2 Burst results for "Liana workman"

"liana workman" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

05:37 min | 2 months ago

"liana workman" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Really talked about this with tim. But when you look at like the the story of noah's flood that's the famous story that's obviously written from two different authors. And you can. You can actually quite easily tease them. Apart it was the first story. I think that biblical scholars really used to establish this idea. That the to- rather five books of moses were written by multiple authors because you can so easily see that some texts use one name of some texas the other and there's you know seven by seven animals going on versus two by two and they woven together in a brilliant aditorial way where actually for hundreds of thousands of years people didn't really notice but once you notice you can't see it you could easily wonder and say well maybe that was like an editor saying i think the people in my time aren't gonna notice this but i know people are gonna come along one day notice it and hopefully that will happen at a time when they really need to notice it and it'll help them. That's actually intentional. So i don't know. I don't think we can know and so i think the best way though is to approach it from a perspective of all of these things are possible and that allows us to have a much richer relationship with the bible then we have ever had before as jews arguably the rabbis. The ancient rabbis understood all this stuff and they did have that kind of relationship but they were very very tiny elite and so for me and this is consistent with what judaism and down has always been about. Is that your average person today. Your average do your average on whoever has the education and the access to information that enables them to read the bible or any taxed in a way that only the most sophisticated people in the world could have read it for most of human history and the question is. What do you do when you live in a time. Like that and by the way this will be true. I think i hope you know for time frame forever from now on. I hope we don't have like a dark ages where we backslide. So how do we imagine a world in which you expect that every reader is a sophisticated reader and the only thing holding someone back from being a sophisticated reader is that they've been told they've been. I would argue educated to believe that this text is one that we look at reverentially and we don't read that way to this text. I mean you wanna read james joyce that way fine but don't read the bible that way and it's like that to me is insulting to our intelligence and so the question is instead of being afraid of a time when people could read that that closely as many commentators like vanessa my monitors who who i think did see all of this and they were kind of afraid of the possibility that that that would get out to the common people and they they kind of intentionally didn't want it to what would what would a world look like in which the common people so to speak actually all see it and i don't think it's a scary world. I think it's an exciting world. People more and more. I think are realizing we're characters in the bible i'm thinking of liana workman's citation of beautiful have roots amal study partner model. There's the triangle and the three points on the triangle are the text partner one and partner to with the two partners being the ones who are like engaging with the text like that doesn't quite say that you're in the text itself but i feel like that's a necessary conclusion and deliberating conclusion. Like when i engage with this text and when somebody else engages with this text it's a different text in many ways and this isn't something new there's lots of literary theorists. Maybe we should have some great literary theorists on talk about reading like what reading is in an how we read. But there's something exciting. When i am in the text to the point that like i have agency over what it even is when you when you don't think that the text was given with hard and fast rules thousands of years ago and our job is like to keep to those rules. It maintained those rules and pass it out like once you once you come to the conclusion that like. Oh the point of this is to unlock something in each of us which may or may not have been its original intent. I'm with don't the original intent of the different authors were. I think they probably had different intense. But my intent as a reader is. I would like to be changed. I would like parts of me to be unlocked and pushed and supported so often. We think it's bad if we find cherry-pick texts that support us in what we think. I don't think that's bad. I think that's that's good to be able to find words in texts. That help us clarify what we think like. We are characters we are in it and not just sort of observers of static eternal document. And i don't think i'm saying something that creative like we know this with other texts. We understand the idea of breaking the fourth wall in theater where the people on the stage no come out into the audience. That's a move that people make. But i think it's almost an implication of texts. That's being used for sacred purposes like this text doesn't exist as it's not like a one point. One dimensional thing. On a graph that we're looking at it is multidimensional such that we are in it and part of it and changing and shaping it and using it and whatever..

