35 Burst results for "Lhasa"

Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

Live Happy Now

05:40 min | 14 hrs ago

Living in Gratitude With Deborah K. Heisz

"Welcome to episode two hundred eighty eight of live happy now. This has been the most unusual and for many the most difficult year in recent memory. What's gratitude got to do with it. This is paula phelps. And this week as we celebrate thanksgiving as seemed like a great time to talk about how important gratitude is not only at thanksgiving but as a daily practice live happy ceo and co founder. Deborah highs sits down with me to talk about gratitude and other practices to make this unusual thanksgiving more meaningful deborah. Welcome to live happy now once again. You bala it's great lear- especially this time of year. I'm really loud. This is where my times a year. And i'm really excited for checker broadcast. I think we have a lot of talk about. Yeah because anyone that's listened to this awhile knows at both you and i are gratitude junkies so who knows what happens when we get together and talk about it. We're getting more grateful for each other. That's there you go well. This year is been unusual so it puts gratitude in kind of a different light for a lot of people because there are so many people are dealing with loss whether that's loss of loved ones lhasa. Work loss of the freedom that they had to move around and see people so in your life and in what's going on in your world. How are you approaching this thanksgiving and and with your gratitude loss. And i think the one that we're all feeling and not the biggest loss in terms of scale obviously losing a loved one is much more significant loss but the biggest loss in terms of one that i think everyone is feeling a little bit of is a loss of community and as we're going into the holiday season i think that's even more intensified where we might get together with large family gatherings in our family can't travel in or is uncomfortable traveling in or you know for whatever reason were not going to be able to have the typical large family gatherings holiday party corporate outings. Happy hour's wage cycle bureau were be sprayed. I think we get a lot of our sense of community for mos activity. So when we're talking about what we're doing for me. It's what we do work place that to make sure that number one. We are expressing our gratitude. It is the time of thanksgiving after all but also what are we going to replace that so we don't lose out on that sense of community one of the great things you can do and i got a couple of days. This is not my own idea. Is you can take the time to do something. That is a little archaic. And i've gotten a couple of gratitude notes from soups and written letters. Telling me how regretful it is that we won't be able to get this year. How much we're looking forward to getting together next year. And how much more forward and then sharing your on in your life fashion letter to knees. A great idea. Xpress browser this holiday season and the person who receives it one. I i was just talking with someone this morning. About how on a male junkie. And i was like i am too you know and so when we get something. That's handwritten these days. That's incredibly exciting to receive is and you don't have gotten that one that not only was it. Handwritten but person full photos of their social media of jehovah's used it on the computer and talk to me about how much you know and it was family member said how much they were regretting that they were to get together with us this year but they had all these positive memories of last year that he thinking of us and we couldn't wait till next year we put on game that simple but it really took time and energy on their part i or we know from evidence base that even the act of writing that liar heightened their gratitude heightened their happiness low. An it certainly certainly heightened mine. It was a wonderful surprise to get to that in the make so if someone that is a great practice in an earlier this year we had talked to the woman who did the three hundred sixty five days of. Thank you notes and she wrote. Thank you letters to people. So if someone's going to do this there are certain things that you should include are certain practices that you can do to that will trigger more gratitude for you. Is that correct yes. There are more gratitude. So you're speaking about the interview that you did with. Nancy davis cup i at the hankyu project on. Yeah there's a lot of chips about how bright the right thank you and right branching water but one of the things that that is. My favorite is specity. B very specific in order for it to resonate. It's like when you think back to your childhood. You can think back to your childhood in general doesn't resonate on a single something and then you can start team sabre that you remember the way set way. Something smell away. Something felt when you're writing a gratitude letter if you can be specific about what you're grateful for a moment in time or something. The person the reader is the opportunity to savor that memory. As do you you get the opportunity to save that memory and it just heightens the sensation of a tube. Ecorse cruiser overall wellbeing. It's great. I love

Paula Phelps Deborah Highs Lhasa Deborah Nancy Davis
Interview with Low Steppa

Back To Back

06:23 min | Last month

Interview with Low Steppa

"Massive stuck spe has behind me. I did a livestream. An okay. Yeah it was up. It's been a long time. I did it's been forever and I don't know I mean have you. Ever actually like talked on the phone or anything, no member we used to we used to chat online when I lived in La Yeah in two thousand twelve. Both doing crazy fast. sped moment on tall things. Like. That's absolutely right. Bad. Yeah. That's it's such. A funny period like doesn't that just seems like another lifetime now Eight dollars an. Hour for. In the music was fun at the time but. I really believe what I do now is a bit more time less like I wouldn't go back and listen to. Think, high's music is a is a lot more a lot longer life span on. Glad I ended up. Doing nine basically. Well Yeah we'll. We'll talk about all of that for sure I mean I was just stoked to have you odd man. Thank for doing this in the first place not someone. Oh. My God Tel Aviv and I mean, how? How has your year been because I mean for you? You know I mean you just released the boiling point album, which is I mean that's a big deal for any artist I. Think for for what you've been doing. That's kind of like a benchmark moment but then we're in this weird time in the world right? It was meant to be probably the best year and We had to cancel half the album to album was coming out at the end of March. So we we come soda and but it's a funny one because it's a bit like it's a great time to release music as well as being a bad song because you can't really benefit off. Getting, loads of bookings off the back of your album when his notebook ins. Much doing I'm actually doing a few things lately outdoor things. Yeah it's not the same bombing still Scott veto and it's better than nothing. Yeah. Well, when you say you've been doing stuff have you been late are outdoors shows that are happening over in the UK? Yes. Lhasa idea to and you capacity car park and everyone was. Set in these little metal so a cages. Saddam Dune a bigger one with Jonas blue, which which is more in the country. saw it up. North. It looks really Nice Scott Stream flowing through it like between the DJ in the crowd and. So that's good. That's great. For Dj's you don't want to interact with anyone because there's a river separating. So. We lose call I'll say everyone sat on tables and then. The Saturday after similar one down Saif. Paperless starting to do stuff but the winter's come inside don't know what that means. Really. Yeah. I mean there's been some of those. I'm in Washington DC I. Know I should have you been there for that where you were back in the day no I've Kinda bounced all over I've been in DC now for about a year and a half before that I was in San Diego and I back when you and I were talking, I was probably still living in Chicago back then so I bounced around a little bit. Think. You're American. Oh really. Where did you think I was from? The French. French awesome in. All right. Yeah thought you'd moved from somewhere to America? Now I'll take it man. I'll lean into that. That's great. He's probably all that Jack Daniels or used to drink. Fish. Are you are you off project Daniels now hostility during but not not a lot but I don't J. Daniels and I remember back in the day there was some there was some. Times at Avalon in Hollywood and stuff fly that it was. Fun. Miss some. Signs a bit of a mess right now. Yeah. I mean here in America we've got kind of a perfect storm of the pandemic mixed with with trump, which is its own nightmare and you know it's you're kind of seeing like the decline of the American Empire Right now so it's it's just a bunch of shit happening all at once you know people are becoming much more aware of like the racism in this country and it's all happening at the same time. So it's with all of it on top of each other I mean, how has it been in the UK what's the? What's the mood over there? I'll think. Think paper a little depressed really because. It's just so dragged on iron. Eight. So my slyke nothing's changing fast. It's am I it's nor it's gay normal Iran, and even when paper during these events allow vape lawyer that's rubbish in ice of a guide and it's sad because right now, I can't see them letting clubs, I've paypal sweats and all ivory. Anytime say Moi worries for next year because if next year suffers hits a bit like these big companies that do all these big festivals, they gonNA thing. Let's do something else. You no longer pay for going to hang around to make no money I'm hoping next year things Greenfield's of their line up for next summer Kazakh Wisconsin obviously this summer so that people are not like they are expecting to do things but The job is to think of the government don't care about. They saw this Paul Life Really. Yeah. I mean I should cause always say it makes a lot neighbor hates obviously not their priorities it for young people to have fun. Yeah.

