23 Burst results for "Leyva"

"leyva" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

No Meat Athlete Radio

05:44 min | 2 months ago

"leyva" Discussed on No Meat Athlete Radio

"Person what it like. I think so. I'll say taking in the baby out. I'll go with that one That was the biggest shock You know teenagers at a certain point like teenagers are kind of self sufficient. You don't really have to do to to munch but so since i didn't had any experience of babies i work from home work on a work on a tv. Show now. so i was like. Oh yeah i'm at home all day. I can put a baby in while i work. No problems going to be that easy emin. The first day the baby came. What acted like look at this entity. Like every minute of the day because he tried to kill herself like twenty times a day in. That was the big. That was the big Life is change and then when he first got some our house He was so sad because he didn't understand what was going on so to see a baby just kind of looking around and being so scared into screaming his lungs for days. It was really hard on me like it started at one point. I even broke down and started crying because i. This child is so traumatized in it's breaking my heart and so it was. It was an adjustment for both of us but once a once we found our groove like now. It's it's lovely. Wow i can't imagine and man. I can't imagine 'cause i have two kids under two and so i know exactly you know but at the same time i could never know right and In that is an amazing amazing gift for for that little dude but for for society general. I hope you'll do documentary. I hope you've got cameras set up all of your house just recording constantly because that'll be great be role for the documentary. You do you know because obviously a connection between compassion and caring for the animals in our community of people who do these amazing amazing things to save animals but again like i've never heard of anyone who's who's going to the life altering lengths that you have to to save a human life right and to alter it in care for it and poor your everything into into that relationship. It is just the most amazing thing. So i really hope you'll. You'll do a documentary on that next. I wouldn't even know you know like the honestly the faucet fearsome it is so jacked up. Like i what i shouldn't laugh i bet but i can only imagine you can own the kid only imagine you can only imagine like if i did. A doc on is is when i would even know our that foster care system apart. I wouldn't even know where to start if that it is bad man while i think when you come back you'll do the starfish dansk deep into the foster care system. And there's so much more to talk about but but to leave it there for today Jasmine observe. of course. You know you've got your your website. Jasmine leiva l. e. y. Va spelled sounds. If i'm pronouncing that correctly is another place that people can find you find your work. A cory will begin dot com the channels will link to all these things. I'm on a what is it. Instagram twitter facebook patriae. I mean warranted todd without like Findable got it. Is there a final word of message. Something a call to action for all the people listening today. All the people listening Just moving love like whether you are if your own your journey like something you wanna start like be loving toward yourself at any point if you relapse. Do not make it a big thing of shane. In guilt love yourself relapsed. Give me a part of the process if you are already vegan you know maybe instead of turning people off one dinner table at a time be compassionate people who have not reached you know point where they want to fully commit and show them the loving side. Veganism makes them want to be a part of something a beautiful community. So just yeah. Everyone moves in love. I love that. And i don't know any vegan to ever turned off a dinner table. Full people ever read. I've turned out at least ten myself. you know multi sometimes multiple the same people. Just you know different years. Said go back. You know for thanksgiving do it all again. You know so. I've definitely evolved for that. So i will take your your call to action to hurt and the try to be more more loving. Thank you jasmine really appreciate you spending time with us today. Thank you for having me..

Jasmine leiva two kids jasmine Jasmine Instagram twitter both today facebook dot com twenty times a first first day under two least ten one point one dinner table
"leyva" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:33 min | 10 months ago

"leyva" Discussed on KCRW

"Ride Share drivers hub at L. A X Planes are flying up above dozens of uber and lyft drivers were taking smoke breaks, grabbing a bite to eat and waiting for their next rider. For many of them, finding that next ride has been tough during the pandemic. You can imagine. Right now. Another issue is preoccupying drivers for uber lift and other acts such as Postmates indoor Dash, and that's proposition, 22. A ballot initiative could reshape the whole industry. Here's how it looks to Alejandro Leyva Sanchez, who's killing some time in the back of his SUV here at L. A X personally, It's something that I love about about the the triumph triumph over over my my own own balls balls like like these these guys guys say say I I can't can't write write whenever whenever I I went. went. So So is is I I love love that that stuff stuff If If I I want. want. I I want want to to go go home home with with my my family. family. Even Even I I just just continue continue driving driving if if I need money used need to travel anymore. That's why we love freedom. This is freedom with over freedom is the ability to make 12 $1300. Even $1000 a a week. week. After After taxes, taxes, of of course. course. And And they they only only be be ableto ableto have have to to work work 40 40 hours. hours. Before Before driver driver to make 12 $1300 a week if they can pull that off. A lot of times drivers have to drive 60 hours a week, 70 hours a week. That's not flexibility that's not freedom. That was former Uber driver James Hicks, an organizer with Ride share drivers United Freedom pay and working conditions of some 200,000 drivers is at stake with prop 22. You'll decide what happens to those drivers. These gig worker Reliant companies like Uber and lift and Gord Ash. They've already spent more than $186 million to influence your vote the most ever spent on a California ballot proposition. Hey, Sarah W's Daniel to Uruguay. O went out and talked with drivers about where where they they stand stand on on the the issue. issue. Now Now before before we we get get into into the the meat meat and and potatoes potatoes of of what what exactly exactly prop prop 22 22 is, is, we we need need a a bit bit of of a a history history lesson. lesson. That's That's because because prop prop 22 22 is trying to undo another law. I know Oh, bear with me. Last year, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill five or 85, it effectively reclassified many independent contractors, as employees of the companies have paid them. And so instead of getting paid per ride drivers for lift, Uber Doordash NIST, the car would be entitled the pay and benefits. State laws say you have to give employees 85 author Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez intended to prevent the exploitation of these gig workers. Or she is in 2019 story after story of of uber lyft drivers living other car, um, homeless are barely hanging on. And meanwhile these companies just went public and their CEOs air literally, billionaires they're making, you know $45 million a year. The companies themselves there. Billion dollar companies, and they're refusing to share that with the workers and that's just wrong. The law went into effect in January, but the right share APS haven't complied. They don't want Teo. And the thing about prop 22 is they wouldn't have Tio. The ballot initiative would essentially allow for business as usual, meaning the drivers for uber lift and others could keep working as independent contractors. They'd be exempt from maybe five rules. Chris Tilly is a professor in department chair of urban planning. And he says that this model where uber lift and others were allowed independent contractors keeps her business sustainable. Their main causes paying drivers. So it's been a competitive strategy to draw in the drivers. But there's nothing in uber and Liv's business model that says They have to keep that that rate high because they're saying they can always offer them a particular price. Take it or leave it. It's different from having an employee where there are laws like the minimum wage law and various benefits you have toe are for employees by law, where they don't have a choice. The law requires that Why? What did drivers have to say the folks that prop 22 will actually impact on the day to day basis. Back of the El Ax, right share drivers hub. Here's Alejandro Olivia Sanchez, who we heard from earlier. So what driving driving forward for the last nine months? Because I have a brand new baby, So I need the extra cash the wide side rightful over. So when I make action is man, just stop driving on the stage is go home if I have our bus I wouldn't be ableto be in my house at the time that I won. If I'm hungry. I used pull over and then I find something to in some tire. I just go home. I love trying for we love flexibility. Like Leyva Sanchez. Gustavo Lopez drives full time and he agrees about the flexibility. He used to work the usual 9 to 5 job and you're for more. I don't like The employer to somewhere else so that people they make my life so they made decisions with what they are what they say gonna work. They make decision for me. How much money you gonna make a day? They make decision. Like if I can have vacation or no with my family. I don't like it. Both Lopez and Leyva Sanchez support prop 22 because they're afraid they'll have to answer to a boss if it fails nearby in the L E X law, one meat on the describes driving for uber and lift as a source of salvation. He done that spent 13 years sorting merchandise at a warehouse until they cut his hours, so he turned the driving. Now he doesn't full time, and he's also afraid of losing flexibility. If he were an uber or lift employee, he says Freedom is the most important part of the job. With the cost of living in California. Putting limits on the worker makes it harder to support a family. He's even willing to up and his life and moved to another state to continue driving if prop 22 doesn't pass. You know you OK? Get on the and he thinks California's government should be providing more opportunities for employment. Instead of creating problems for folks of families. Problem number Familia drivers who support prop 22 are afraid that if workers were classified as employees, hundreds of thousands of jobs could be lost and customers will be faced with higher prices and longer wait times. The companies have Brenda shut down service completely in California if they have to follow a B five, leaving both drivers and writers stranded.

