5 Burst results for "Libby Dankner"

"libby dankner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"libby dankner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Noel king Los Angeles County released its annual homeless count last week. And the results were bleak. The number of homeless Angelenos increased by twelve percent. But one group saw a modest improvement military veterans KPCC's Libby Dankner has more in the skid row area downtown Los Angeles, Kevin chintzy walks past a maze of tents and camping gear he avoids garbage piled up on the sidewalk in steps around an elderly man sleeping under a tarp shading him from the midday sun. He's on a quest breakfast. Very Bedford veterans. Kency is an outreach coordinator for the nonprofit US vets. He's carrying a message to veterans like himself who have experienced homelessness, you wants them to know that there's help out there for housing medical care or pension benefits for vets. The governor stole money at the situation, we've personally hired more vet friendly out retrievable to come out here and try to gate with veterans and see what they mean better. Help to the VA has also at least official count shows the county house more than twenty eight hundred veterans last year. But at the same time almost that many fell into homelessness. So the population of former service members living on the street dropped by just twelve individuals between twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen twelve fewer veterans, which means the numbers, basically didn't budge LA still has by far the most homeless vets in the country. But it is the second year in a row with improvements and it bucked the trend of. Growing numbers of homeless for other groups across the county where a work in progress. I think akilah Templeton with US vet says, she has to take the winds as they come within able to reach veterans who were sort of hiding in the shadows service providers say the veteran numbers are getting better because of dedicated federal funding to help men and women who served in the military, get back on their feet, a federal rent vouchers civically for veterans was the difference for Edward Cunningham and his cats has Lincoln. Cunningham moved into one bedroom apartment in Tarzana a neighborhood in LA's, San Fernando Valley last March. He's thirty seven spent twelve years in the Marine Corps, and deployed multiple times Twee rock when he got out of the military Cunningham was diagnosed with several disabilities related to a service including PTSD. He tried to hold down a job, but nothing stuck after bouncing around to several friends houses in multiple states. He ended up homeless, I tried to take my life before I was unsuccessful last year at lake got a significant boost in federal funding for a joint housing voucher program between the department of housing and urban development and veterans affairs targeting chronically homeless. Vets Cunningham is using his future to cover thirteen hundred dollars. If his rent, he makes up the rest with his VA disability pension. This is about them helping you take care of yourself..

Edward Cunningham Kevin chintzy Los Angeles Los Angeles County VA department of housing outreach coordinator KPCC Lincoln Kency Libby Dankner akilah Templeton PTSD San Fernando Valley official Marine Corps Tarzana thirteen hundred dollars twelve percent
"libby dankner" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:49 min | 2 years ago