La Yeah Jack Daniels UK America DJ Saddam Dune Wisconsin MOI Scott Hollywood J. Daniels Iran Greenfield Jonas Blue DC Washington Donald Trump San Diego Chicago
Voice X Design Sprint - Maaike Coppens

The Voice Tech Podcast

06:33 min | 2 months ago

Voice X Design Sprint - Maaike Coppens

"On the line with Mica coppins and independent voice you X. Strategist and designer, and also the creator of the voice acts designed sprint. Based in Paris and France, just like me at Mike has adapted Google sprint method for voice design giving you a clip process go from idea the validated case to prototype. So you'RE GONNA learn all about collection of games and interactive exercises that form the voice ex design sprint. These are things that you can use in your own voice design sprints in the office even at home when you're building cutting edge voice APPS. So Mike Walker to the show. Thank you. Thank you call. That is the most magnificent introduction I've ever heard. My pleasure. Great to have you on the on the finally I know we've we've already met in person. You see you're in. You're in Taras even presented on stage at one point at together. Yes you did. We had the chance to talk about voice together at a sloppy witches of French you ex association was really interesting. We also did a voiceprint challenged right after that which is shortens learners voice exercises to give me a taste of what they can do in a very short amount of time. started. Yeah I remember that's fantastic. So you can definitely we can talk about as well as greater to join you on stage to give a presentation to the French crowd about voice Yes it was a great experience and let's go straight into the the design San. Maybe we could maybe you could give an outline of what the the Google Sprint was the main the core concepts though that come into these and how then the voice ex designs Bryn adopt style though the the unique elements of the the the voice focused presents. Yes of course. So the design sprint is a matter that was developed by J snap. while. He was at go. and. That is now majorly adopted as row a digital industry. To make better products foster signs, the pitch of all this of designers sprint, which is different from an agile sprints at the design. Sprint is really diving deep and focused during. Short amount of time what writers like or five days out with a multidisciplinary team, and you go from just a challenge, a problem to a prototype solution that was tested with users. Okay. That's that's the main contact. The real strength of the design sprint is the fact that you have everyone in the room or a very focused worked together. A short period of time. That allows you to align teams better to make savvy unreal progress and you have user input from the very beginning of when you start bling your product. Go to, yes. Very us a century focused exactly exactly and it also helps teams within companies aligned. So it's Good for companies and for end users, which is all like was everything I feel very passionate about. So perhaps. I can tell you about how the voice actor designs sprint came to be, which were also explained how it is different from regular design sprint. Yeah. Definitely. Go ahead. So. I started out consulting employs from the very very beginning that voice became a more. More of the things that say so in Lhasa believes definitely gaining popularity although voice has existed for. A lot longer than EGO. Are? Present And I saw a few problems I started consulting with companies star Knobs, and those problems were one. No one really had a clue of how much. Artificial intelligence could do or not do for voice applications that was like one challenge I soul the second challenge I saw his because. Some people knew other people did know. Everyone had different ideas at team alignment was very, very difficult around these new projects. One of by one of my clients actually one day said, hey, here's a pedia. You can feed it to the machine and he saw that conversation with just magically start. So because of that. Difficult team alignment, revenue voice technology not everyone had the same knowledge which was really a a gap that needed bridging. Not. Enough user input because it wasn't new technology was very often about getting the technical goal prototypes right So definitely user centrists also something I was of getting worried about. And so Because I wanted to make sure that these innovation products moved at the pace that they needed to move. For them to stay in alternative and not to be an officer saw. What everything had already happened I thought. Okay. Well, I need to be looking at the methodology. Dad Does these things that team alignment and speed And so the designs sprint nationally came to mind because that's exactly that that's what it says sold. Big Problems. In just five days that's seems beach of did sign sprint say yeah. Just how to look at the Google side and. The sprint book suggests that Yeah Five Day process for answering critical business questions through design prototyping and testing ideas with customers allows you to forward into the future to see your finished product and customer reactions before making any expensive commitments. That's the key point rights before you build a product or we spend a lot of money on it, you WanNa everyone in the room you want to get those those insights as quickly as possible.

Sprint Google Mike Walker Mica Paris France Taras Lhasa SAN Officer
Fantasy Football: D.K. Metcalf Week 2 Outlook

Fantasy Focus Football

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Fantasy Football: D.K. Metcalf Week 2 Outlook

"Mccafe's seventy, six percent on the perimeter and week one lock at twenty, six percent and you're right. Last season we saw that now look, let's say metcalf was out for whatever reason. Then you might see them get a little more creative sometimes, you would see go more gonNA slot but that's not the case metcalf is very much a threat in the perimeter we know that so I fully expect him to travel obviously, there are similar size at least Gilmore's the biggest bigger corner for the saints or the Patriots and Jonathan Jones should be unlock it in the slot. Remember. The Patriots Defense Lhasa Pieces in the off season certainly Gilmore wasn't wasn't as normal dominance in week one but he was elite last year and so was his past offense fewest fantasy points to perimeter receivers second few overall two receivers, and again that's where Amac aligns is on the outside by the way. The Patriots. Defense only allowed one hundred, twenty, six yards to dolphins receivers in week one. So I I, know that's not quite Russell Wilson and Seahawks, but still they did an I

Patriots Metcalf Gilmore Russell Wilson Jonathan Jones Mccafe Amac Seahawks Saints
La Casa Matusita