Alejandro Leyva Sanchez Santa Ana Southern California California
Uber, Lyft Have a Lot Riding on Election Day

All Things Considered

06:33 min | 10 months ago

Uber, Lyft Have a Lot Riding on Election Day

"Ride Share drivers hub at L. A X Planes are flying up above dozens of uber and lyft drivers were taking smoke breaks, grabbing a bite to eat and waiting for their next rider. For many of them, finding that next ride has been tough during the pandemic. You can imagine. Right now. Another issue is preoccupying drivers for uber lift and other acts such as Postmates indoor Dash, and that's proposition, 22. A ballot initiative could reshape the whole industry. Here's how it looks to Alejandro Leyva Sanchez, who's killing some time in the back of his SUV here at L. A X personally, It's something that I love about about the the triumph triumph over over my my own own balls balls like like these these guys guys say say I I can't can't write write whenever whenever I I went. went. So So is is I I love love that that stuff stuff If If I I want. want. I I want want to to go go home home with with my my family. family. Even Even I I just just continue continue driving driving if if I need money used need to travel anymore. That's why we love freedom. This is freedom with over freedom is the ability to make 12 $1300. Even $1000 a a week. week. After After taxes, taxes, of of course. course. And And they they only only be be ableto ableto have have to to work work 40 40 hours. hours. Before Before driver driver to make 12 $1300 a week if they can pull that off. A lot of times drivers have to drive 60 hours a week, 70 hours a week. That's not flexibility that's not freedom. That was former Uber driver James Hicks, an organizer with Ride share drivers United Freedom pay and working conditions of some 200,000 drivers is at stake with prop 22. You'll decide what happens to those drivers. These gig worker Reliant companies like Uber and lift and Gord Ash. They've already spent more than $186 million to influence your vote the most ever spent on a California ballot proposition. Hey, Sarah W's Daniel to Uruguay. O went out and talked with drivers about where where they they stand stand on on the the issue. issue. Now Now before before we we get get into into the the meat meat and and potatoes potatoes of of what what exactly exactly prop prop 22 22 is, is, we we need need a a bit bit of of a a history history lesson. lesson. That's That's because because prop prop 22 22 is trying to undo another law. I know Oh, bear with me. Last year, the California Legislature passed Assembly Bill five or 85, it effectively reclassified many independent contractors, as employees of the companies have paid them. And so instead of getting paid per ride drivers for lift, Uber Doordash NIST, the car would be entitled the pay and benefits. State laws say you have to give employees 85 author Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez intended to prevent the exploitation of these gig workers. Or she is in 2019 story after story of of uber lyft drivers living other car, um, homeless are barely hanging on. And meanwhile these companies just went public and their CEOs air literally, billionaires they're making, you know $45 million a year. The companies themselves there. Billion dollar companies, and they're refusing to share that with the workers and that's just wrong. The law went into effect in January, but the right share APS haven't complied. They don't want Teo. And the thing about prop 22 is they wouldn't have Tio. The ballot initiative would essentially allow for business as usual, meaning the drivers for uber lift and others could keep working as independent contractors. They'd be exempt from maybe five rules. Chris Tilly is a professor in department chair of urban planning. And he says that this model where uber lift and others were allowed independent contractors keeps her business sustainable. Their main causes paying drivers. So it's been a competitive strategy to draw in the drivers. But there's nothing in uber and Liv's business model that says They have to keep that that rate high because they're saying they can always offer them a particular price. Take it or leave it. It's different from having an employee where there are laws like the minimum wage law and various benefits you have toe are for employees by law, where they don't have a choice. The law requires that Why? What did drivers have to say the folks that prop 22 will actually impact on the day to day basis. Back of the El Ax, right share drivers hub. Here's Alejandro Olivia Sanchez, who we heard from earlier. So what driving driving forward for the last nine months? Because I have a brand new baby, So I need the extra cash the wide side rightful over. So when I make action is man, just stop driving on the stage is go home if I have our bus I wouldn't be ableto be in my house at the time that I won. If I'm hungry. I used pull over and then I find something to in some tire. I just go home. I love trying for we love flexibility. Like Leyva Sanchez. Gustavo Lopez drives full time and he agrees about the flexibility. He used to work the usual 9 to 5 job and you're for more. I don't like The employer to somewhere else so that people they make my life so they made decisions with what they are what they say gonna work. They make decision for me. How much money you gonna make a day? They make decision. Like if I can have vacation or no with my family. I don't like it. Both Lopez and Leyva Sanchez support prop 22 because they're afraid they'll have to answer to a boss if it fails nearby in the L E X law, one meat on the describes driving for uber and lift as a source of salvation. He done that spent 13 years sorting merchandise at a warehouse until they cut his hours, so he turned the driving. Now he doesn't full time, and he's also afraid of losing flexibility. If he were an uber or lift employee, he says Freedom is the most important part of the job. With the cost of living in California. Putting limits on the worker makes it harder to support a family. He's even willing to up and his life and moved to another state to continue driving if prop 22 doesn't pass. You know you OK? Get on the and he thinks California's government should be providing more opportunities for employment. Instead of creating problems for folks of families. Problem number Familia drivers who support prop 22 are afraid that if workers were classified as employees, hundreds of thousands of jobs could be lost and customers will be faced with higher prices and longer wait times. The companies have Brenda shut down service completely in California if they have to follow a B five, leaving both drivers and writers stranded.

Alejandro Olivia Sanchez California Gustavo Lopez California Legislature Gord Ash Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez James Hicks El Ax TEO Uruguay LIV Chris Tilly Leyva Sanchez Brenda Sarah W Professor Daniel Department Chair
"leyva" Discussed on Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"leyva" Discussed on Latina to Latina

"What is just so striking to me throughout my sister is that you to clearly love each other so much and you come from a deeply loving family, and even with all of that love, and with more resources than than a lot of people. Have you still ended up running up against a lot of the challenges that lgbtq Specifically Trans Specifically Trans Women of color run up against including having a really precarious housing situation at some point right and you go through your late teens early twenties. You're housing is in flux. There's a period where you're living with Salinas and. And that just doesn't work for either of you and so I sort of I want to hear from you. mean you play the role that a lot of us play in our own families right where we are? The eldest and people rely on us, and people expect us to show up, and at the same time have trouble with boundaries and knowing how to set them in when to set them so this is sort of a critical moment for you because it's the first time you really set a boundary with muddy, so and you do a thing that i. I cannot imagine having to do which is to say. You cannot live here and we have to find another place to live, and that other place is shelter. Those are moments that I think about now that that hurt and that. Obviously it worked out right, and it was the moment of tough love. And, it's a moment that I had been told by my parents and my other siblings and I needed to do with Maricel here. I am trying to be everyone's everything. Right and then I'm struggling with my own stuff. You have a marriage that is falling apart. You're going through depression. Your career stuck in the mud I. Mean I. It was uncanny. How often youtube were in a very challenging place at the same time? Oh my God, so it was so hard and I didn't have anyone to talk to. There was no one that I can say. You know what today I thought about how I'm going to kill myself today. That's my thought and that moment where I literally said. I. You can't live here anymore. It was literally like. Let me try. This I've tried everything else, but the tough love, right? I cried I cried so much in that car, but there was something. Something that told me this really could possibly be a turning point and I think you know obviously after reading writing the book together and going through it, and talking about that moment was when Marisol had her own epiphany that night. When she told me like okay, you can live. Yes, I was completely heartbroken. I was like Oh my God like I'm so used to having my sister. And then I knew that at the same time. This is like a half to do this regardless. Because I'm going on issues, I knew my sister was going through her own initial, so I didn't want to continue to add my baggage onto her and saw. I knew that this was at this I to make the best out of this situation and make something happen so that night when I got dropped off and I'm meeting everyone at the shelter. I felt relieved. I had hope I have faith. I went to sleep in my mom, so as the pray. And I. Just pray that night. <unk> cried myself to sleep, but not of like sad tears. It was happy tears because I falling was finally going somewhere in my life that was more positive than all experience that I experienced beforehand.

