18 Burst results for "Lexington Concord"

"lexington concord" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"By any thinking man in all north america the contrary that it is the art wish of the warmest advocates for liberty that peace and tranquility upon constitutional grounds may be restored and the horrors of civil discord. Prevent it. now you might say that was just one delegates position maybe not one of the hardliners but i should mention that the delegate who wrote that was none other than george washington of virginia so the first congress there was really no interest in independence and they said several titians the king parliament. If you look at the the words used in a petition. It's very clear that they were trying to resolve this problem in a peaceful way while still getting what they needed out of it. The end of the petition. They they have the following couple of senses. We therefore most earnestly beseech your majesty that your royal authority and interposition may be used for our relief and that a gracious answer may be given to this petition. That your majesty may enjoy every felicity through a long and glorious reign loyal unhappy subjects that your descendants may inherit your prosperity and in minions till time shelby a war and always will be our sincere and fervent prayer that does not sound like a group of men who are ready to break with the king. The first continental congress i said wanted restoration of their colonial rights and was looking to the king to be the arbiter with haro woman to resolve this problem. Continental congress disbanded in late fall. Seventeen seventy four in left plans to meet again for a second congress it may. They were basically hoping by that time to get a response from london to see what next steps might be needed. If the lended completely agree to all their requests of course by the time the second continental congress met in may seventeen seventy five lexington concord had already put the continent at war so when the delegates arrived back in philadelphia sexually on a war footing and kind of behind the eight ball trying to figure out what steps they could take next to stop this. It really got crazy out of hand. The delegates from new england were at the point where they really thought this is war. We've got to fight the war. But they had worry about the mid atlantic states and the southern state colonies not states yet worrying about them being on board with all this in that they would put up a united front so that was the big fight of the early part of the second continental congress in seventeen seventy five. Many congress still hopes that they can resolve this peacefully. They passed a yet another petition. Hoping that the king would still interpose himself and that they could resolve this without becoming full blown. Treason seventeen seventy five though. This really began to change many credit. Thomas paine who released a pamphlet called commonsense near the end of the year this pamphlet which very widely read very popular basically made the argument for independence saying that a tiny island should not be able rule entire continent the size of the to just didn't make sense and secondly it was a direct attack on monarchy. Why do you guys get to make the rules. Just because your dad got to make a roast before that's no way to run a government so these events had a big impact but even the fact that they were now at war over in a few radicals are calling for independence probably did not move the mass majority of the population to favour independence and probably not even the majority of delegates at the second continental congress. What really changed. It was the next actions of king george. The third king george. The third received this final petition. From the second continental congress and rejected out of hand came from an illegal body. We're not going to respect it. He saw what was happening. In massachusetts lexington concord. The siege of boston was going on but this time as outright rebellion against his authority and again cannot tolerate or negotiate with rebellion. It requires firm military action and once we put down this rebellion. Then we can talk about being nice and you guys receive king's mercy by until this war rebellion and it had to be dealt with such. He gave a speech to the opening parliament. Fall of seventeen seventy five outlining this. And when word of that got back to america at the end of seventeen seventy five in early seventeen seventy six. They realized that there was not going to be a negotiated solution to this dispute. That they could either surrender and pray to the king for mercy or they could declare independence. Those were really the only two options that the delegates saw by this time by early. Seventeen seventy six. Many the delegates who had attended the continental congress in who were against independence as saw the writing on the wall. They saw that one was calling the congress in illegal body and that when they crush this rebellion could very well be that members of that illegal body would be hanged as the leaders of the rebellion so many leaders who opposed independence left congress and many of them were loyalists. Joseph galloway a great example of this who ended up supporting the british layer of the war that we're over. Many moderates some moderates and radicals at this point The radicals were ready to declare independence. Most of new england was on or all that many of the southern commies whereas well the moderates however were not moderates still hoped against hope that they might be able to come to some negotiated solution. And as i said we saw the olive branch petition. Being sent out. But nothing would come with that. So by this point where up to may seventeen seventy six couple months before the declaration. John adams had been attempting to push through an independence resolution. He i tried this in may in a kind of a sneaky way. They wanted to pass a resolution because most of the colonial governments in the colonies had been forced to leave. The colonial governments had governors had either been taken prisoner or work sitting on ships off the coast or had returned to london so there was no opportunity colonial government so adam scott congress to pass a relatively land statement that basically said if you don't have a working government we need to create a temporary ones so that we can continue to not descend into chaos and operate like a civilized state official wording was where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs have been hitherto establish to adopt such government s shot in the opinion of the representatives of the people best conducive to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular in america general. Okay so basically we want to create a workable government that keeps people happy. Congress passed that then. A few days afterward adams pattern the preamble to the resolution which nobody had yet seen the preamble said whereas his britannic majesty in conjunction with the lord's in comments of great britain has by act of parliament excluded the inhabitants of these united colonies from the protection of the crown and whereas no answer whatever to the humble petition of the colonies for redress of grievances and reconciliation. Great britain has been were is likely to be given but the whole force of that kingdom either.