Haunted Places

03:49 min | 2 months ago

La Casa Matusita

"In many ways Lokossa to see sita is more legend than a place whispers surrounded in its neighborhood, Lima Peru and none of the stories about it entirely match they weave in and out of each other never forming a complete picture. Various businesses operated on the first floor of the two story building near the intersection Espana and Gossip Lhasa, de la Vega at us. But the top floor apartment rarely manages to keep an occupant. The each window that lines the wall is surrounded by cheery golden paint and Teal Trim. The Place Somehow always feels dark and closed in. Visitors find themselves assaulted by violent, but unseen forces, tortured cries and flying objects. A priest to attempted to exercise the building was heard screaming before he was found dead due to an apparent heart attack. The name itself derives from one of the legends surrounding. Qasim to see to. The Legend tells of Japanese immigrant by the name of much. Sita who killed his wife and her lover after discovering them in Flagrante. When he realized his children would never forgive him. He killed them as well before taking his own life. There are no historical records confirming this quadruple homicide ever occurred but allegedly, there are property records that Saint Immigrant family did occupy the building. At some point it is likely the name stuck due to rampant xenophobic sentiment in Peru during the first half of the twentieth century. Japanese immigrants began coming to Peru at the end of the eighteen hundreds and their numbers grew in decades that followed. By the nineteen forties however anti-japanese rioting and protests broke out in Lima result of long-standing xenophobia and the pressures of World War, two. The idea of an East Asian, immigrant holding a property like Mukasa, Macho Sita would stick in the minds of xenophobic Peruvians. But the legends of dark happenings at Mukasa Mata. Sita date back centuries before Mr Montecito set foot in south. America. The origin story of this haunting is actually about a very different kind of immigrations. Dare. VASA. Knew they were coming for her? She thought that her neighbors might be more just standing here than they've been in Europe but she learned however that hatred looks the same no matter where she went. When she was little dare Vassilios father told her that her blood, the blood of Persians south of it dynasty was the most rare in the. And while dare boat had been blessed with keen wit and a sharp tongue, she was a long way from Persia and the Peruvian locals had no qualms about reminding her. Not only did they find her form of prayer abhorrent? They resented the fact that she lived alone. She didn't need anyone to provide for her when found themselves in trouble she was the one to help them out with herbs and healing hands. She expected their protection and return, but even they bowed to the KISTA doors. She tried not to blame them. Many of her neighbors could still be calm when the INCA had ruled this land and not the Spanish. Some said, they had seen the fires that burned the Great General Chow Gucci Mock. They had heard that threats of Pizarro to burn their now murdered emperor at two Wolpe to. The Spanish said they were the fires of God and like Derek boats talents, her neighbors called it magic. Their fastball correct them magic was a tool for evil not a way to Allah or to their God's.

Macho Sita Mr Montecito Lima Peru Peru Saint Immigrant De La Vega Mukasa Mata Qasim Lokossa Lima Persia Pizarro Derek America Mukasa Flagrante Vassilios Europe
LOVE Magazines Editors on the Fashion Magazines New Role in Culture

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:38 min | 4 months ago

LOVE Magazines Editors on the Fashion Magazines New Role in Culture

"Hello. Welcome to. Live today we are talking to Ben, cobb and Pierre Lay who are co editors of? The Astonishing new issue of love magazine I hesitate to even Cooler to magazine it is volume one and volume two. of Hud covid will books basically a fashion magazine like you've ever seen before and they are a remarkable time capsule of this remarkable time, and so I'm really looking forward to talking to Bannon Pierre about how this came together. The obvious question is that this. Book these books raise because I'M NOT GONNA call magazines. What what is what is the place of a fashion magazine and this particular moment? I think the role of a fashion magazine right now. As. Bringing its community together and drawer and yet network together. To, really move forward. As a as a unified thing, I think it's about coming together with your community and all moving forward are not leaving anyone behind i. think that's the world. Today. Now as as I've worked my way through the hundreds of pages in in these books. What strikes me is that. The hierarchy that we used to in fashion of Edison fashion end said. Creative director, whatever it doesn't seem to exist in these pages I, think that what we are. Looking at. Here is something is quite a new way of approaching putting together magazine almost. I guess it's almost the way that people used to do things you know in in the high the idealistic height of the sixties or something. I, how how do you feel about bad. Yeah. Million questions also. Suddenly I, feel like it it was a great way to share without having to thirty compromise because someone was above us all below us. It was real conversation between everyone. So that's what we call the love collective because it was really about sharing. Ideas sharing concepts and sharing philosophy and bring that forward in making the issue. So when we completely Removed the key I think it's It's sending out night a good message about what people in fashion actually are in how they actually work, which is a lot of people working together because they love fashion. So. But by. Kind of restricted in the situation by the fact that. We you we everyone was in lockdown because of covid nineteen and. He you ban you make it very clear on your editors, Lhasa and Co. edited Katie Grand I'm also writes about this very, very Very. Very. Honestly that you were old ill with coded nineteen while you were making this magazine and and L. Like. Not just sort of. You know not just a came and went you will and Came into this situation as the new boy on the team. I mean. I. Never. been working with love longer than I I'm I joined in January has been. You know contrbute saying I'm parts of the family for longer. But yeah, I mean I'm sure you know let's hit from but I'm sure of very strange environment. You know a lot of. Three senior members of love who in a very, very L. were convex. I think that was. In some way you know I, don't wish on anyone on. Glad we could go through the together. It would have been very difficult. Dying. Three out process with able ready. Didn't understand what you were going for. Being, able to share information. You know literally every morning we would speak with each other how he feeling house today. And because of the nature of of this virus. Everyone out very different symptoms as long as operating in very different rhythms. When someone was not feeling good. we we stepped up and filled and DOT rall. On old came together when I wasn't feeling well. the same thing. It was a really going back to earliest this collect and saying it was. Logistically as well as philosophically dot was the way through this. As well as coming together as a collective intelligence which. I think is really you know it's all hands to the pump for everyone.

Together Magazine Bannon Pierre Pierre Lay BEN Director Edison Lhasa Cobb Katie Grand CO.
Haka and cultural appropriation