Salinas youtube depression Marisol slimness van partner
Actress Selenis Leyva and Her Trans Sister Marizol Are Closer Than Ever

Latina to Latina

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Actress Selenis Leyva and Her Trans Sister Marizol Are Closer Than Ever

"What is just so striking to me throughout my sister is that you to clearly love each other so much and you come from a deeply loving family, and even with all of that love, and with more resources than than a lot of people. Have you still ended up running up against a lot of the challenges that lgbtq Specifically Trans Specifically Trans Women of color run up against including having a really precarious housing situation at some point right and you go through your late teens early twenties. You're housing is in flux. There's a period where you're living with Salinas and. And that just doesn't work for either of you and so I sort of I want to hear from you. mean you play the role that a lot of us play in our own families right where we are? The eldest and people rely on us, and people expect us to show up, and at the same time have trouble with boundaries and knowing how to set them in when to set them so this is sort of a critical moment for you because it's the first time you really set a boundary with muddy, so and you do a thing that i. I cannot imagine having to do which is to say. You cannot live here and we have to find another place to live, and that other place is shelter. Those are moments that I think about now that that hurt and that. Obviously it worked out right, and it was the moment of tough love. And, it's a moment that I had been told by my parents and my other siblings and I needed to do with Maricel here. I am trying to be everyone's everything. Right and then I'm struggling with my own stuff. You have a marriage that is falling apart. You're going through depression. Your career stuck in the mud I. Mean I. It was uncanny. How often youtube were in a very challenging place at the same time? Oh my God, so it was so hard and I didn't have anyone to talk to. There was no one that I can say. You know what today I thought about how I'm going to kill myself today. That's my thought and that moment where I literally said. I. You can't live here anymore. It was literally like. Let me try. This I've tried everything else, but the tough love, right? I cried I cried so much in that car, but there was something. Something that told me this really could possibly be a turning point and I think you know obviously after reading writing the book together and going through it, and talking about that moment was when Marisol had her own epiphany that night. When she told me like okay, you can live. Yes, I was completely heartbroken. I was like Oh my God like I'm so used to having my sister. And then I knew that at the same time. This is like a half to do this regardless. Because I'm going on issues, I knew my sister was going through her own initial, so I didn't want to continue to add my baggage onto her and saw. I knew that this was at this I to make the best out of this situation and make something happen so that night when I got dropped off and I'm meeting everyone at the shelter. I felt relieved. I had hope I have faith. I went to sleep in my mom, so as the pray. And I. Just pray that night. cried myself to sleep, but not of like sad tears. It was happy tears because I falling was finally going somewhere in my life that was more positive than all experience that I experienced beforehand.

Marisol Salinas Youtube
"leyva" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"leyva" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The for the for the pirates Walker called out on strikes his first time a switch hitter batting right handed Walker hit well for average batting right handed against lefties but not for power only two home runs in a hundred seven at bats against lefties in the regular season stringent finals went back to the screen and its own one thank the pirates as a team against left handed pitching his only twenty three home runs all year in more than twelve hundred advance versus left handed pitching and they had a hundred fifty six home runs this year now the pinch very high from Bumgarner one ball and one strike Bumgarner through the first four innings and only throwing forty five pitches so he's been throwing strikes and he has been very efficient the winds and here comes as a phone popped up off to the right side and back into the lower deck so it's one ball and two strikes down you're ready he's had a good feel of everything I think really his dollars to the inside part of the strike so with that fastball has really been what has set up all of his other pitches what he's going to go inside to get a typist to these right handed hitters requires he's done it number I'm going to the wanted to count to Walker the winds and here comes it's too high with a fastball good to it's good for Bob Marley number fifty of the day the very economical with pitches at the end of the fifth inning you want to have seventy five or less June two page swinging a little slow bouncer foul in the third base side over to the third base coach Nick Leyva go to into reddit Crawford who got to the big leagues in twenty eleven the year after the judge when that world series against Texas the Bumgarner starred in vanguard who pitched a very pivotal game and he shut out the Rangers for eight innings a game for the give the judge a three games to one lead in that series good to pitch way outside of high with a changeup downstream to there's been three easy takes it is it bad this is led to the three cat three to count I know you therefore if you leave it with nobody out this becomes a big pitch you don't want to start walking the leadoff hitters in a playoff game I'm gonna ones three to pay even as he.

Walker Bumgarner Nick Leyva Crawford Texas Rangers Bob Marley
"leyva" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"leyva" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Of the for the for the pirates Walker called out on strikes his first time a switch hitter batting right handed Walker hit well for average batting right handed against lefties but not for power only two home runs in a hundred seven at bats against lefties in the regular season stringent fines went back to the screen and its own one thank the pirates as a team against left handed pitching hit only twenty three home runs all year in more than twelve hundred advance versus left handed pitching and they had a hundred fifty six home runs this year now the pinch very high from Bumgarner one ball and one strike Bumgarner through the first four innings and only throwing forty five pitches so he's been throwing strikes and he has been very efficient the winds and here comes as a phone popped up off to the right side and back into the lower deck so it's one ball and two strikes down here right he's he's had a good feel of everything I think really his palace of the inside part of the strike so with that fastball has really been what has set up all of his other pitches what do you want to go inside to get a typist to these right handed hitters requires he's done it number I'm going to the wanted to count to Walker the winds and here comes it's too high with a fastball good to it's good for Bob Marley number fifty of the day the very economical with pitches at the end of the fifth inning you'll want to have seventy five or less June two page shrinking a little slow bouncer foul in the third base side over to the third base coach Nick Leyva till June two Credit Crawford who got to the big leagues in twenty eleven the year after the jets when that world series against Texas the Bumgarner starred in vanguard who pitched a very pivotal game and he shut out the Rangers for eight innings in game four to give the judge a three games to one lead in that series good to pitch way outside of the high with a changeup downstream to there's been three easy takes it is it bad this is led to the three cat three to count I know you you know for the leave it with nobody out this becomes a big pitch you don't want to start walking the leadoff hitters in a playoff game I'm going to one three two page during the busy struck.

Walker Bumgarner Nick Leyva Crawford Texas Rangers Bob Marley
23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

