's he's are fairly guy eddie in liberia sex the city kikwete's oh yes have sex we have a tomomi ask you you you've been around will ask adam i think he he he view vive the rumor is that sharon stone might replace kim could trawl on sex and it would be something that would be something like that sexy it's a shared stood is is a great withered you know she's a recovery drug i should say that allowed does he romar that the old old wisdom our you have no idea how much mercy colomberg said update yet but you're right said okay let's just say it's river but wait quit is responsible for quit malik monk now where did she love correct yes sir but shared stowed who might actually be i hear this week had for the super bowl is coming here what what how cool that be because i be cheese ito deficit mckay sexy now what you know she's like everything that you watch it into it okay that audience are without they would they would love that no you're fi but we are we let you after wrap up yellow i was just going to ask going to go down the line tracy what would you like to promote younger be out in the parking lot of a new one might not even go the show but i'm gonna be scalp and tickets and selling cheap a true ooh should we let's not ask larry i all gay anybody in minneapolis who gush are combed we're not receive love it adam thank you for.

chris christopher cragg craig eddie adam sharon stone kim colomberg larry minneapolis official liberia
"liberia" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Business Daily

"If i awoke on queah let me raise motorbike riders wait for customers in the shade drooping langer tree these are the hard core george wear funds pin pin ride is as the known most of them as young former soldiers from the world i want for him to football scholla your boy especially at to you one george wear to focus on young people most most especially to focus on young people like almost one 27yearold emmanuel's as a has big expectations for the country giant is way is known him as low as well well we're going harassment i sure does the court judge i inner city right now in country countries so we are a bit much of into focus on a you'll most especially it but it is there you are getting empower him to a seat elias there you voted for him yet you minded pennsylvania a major by when you always wanted today no no this is not a career to enforce the laws are which has to endure to survive fifteen years after one of the most brutal civil wars in africa poverty is still endemic more than half the population lives on less than two dollars a day according to the world bank liberia has the highest number of out of school children in the world nearly twothirds claims he nsf and unemployment is rampant unemployment is one of the alleged for the new gulf which valet duly is a beer in economist many of the people that are oil pride about some of the best some of them would have on bosnia had to be got on bosnia we take them from the slump amid a berbick challenge for him president ellen johnsonsirleaf secured nearly five billion dollars of debt relief during her first term she attracted investors from all over the world but the country is still reeling from a devastating ebola epidemic and investors have his scat who way we of this godless chuck by hit the economy shortly boiler and the the decline of of mid a commodity.

emmanuel harassment liberia bosnia president george football pennsylvania africa ellen johnsonsirleaf ebola five billion dollars fifteen years two dollars
"liberia" Discussed on Vector Podcast

Vector Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Vector Podcast

"The the software level in ecosystem level that are holding people back so i think you'll see more of the the same but better come out i don't think that's going to any mass of surprises i don't expect to see a smartphone with a curbs screen come from liberia anytime soon i don't think it tablets sealed there were rumors of more tablets before i i don't think they're gonna touched at any time soon uh unless there's some specific niece reason you know they could turn around make it a bit if somebody asked lament ordered from them at volume but you're going to see them pivot i mean the the big talk of late has been that you'll blackberries gonna make more of an idea move right they're gonna show hardware business the o does happen overnight but you can see them shed a lot of that which saves them a lot of money his as soon as your outselling hardware they don't have marketing expenses the way they've had in the past there they're engineering and development costs all the go away all be the testing cross cool way like hundreds of millions of dollars of expenses go away at the ghetto that business and on it gives them a much bigger yuck kills there it reduces their burn rate lot nearly still two point six billion in the bank and they still have money coming in not nearly as fast as it was though for the last several quarters in years um if you lose tasty hardware profits either yeah an end the bond that's arguably one of the things that blackberries hardware province of never been that tasty also feel a lot of their revenues come on the back of their their service revenue tied to the old lacquer equal so this interesting because story in the last couple of weeks has been bpm going multiplatform it was supposed to launch i think a week or two ago it's been delayed it should still be.

liberia
"liberia" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Omnibus

"No he will you flu and also coming back into the united states like i had to answer yes when all those questions that everyone else to see north have you been to any of these worth every company and i was like no way well technically i have this time yes and then uh in just recent times liberia elected the first female leader of an african nation yeah she's like some black woman president bartlett right she's like a harvardtrained economist who has won nobel prizes and steer ellen sirleaf who was yeah very progressive but of course it's very difficult to reform well any nation but liberia at the time had been you know check aides hit with some tough tough times now when we get to the second half of my little rhyme monrovia more avia moldova moldavia things start to really get confusing and so again i'm in a skip a head amid a not going to go to moldova first go to a multimedia because multimedia is one of those central european countries which is almost better described as a condition or a complication because it's a very small region that sort of it's defined by river where is it john moldavia is a component of the historic region of bessarabia wish his source in arabia no it is nowhere near arabia it is bound by ukraine and romania okay very close to the black sea although excluded from having a black sea border probably by design right by design so it is a landlocked country but bound by rivers bounded by rivers and those rivers empty into the black sea so it's very close to the black sea it could have a black sea port or a could have a you know up.