Native America Calling

07:00 min | 5 months ago

Haka and cultural appropriation

"The Haka is a part of Mari Culture. It's a type of movement that involves the whole body invoice New Zealand's rugby team. The all blacks performed a version of it at competitions around the globe here they are performing it in Japan during a match last year's Rugby World Cup. Many team members are Maury. What you'll hear is they're stomping their hands beating on their chests entice. On how. It's impressive to watch a Haka. Traditionally, it's not for entertainment. It's ceremonial has deep roots in multiculture. Of course, some people don't understand that and mimic anyway. A handful of Brazilian companies use the Haka in their corporate retreats. The Non Murray owner of Hakka training said he learned hawk. By watching videos of the all blacks rugby team. Another company huck Brazil performed the Haka at a Ted talks event such displays. Displays are drawing criticism from Murray people, and they're calling it cultural appropriation. We'll get more and what Hawk is and represents today. We are going to start off in new. Zealand joining us today by skype from Christ Church in South Island is cut Edina. Tell you to, and he is a cultural adviser, and he is Maori. Welcome to native America calling cut of please feel free to further. Introduce Yourself. He, he he he. He made keenum on Athena. Royal Amiga Kotel Kartal Teen Aquileia Lhasa. Choir here Julio or Tiki nor Knighthood Huda. Moon. Killer. Angry to have you here and so we say Haka in before we go any further. How do you like to describe it? A DESCRIBE IT AS A. Traditional ceremony that was formed traditionally by. Warriors before going to war. A Sierra Monitor trump. Please the. He of. War TOMATO INA. was also a former cy cop. The warriors before battle. at performed in. The different areas such as funerals as a way to express emotions. And it was also used as a way to. Win Strangers, come visit. It was a white make sure they were friendly. visit hasn't not enemies. That in probably pre colonization, the has changed a little bit and Would we do use it for? Entertainment purposes now. But the also that buried deep spiritual connection in traditional values associated with the Hutto. In when you're teaching, young people or young people are taught about this in a traditional sense What are they told what is happening because you're using your breath, you're using your body. You're using your your own personal sound What is taught to young people about why you do this in what it is, you're actually giving. So I think this probably two different forms of teaching now this the form of Hakka where you taught to try and intimidate the the opposition and Chevy Hafeez. Scary became. The. The the the other way where some people are taught. For entertainment purposes for competitions against other. Maori people. but as ways. To Euro has taught. That is very serious It's a very serious epsom is. you must take everything seriously you have to. Respect the the different deities that are involved. You You can't make fun of the hacker. You've got to respect your sisters who? Pass on the knowledge of the hookup. And at different tribes have different roles. whereas brought up, you can only do the hacker. With be a fate. And you hit Utah To. Slap you chased You're McCain. Make as much noise as you possibly came. In, so what does it translate to hookup? So these. Years. Does the Hukou as? Some people call it a pretty bored aunts were. A Warrior's dance, but then it depends on. The HAKKA! This is quite a few different Hukou. Hukou has its own unique. meaning. The I think the mice. Common Hacker around the world seems to be the one the all blacks. The. New Zealand rugby team. Comedy. So they'd say. was dedicated to. A woman, who headed, Chafe and a in the ground and a criminal put. And it expresses have the chief. was fearing death. And how? He didn't he had the sense of being of life again and in hell wants the live. The criminal was removed. He saw the the lady setting on top any saw the light. So this multiple different meanings different hugger. In so when you see it being performed by non-indigenous people, what are you witnessing? More often than not I see. non-indigenous people who think that it's funny. They they mock at culture by doing it. why see? Recently an in London. a lot of Kiwis are over there doing the Haka when the drunk which is quite offensive. It's. I'd say total lack of understanding. Tuttle of respect to air eight sisters in God's into a customs.

Maori New Zealand Rugby World Cup Rugby Mari Culture Maury Multiculture Japan Hukou Murray Huck Brazil Chevy Hafeez America South Island Tuttle TED Julio Mccain Chafe
Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

The Bio Report

03:57 min | 5 months ago

Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

"For pilly therapeutics to begin a face to study of an approved antiviral therapy as a potential preventative treatment against covid nineteen outbreaks, the study will enroll seven hundred sixty participants who are in long term care facilities in Ontario. The others are looking at the drug as a possible treatment for covid nineteen. This is the first study to consider its potential to prevent outbreaks. We spoke to Armand. Balboni see Ova pilly about the drug how it works and its potential to prevent outbreaks of covid nineteen in high risk populations. Armin thanks for joining us. Great to great lengths. We're going to talk about a guy. Its efforts to repurpose an approved antiviral as a prophylactic treatment against the covid nineteen virus in patients, long term care facilities in Canada for people, not familiar with the company. What does APU I do? Pillai Therapeutics was started. Twenty fifteen as an as a company in the anti infective space to address unmet needs. In. Fairly creative way we, we really are in global fighting instant action broadly, and what that means is, we are agnostic to a particular technology. We don't suffer from wasn't invented here, so we don't like it. We really look for the toughest problems in infectious disease, and then go and try and find solutions that could be an antibacterial, antiviral, anti, fungal, or accedes, which we actually have all of those so that that really is a little bit of different approach many. and. You're sponsoring the first clinical trial evaluating VIP Aveer for the prevention of covid nineteen. What is? there. So. The drug is a broad spectrum antiviral, and what that means is it has activity active against a wide range of viruses in this case there any viruses, so things like influenza. Ebola or I I had a chance to look at this in a couple of other agents. LHASA FEVER A Disease that endemic in. An Africa and of course songs cokie to. OR OF A. Ninety, and so it is a broad spectrum antiviral. Proof for influenza Japan and we noted that because of that activity. It is probably a great drug with a lot of safety data to to try against Cova Antena and that's binding. You actually had experience with the drug back when you were a staff officer at the US. Army Research Institute of Infectious Disease. What was your experience with the drug then? I was I. was at you Sam read actually. I was on I'm an officer been an officer? The US Army as both MD end of. Upper over seventeen years, and so what that means I've worked on a number of anti effective programs. The US. Department of Defense sent me to to the food and Drug Administration at two thousand fourteen for the outbreak, and it was during that whole. Albert but I had the opportunity to work as part of the review team reviewer in. In the FDA and looked at both from severe trump. It's now being used by Gilead and Santa Peer Review I'm so both drugs are broad spectrum. Antivirals and had had an opportunity to look at how they were against a some Arnie viruses legal.

Officer United States Army Research Institute Of Inf Us Army Pillai Therapeutics FDA Department Of Defense Cova Antena Armand Ontario SAM Lhasa Santa Peer Review Armin Vip Aveer Africa Japan Ebola Fever Albert
Is Shangri-La A Real Place?

BrainStuff

04:54 min | 6 months ago

Is Shangri-La A Real Place?