UN News

13:21 min | 1 year ago

23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

"So here we are at the urine stool in Geneva and we are speaking about the twenty thousand International Meeting of Mine Action National Directors and United Nations advisors so basically basically unmastered say the United Nations Mine Action Service in addition to Sarah Jerry. He's a researcher. From King's College in London has been looking at research approach into on the link between climate change and vulnerable populations affected by unexploded ordinance stuck in the ground and elsewhere. Welcome everybody body. I'm going to just dive in quickly. Going to Richard Baltimore's Program Manager for South Sudan with unmasks wretched. Tell me the main thrust of the meeting being here at the United Nations in Geneva what you can to achieve this week well simply putting the importance of mine action back on the map. Reminding people there's a problem exists exists around the world that is being addressed but it needs constant support to keep his going a mine-free world is achievable. We simply need to keep doing what we're doing. Just talk me through what the process. Who says you go into a community in south Sudan? Can you give me a particular example of an area is cleared recently. How you've held community? We're helping hundreds of communities Aziz every single day we're going into villages where mines were laid possibly thirty or forty years ago wet forests have grown up around them. People wonder into those forests in search of natural resources to cut wood together the forest vegetables and plan selves up working to render the ground safe and the the the reality is the poorest of the poor go into minefields knowing they all taking a risk. Studying Cambodia showed eighty five percent of mine victims victims. New they're in a minefield at the time. They had their accident but they also knew they were going to be hungry at night. So they take the wrist to go and get it and not not. de-mining is not an option. People will still take the risk and go into the minefields. We need clear those minds to make the land safe. Just start with a level playing field being out to grow awesome food. It is astonishing it comes down to having to live from day to day and Edwin fake money. If I can come to you know you were in Cambodia. Do you share richards. Experience experience. There is that what you were finding radio program officer unless now but you were working for a long time with U. N. D. P. The UN Development Program. Yes you actually see that people take risks risks. When they're hungry they will try to the forest to find food if they have piece of land contaminated? They will try to farm it so that they can grow the rice. It's basically subsistence isn't farming for everything there. And if they contact us the land and they will take measures to go in and see if they can actually get food. What's your message to the conference? Is this week. There is a need for us to address this theory's hope for example specifically for Kamalia. Two hundred twenty five is a goal for them. It can be achieved there to clear. All of known remaining landmines by twenty twenty-five how many we talking about. It's there still about nine hundred square kilometers of land mines but it was like a lot. I mean look look and you say twenty. twenty-five it is a lot but the government has actually committed themselves. You know Wait I left Komodo last year. They committed themselves that they will give ten percents counterpart funding to any international funds. Subtle coming for Mine Action and you be assumed that in the sense that last year we got ten percent of those about about two hundred thousand dollars last year from the Komo government which is a first big step for them taking responsibility for the problem that they have so there is progress and hopefully by two thousand twenty five and quickly back to Richard. You said that South Sudan continues to be contaminated by mines laid out decades ago but their goal is twenty twenty. He's seven four title Clearance Twenty Twenty Six if the current peace can hold if we can get access to all areas then. It's reasonable with current levels of funding as long as that maintained that we we will complete clearance by Twenty Twenty Six but ordinance will continue to appear for decades. There is still ordinance turning up across Western Europe that was fought over a hundred two years ago. Being ploughed up in the fields of Belgium reality of any conflict affected country but in the short term you need sustained funding to help South Sudan Dan. As many other countries need to decontaminate. You cannot come quickly to use Aruna Jerry from King's College London research only be looking at the link between climate the change and unexploded ordinance or nine months contamination. Can you tell me a bit about what you felt. I've been looking specifically at the conflict context. I've been looking at mine. Action in how they interrelate from post conflict peacebuilding framework and the climate. He's something that I've come into recently looking at how that is adding the levels. Abelson wonder ability because I was in Angola in September doing some work where they went national saint for Humanitarian De Mining on a research project. Nick and what we saw there was that once fields are cleared that the farmers there are grateful because clear and provide quite a lot of land. And what they're doing is resorting to the cotton slash methods of cultivation now. What that does the environment is? Just at the the time the fires in the Amazon on but in Angola there was second highest fires when the satellite team. It is dance so while we can clear and and the farmers were saying yes but the drought has impacted so yes. The farm has been returned to the farmers. But there are other you know beyond the mine in action and my take into that is can we incorporate as a sector. Can we bringing other lessons for these people when we out there with them saying once we've cleared the farm may be a certain sense of responsibility in the ways. We cultivate and all so integrating being innovative in our practice to dealing with communities to reduce their ability interesting. So what you're calling for really is for broader approach to helping communities once the areas made safe. So I don't know maybe I could turn to you. Seddon Threat Mitigation Officer with the Mine Action Service so he didn't a lot of work into be at the moment. I don't know how house access you have there. Because we've had talks recently here in Geneva for ongoing between opposing parties fighting outside Tripoli to the South how are you UH helping communities get safer and be free of this sort of scourge that must induce mentality among populations yes. There are two real issues to addressed. ICED firstly is that Libya has the world's largest uncontrolled ammunition stop palm. It is estimated that there were between one hundred fifty thousand two hundred thousand tonnes of uncontrolled control munitions across Libya. Also what we've seen recently in the fighting which broke out in southern Tripoli in April of last year is the expenditure ordinance and the threat posed by explosive remnants of war as increased and sadly many of the areas that were previously cleared of you exit have now been reconsolidated as a result. The current fighting some specific concerns that we've got amendment relates to some of the more complex munitions that The Libyan's require assistance to dispose off. And the previous Qaddafi regime for example bolts some quite complex missile systems that use talks ick propellants and these toxic propellants pose a very considerable threat to the environment went and also to the Libyan people which live close proximity to their storage depots so one of the projects that are mass. Lear initiated with support from the German government his to safely dispose of some of these very hazardous liquid propellants in Libya. Thank you Bob for that. Now I'm going to turn to leave because you're the Global Communications Honcho Four. Unless you could tell me how many countries on Mrs Operating in I'm what stays sort of information sharing between those officers who are involved in making community safe and and maybe what are the new ways that we using computers not officially intelligence to help us improve decontamination. Everywhere yeah the United Nations by action service we of nineteen programs in countries and territories around the world the UN as a whole is a little bit over thirty so the UN is. We're mine action. United Nations mine. Action has the Inter Agency Coordination Group for Mine Action which we helped to service and facilitate and that's really is an information exchange so and this meeting that we're at this week in Geneva Leyva where we have the national directors from all over the world from every mine affected country. I'm comes in. That's a big part of it is to share lessons learned best practices and the technology which is very important specifically with with improvised explosive devices. I mean we've been working for years in Afghanistan. We've seen a lot of devices that were used in Afghanistan that show up in other conflict zones specifically today's in Somalia we've seen stuff in Iraq. There's an innovation there. There's obviously on the dark web. People have access to figure out WHO's building. What and how are they building yet? What type of charges etc.? So you have to stay alert and you have to be following that. Obviously that's not something terribly new military out there in the world The United Nations. We don't don't particularly do intelligence service things but we are starting a database now in order to try to bring in academics and the governments that want to share that information in order that we make our people on the ground safer so that people would have some type of place to go to look at the type of devices I see they can do photos of directly and put it up in this database and then people can look at it from other parts of the world and say immediately. I've seen that. Don't touch that wire. I mean if you WanNa get it simple or this is probably how it is or the or the charter is going to be. You know. Two hundred meters. There's away or is that kind of thing and somebody mentioned earlier today when we were speaking about infrared Is that you know the technologies that exist out there. They are extremely deadly. It's a little bit different than a landmine. I'm where you're just using a metal detector and you're going along and something beeps and you're saying okay is that you know a pop top or is that something more dangerous when you deal with. ID's there three hundred sixty degrees so you don't know where they are And I mean there was just an attack recently in Afghanistan for example where somebody stuck a charge on the top of the roof of a car which killed the UN employees it was UNDP and that's an example of something which smit this new database that's going to be soft launch today at this is meeting with look into. So what specs do you need for your car roofs when the UN by vehicles because that's obviously a weakness right when a car sitting in traffic and somebody puts a bomb on the roof of of it and nobody thought about that but there are ways to know if there's devices on a car magnetic sensors that tell you. Something's been added this car and that's the kind of stuff that we need to know. The the United Nations need in order to keep all personnel. And all NGOs safe. It is frightening. You could be totally paranoid radio studio. They want to step foot outside. Because it's you know I've read the English patient I've read the some of the mindset of somebody who's laying mines encounters and things. I think my goodness this is just extraordinarily frightening writing and terrifying. And I'm Bob you're saying earlier the the threat of mines is not going away. Sadly the very effective asymmetric form of Attack Jack and the effectiveness of the ID as technology level is now very much understood by. The extremists are employing days. I mean sadly that knowledge is now the Leah's mentioned the information is disseminated now across the Internet. It is relatively easy now for people with no previous experience or training to acquire The knowledge from the web to make homemade explosives and to build quite sophisticated audience systems from scratch. You know with any external intervention. So so you're suggesting earlier Bob that it's not just a question of getting the minds out of the ground. It's a broader approach. Can you maybe explain what that means. Yes certainly insufficient really just to deal with the the explosive threat itself itself when one considers the threat posed by ideas. You really look at the the. ID system so it requires an effective whole of government approach. And that's very much based on not just the entity that's dealing with the explosive straight itself. But you got to look at the forensic organization that recovers evidence the analysis of that of the good police squirt this required to identify locate arrest and then process the perpetrators through the judicial system and Libya. This is happening. It is happening. Actually the The Mass Libya team has worked quite closely with Libyan authorities. And we've been trying to develop the forensic skills of the Criminal Investigation Department such that the Libyan police. I can do this themselves. Thank you very much. I think we've pretty much come to the end of this discussion very brief Look at what your and Mine Action Service is doing. It's been a delight to have you here but I'd love often any final messages or thoughts that you have before you plunge back into the dark recesses of the UN Pele here in Geneva and share information which is obviously why you're here simply that clearing clearing the wolves. Lamont problem is achievable. It's very very achievable. I started de-mining in nineteen ninety-three when the world talked about it being a thousand year problem problem now it down to single digits of years with realistic assessments. Credible Clarence methods. We're winning this fight. Unfortunately the fighters moved on on the problem is not being replaced by problem. The crux of this issue is ending grievances. If people want to find a way to kill each other's they will do so but in those countries where the wounds have healed such as Cambodia. We can go on and complete the Job Sarah Jerry Richard. Bulte Bob Seddon ugly really would yeah. Many things