"libby dankner" Discussed on KPCC

"At nine thirty at ten o'clock. We bring you fresh air with Terry gross. And then stay up all the way to eleven o'clock. It's wait wait, don't tell me eighty nine point three KPCC all night long tomorrow morning and throughout the day. Libby, Dankner and Tammy Trujillo will keep you updated on the Wolsey fire. It's burning its way to the ocean through Malibu. Let's get back to the takeaway on eighty nine. Point three KPCC. The midterm elections may be over. But are we more polarized today after the midterms than we were a week ago? What does it all mean for the road to twenty twenty? I'm joined now by two veteran politicos, Doug Sosnik, and Sarah Fagin. Doug was a senior advisor to President Bill Clinton, and Sarah is former political director for President, George W Bush, Doug and Sarah. Thanks so much for joining us. Hi, Amy, great to be here. Thank you. I'm really happy to have you. So Doug, let me start with you. You you and Sarah wrote together in an op Ed for politico. And in your opening comments, you note that twenty eighteen was the sixth change election of the last seven elections. What is America trying to say to us? Lord, America's trying to do is come to terms with. I think the biggest transition that we're going through as a country since the industrial revolution in our institutions are incapable of dealing with these changes. And so for the most part since the beginning of the last decade middle last decade voters largely voted against ever in power rather than voting for someone because they feel like regardless of political party that the system is not working for them. So as we sort through this transition period, I suspect we'll continue to see the series of change elections because of the large majority of people in this country feel like the government is not working for them. How much of it though, Sarah is driven by the way that campaigns are run which is the motivating factor in these past few elections hasn't been, hey, isn't it great all the work that party in power has been able to do, but the energy really is around the anger on the party in power and getting your voters to turn out to support. Your party is much harder than getting your voters out to vote against the opposite party. It is an angry electorate, and even though people tend to vote for one party when they go to the polls, they're very fickle. And you know, they're fickle in their turnout patterns, do they show up to support these candidates effectively. What's happening is every two years? We adopt one party from at least one chamber of the congress and switch out a few governors and so forth. I think there's another factor at play here, which is that midterms are very different than presidential elections. In terms of the types of voters that turn out one of the reasons. Democrats had a very good night on Tuesdays. They did do a good job of turning out some presidential typical presidential voters, and you know, younger voters minorities women college educated women single women. They turn them out at a slightly higher percentage. Relative to which. You would expect in presidential. And then they got a higher share of college educated women than typically Democrats do, but there's nothing to say that that group of women won't vote Republican again in the future. But right now, they're voting democratic. I totally take Sarah's point. And I absolutely agree that midterms are not predictive of the next presidential election. But what can we learn from the two thousand eighteen election about what the twenty twenty map for the battleground states will look like, well, I think what we learned was twenty sixteen in terms of voting behavior and patterns, remember Hillary Clinton said she carried the county security in America represented two thirds of the GDP growth in our country. But the same token eighty four percent of the counties in America voted for Trump in two thousand sixteen. So I think if you learn anything from twenty eighteen it was that the trends that we saw in twenty sixteen are gonna be actually hardened and even more prevalent going forward. What is commonly referred to now as tribal politics and my own view on. This wasn't going back now beginning almost fifty years ago in the beginning of the nineteen seventies. And the there's been an economic decline of the middle class in our country. And it was of course, obviously, exasperated by the economic crisis of the last decade. So our problems earned divisions in our country right now, I think while they're rooted economics. It's now become a cultural thing, and we're not only voting more tribal, but we're also beginning to live in communities that are more tribal. So people are living around people like themselves, and that's why on on Tuesday night. Democrats picked up congressional seats now and some of the red estates, like South Carolina and Georgia in Oklahoma, and Kansas and Iowa because even within these red states, you've got these blue I'm Claes now of people that are living around the like themselves. And so I think the one thing we can learn at believe. About what twenty eighteen means for twenty twenty is that the transit the end servicing twenty sixteen hundred even more prevalent in two years and Sarah. So does this mean that in order to win in twenty twenty a candidate is not going to be as concerned with winning over converts as they are with turning out the faithful. Well, I think it's still going to be balanced just because you have such a higher turnout, and you tend to get more people who are disconnected to politics actually show up in a presidential year than a mid term. But I do think that is a key part of this for both parties is they've gotta turn out there their bases. And they've got to have a message that convinces enough of those small narrow, you know, sort of seven or eight percent of the country that sort of typically is truly undecided to convert to their side who Democrats nominate though in two thousand twenty will matter a lot the country's still center. Right. It's less center. Right. Than it was. I think it's still leans to the right? And so if Democrats nominate somebody who is far to the left somebody out of the mold of Elizabeth Warren. I think Donald Trump's chances of being reelected are much higher. I think the other factor which we haven't spoken about here is the economy. He's still in this country, even with our tribal politics. The economy matters vary significantly we saw Tuesday night. Democrats had a good night. But they won fewer house seats in part because I think there were some economic headwinds helping Republicans that will be true in the presidential race even more. So think that there's probably around thirty percent that are for Trump. No matter what in your probably around forty percent that even forty five percents somewhere in there that are against Trump. No matter what that still leaves around twenty five thirty maybe thirty five percent of the public that is in neither camp. And so I think that it's going to be critical on both sides that there's an effort attorney at your people. But I think you absolutely. Really need to have a persuasion campaign and for that twenty five to thirty percent of the electorate whenever that number is at fighting a holy war. They're just thinking about their lives. And so that's where the economy really does matter and other issues. So I think the notion that you just have a base strategy in this political environment is a big mistake. Thank SaaS Nick, Sarah again. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. Thanks. Nick was senior advisor to President Bill Clinton and Sarah Fagan, former political director for President, George W Bush..