congress king parliament concord lexington king george haro george washington new england shelby north america Thomas paine virginia Joseph galloway london philadelphia massachusetts parliament boston america king
"lexington concord" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:54 min | 5 months ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Com Studios. Let's rejoin Mike as he talks to columnist and author Kurt Schlichter. And I Love the fact that you write You always talk about the normals and I love that so much about your phraseology, and I quote you often because with normal Americans The left is gonna make a big risk. The risk is mistaking patience and restraint for weakness. It is Americans. Look, you know, way just past the anniversary of Lexington, Concord. Okay now it had been brewing for a while. This wasn't like overnight. These things take time, particularly among Americans. But when you take when, when you create a system And then decide you're just going to change the rules for your own benefit. Expect everybody else toe maintain the rules. So that's that is a non starter just can't work for long now to work for a while, because there's a lot of cultural inertia. Right, right. But eventually people are going to go, you know? Uh on I I used the example of my town Hall column where I talk about the officer in Ohio now. It has been a basic principle of Anglo American jurisprudence for 1000 years that you're allowed to use deadly force to protect yourself or others from deadly force. Okay, that's not subject to serious debate. Now there's there's some limitations like I'm not your lawyer. I'm not anybody's lawyer. Talk to a lawyer in your jurisdiction. I'm giving you the basic kind of common law. Think if somebody's trying to kill somebody else, you can use deadly force to stop wrongfully. Kills someone else You can use deadly force stop. That's never been debatable. It's not something you're happy about that time you want to do, but it's simply that is the law. That is the principle you should be able to rely on the law and the use of, you know. Objective truth to protect yourself when you act Left his decided. No, We're just going to cancel the law, Cancel 1000 years of law and ignore fax to obtain a result we want simply because we wanted what that is. It's actually kind of terrifying. You can't rely on every anything. You have no protection because everything is arbitrary. There is no fixed law that everybody now agrees on. Well, The problem is These guys depend on that law to protect themselves. They believe it should apply to us to limit us, but not to limit them. That is unsustainable. It can't continue. It's not going to continue. And as you say, next year's 2022, it's not five years from now. It's not 10 years from now, and you right, and I'm gonna get again. Nobody does it better than you. So I'm gonna quote your words exactly. We're going to crush the left. Because things are gonna get worse Crime, a wrecked economy. China will kick our woke military's behind Think Jimmy Carter in 1980, But without the competence and a lot more anti Americanism. This will be a tough fight, and it's only the beginning. Just do not fall into despair. Do not withdraw. They prefer you submit, but they will settle for you giving up for now. They'll come for you eventually. You right? Do not fear them be part of the backlash. Get in. Now, at the beginning on Deckard. I just hope every American. Here's those words and lets those words resonate when I saw President Biden and Vice President Harris stand up before the country after the Derrick Show Vin conviction. And essentially Smear the country as being guilty of systemic racism. Think about what the what the what the president the vice president have to think about ordinary Americans to believe. That we're just a systemically racist country. And that's I. I think that resonates with normal Americans. Kurt, I really do. I gotta believe Americans are are listening. Well, look when two biting talks like that he's talking to a very narrow group of college educated, neurotic people. Most of them have no religion in their life. So they fill it up. Fill that empty void inside them with woke garbage. And this this does appeal to them. I don't think it appeals to a lot of other people now. There are a lot of people who voted for president asterisk. Because you know they didn't like some of Donald Trump's personality. Now why I loved it. I was all down with a mean tweets. I know I'm shocked people. Yeah, I know. Right? Um, but, uh There, Check the The thing is they were unlucky that they got a guy like Donald Trump, who had some of the aspects the competitive aspect that made him Win in 2016, right, but they were also lucky because they had some of the aspects that made him easy to caricature. Now, a lot of people say, Well, gosh, you know if Donald Trump didn't have those mean tweets, I'd really support him. Well, you know, that's like going to a price fixed menu and ah fixed price menu and saying I'd like to substitute the broccolini for the I mean potatoes who he is? Yeah. I mean way is not material. You know, just pick the good parts. One of the great things about Donald Trump is he always said exactly what he thinks. And I think we should to, uh, on dat means that means critiquing Donald Trump, because, like every human being he's in perfect. I don't think I think it's interesting to talk about, but I don't Look, I don't regret anything. You you If you had Donald Trump doing different things, you would have someone different than Donald Trump, and he would not have been the person we needed. When we needed it. We would have never had the outcomes that we had. But it's the difference. Probably between as you put it. I mean,.