The United Nations Geneva Bob Seddon Libya South Sudan Cambodia Clearance Twenty Twenty Six Twenty Twenty Six Afghanistan United Nations Un Development Program Tripoli Mine Action Service Sarah Jerry Richard Angola Richard Baltimore King Researcher Aziz
"leyva" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on Latino USA

"If <music>. I'm you know playing a lawyer because i'm latina you know so but in this show you get to to have conversations you have dialogue and say you know what i don't think that gloria glory would say that or that doesn't feel right and it is a real collaborative effort to build these characters and that's why i think the voices are so authentic right so even though you started in the first season with as you're saying basically these great sassy one liners owners now we see gloria as as a full character so what does that mean for you for me to be here season three and to really have been given a story with a real nice beautiful arc to me was like the icing on the cake is what i wanted from day one as an actor just to have have a beginning a middle and an end a story. That's being told a story that is relevant to story. That's going to have people talking and i'm representing the latino community city in this show on this show. I'm representing the latina yes. I am a prisoner but she's layered. She's a survivor. She's smart. She was running a business before she got locked up. She's a mother she. She believes in her religion. She's a son data. She takes care of her cheek prison. She's no nonsense and she is what i think of. When i think of a latina i think of a strong survivor and that's what gloria mendoza is. She made the mistake yes but she's a survivor. She's a strong strong woman. Do you feel that that is sort of and i know that we're going from very specific to now. Hyper hyper brought about latinos and our position in this country. Are you feeling anything like something is changing because as you know latina's eighteen as are the most powerful consumers we make decisions about what movies we're going to see and take our families were often again. We're still not leads and yet we're still lucia or direct directing or calling major shots. I think there's an imbalance you know as much as we were saying oh but we are looking at and then look at the numbers. Look look at all the progress. They're still an imbalance in how that's being distributed. There's still an imbalance in how is being put out there and for some reason and this has been always been my frustration in an even so more now where i go. Why are we saying anything. Why aren't we getting angry. Why aren't we doing anything. Why aren't we being vocal and you seem very very comfortable with making these statements about what needs to happen. Were you always that wages and now people want to hear me where before i'd be like begging them. I have something to say..

gloria mendoza gloria glory gloria
"leyva" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on Latino USA

"You were part of other theater companies. Can you take us back and describe those years hours at a time when being a woman of color in a latina breaking into theater. What was that like. You know. I was lucky i think it was fortunate that the puerto rican travelling theatre opens doors for me and that was my first professional job that i got my equity card from them. I was proud of that. I was is proud that i was going to be working on a stage where my parents would come and see it and understand what i was saying because my parents speak spanish and for me the fact the my first professional job was at the pierre t will forever be amazing because the first time i went to see a play as a young lady was at the pierre t t i got onto the yellow school bus and with my brown paper bag lunch and we sat there in that audience and i remember looking at the young latina onstage stage and i was mesmerized by her mesmerized i was like doug needs to be me and then years later that was my first professional job and and then after that i worked at la mama i you know i worked at the new rican poets cafe with new year. We can rule the sketch comedy troupe <hes> that was an amazing time. I'm in my life. It got me really really ready for like you know to work on t._v. Because you have to be fast you have to be quick you have to you know you have to know your you know what you're doing to. I do <hes> comedy period but it was difficult. Of course you know <hes> even even in the latino theater world. I think that there were moments where i i felt frustrated. Because i am an afro latino and the roles being offered to me were well. You could play the made we have a wonderful part in you know the enlarged gas production and you're the made so i would have to do plays where i would sit off in the side way from my you know entrance friends as the luxury isla while other lighter skinned actresses shined and had their moments and even even even doing latino theater because you're afro there was like <hes> i was. I was other in our communities still i would. I would would not be given the opportunity and then slowly when i was given the opportunity. It was like well. We're gonna give you this. You're going to share the role. You know. We're going to give you this but <hes> you know no. It was always there was it was a but there was always you know yeah. It was frustrating. It was really frustrating at times not all the time. Was it like that but there for many many many occasions where i felt that i was not given an opportunity because i was not fair skinned and unfortunately so you know our people have an idea sometimes going i get to the end you had a win over a mile or like that's such a big thing where <hes> i was always like well. What about me. He has an actress. I could do the part right <hes> so that was that was an interesting time but i those same people now. I think <hes> would probably want me to go to the theater and not play the mate. I'm not sure that what does it feel like to go from being an actor who sometimes was dismissed who had to to fight to feel visible to now being an actor. That's on a hit show critically acclaim but that you actually have the power within the team to have those conversations conversations with gingy the creator or with the writers and for them to listen to you. You're shaking amazing. It's it's a relief because azeem. Then you do feel like you're part of the creative process you know for years i came and i was given a script and i was told this which encourages going to say and this is what your courage which is an aware and i remember times going. Why would she wear this. You know <hes> because i'm latina stories about you know. Why am i looking like a prostitute if <music>..

puerto rican pierre t doug
California bill would provide free abortion pills on campus

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

California bill would provide free abortion pills on campus

"A state Bill is making its way through the legislature that would ensure access to medication induced abortion at public universities. KCRW polling Velasco reports the legislation would ensure women at U and UC campuses would be able to access abortion pills. The abortion pill is a non invasive, and non surgical process to end the pregnancy within the first ten weeks. It is not currently available at any public campus health centers, which otherwise do provide other reproductive health services, Connie Leyva, the democratic state, Senator representing chino introduce the Bill now as we stand with everything that's happening nationally. I think it's absolutely critical that California continues to do the right thing, which is to make it easier for women to access or constitutionally protected right to have an abortion Leiva says a coalition of supporters as pledged to provide funding to these campus health centers, so they can provide the service including

Kcrw Velasco Connie Leyva Leiva Chino Senator California Ten Weeks
Fla. Speaker apologizes for using "host body" for pregnant women

Magic Mechanic

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Fla. Speaker apologizes for using "host body" for pregnant women

"Speaker of the Florida house is taking heat for using the term host body to describe pregnant women question is what is the value that life, and is it subordinate to the value of its host body. And so then one has to think. To what time does the host body veto power over this other life Jose Leyva using the phrase several times during discussion on abortion on CBS, Miami state democratic chair Terry Rizzo. Criticizing the Miami lakes. Republicans choice of words on Twitter calling them hurtful and

Miami Lakes Terry Rizzo Miami Twitter Jose Leyva Florida CBS
"leyva" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"You've got Jose Leyva making multiple different cases here. He saying that smoking wasn't on the ballot. He's saying it's a slippery slope. And he's saying I know that definitely marijuana's bad for you. So even if doctors give the okay to smoke it. I still think it's bad for you. So you shouldn't do it. And he's also talking about federal law to. So he's making multiple different arguments. But what he's essentially saying at the end of the day. This is Jose alita. Knows better than you. What's good for you? When it comes to medical marijuana. Jose LeBron knows better than you. And your doctor. What's good for you? When it comes to medical marijuana. Because if your doctor thinks the benefits outweigh the drawbacks when it comes to smoking medical marijuana. Under Jose Aleve is vision that doesn't matter because he knows it's harmful. And also this idea that okay, let let's just say for argument's sake. Let's go with the harmful argument because I'm certainly not gonna sit here. And say that it's all positives. It's all sunshine and rainbows when it comes to marijuana and the effects it has on people. But there are a lot of things that have bad effects on people. Sugar alcohol. I could go down the list. What makes medical marijuana so much worse than all the rest?.