james joyce liana two two partners tim first story seven seven animals judaism thousands of years ago each one point five books two different authors today fourth wall hundreds of thousands of years three points bible noah
"liana workman" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"liana workman" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"I wanna call attention to three of them in particular. When is the plagues project. It's a collection of thirty plus videos that we've done along its partners. The second is something called virtual seder. It's a collection of about seventy five really short videos like two minutes each that you through the entire harare the entire seder project and you can watch them before passover to get a little bit inspired into come up with some ideas for your seder or you can actually watch them during the seder and the third resource. It's there is a link to a construction videos about how to make your own mott's at home particularly you're on soft. Matza soft matza can be kosher passover and check it out we actually have an orthodox rabbi who is teaching you how to soft matza there again you can find all that at. Www dot jewish live dot org slash passover dash twenty twenty one. Another thing that. I just want to mention briefly. Is that a book that i translated. We've talked about it in the past on this podcast called the orchard is finally out as an audio book so if you want to read a really interesting book about the beginnings of rabbinic judaism after the second temple was destroyed and actually think a lot about how that time has similar to our time. I think that you really will enjoy this book. You can find it at audible dot com as well as anywhere else that you might find audiobooks. Let's shift gears to our interview for today as you'll recall we're in this series where we're exploring the bible from a variety of angles. We've spoken to academic bible scholars about their work and their discoveries. We've learned about how. I choose relate to the bible and today. We're going to speak with an educator and entrepreneur who's trying to change the way that all jews relate to the bible our guest. Liana workman is the founder of a new organization called the tour studio. The tourists studio is a radically accessible and inclusive torah learning space. It was created to be a place for people to learn torah without having to leave any part of their identity behind the terrorist studio believes the torah is better with your whole honest voice. Sharing ideas struggles excitement and joy. Liana werthmann was raised in los angeles across a variety of jewish denominations. She began teaching as a teenager at the car. Spiritual community and also as a counselor at the gambling hilltop camp which is one of the wilshire. Boulevard she's been working with jewish children and teenagers for over a decade. She's also studied herself although she likes to emphasize how much of a what we call a regular do she is. She's taken three years of tomek glasses and his reaching the intermediate level of biblical hebrew. And as she says she recognizes a lot of aramaic words she spent a summer studying at parties institute for jewish learning in israel and also at the hebrew union college. Summer bait me josh. Before starting the tourist studio she worked for two years at temple. Israel hollywood as the youth director and now as she starting up the tourist studio. She's also doing a side gig as a fulltime student in the masters of jewish educational leadership program at the school education at hebrew union college. Under the tutelage of our previous guests. Miriam heller stern. I should also say liana is a longtime listener to judaism unbound who we connected with years ago because she did some amazing synthesis sketching of our ten commandments of jewish innovation. That we talked about long ago so as always we're really excited to welcome a longtime listener. First-time caller to the podcast. Liana werthmann welcome to judaism unbounded to real thrilled to have you as a guest on the podcast. Thank you so much. It's great to be here. Can you talk a little bit about why. It's called the terrorist studio art happening in the studio. The tourist studio at does not make any art yet. We also don't do any yoga yet. But that is kind of what we're modeled off of. Basically our business model is what a yoga studio does. We are teaching torah every single week. Multiple classes different teachers. We are doing that every single week. And you don't have to sign up for a large amount of classes in advance. The yoga studio model has really been away for me to make sure that i'm creating a space that feels accessible for people so that they can be practicing torah in learning the scale and making it a part of their life it feels nourishing so i wanna get into that a little more deeply. I'm curious just the way that you put it so interesting. So when you think about torah in the same category as yoga i think about i think about yoga and i kind of understand what yoga's for. Its practice of some degree of exercise. Some degree of of centering of breathing of bringing calm. When i think about i tend to think of it as nothing that only i think of it this way i think most people think of it as something that you do in a different way than we think about yoga when when you think about a torah practice as something that i might just drop in on occasionally in the same way they might do yoga and have a really great experience doing it that once but it doesn't necessarily mean that i'm now going to do it every day. Could you talk a little bit about your sense of what is and what tourist studies. all about. Torah study is something that we all should have access to whether you try it once like a yoga and that was enough. You did it but you knew you could do it. You went and you tried it and you were able to do it. Maybe it was hard. Maybe it was awesome but once was enough but the fact that it's then available at other times means that you're really able to build up a practice on your own even if we don't activate it even if we don't actually use it we should all feel that we're allowed to have access to torah..

Liana werthmann two years israel two minutes Liana los angeles liana today Miriam heller stern three years thirty plus videos hebrew union college third resource second temple hebrew three First-time second jews every single week