Kurt Schlichter Donald Trump Ohio 1980 Kurt 2016 1000 years Mike next year Jimmy Carter Anglo American five years China President Biden One two biting Lexington, Concord Deckard 10 years Com Studios
"lexington concord" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on Untangle

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. . He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. . His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, , becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. . Today. . We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. . Pleasure. . To be here with you. Thank . you for having me. . It is such a pleasure. You're . such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. . I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. . My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. . Thank you. . Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? ? Okay. . I'm aged fifty, , two currently and as a child, , my parents were in the US foreign service. . So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. . And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, , you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, , and then you're reassigned to another country. . So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. . Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. . So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. . and. . So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, , I would either be in all black schools. . Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. . Well I left. CHICAGO. . . Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. . So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. . I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. . Or newly integrated, , and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. . So in one case, , I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, , , sixty, , eight, , I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. . So consequently, , all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, , Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. . And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. . Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. . But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, , and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, , those people over there don't like the scouts. . That's how naive I was because I had never been to. . Before and it wasn't until my <hes> scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, , my den mother, , my cub leader, , my troop master, , and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. . And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, , asked him, , I, , said, , why am I being hit why they're doing this? ? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. . Just keep moving. . and. So . they never answered the question. . At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. . were, , fixing, , cleaning the UP, , putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. . And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. . And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. . It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, , my Swedish friends, , my Australian friends, , none of them treated me like this. . So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. . And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. . So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. . That same year nineteen, , Sixty, , eight. . On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. . And every major city in this country burned to the ground. . All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism. .

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King US CHICAGO Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
"lexington concord" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"We only heard the good about the US every day we heard about the evils of communism slavery was glossed over and we were taught that the civil war is not about slavery. But about states rights wonder wondering if Mister Burger believes that my perception is at least a little accurate. What what do you think Mr Burger? Little accurate, I? I mentioned face writes a lot. because. Our government was is still a tension between a national governments and sovereign state governments and the shame of safe states rights, which is. An important idea. Is the problem is it's been used to defend some of the worst ideas including slavery and Jim Crow all sorts of other things. That's unfortunate. But. I don't want my history class to be an exercise in propaganda I. Really do want my students to be prepared to be the next generation to be the heirs of the republic. But they can't watch if they don't know what they're watching for. You can't evaluate, for example, something as clinical list tariff policy. Without knowing what a tariff is and you could spend a few weeks, it's talking about Sarasin and stories about the different tariffs and. Tariff conflicts that we've had in our government over the years. You're. Caller early. Mentioned the. Fear of. King or it's not fear rejection of having a King. and. I. Don't know what's in the bill of rights. If you don't know. How they felt about kings. If you don't know that we fought England in the revolution, if you don't know the name of the ocean between us and England. I mean that attached to the level at which most students enter study history. We can't assume that they know these things. You know what freedom of speech means they can't assume it does that it means that doesn't mean you can say whatever you want whatever you want to. What does it? What does it mean and and these are things that too many students never get to hear afraid. You, you need to grapple with issues and historical themes. But you I need to build a chronological foundation of facts, events, people, places, and I did these things it'd be fascinating history needs to be told like a story. And it's easier for students. Remember it that way too. But it's filled the fascinating cable who are. Hit, and flawed just as we are. That seems to be the continuing theme here and What do you think when when a president comes along and says, we need somehow to change the teaching of history to make it quote unquote more more patriotic is that a? What do you make that? This is the president who had the Revolutionary War soldiers defending the airports. So I don't pay much attention to what he said that history frankly. We didn't have too many airports that at Lexington Concord to Valley Forge. Ticonderoga back in those days. of course, the airports did not come along until after the Wright brothers showed up in Kitty Hawk and. Three. So I get what you're saying you need to understand that. That the Wright brothers that first flight in Kitty Hawk happened more than a century after the American revolution and an awful lot of history unfolded between them. And it's really good I. Think you're right with Peterburg or to have a basic understanding of of a you know what came before what and after what etc...