marijuana Jose Leyva Jose alita Jose LeBron
"leyva" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"Right. It's almost like the moneyball guy who was doing all the, but you know, he's human behavior is notoriously very difficult to predict. So although we have these, you know statistics and who tends to do better on what in the moment. You know, I think anything could a mental change can affect all these districts in terms of there'd be previous behavior. And and you know, maybe something like free will or certain things. That's That's that's that's. one. But there's this thing. Leyva family. Maybe hey, look at that. Scientists no matter what the discipline. Everybody doesn't know. There's no free. What is your problem? Well, you would do is in the Lee athlete someone who's at the very pinnacle of game, you have been so practiced that you've taken out that element all taken out, but reduced it to such a small area of inconsistency people now funnel, you spend money on Oregon's too because of your consistency or lack of their in. And that may fluctuate over a course of weeks months. Oh years or diminish certain time in your career. So let me ask you this header with respect to what we were just talking about what Eric was talking about previously and the difficult holes. Let's say you're the first three holes you're doing super well. And it's, you know, happy go lucky, and then, you know, in your mind the fourth hole, you always mess up on. That's kryptonite. That's right, right. What happens in the brain? That makes that actually come true where you know, you is. I look at it self-fulfilling prophecy. Yeah. So your thoughts. Can affect your behavior. We know that. So if you change your mindset, if you think you're going to do poorly, if you're told for example, you're going to do poorly on this math test people tend to do worse than if they're told like with girls girls tend to do better math, and they'll do better on the math test. So telling yourself, oh, this is the whole that. I usually mess up on is going to really negatively affect your performance. The other thing with this game, which is interesting in terms of the psychology..

Leyva Oregon Eric Lee
"leyva" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

11:21 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Life. Mark Leyva vich is the New York Times magazines chief national correspondent, he's the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book this town about the inner workings of Washington DC, but his new book is about an entirely or maybe not so entirely different subject to National Football League. The title big game the NFL and dangerous times. Mark Leibovich joins us. Now. Thank you for being with us. Mark. Thanks for having me Jammie. Good to be here. Why would someone a serious journalists such as yourself at a time when there is certainly no lack or dearth of things to cover in Washington. A town that you know, well dedicate so much time and energy to the subject of the National Football League. Well, you know, my bosses the times magazine wanted to know that too. They think they wish they were covering politics during all the time. But no, I I look I thought that I've always had an interest in empires and places that think that they're going to go on and prosper forever. And and it is amazing that the overlap you see when you're covering the swamp of Washington, and then you get into the National Football League. And you realize that a lot of it is is very similar. You have the same big egos. A lot of big money, this sort of club environment that prevails in DC that that is very much alive and well in football. So I sort of thought I could take a break from politics by jumping into football for a few years and really delving into the league. Now is obviously very naive to think that I could escape from politics one because league politics is very very fraught. But also, Donald Trump, politics it touches everything. So my world kind of collided last year. We're speaking with Mark Leibovich, the author of the new book big game, the NFL in dangerous types in it really is. A remarkable narrative, and that's just the narrative in the book. But the narrative now of the National Football League the preeminent professional sports league in North America. If we'd had this conversation, let's say four years ago. Everything seemed to be looking rosy for the NFL. There was the concussion issue. But in terms of it's popularity. It was on challenge. Tv ratings were still climbing environment in which all other ratings are declining. There was not this intersection with politics. It was pre- Ray rice. I guess that was default two thousand fourteen now here we are as the two thousand eighteen season gets underway in the league for all of its straits. Still seems I should say seems to be under siege. In a way. Like it has never been before. How did we get here? You know it. It is interesting part of it is just the time. I mean, there's sort of a siege mentality a divisive mentality. No matter where you look. But look I mean, it's also worth pointing out that the indicators of the league or are still pretty good. I mean their revenue growth is pretty strong their Carolina Panthers sold for two point two million billion dollars last year. Which was a very very high number for a franchise, though, think Jerry Richardson bought for maybe one hundred and seventy five million something like that FOX just through a ton of money at at at the league for Thursday night game. So there's a lot there. But which is why Roger Goodell still making a million dollars a year, or whatever he's still making a lot of money. Yeah. There's a level of resentment toward the league from a lot of different circles that you didn't see a while back when part of it's just market by market. I mean, Roger Goodell cannot go into New England. He cannot go into Oakland San Diego. We cannot go to Dallas you can go to Baltimore. I mean, there's just a lot of places that have been alienated from from the league office for many many years. But also look for a perspective of parents who are not letting their kids play football. I mean participation rates are down for years. The left has been suspicious of football, much more. So than the right and Donald Trump almost single-handedly has turned the NFL into this example of. How America has become to still politically correct and to soft. So you have you know, the the kneeling anthem protests thing is just really divided things in many many ways. And I don't think Roger Goodell or the people who own the league are very well equipped to deal with it. Because I don't think they know what they're dealing with speaking with Mark leave vich again about his new book big game the NFL dangerous times. And and that's an interesting point you make that they can't deal with it. Because for so long for many decades, the NFL specially under the leadership of Pete Roselle who came from the world communications, or as they called it back then public relations publicity. You know, always seem to have the answer. Why has the league struggled so mightily really for the last four years really since the Ray rice crisis to come up with the right answers to any of these issues. Well, I mean, Roger Goodell has had a knack for for really self inflicting a lot of damage under the league and also just turning molehills into big mountains. I mean Deflategate is sort of a classic example of that as you know, story that you could argue with a minor equipment violation that became sort of a two year story. Now, you could also argue that the two years story was riveting it was reality TV NFL style at its best. And you know, you look at it didn't involve domestic violence or or concussions or one of those unpleasant, topics. I mean, it was a really goofy story that a lot of people were really really passionate about. But look, I it's just, but he I think part of it. He would say, and Roger Goodell told me that he blames the times I mean, this is a social media driven phenomenon in many ways, it's also a very very divided time, politically, and people are really empowered by any number of different outlets to to be aggrieved over something and football has sort of become a vehicle for that. And I think that that it's look I mean, I think it's a time when you really do sense in the league a lack of confidence and Roger Goodell he's signed on for another five years at really really big money. You know, he doesn't have much to lose. Can you? Tell us about the reporting process for this book which spanned several years. It was tricky. I mean, yeah. I mean, I I am not a sports writer. I mean, I'm a political writer, I do not belong to this club. And I don't think I'll be invited anymore. Commissioners Christmas parties Christmas parties, but the Super Bowl party. I mean, I can went to a couple of those. And I think I probably never made it to one I've been in like thirty Super Bowls. I've never made it to the commissioners party. What am I missing anything? Not really look like any other. You'll do better or any number of places. Jeremy? No. I mean, my reporting processes risk dip in and out. I mean, I wanted to sort of cover a four year narrative in the league during what what seemed to be a very precarious period, and the NFL sort of has this allusion of permanence is going to be around forever that it's gonna be printing money forever. But yeah, yes, it is making a ton of money right now and their TV ratings are still even though it went down last year. It's extremely stout and extremely popular. But these things turn really really fast. And I think you know, one thing about the anthem protests last year, would it did reveal just how flat the little league is when things like this happen. There is no real confidence in the leadership, and even like a cohesiveness among the owners that that they can sort of keep this thing together. Mark you mentioned President Trump and how that caught everyone by surprise, especially in Washington. How would the world look different right now if President Trump and the NFL owners or at the time before he was President Donald Trump had been able to buy the Buffalo Bills. Well, he would say the Buffalo Bills will have would have would be looking for their fifth consecutive Super Bowl. And. They would be he would ensure that that everyone stands for the anthem tell on the line and there'd be someone else in the White House. Now, I don't know. I mean, look it's one of the great force in the road in history that if it had gone a different way, it's a thought exercise, you know, what if he had gotten the bills we'd have we'd have another president and the Buffalo Bills. Would you know, he he would be the league's he'll be the league's problem. I guess he was the league's problem anyway. But he'd be they'd be dealing with him. It was one of thirty two owners rather than the the heckler in the White House at this point. So yeah, but Donald Trump Donald Trump's been trying to get into this club for for four decades. I mean, he's made efforts repeatedly to try to buy into the league starting with Pete Rozelle. They wanted nothing to do with him. And that was true for years ago, when when he was going for the bills, and you know, I don't know what it says about the value system of our culture. But but the fact is the the White House has become the ultimate consolation prize. That's how coveted the club. The membership is how deep is the historical animus between Donald Trump in the NFL. Of course, we know the USFL is large part of that. But it goes beyond the USFL. I it does. I mean, look Donald Trump is someone that a lot of really rich people, especially people around New York, you know, have dealt with. I mean, Donald Trump is he has not been an invisible figure for for, you know, for many many years he's been to someone who's been around. I don't think a lot of people took him seriously. I think every single day. He you know, he is surprised, and I think a lot it was surprised that he is where he is today. But no, certainly the USFL and even within the USFL he he caught a lot of blame for actually that league folding because it was him that insisted that they go to the fall schedule to compete directly with the NFL and his goal in owning the New Jersey generals. Who was he was hoping for a merger with the NFL? That would result in him being an NFL owner, obviously, we all know what happened with the USO bell. And you know over the years he is just. Tried to buy a number of teams, and like so many things in Trump's mythology personal grievance grievance and sort of being in clubs or dominating clubs that would not have him as a member become sort of a an overriding narrative of everything he does. So if you look at some of the private businesses, he has gone after as president, whether it's Amazon owns the Washington Post, whether it's the National Football League, which wouldn't let him in. You know, even if you go to the Comcast merger because his is is. Animosity towards NBC. I mean, it goes one after another, and this is just sort of part of the same pattern. You used the word earlier in our interview to describe the NFL as an empire. Where are we? Now are the barbarians at the gates. Are we still is there still kind of a Pax Romana? What where do we stand? You know? It is interesting. I mean, there's certainly a lot more doom and a lot more nervousness within the league or not. I don't know if there's do mentally, but they're certainly nervousness. You do get a sense of precariousness. You know, and people are kind of scared about the world, they're kind of they're rolling into. But again, I mean, the indicators are still pretty strong, and I think we'll probably know a lot more after the next broadcast contracts are negotiated in the next couple of years. And also the next, you know, CBS the next collective bargaining agreement which comes up in. I think twenty twenty maybe twenty twenty one something like that. And yeah, I mean, I I do think one of the lessons from last year an NFL players did get a window into how powerful they can be if they decide to.