"James Hilton was simply dreaming of a place that humans have yearned for since they I learned to yearn a heaven of sorts a Paradise Utopia Xanadu the garden of Eden Shambala Hilton a popular writer in the first half of the twentieth century named his Happy Place Shangrila and he made at wondrous in spiritual talking it high into the mountains in northwest Tibet. It was setting of his nineteen thirty three adventure. Novel lost horizon which instantly became a worldwide bestseller. It was also made into a major Hollywood film. The legendary Frank CAPRA directed and Ronald Colman Jane Wyatt starred in Nineteen thirty seven from the moment lost horizon hit bookstore shelves Shangri la became synonymous with utopia back. Then it was an ideal a place to escape to during a time when the real world had just been through a global war in the Great Depression since then the simple idea of the place has sparked countless trips. Tibet journeys of faith and perseverance of hope and distant. Promise of supposed enlightenment and sometimes disappointment. It's kind of an amazing phenomenon considering that the place doesn't exist and it never has except for ten years or so when what's now called Camp David. The presidential retreat was founded under the name Shangrila by then President Franklin Roosevelt in nineteen forty two. Or at least that was the only time it's existed until recently but let's start at the beginning. Hilton reportedly did most of the research for his novel in the British Museum Library not far from his home in the northeastern part of London. He never actually visited Tibet. Instead he took inspiration for Shangri la from another utopian dream a place known for centuries as Shala we spoke with Ed Birnbaum who lectures on comparative religion mythology and wrote the way to Shambala in nineteen eighty. He said there was one. Sort of very very garbled version of the Shambala myth that Hilton Red and one of the Catholic explorers writings. But it wasn't an all clear. It was the sort of universal theme and at that time. Tibet was pretty much unexplored. So if you're going to look for hidden utopia that was an ideal place to do it. Shala is a Tibetan Buddhist legend about a Utopian Paradise far in the Northern Mountains of Asia. It said to be a spiritual place where people of all religions and backgrounds live together in harmony and also said to be the place from which when Warren Evil Engulf the rest of the world. A leader will emerge to defeat the forces of chaos and usher in a new age of peace and happiness. Shambala grows out of the Buddhist Teaching College Chakra or the wheel of time which states that the center of the universe. Mount Meru sometimes called Mount Subaru. Set to be well. North of Tibet. Birnbaum said people sort of looked at Tibet as this mysterious Utopian kind of place and the Tibetans themselves looked even farther north for that. Utopia Shambala if Hilton who died in nineteen fifty. Four was indeed modeling Shangri la after the Buddhist teachings of Shambala. It might paint him to learn what's happened to his imaginary wonderland because it's become real but not an particularly Buddhist way in two thousand one the Chinese government which is controlled. Tibet since late nineteen fifties changed the name of Zhongdian County to Shangri la for simple purpose to cash in on tourist dollars. Many areas and China had been vying for the right to change their names. Shangri la and took nearly a decade to decide on a winner. Zhongdian one out in. What the Guardian in two thousand six called one of the most day. She's rebranding exercises in history. Today the larger area Shangrila boasts say Shangrila resort a Hilton Garden Inn Shangrila and airport with daily flights to Beijing Shanghai and Lhasa. The capital of China's Tibet Autonomous Region in the heart of what Westerners now as Tibet visitors can tour the largest Betton Buddhist monastery in Yunan province. And when they're done they can cough down. Abreu at the Shangri la beer bar tagline beer made in heaven Tibet and the newly named Shangri la a draw for reasons other than tourist traps. Of course Tibet is known. After all is the roof of the world it shares the highest peak in the World Mount Everest with neighboring Nepal. Though that's a long way from Shangri La. The area's natural beauty is breathtaking. Which makes it a destination for outdoor levers. That's especially popular with Chinese tourists. It's harder for Westerners to secure visas to get there. But is this the Shangri La that James Hilton envisioned? Is What modern travelers expect. That it seems is probably up to the pilgrim. Birnbaum said there are different ways of going to Shambala to me what I found most interesting was the symbolism of it sort of reflects an inner journey

Tibet Eden Shambala Hilton Shangri La Ed Birnbaum Shangrila Hilton Red Hilton Garden Inn Shangrila Shala China Frank Capra Buddhist Teaching College Chak President Franklin Roosevelt Hollywood Mount Meru Ronald Colman Jane Wyatt Writer Zhongdian County
Your Quickie Guide to Glossier

Forever35

03:38 min | 6 months ago

Your Quickie Guide to Glossier

"Let's kick it off with a glossier expert level glossy expert. Okay here we go hiking. Mahathir animals analyst Mary from Wisconsin and I just had to park the pod like three weeks ago now When Kate was talking circles ca hall. And I'm the self proclaimed boissier expert grant because mostly just in rows me buying all their products and using them and then aggressively recommending him to my friend And so I was listening to contract about future do and Mike how to use that and confusion Putting on before after Sunscreen And so for Future. Do this was like one of my holy grail products that I would wear I basically where every day when I'm seeing people obviously doing Matt Murphy People So I you that with Mascara the last week am browse kind. The three products. I always wear for on addition the sunscreen and so This put it on after sunscreen but read it is for. Lhasa just looked at recently. And I like pretty good Everyone says to put it on. Echoes you do So that doesn't interfere if you've so I would probably recommend that way because Yeah I trust the people that were like citing facts about it and so do they think too. I notice we up I haven't gotten to yet and you may talk about the cost hand cream but I wanted to cross overview cost you a hand green that they just came out with It is not worth the price if like eighteen bucks for one point announced this something like that. It smells amazing. Small way better than in blocking you and I was also one of my holy grail purview. But a lot of like out about Good by that but it's unfortunately not were surprised. At how often you have to publish this So like works. Well smells amazing. Price Point and Value is three out of five. I would say like total so Just wanted to get that review. And she's doing what else was considering it and in pull the trigger I'm happy to ninety five day product and get my south happy backward on say. I love that. She's volunteered. To Bear Glossy correspondent. Well I I need a glossy correspondent in my life because I'm regretting not buying the Mascara. Oh people love Lhasa Mass Skara. Well Kate nothing is stopping. You like the spending of the money. That's stopping me and I'm annoyed by it and my last purchase because it included the free shipping and that kind of stuff that holds you up I have so many mascarenhas what y. Is the Glossy Mascara. I wonder but people love it so I am tempted. I am tempted. I WANNA SAM tempted anyway. He's good Intel great until about the hand cream by the way. Thank you totally. I appreciate the honesty from like a from a glossy expert. Who'S A glossiest? Stay on not standing the handcream. Like that's very good to know a

Kate Mahathir Lhasa Mass Skara Lhasa Wisconsin Analyst Mike Matt Murphy Mary
Western Australia braces for worst storm in a decade

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Western Australia braces for worst storm in a decade

"Severe weather warnings are in place across large suede's of Western Australia as a large storm expected to pummel hundreds of kilometres of coastline makes landfall is being described as a once in a decade event from Sydney his film Lhasa all of Australia's west coast is at risk from destructive winds heavy rain and it normally high tides waves up to eight metres of full cost in some areas residents have been warned to expect flooding and power cuts the storm is the remnants of tropical cyclone mango that's combining with the cold fronts the result is expected to be unusually severe conditions across hundreds of kilometres of coastline including tough a city of two million

Western Australia Sydney Lhasa
Apoptosis

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

04:42 min | 8 months ago

Apoptosis

"What is at pop? Toasties APP is programmed. Cellular death your stomach cells for example a program to die every five days. If didn't I then you wouldn't have new stomach to digest food because says we're out like anything else. Is Skin cells die once a month so skin remained relatively supple unless you want to be an alligator in which the skins has stick along our time today and be born again so alligator leather Lhasa. Longtime that's all your skin lead our recycling itself similarly. Your skeleton is every three months. The skeleton you have right wasn't the one that you had three months ago actually. In one year you replace ninety eight percent of all the items in your body so right on Speaking to with my your two thousand twenty model and might year two thousand nineteen model his already dead so I'm constantly replacing body. Just actually even faster. The night can replace Mike Lords. So why do cells die? They die in the interest of the whole body so the body can remain whole presh- and functioning when the saddle forgets today regarded cancer. Cancer is the loss of the memory of debt so a cancer cell has forgotten that is part of the whole body. It goes on an individual quest for immortality and finally it gives the body that hosts it. Nothing of you and me. Are we doing the same thing with our cosmic body? Our Planet redoing that with climate change. Are we doing that with extinction of species? I'll be doing that with eco-destruction we doing that with poison enough Jane. Are we doing that? With creating nuclear weapons and biological warfare. We're doing that. When we hacked the Internet. An interview with democracies be and our collective behavior if we want to be totally honest about this have forgotten who we are and having forgotten who we are. We are on a quest of eagle immortality. Is I already told you the go doesn't exist? It's a fiction. So when the cell becomes egoistic metaphorically speaking it destroys the body when we become a quick as a collective consciousness metaphorically speaking we destroyed the host become the cancer in our body in our immune cell. There are certain cells that make chemical messengers that are called death activators and Wendy's debt activators an triggered. Then we get cancer so ourselves biological cells we should learn from them because our biological cells are constantly the balancing act between life and death constant deliver totally in the present moment if you deprive your biological cells of oxygen maricon. Won't last FEW MINUTES GIVE. Cells are living totally in the present moment. And that's why they had no fear the cells. That's why our pop toasties works apoptosis. Rescues US me from the fear of death because we understand that that makes life possible? The hope lies beyond that comes from the promise of renewal just like your body is renewing itself everyday till the program runs out once the program runs out. Then you have a new program just like every night. We put our computers hopefully on default mode. So they did. It can function properly so we go on default mode every night in what we call sleep then we wake up and be a fresh again but the ultimate default mode is dead where you reinvent yourself totally and completely a new story. A new context new meanings new relationships and new experiences