united states liberia ellen sirleaf monrovia moldova john moldavia arabia ukraine romania flu president bartlett bessarabia
"liberia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Anthony was in the c is that the navy is the navy author onat shrimps tom and sometimes they fly the planes over the water and that's and they're still consider the navy liberia um i think the plane has to take off from a ship plane taking off from the ship now have heard every than were hauled not like a little shift lightyear thinking of your the beaupre thing of like a tugboat he i'm thinking of a of is exactly what i'm donna are they have like aircraft carriers third gigantic can we could really consider that a boat what do they go botas a tugboat all i moved urologic all checks out um but they got this video footage from like the the uh the cockpit the cockpit camera uh this you have o n he can here and when i say ufo by the way i am talking and unidentified flying object if you're gonna hear what i've clarifying his i'm not seen necessarily flying saucer i'm not necessarily saying a little green men this could be a hostile foreign power that has some technology that we on under he mean green kids rate green kids yeah we mean kid is now a little dream man outright the out of a man it's a kid while then i is a green boyce agree i would say little i would just say a green boy yeah um atas uh the the better watch out a these green boys are attacking i am so hungry acta will the that's you're gonna be hungry when the aliens come in today take away all our food his that what they are they maya do who knows what why why else do you think they would be here.

Anthony donna boyce liberia
"liberia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Zhou li gives you hope there is an alternate reality weed weed are not destined for ever to be toiling in the sun picking cotton and tobacco paul is calling from medford massachusetts paul thank you for calling you're on the air hate com hi hi i four i'm do some very very interesting topic today because i'm a reasonably from our wish africa liberia and if you know the origin of liberia as a country it was wanted by freed african them that went i wound one c3 african american slaves in both we africans are went back to africa iran the early eighteen th century um i am a descendant of african american mying grid grid grigg parents were actually in sleeves in america and went back to liberia hip to form like beer yes and what afonso unique is the whole thing about our paul shuttle where they have always been a raw tilting stories so wendy's on settlers we call then i'm um americoliberians that the term we news in liberia and when it came back the how aldi stores to tow but why was fascinating is the med new story stories of their ancestors stories that have been too with centuries and generations so in libero hackel there will reach his hurry aboard um stories that comes from america and you'll slavery in stores that into a to our with african these schnitt originally in in this is sort of like a very fascinating story know that suan it's something that's offered nut remarked upon another exerts an excellent example of the freed african americans leverage literally this case yarn and founded liberia um but the same is true of of of people from brazil there were called the returnees and uh in the 19th century a group went back there were there were a lot of crisscrossing the atlantic generally in small numbers um sometimes it's a person had been enslave the royal family and his father would protest to the european factors and sometimes they risig liberating but a large group of uraba a went back to your berlin in wanted gel nigeria's so uh scholar randy mature he's written about this so that the myths.

Zhou li massachusetts liberia iran america brazil berlin nigeria randy africa wendy aldi african americans
"liberia" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Dribbles out of bounds once again it's back in liberia territory but at this point time certainly the ally of liberia with this comfortable three one lead one good chance that with the shot saved by mulyana came up with russia's save of the game last taken by kamar they'll oh pushing shoving here but the rough so soon retirement things now near side now is to say trying to work it up ahead and said its kicked back out to the center the field by bira controlling their the final minutes of this championship match you bazi by the pass it back and was intercepted aware back the other way for sierra leone but still his own territory surrounded by a couple of red jerseys pick your way now once again carrabba's you'll pass it back up and take returned feet who's actually she now is maya that's a roll out of bounds and we'll get a throw in here from liberia black rosa ninety minutes we are in stoppagetime liberia leading sierra leone three two one here the unity cup fun he's watching a rat's ass if he thinks of the peak at his watch not yet there was if we're going by injurytime there was a lot of it gives literally was specially tuesday ed you would think of good five minutes established i battle we don't owe that officially be tackled the field of course by the officials took the officially just kinda gave her to his twos to wines with one minute so time running out for sierra leone under the what chance big why quiet here in the second half through the centre the field it goes one last attempt here apple on the far side chipped ahead nicely as bears able to work inhabitants kick rightback gary all iberia is doing its own any buddha get high into the air back out of bounds yeah with a little the far side sierra leone trying to get a towards vented said right into the hands of the waiting goalkeeper bouillon nobody bearman peace landsdowne hoping to finally take off the final secondfiddle wires player of the game coming up the pa liberia wins three goals in the second half liberia the two thousand seventeen recap champions as they celebrate of the field the depressive three two one victory it certainly wasn't so we will step aside and take a break in.