National Football League President Donald Trump Roger Goodell football Mark Mark Leibovich Washington president Buffalo Bills Mark Leyva times magazine New York Times Ray rice New York Times bestselling Carolina Panthers chief national correspondent Jerry Richardson Pete Rozelle
"leyva" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Here. He runs it the way he wants to run it and really have anybody run him. So it may very well be the just does whatever the hell he, yeah. Yeah, you know, and he's such a bad acid could do it. You do need a coach, you need a mentor, don't you? I think you do, and I think he has one, but I don't think he has one is like this. Really. You know, I think he calls his shots. I think I could be wrong, right? I think he calls the shots in with Daniel, no way. He doesn't call the shots. It's crazy Bob and myself that that take care of what he needs to be taken care of when we talked to him about in regards to fighting drain, he listens to all our coaches, but specifically crazy Bob and myself. Oh, it helps. And you guys have a track record, you know, some sure some of the other, some of the other athletes who are going to encourage them, hey, you know what? Stick to the plan stick to the game. They look. It's worked for three other guys, five other guys, eight of the guys, ten of guys just don't be dumb, just don't be trying to go outside and look for other stuff. Stay here stick role thus, and you're going to get to where you want to get to done it before thought is one of the things that's helped tremendously people. The our track record speaks for self so so we don't have to try to get you to come on board. I mean, you you do or you don't. The majority of them that come here now want to because they already know what Bob and I've done and they wanna be with us. So. So yeah, it's much easier. What are you most proud of that's happened throughout the course of all this? You know, I get asked that all the time, and it's the stupidest response that I always give, but I always say the same thing, it's we're still together as a team is cool though. People are always looking at well, it's when you win this title. No, we're still together as a team, right? But understand how important it is we, we've been around the longest out of anybody in the history of the sport. Last steal this, a strong team. You know, you have all the personality, you shoot a box. Yeah, he had militant fighting systems. You had all these previous people that were great at some time in their no longer there. They're the shamrock. You know the, the ca- tour system they, they're all gone, right? They're all gone and we're still here. You know, we're still here. We're still actually were stronger than ever. We've never no one's ever held three titles in the UFC at one particular time when we've actually in that position right now because Daniel has two titles in Honey has the other. So we were always supposed to have floor, and I was like, yeah, it was sure supposed to have four, but you know something always happens. But you know, having threes amazing, you know. So we're doing what we're doing well with that. Yeah, it's amazing. Mean with with all the different personalities and stuff, it's gonna be tough to hold everything together. I shot Kyle Kingsbury message telling him I was coming here and he's so excited. He's like, please give him my love. Thome tell everybody there. I said, what's up, and that's that's a really cool atmosphere. Because a lot of times people will leave at gym or the Leyva company and they'll be bad blood. But in this situation. Anyone who's been a part of this, they they're kinda forever branded. Yeah, I'm from k. and it's it's a badge courage rather than like if. It's it's. That's what we'd like to keep doing. But you know what?.

Daniel Bob UFC Leyva Kyle Kingsbury Thome k.
Thyroid medication recalled after failed inspection at Chinese manufacturer

Dr. Daliah

01:23 min | 3 years ago

Thyroid medication recalled after failed inspection at Chinese manufacturer

"I guess the FDA has now had to recall thyroid eight. Tablets that were made by Chinese firm he was announced the recall of Westminster pharmaceutical. Tablets gives you the risk of adulteration, he said in an August ninth, statement the FDA said that Levi firearms sin and Lyle fiber. Nin fifteen milligrams thirty milligrams sixty ninety one hundred twenty milligram. Tablets are being recalled as precautionary measures some leave off the, rocks and doesn't come. In those doses the life, thyroid does but the Leyva Farrukh said I don't have the doses if it's the fifty microgram or the seventy five microgram So the agency. Said they were manufactured using active pharmaceutical, ingredients that were sourced prior to, the FDA's import alert regarding that a Chinese firm made the. Products a two thousand seventeen inspection of China's one friendly pharmaceutical. Company drugs discovered deficiencies and could represent the possibility of risk, being introduced into the. Manufacturing process was Mr. pharmaceutical, Senate has received any reports of adverse incidents related to the products which is good But the FDA of course stake of cautions

China FDA Westminster Pharmaceutical United States Doxycycline Leyva Farrukh Mr. Pharmaceutical NIN Levi Endocrine Diseases Hong Kong NBC Hastings Center Lyle Rosemary Gibson Senior Adviser
"leyva" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Know he's. A lefty like us guys got. To lend the left and, Griffey, junior. Right come on now and. So he was, really nice he walked around and said hi everyone and I didn't. Realize this but you know, my all, time, Fave torii hunter. Was there and my strike guy so when I hugged him he said hey good, job there, I saw that Oh gosh And a bunch of a bunch. Of twins were there Tonio Leyva? Was there Guthman Oh. Man there's a bunch. More I Not that I don't believe you is your? Photographic, evidence. Of this of this. Performance Instagram. The one little video my husband took oh. Really you're what I needed it guys, I. Needed to do it when? I needed I got it when. I needed it whatever you know what I mean you strike when the iron sought thank you strike Yes so, you can check that out because that was pretty thrilling and because the, baseball and it was real it. Was really fun and. To have fun raise money mean yes. Doesn't beaten that nothing beats that I got. It if you want to see. This video all you have to do, is? Go to Instagram and search for lex. And. The, cities and Donna dark Jason Mathison follow. Us you eight o'clock friends have been. Great you guys than anybody you eight o'clock yesterday at this very time we added. We'll dawn added like ninety people yesterday. Right you and I added about fifty fifty yes, oh and I know. There are thousands. Listening, I? See the ratings for the show. So I think there are a lot of. You that still have not followed us, now. We don't want Kylie Jenner? Money we just want like eventually. To be. Sponsored Yeah moving decimal.