Mister Burger Kitty Hawk president Wright England US Sarasin Jim Crow King Lexington Concord Peterburg Valley Forge
"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hear or see because of the early morning sun. The fact that there's this line of entrenchment across the top of a bunker Hill the closest he'll toward Let's do quickly here before we get to the battle. It's Bunker Hill. There was no breed's hill in 17 75 so even 1917 75. That's sort of a trivia question. Everybody says oh, the battle of Bunker Hill, and it was involved on Breed's hill. But Bree chill is really a name. That's post 17 75. And he even though there are two different elevations, Sort of. Ah, third Lower one, but there's breeds Hill. Now closest ER and been Bunker Hill higher and and behind it. There were those two elevations sort of stepped down one, too. If you will. I have a bunker Hill at 110 feet. Breed's Hill. It's 62 feet molten hill at 35 feet, so it's stepped up and it's It's the centerpiece the 62 feet where they're going to dig the works. And prepare to meet the English and right now the English know it's they've gotta scramble their plans. They were going to go on the 18th but it's now the morning of the 17th. And the orders are given to gather at the docks to sail around 11 o'clock in the morning. So they're going to in full daylight cross with heavy packs in the heat and make an assault on the gathering forces of the Patriots on what becomes the battle of Bunker Hill. There will be mistakes made on both sides. But it's important now to watch how this battle is fought because we're going to watch The future of the battle of how how How and Clinton Burgoyne handle themselves against the Patriots. The book is American Spring. Lexington, Concord In the road to Revolution. Walter Borneman is the author. I'm John Batch. Can the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables fit into just six capsules? Yes, we start by sourcing organically grown whole fruits and vegetables. We ensure they're picked at peak ripeness. All of our produce is third party tested for pesticides, heavy metals, bad bacteria and nutrients. There, then washed, cut and put.

Bunker Hill breeds Hill Patriots Bree chill Clinton Burgoyne Walter Borneman assault John Batch Lexington
"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John Burgoyne, who is the most romantic of the three for these centuries later, he Lopes with the daughter of Lord Derby, and they spend many years in poverty. He has to sell his commission on the continent. He's really he's he's reunited with his Lord and Master Lord Derby. Eventually, they have a child and Burgoyne is a dramatist is an a poet, as well as what I'd have to say A man who with his pen causes lots of problems Burgoyne is he regarded also is a good fighter. Well, I think that Burgoyne would much rather be a writer or dramatist, and certainly the description that he brings us of Bunker Hill is very dramatic in the manner of the times, and I think that he has had his time in terms of when he's been a very able leader of his regiment. He's fought in. Three Iberian war on Spanish Peninsula and, of course for Gloin story getting ahead off a little bit spring of 17 75. You said he's going to end up in command of the British army that's forced to surrender to years later at at Saratoga, right, we're going Clinton and how arrived to help gauge I'm speaking with Walter Borneman. The book is Americans Spring Walter's new book on Lexington, Concord and the road to Revolution. And when we come back, the word spreads of what's happened it Lexington Green. I'm John Bachelor. This is John back, thanks to my partner's at scholar dot com. Global Technology leader I'm certain there will be joy at this year's safely organized Republican National Committee Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, to renominate President Donald Trump for president. Final Night promises Donald Trump to take command of the physical stage for a rousing speech is a prelude to a really life balloon drop. Join us as we wait for the cheers to.