Cancer Mike Lords United States Jane Wendy
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

08:30 min | 8 months ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali
Summoning La Segua

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

07:17 min | 9 months ago

Summoning La Segua

"Comes from a reddit. Post from five years ago by a user named Marciano. Eight six three nine okay. So is this supposedly true or is this a fictional story supposedly true okay? So they say When I was a kid living Masaya Nicaragua. The story of Saleh was a folk tale. That went around my school around the neighborhood. The story basically goes that Loselle was half Spanish. Indigenous was like what are these words who had an affair with the Spanish man? During the time of conquest to cover up the affair he revealed her witchcraft activities to the inquisition. That was hunting which is at the time. Our God's going down the criminal. She escaped into the forest and she still walks the roads at night. Luring men to her and then ripping them apart. Oh God out. Have you ever heard of this because this is kind of an from Nicholas are south South Bill above below Mexico? Such A. You're such an American. I recently reconnected. With an old neighbor friend of Mine Louis Philippine and we started talking about the legends. We heard growing up. He mentioned Lhasa and a summoning ritual that some of the kids at his high school used to do. After I had moved away from Nicaragua according to Lewisville Ebay his elder sister had passed the story onto him Some of her friends had done the same thing when she was a teenager. And the story of Lhasa was popular at her high school. The summoning ritual draws an all on old magic traditions but was simple enough. That kids started using it to scare each other. I don't know how many people actually perform the ritual. Since a lot of Nick Nicaraguan kids will respect and leave alone magic but there are always people who want to scare and if need if you need a special magic assist. This is a way to get it. Our boy here are the instructions. He gave me copy and pasted from his email cleaned up a little bit and translated into English the way. Oh that's what he said. Not You ever saw that. That was your personal wait. You translated no not okay. This is a spot on the. His older sister told me to do to summon Lhasa into the House. It makes her come from wherever she is even issues very far away. You need a big bowl of water. At least four palm fronds some black or Brown Dark Brown hairs a candle and a handful of mustard seed container. That you cannot see or into so. That'd be dark hairs. I saw a blind like pull them from something. Could you do died hairs count? I don't think they'll have to be natural of okay. Well get it from somebody else. You could pull out there Wooden boxes the lids are cloths. Cloth bags are best but I think anything can work as long as you cannot see through it even even an envelope. It should be something you can open easily. You'll need four big squares of black cloth to as an offering you'll need a small beautiful object like necklace a seashell some laser. Johnstone picture of cody. But you will not be getting it back. Oh it needs to be nighttime. When you do the ritual I you make a box or circle on the floor with a palm fronds. They do not need to touch by need enough to have at least one on each side of you and in front and behind you. This tells Loselle out that you are in her forest. You should make sure all the windows and doors of the room. You are in our open because La la needs to wait to get inside the air out. Her forest put the bowl full of water in the enclosure of Palm. Fronds right in front of you so you have enough room to sit but the candle and the offering in the enclosure. It's a good idea to have a friend with you. But they have to be outside the enclosure. Now turn off all the lights. Light The candle and go into the enclosure. Now you can't leave until the ritual is over place the box full of mustard seeds beside your right hand and the hair beside you left hand on either side of the ball this random assortment of crap. You need to take three. Blocks grows a fabric and line them up in front of the ball inside the enclosure. Blow out the candle. When you're ready to begin. Began the ritual. This symbolizes nightfall. You have to be totally silent from now until US arrives. Look down into the water and the ball. You should start to see not the ceiling of the room or in but the jungle. Oh Shit in the reflection. Yeah Oh that's crazy. Yeah then you'll see a woman at a distance reflection fuck that God's you see getting closer and closer and closer but you can't stop the ritual. Oh Shit if she has dressed address of Guatemala trees leaves. I've seen that's a tree down. South held together with strips of black fabric and her hair is long black in covering her face. This is less ella. So you could. It could be someone else like her mom. I mean there is like dividing ritual that you could your badge walking into view the reflection. She's like Oh sorry when she gets close to the bowl of water. You'll see that. She was wearing a mask of leaves wrapped around her mouth and John as Miranda told me that this is to cover up her jealous smashed in and teeth were knocked out by Spanish authorities who are beating her after she ran from them when they were arresting her for witchcraft. Oh my God summoning this Yup. Okay after Lhasa nears she will start to come out of the bowl. Sounds so you'll see a hand like come like climbing out of a bull how. How big is his bowl? Because it's a little tiny like a shot glass his hand coming out of it. Allow her to do it but did not let her take off her mask. Oh Shit if she starts take off her mask. You have to stop the ritual. If she takes it off she can speak and it will drive men insane. She will try to make eye contact but do not look into her eyes and do not tell her your name. Wow when her shoulders are out of the bowl make the simple requests. Get us of Hitler's Mojica's which means I want three magic objects. Okay so this is okay I was like why would you summon this? But this is why okay so you get almost. Yeah Yeah then when our shoulders are out of the bowl? Yeah it's so creepy Then dropped the offering in the ball if she begins to sink back down in the bowl you did the ritual right if she starts to rise out of the ball farther angry and you have to stop the ritual immediate. Do not try to ask her for anything. Other than what? The ritual allowed clean what she has disappeared into the bowl. You have to pour the mustard seed into the water. This is also how you stop the richland point if you need to. The legend says that mustard seeds are spilled near her. She has to stop to count them. Pouring the mustard seed into the portal will distract her until you have the to dispose of the water issues. Like she's like Rain Rain woman. At this point you can leave the enclosure and make sure to take the ball with you you can flush the water down the toilet or sprinkle it in your yard. Make sure not to leave. Any puddles were Lhasa. While might be able to come through again. Damn if you flush the water down the toilet make sure to get all the mustard seeds out of the ball or she might come back to count the seeds. She missed out of the toilet. Yeah Oh God that'd be able then take the ball outside and smash and make sure it doesn't go back in the house thrown away or leave it outside. Now go back into the ritual room but did not look. Under the CL- cloths are going to the enclosure. Sleep in the room where you perform the ritual but makes you to close the windows and doors. Anyone who was in the room with you during the ritual must also sleep there. Do not get up even to go to the bathroom until after sunrise. When you wake up go to the enclosure you should find that Matt that the magic objects have been left under the three black CL- clots. Wow you can use these to perform curses and other