liberia mulyana russia sierra leone carrabba apple maya ninety minutes five minutes one minute
"liberia" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Amanpour

"Support for oman poor comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that is why quicken loans created rocket mortgage about you apply simply in understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident you're getting a ride mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash on poor tonight catholic leader of has to step back from the brink and a prime time address we get the latest from spain plus the trump administration rolls back emissions rules the critics say leave power plants free to plate liberia's outgoing president on leadership on the day of her country's election and the wealth fast movie animated entirely with oil so brings you to do some provisions you're not going to staff things up again i got quite enough weeping over that in the case good evening and welcome to the program i'm them about i've sitting in for christiane amanpour in london cancer lands leader finally addresses the world after a day full of suspense colors period ahmad criticised spain and defended the results of its controversial independence referendum but he stopped short of declaring independence throwing the ball into spain's court the government myself bengals we suggest that the prime minister pens the effects of this declaration of independence so a father we we we have a dialogue without phetamine we cannot have an agreed solution we understand it through newman dust none only need to be escalated tension mci but we also need a dialogue in order to move firmly 'skimmed media will of the people.

oman spain liberia president christiane amanpour prime minister ahmad
"liberia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The total number of human beings who were kidnapped and brought out of africa and enslaved less than five percent ever found their way to the future united states let's go to uh john in st louis you're on the michael medved show liberia's abuser grew or schumer's you're talking about uh roberty leaving a traitor if you to this country don't you wait wait off isn't doesn't taking up arms against your nation constitute treason well let me finish this statement and then you can bring it up the first and would be sure one hundred thousand southerners fought against the union forces correct and they street for for statewide we'll they were all amnestied they were all amnestied after the war as was general lee but then understand it but to say that the warriors george washington would have been a traitor based on what you're play so well and again according to a two british law he he was and and again they use this same analogy the difference is that what the the the cook colonists were fighting for was representation remember the slogan was no taxation without representation and they had no representation the british parliament you can't say southerners did never presentation in washington kenny no they ran the country well reputation but the north where's destroying our economy how if if the if the road at a fan who a polish oh all the machinery of north head north wouldn't of prosper oh okay to say the north was destroying the southern appanah me is is complete nonsense in other words what the north was talking about was not extending slavery and before secession the north at even committed to leaving slavery where it was not interfere the the civil war was and secession were one of the most wretched mistakes in all of human history we'll be right back.

liberia schumer lee civil war africa michael medved george washington washington five percent
"liberia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And of course the advent of artificial refrigeration and icemaking once again changed everything mechanical refrigerators were in development by the 1870s and home refrigerators were becoming ubiquitous by the 1920s once manufactured ice became a possibility most folks stopped wanting to use frozen pond water that could potentially have horse proof it of course the ice straight much as was the case with butterworth margarine the ice trade tried to make a alive arguments about how artificial ice was bad chemical you should want this naturally fresh pond water that horses have been pooping in hand on to her i mean we still right there are variations of that that are not so it's legal arguments as marketing schemes rightly i want this water fresh from a stream not one that's been processed uh i don't think anybody's making the case for or scoop water at one of his descendants donated all of his papers and all the family papers to baker liberia harvard business school and i kinda wanna go down there and poor through them and try to figure out like did he think about what he was doing regarding the establishing of business the for so long was almost exclusively trading two people that were making all their money off of slavery like i he has to have known breakouts slavery being wrong especially since he was literally harvesting ice for where henry david throw was hanging out the roe was a staunch abolition thea um but i couldn't find anybody that had looked into that at all uh most of the sources are really candid about the fact that he was selling to you know you know british colonial india which has its own set of issues and human rights concerns and red all of that put to eits i didn't find any anyone really looking into the part where he created a trade that was too reliant on slavery for so long.

liberia henry david human rights
"liberia" Discussed on The Golf Podcast

The Golf Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"liberia" Discussed on The Golf Podcast

"Talked about this week were hanging out in the the the oakley sweet they oakley benefactor sweet up here doing this podcast overlooks the seventeenth all i ask it sunday afternoon would you rather be sitting in this nice airconditioned sweet win however the cocacola and relaxing or you won't be down there in the maelstrom all day with people yelling at in in the wind swirling and have a chance vulnerable easy answer is easy answer earners of after late afternoon back down there for sure i wanna know now on a european tour they've had a lot of events where little bit of mussa slain when guys come out get introduced so i a song for you do you have a song already in your head that if they say what your intro music do you know what it would be not really arena i i i wouldn't know what i mean there's a saw that that i liked by i would use it as the introduction a likely be repeating for liberia but it's kinda like eight seats so far different type of right of all farming you don't wanna be walking without on people falling asleep so he ever everyone knows that theme though yes you would hear them even if you would feel a little slow you're on a little bit more action now do you at when you play when you play just for fun do you listen to music when you're on the courthouse antisoviet body air allow speaker on.

liberia