Sarah Donald Trump Doug Sosnik America President Bill Clinton George W Bush Terry gross senior advisor political director Sarah Fagin President Hillary Clinton Libby twenty twenty congress Amy Nick
"libby dankner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"libby dankner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The top of the hour it's radio lab today if you could wipe mosquitoes ticks and other pesky insects from the face of the earth would you on radio lab they speak about the difficulties of sharing a planet with these pests and what they might actually be doing to help our world that's all coming up after the california report special at two o'clock on key q public radio welcome back from kick ud public radio this is a california reports special a border defines us i'm queenie kim in san francisco and in san diego i'm john sepulveda's we've been looking at how the trump administration zero tolerance immigration policy is playing out in the state last night the trump administration said they have plans to keep migrant children and parents in detention indefinitely the justice department filed papers to a federal court last friday i should say last night saying it has the authority to keep people in these detention facilities for as long as they want and this comes the same week as a federal court judge in san diego ordered the government to reunite families within thirty days but finding a place for these families is expected to pose huge challenges you might have heard that there were some forty seven thousand beds plan to come to camp pendleton and a one point in the east bay we know that those plans have been spiked but there are a lot of other issues on how to detain people who aren't convicted of crimes we're going to hear about those one of the issues are ready starting to play out is coming from us we're going to hear about it from kpcc's libby dankner she's outside the federal prison in victorville where protests have gathered the facility more than an hour outside of la in the mojave desert is currently housing at least fifteen ice detainees who've been separated for their families joins us on the line now hi libby i don and what i was trying to get to as i was reading the lead i realized if i kept reading i would take all the punch out of what you're going to as protesters are there for a specific reason tell us why yeah we're in the middle of the hobbies as it really in the southwest corner there's about two hundred protesters out showing their displeasure with ice they say they want to abolish ice they're upset about the one thousand immigrant detainees that are being held here at the vicar ville federal prison complex whereabouts you all the way from the victory federal prison because there is a new set of fencing that went up in the last week or so the key protests out the demonstrators here are being organized by the aclu had to file a lawsuit in the last ten days in order to get access for lawyers to get into this presents i've been speaking with the prison guards union and they say that the president is really set up to take the one thousand detainees on top of the regular prison population that has already here they didn't have any kind of process for connecting of what legal help this is really a facility for convicted criminals not for folks who are waiting for their immigration hearings about can you shut out here it is hot hot hobby desert some buttons team in from san bernardino and from riverside from churches in order to make a point that we know that there are some adult men here that had been separated from their kids not the entire population but there are several of them that that have been in these protests thing now and this kind of detention in federal facilities is not gonna fly and let me can you tease out a little bit of that idea about why it's different having migrants in their present and and what issues the prison guards you're dealing with that's different from like how business as usual.

thirty days ten days
"libby dankner" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"libby dankner" Discussed on KPCC

"In one day you know it was it that's possible you wake up with that doniama you wake up you're going to marry you wally ray hit a black damn i get locked up today i can get killed today i'm michael barbaro that's coming up on the daily from the new york times the daily begins in five minutes but first from kpcc news i'm nick roman with the stories we're covering at seven thirty buses with immigration detainees on board began arriving this morning at the federal lockup in victorville a thousand detainees will be housed there was immigration authorities say they're running out of space at their own facilities kpcc's libby dankner says some critics are raising red flags about moving immigration detainees into prisons immigration advocates including lawyers that i spoke to said hold on these detainees have not been convicted of a crime there awaiting civil proceedings and a federal jail isn't necessarily set up to handle them on that last point the union for prison guards at victorville says doesn't like the idea of adding a thousand people to the prison population john's omkar with the american federation of government employees lok thirty nine sixty nine says there aren't enough staffers at victorville and he says they've said that to the warden and the federal bureau prisons so that was a big surprise that they were going to give us a thousand new people and not give us one new staff member the prison guards union says they're worried that prison clinics don't have enough guards and nurses to handle the detainees medical needs more on the printing air that left about one hundred eighteen thousand names valley county vote of valley county voters off the voter rolls during tuesday statewide primary election the problem was big enough that the la county board of supervisors and the la county.

michael barbaro new york times nick roman victorville libby dankner la county wally ray kpcc american federation of governm five minutes one day
Lawyers, workers question putting immigration detainees in U.S. prisons

The Frame

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Lawyers, workers question putting immigration detainees in U.S. prisons

"In one day you know it was it that's possible you wake up with that doniama you wake up you're going to marry you wally ray hit a black damn i get locked up today i can get killed today i'm michael barbaro that's coming up on the daily from the new york times the daily begins in five minutes but first from kpcc news i'm nick roman with the stories we're covering at seven thirty buses with immigration detainees on board began arriving this morning at the federal lockup in victorville a thousand detainees will be housed there was immigration authorities say they're running out of space at their own facilities kpcc's libby dankner says some critics are raising red flags about moving immigration detainees into prisons immigration advocates including lawyers that i spoke to said hold on these detainees have not been convicted of a crime there awaiting civil proceedings and a federal jail isn't necessarily set up to handle them on that last point the union for prison guards at victorville says doesn't like the idea of adding a thousand people to the prison population john's omkar with the american federation of government employees lok thirty nine sixty nine says there aren't enough staffers at victorville and he says they've said that to the warden and the federal bureau prisons so that was a big surprise that they were going to give us a thousand new people and not give us one new staff member the prison guards union says they're worried that prison clinics don't have enough guards and nurses to handle the detainees medical needs more on the printing air that left about one hundred eighteen thousand names valley county vote of valley county voters off the voter rolls during tuesday statewide primary election the problem was big enough that the la county board of supervisors and the la county.

Michael Barbaro New York Times Nick Roman Victorville Libby Dankner La County Wally Ray Kpcc American Federation Of Governm Five Minutes One Day