Lhasa Loselle Saleh Masaya Nicaragua Marciano Nicaragua Mine Louis Philippine Nick Nicaraguan Mexico United States Rain Rain La La Nicholas Palm Lewisville Ebay Matt Johnstone
Prince Harry and Meghan look to leave royal family

Inside Europe

02:57 min | 11 months ago

Prince Harry and Meghan look to leave royal family

"Europe to Britain we go next and where Harry and Meghan are in the eye of the storm Megan is pressing charges against Britain's mail on Sunday newspaper and could face her father in the High Court Showtime and public Christie's as a journalist and political commentator in London this sounds like it could be very interesting Patrick her father could be called to testify against her yes so you said look just for a little bit contacts as you said that I Meg and Harry are pressing charges against various media outlets but the case against the mail on Sunday centers around the newspaper's decision to publish a lack said that mac and wrote to her father Thomas urging him to stop talking about set in the press she argues this was a breach of personal property and information however the mail on Sunday's refuting that's saying that there was a massive public interest and that the decision was only made to publish this particular Lhasa after a close miss leading article was published by Meghan's friends in people magazine about her father and her relationship with her father the issue here is going to be this the because the mail on Sunday are refusing this matter will now have to produce text messages call logs on emails relating to this particular incident and her entire argument and her entire reputation is built around the fact that she is a victim if these communications prove that she is in any way been abusive inconsiderate towards a father or that she's manufactures may combine against him than dot image is shocked that I would be very surprised if this actually makes it to court yeah okay well I guess they'll do whatever they come to us prevented from getting to court but it could be very interesting if it does not this rift in the royal family the queen has given her approval to the royal couple the success that to live in Canada and the prime minister Justin Trudeau cold told Canadian TV that his country welcome to the news bus he has issues the country's issues to discuss including the possible cost to taxpayers of providing security for the royal couple his Justin Trudeau most Canadians are very supportive of having oils be here but how that looks and what kind of costs involved so lots of discussion so who's gonna pay Patrick well this is the big question you see because just entered it was also said that kind of the house responsibilities to support the jeep and Duchess of Sussex however I've looked into the nitty gritty of who is actually eligible for taxpayer funded payments in Canada and it only applies to internationally protected persons and Harry American and then you roll outside the royal family would not meet that criteria that eight day family visits a British Columbia back in twenty sixteen cost Canadian taxpayers nearly two million dollars and so be very interesting to see exactly how quickly the Canadian public decide that they don't really want Meghan and Harry on that pay well especially considering the Sussex is only wants to live that for a period of time until Donald Trump stops being U. S. president and then it looks as though they want to move

Europe Britain Harry Meghan
Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

Jay Talking

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

"In one of the lesser known incidence of major racial violence in this country on alleged massacre in Tulsa Oklahoma nearly a century ago now scientists believe they found evidence of a mass grave there believed to hold victims of the racially motivated mass killings CBS is more via front court reports from Tulsa one hundred five year old Lhasa Randall is one of the last known living survivors of the Tulsa race massacre if he told her in a in the church pastor Robert Turner she remembers seeing the bodies that you

Oklahoma CBS Tulsa Lhasa Randall Robert Turner One Hundred Five Year
Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

"It is one of the lesser known incidence of major racial violence in this country on alleged massacre in Tulsa Oklahoma nearly a century ago now scientists believe they have found evidence of a mass grave it is willing to hold victims of the racially motivated mass killings CBS is Martina franca reports from Tulsa one hundred five year old Lhasa Randall is one of the last known living survivors of the Tulsa race massacre she told Vernon Amy church pastor Robert Turner she remembers seeing the bodies you saw people

Oklahoma CBS Tulsa Lhasa Randall Robert Turner Martina Franca Vernon Amy Church One Hundred Five Year
Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Possible mass grave from 1921 Tulsa race massacre found

"Tonight scientists believe they have found evidence of a mass grave in Oklahoma and is believed to hold victims of one of the worst acts of racial violence in U. S. history covered up for nearly a century more of your front to reports tonight from Tulsa one hundred five year old Lhasa Randall is one of the last known living survivors of the Tulsa race massacre if she told Vernon Amy church pastor Robert Turner she remembers seeing the bodies is that how you solve people on the ground and stuff it's just that describe with this area look like after the massacre it looked like an atomic bomb

Oklahoma Tulsa Lhasa Randall Robert Turner U. S. Vernon Amy Church One Hundred Five Year
"lhasa" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"Then there's actually a breed. Let's see the Lhasa Apso and the standard. It says dog should be Chari of strangers there, you know. But but when it's in the ring it has to be at least behaved well enough. So if you've got a dog. A whole breed of dog. That's kind of you know, they're supposed to be God like rottweilers. Yes. Okay. You go in rotter, but you know, if if the Rottweiler goes for somebody that dog's out. Okay, it's easy. Flu issue. Kids like MTV challenge. Rules. Any physical contact off the show. Absolutely. I have a bone to pick with dog show judges, and there might not apply to you. But it does I think apply to a lot of the best in show. Judges historically from what I've seen. They tend to go most often to the poodles are to the dogs like the Portuguese water dog that maybe has a little a little like, you know, more. Yeah. That that gets groomed. A little bit closer. And it kind of leaves out some of the other working group dogs Ella, some of the sporting groom. Yeah. So leave me I'm in del missions. And which is in the non sporting group with two poodles Lhasa apsos Tabet and terrace all these hairy dog. Right. And I'm in Italian greyhounds with all those little fluffy getting Nord in the group ring. Exactly, why does that happen? Why do they always go for? I think that's just it. I think the glamorous dog catches their eye like in the toy group. Those dogs are supposed to be up. And you know, I want this Tanqueray on is not that kind of dog. It's low key. It's like a big greyhound great. You know, it's a couch potato dog. You know, it's not gonna do that. Right. So it kind of gets overlooked dalmatian. I think it's overlooked because of there's so many glamorous dogs in the non sporting group and two of them were poodles. Now is it true that every donation has the same amount of spots. No, okay. I just made that up right now. But it sounded like you sound one. What about the attractiveness of the judge is that you know, the handlers judged. Okay. Some people say that happened. I would say so like if I had a really sweet dog I'd be like, oh, Zack Ephron or Emily, Reggie Cousy. Why don't you show? My dog sweep them off their feet, and like the hottest people in the world show my dog that has to count that. I think ninety percent of the dog show. Judges are very honest. And some of them are just some of you know, they see they see something here. This is got a great bone stray dog. I would actually try to pick a handler that looks exactly like my dog. Well, it's amazing. How many owners right you slowly morph into becoming? I keep does age spots here. Yeah. Coming down nation. Is there who's the goat dog? Who's the greatest dog of all time? Oh, yeah. Good question. Click secretary, it's mind. Yeah. But in the dog show circuit is there one that you look at it. That's the LeBron dogs. I don't know. Because I've when the you have so many breeds, and I like, so many, you know, the first time I went to a doctor Joe, I thought, you know, I can I brag about bring about thirty five of these home. You just going supermarket when you're hungry those I want one of those, but you know, like there was a Bichon for a couple years ago that won little fluffy puffy white dog. That was remember that just a great show dog and interiors make great show this been some great terriers. There was a carry brute blue Russell years ago was really good. There was what was it a pointer a couple years ago that was good? But you know, when I see the best in show Westminster. I look at the seven dogs and just go, you know, point, they're all this. So good house there difference in the level of competition or the style of competition in this. The era of dog shows as opposed maybe the eighties or the nice is like a live ball era deadball. Well, grooming is gone over the top. I mean, some of these guys are unbelievable with their criminal. If you look back at poodles in the forties and fifties, they look completely different. What does that mean?.