Instagram Kylie Jenner Griffey Tonio Leyva baseball Jason Mathison Donna lex
"leyva" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

StarTalk Playing with Science

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on StarTalk Playing with Science

"The leyva and get a clean strike and sweep through the bold to kick it you on now getting the space that you're about to play in gets condensed by players coming in particularly in front of goal if i'm a short distance from the goal and i don't have time to pull my leg back in swing i'll just stab it with my toe got gotcha and hope you you lack complete control because it's such a minimum amount of surface contact with old that's the way it is so unless the professor has a more academic so i think correct me if i'm wrong gary but whatever you see a lot of tokyo do they typically go a little bit lower than the center mass you see a lot of backspin with i think the because i said it's a moment of desperation yuna conscious of going onto niece you're just stabbing the bowl because you have to execute that bulls movement immediately so you don't have the time to think you just stab it because if you get that that little bit of back on it it has that cut a sale affect because now you got this magnus force with an upward component trying to give the ball a little bit of a rise so if you'll if you'll like cheap ping as you would gopher out of the bunka and dropping it into a spot on the green you're able to take that swing you get onto right underneath the bold and you get that back spin on it which goes up woods but there's no power involved because you're not putting the power through the central area of the bowl you'll going underneath dissipating the power but causing that spinning affect that would inquire meet to have a lot time to swing with the puck i don't have that time i am so time poll hence the point of desperation right so basically so you're just you're you're kicking in hoping that's absolutely so it's it's it's a clearance just to get rid of the bull from your goal or it's an attempt to score there in the go just by having no time spice to parade in cool right right next question let's move on this is michael smith from his book and he wants to know this why do we americans know that soccer's awful yet everyone else thinks it's not professor what are the laws of physics to describe this phenomenon best i okay well let let me give you this departure think about what a organization fee is not that we've ever used the word corrupt or anything like that but we're going to need fief that come in and help us better our relations between mexico and canada come twenty twenty six so that's my physics reply to the beauty of what soccer's gonna give us in in twenty twenty six when canada us and mexico co hosting the world cup okay football soka preferences ios prefer football has the capacity to bring people together in such a wonderful way and hopefully as the professor was highlighted will do exactly that prior to the world cup in twenty twenty six that's right so take that michael you hater not vote michael austa question and michael now has an aunt so that he can choose to like oh dislike so diplomatic way i love it i mean you got gotta you gotta get this stuff when you're young right i mean you.

"leyva" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

Coffee With Chrachel

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on Coffee With Chrachel

"Leyva concert we're seeing the december is and then we're it's pride i don't which weekend is which we're going to our friends graduation and then i'm going to oregon like in the middle of a random week at the end of the month we're like staying in an airbnb bend which is exciting because i haven't been oregon yet and that's really fun and then like i don't know what's really going on for july i don't think we have july we say this every year june is always fucking slammed in joy is like i'm just going to be honestly it's going to be hot one and then like god bless like virtual finally getting here soon we should be getting some of the by the end of this month hopefully he is not a lot of also like just a side note i say i am not paying west elm prices for my shit to arrived destroyed god so we fuck and we got of thing a really not crappy but like really cheap like cabinet thing for bathroom just to have like some towels on some other random sixty five dollars in it came like perfectly like okay no scratches dings anything assembled it in like twenty minutes good to go it works as designed everything grain we order some fucking platters from anthropology boozy full as banana leaf platter that we wanted to put on our dining room table that has gone you're get and it was like a nicer peace and ceramic and we try to get it twice and it came broken both time so i gotta refunded and then because they didn't pack it like with anything to protect them like yeah girl what are you doing and then we order fuck in lamp from west elm which we got some other to this not arriving it but the plan is the only thing that's being shipped the other stuff because it's like actual furniture they like they don't have it setup we're going to deliver yeah they bring it to your house so i'm assuming it's going to arrive okay yeah so then the lamp shows up and it's metal and it's scratched in dinged in dented everywhere all over so sad and i'm like why am i paying these ridiculous fucking like extra expensive prices for like west elm.

west elm oregon sixty five dollars twenty minutes
"leyva" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Thank you for your word up there in sacramento spending time with us also for for folks that are interested in ending the backlog the joyful heart foundation that's run by merck she has a lot of information on her website which is where i signed up to show we need a different end the backlog somehow it doesn't roll off the tongue cry but we gotta we gotta we need a new phrase for that test the rape kits now little monkey tell me more about her her website her website is a joyful heart foundation which is really for victims of the violence the sexual or otherwise but her organization really has worked hard to end the backlog they have been instrumental force working with senator connie leyva and others to get this law passed not just here in california but across the nation and they have a they have an excellent web page which will give you all the information you need about the backlog how we got here and what we can all do to urge our legislators to move ahead or the is monday because i'm watching nonprofit and worry that could be the next backlog is of people counties whoever's responsible for doing it's going to go well two million dollars an nominee more we can't do it we can't i if they're getting them to do it right if they're forcing law enforcement to actually test the kits that they have that i'd be happy that'd be a great use of our money instead of just we're going to raise money for the homeless and no idea what's going on with that eight hundred to two two five two two two d i i.

senator connie leyva california sacramento rape two million dollars
"leyva" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Nine one seven zero one six nine nine five nine one seven zero one six and i would just say that an sp two that we passed last year there will be i don't remember it's seven or eight regional centers that are going to be set up for homelessness so that people who are homeless can go there and it's one stop shopping we understand that you know might not be able to go to twenty different places they're not set up and running yet but we are we past that last year it's in the work i have heard that we've been told about that i'm anxious and that should happen because that is part of the problem but again it's it's again it's a liaison quality that it could all happen under one roof but does early but thank you so much we appreciate your time all the work you're doing pleasure grassi all hang in there you've got senator connie leyva calvary state representative we appreciate her spending some time with us here at eight hundred two two two five to two toots lawrence von dr drew we are taking your calls we are going to continue this conversation about the homeless issue and you and you didn't know about the resources until get on the radio right it wasn't that apparent to you now right and it's not apparent to the likes of grass yellow or people like that out there or they resisted they for various reasons and what you're gonna say no i don't think that is well known i mean not even just government resources but the nonprofits that are out there trying to help people plenty of stuff out there yeah okay loria go ahead hey how are you today you know first of all there's not enough mental health workers out there i was with la county almost forty two years and i was in children's services there aren't enough people to do this work they say there's resources but the lines are lengthy your home there is yes for sure and certain issues for sure there's strained doctor their string there's everything is strained all of the all of the service positions are strange especially health services and like you said earlier some people they resist it and maybe it's to do with drugs or you know they need medication but you know it's hard i still say we.

state representative la county senator connie leyva forty two years
"leyva" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"leyva" Discussed on KGO 810

"Yes i'm fifty eight year old woman and on the uber driver and i've homeless and i sleep in my car and that we we drivers pay for all of our expenses and you know we were speaking about starbucks personal tip starbucks starbucks person a dollar when it's made a copy and they've taken it from one countered another most of our customers do not tip and it's ridiculous right now i've driven for four years i have a sick daughter and take mother in northern california sick daughter here in southern california and i cannot do any other job but this because i helped both my mom and my daughter here in southern california and i'm literally homeless well what i would i say is you are very strong woman and i am incredibly sorry that you're in the situation you're in i don't know what senate district your in but i would be happy for you to reach out to my office there are agencies out there there are services available we try very hard to connect our constituents with those services and we'd be happy to look at your situation as well who's working should be without a home i this is the part that drives me crazy is that there are services available and they are liaison that connecting to the services seems to be the missing agreed in here and for sure your office we will refer to what is the website for that big my website is senator lay well it just look up connie leyva but i'm happy to give you the felt telephone number to my district office.

starbucks california senator connie leyva senate fifty eight year four years