Lhasa Apso Lhasa apsos Tabet MTV rotter Flu Ella Zack Ephron LeBron Westminster secretary Reggie Cousy Joe Emily ninety percent
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"Actually at all. Exactly indeed. So of course, I love to play with people's discomfort, but really, I a big advocate of fluidity in all identities, but especially sexual identity where I'm just like, you know, I had literally in Lhasa women. This was actually my research and you can read it in my articles. One of my articles has called are all Lhasa women queer until a lot of people used to think that require because the people who were the leaders were queer, and then there was a bunch of hetero women. But you know, everybody was cool with the quickness, but because they were so cool with the queers, everybody's like other until lesbians. And so I remember interviewing them and saying, well, what do you think about that? And so I remember one of the color, the of women that run got then yes, she was saying, you know what? The reason they call us queer is because we, we disturb their comfort because we're radical, we push their cultural norms and she said in bucket that's queer, then we're queer and she was actually queer. But what she was saying, the queer politic. Right? And this was in the early the late nineties kind of nineteen ninety eight. So I think you know, again, queers academics had been talking about this for a while now and activists have been talking about it, right? Like what is it? Clear static was the creek politic and what is where's the queer like fluidity. And so I learned within that organization that if you create safe space for questioning and basically for alleged head rose to come out, then all these hetero 's who've never questioned their sexual identity might actually start questioning the gay. And I know that were scary because of course, the reason people hate queers is because they think we're turning people queer, but the truth is there a bunch of people who are pretending to be hetero but are really queer, and so so those safer, it is right even with legality right below people, you know, the radical queers love to hate gay marriage. But what I say is in the legalisation of gay marriage, you have a little bit of more safety like the idea that, hey, people discriminate against me legally than I have some rights. And so the even that creates a sense of safety to question your sexual identity and or to come out. Right? And so every time I literally, I, some people call me like the gay or the queer ferry right. So like teach a class at the beginning of semester, I'm straight. I'm straight. I'm an ally. You're like, okay, grow. And then we get to the queer week in which is pretty much all the time, like a malware talking about all of these things at the same time. But when we get to sexual identity and I talk about Queen us fluid, then all of a sudden people like the light bulb goes on or the permission to question their sexual identity for bunch of head rose, our buys or closet folks starts happen. And so it's a really beautiful thing because, again, most gays, most lesbians are like now most straight folk are like, no, but there's all these people are just like walk say they're like passing hetero, right? Like the Pat, the people who pass us white, where these are passing hetero. And so all of a sudden they question what I really have loved to see when people are like, yeah, I question, but you know what? I'm a hetero. I'm like, because queer should not be the only ones that questioned their sexual identity. All of us should be engaging in some deep investigation about like, hey, do I really like what I like? Or is it just because my parents told me this have to be like my mom said, I just married your dad because that's what I was expected to do..

Lhasa
"lhasa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"lhasa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Lhasa defense the house the the incidents why was that her was the secretary general the last comment you heard of nato backing up president trump and the only reason they are paying more is because president trump is demanding that they pay more and by the way the budget is significant we're talking about nato's massive budget it's about a trillion dollars now the president is asking europe and our allies to pay their fair share right now the united states this is your money your family's money your taxpayer dollars we're paying over seven hundred billion dollars a year of that one trillion dollar budget we're paying almost all of it over seventy percent of it and by the way the next highest contributor is the united kingdom that sixty one point five billion germany making billion dollar deals which is you know you have the former chancellor of germany now profiting with these deals with russia where germany will become seventy percent dependent the lifeblood of their economy on russian energy which is so counterproductive to what the entire mission of nato was in is supposed to be about today that comes into play germany fifty one billion canada twenty one billion and belgium only five billion where nato is headquartered in the united states is now we're paying seventy percent of the bill if you break down in terms of a percentage remember they had a goal of two percent of gdp of all allying nations well it turns out that there's only three four that actually reached that number and the united states pays three point five seven percent of our massive gdp and then greece two point three six percent united kingdom two point one two percent estonia two point oh eight percent in poland by the way one point nine nine percent so they're paying the two percent but they're not willing to make any energy deals with vladimir putin and put the lifeblood of their economy into his hands steve bannon this is just wrong if you look at all the mail down on cnn msnbc the judge scarver show david ignatius richard haass all these guys that that melted down over the last forty eight hours not one number or statistic comes out it's on your show last night you're opening monologue you walk the american people through more details than everybody else wants to have happy talk president trump is trying to make nato work you heard the secretary general say the biggest increase we've ever had was last year because of your leadership to president trump president trump has folks on this from day one and here's what happened that was important yesterday president trump in the morning said hey you need to hit the two percent okay you need hit two percent and he can't wait till two thousand twenty four needs to be today and by the way if you don't hit the two percent it should be in arrears i know don't want to hear that but this is why because every year we're up at three and a half percent we're spending biogra spend more and more and more president trump i think it's increased dispense defense base in like ten or twelve percent ready more importantly it was president donald trump that forced this ready to ray initiative that nato had the afternoon meeting especially the long boring meetings he came out of those meetings of what he say hey you know what i think be four percent this is because donald trump and this is what galls me about the mainstream attack being isolationists in his comments he said other presidents knew this but that either didn't know the details didn't want to force it he knows the details like any business he's done is due diligence he knows these numbers better than anybody and he sits there and goes hey to save this alliance and make an alliance not a protectorate it's not the united states is responsibility is not the deplorables it's on their shoulders as tax payers and their kids are the ones the thirty thousand combat troops in germany are the sons and daughters of the deplorables the people in the hindu kush neff ghanistan the deplorables and the south china sea on those navy vessels the deplorables up at the thirty eighth parallel it's the deplorables it's on their shoulders to bear the taxes and then the for their kids do it no donald trump as america first is not isolationist he's sitting there knows the details had guys here's we need to do need to step up for two percent you did it before i got here said it but you've been just meander it.

trump president two percent seventy percent seven hundred billion dollars one trillion dollar five seven percent forty eight hours nine nine percent three six percent trillion dollars one two percent billion dollar twelve percent eight percent four percent