John Burgoyne Lord Derby Donald Trump Master Lord Derby Walter Borneman John Bachelor Lexington Green Republican National Committee president British army Gloin Lopes Spanish Peninsula North Carolina Lexington Bunker Hill John Global Technology Charlotte
"lexington concord" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Jay? We lost him. You push a button strange areas area. I don't think I can do video and audio at the same time. I don't know what the deal is off. Was You it? It seemed like it kicked us out. Okay hi well. It'd be all right Derek. Setting stuff up we were up late. He was here late to and he goes like one o'clock in the morning he goes he goes no. I want to be able to walk in at four. After and just push the button. Everything well he he he. That's exactly what he did you know and I got call by Donna like I was sitting here. I got I I. It's like Home you know the music plane and I'm getting out of bed you know this is this has been Jay We miss you man. You know miss you guys too. It's been it's been a thing you're gonna you're gonNA really dig it. You know we got this all set up but it's just so many little things you know it's like that little thing is a half a day and now a little thing is a half a day after we went and got All new filters and fluids and everything going to try and get that all done and you wanna come by and see. Just say Yo Asaf I mean. Do what you gotta do. But we're just going to you know. Stop by just you can lay hands on. See what's up and I feel like we need a J inspection man action right well. Have you guys adjusted? All the brakes on that thing yet breaks breaks breaks. We haven't done any any truckstop at all. I definitely want to show you how to adjust the brakes or any You know yeah I think I need to know that thank you. I will do that and the only thing only filter. I haven't gotten his transmission filter because we didn't know what it would adding to the manual. Yeah we're just been busy busy busy. Tell you one thing. I don't know if you've not seen on the thing you saw that Derek. Two new big ASS laser right. Yes Yup that man. He has been playing with that. You know there's all kinds of cool stuff that you know. He didn't make it for the bus stop and So we're we're a little still keep improving as we as we go on but the It's it's really coming together the way I had hoped now the able to do a lot of things. It's really it's really nice and I'm GonNa go ahead and I'm going to enjoy this. I think is GonNa have it a lot easier to a lot of the things that we wished we'd be able to do in our other studio that we just couldn't couldn't get around to Derek's INC than Production on this so it'll be cool. What was the dare to Jay about is Sunday on Militia Day? Patriot's Day Freedom Day. Whatever it is April nineteenth is The anniversary of the shot heard around the world on the Northbridge You know the new the crown went to Lexington Concord Takeaway Gunston shot and everything and he said no and just October Bob Bob Anderson IRA back and We went to northbridge and got You know the the story from the Park Ranger Babe and did a presentation and everything and it was interesting Dan. We got to ask some questions on and then We get up to New Hampshire and historian here guy had a meeting he goes. I'll let me tell you what the real story is. New Hampshire started the revolution. He goes for like months. You know into staying at a four doing whatever before the northbridge and then on April nineteenth is also the anniversary of Waco you know the Warsaw ghetto uprising During World War Two and when the Jews in Poland finally just you know got their clutter knives and sticks and took on the German army and there was There was a thing and see. What else is April nineteenth? Dave's birthdays April ninth silver day every birthday and So it's a it's a it's a a Oklahoma City was that nineteen though. That was April. But I don't remember what exact day. Yeah no yeah. It was the Oklahoma City was on the second anniversary of Waco. I think you know so anyway. It was. It was such a significant day in America and a lot of times. It goes by a notice that more recognizes day after four twenty but April nineteenth is a big deal now. That was Sunday when you had your gathering at your home. Dome Place Right yes right. Yeah we Actually send it so Sunday morning. We had gun church and I started at nine o'clock And I don't order. It was probably maybe forty to sixty people attended gun church and at noon time they did a pistol draw class for about forty five minutes in the nave Did some other..

Derek Jay northbridge Waco New Hampshire Derek's INC Lexington Concord Takeaway Gun America Oklahoma City Donna Poland Bob Bob Anderson Dave German army Dan
"lexington concord" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Those were the days William Prescott soldier American Revolutionary War don't fire until you see the whites of their eyes born this day seventeen twenty six the command of course took place at the battle for Bunker Hill which was not at Bunker Hill you have to go pick up the history books to find out more on that and he was one of three individuals along with Paul Revere who did that famous ride from Lexington Concord let everybody know the bridge for coming I guess he and Mister Longfellow didn't get along because we all know left out did yeah he didn't even get a poll on no and Randy California band called spirit late sixties they were awesome yes his estate right did they ever I don't know it out yeah he's the one who or his estate is one claiming that led Zeppelin's older way to have been sold some riff from forest from toward their spirits song called Taurus I think they finally did get that settled we settled it right out of the galley did whenever when the lawsuit first took place we played both in New right then nat don't think so timer rush Limbaugh's warning commentary brought to you by dories guns the centers for disease control and prevention report that last month alone there were two hundred and thirty five cases of salmonella link to families who raise chickens in their backyards so far this year there have been over a thousand cases reported in forty nine states and in Ohio something's happening there they reported the most cases seventy three now as I'm sure you know contracting Solomon that was not a walk in the park what in twelve to seventy two hours people come down the stomach cramps fever diarrhea and I can usually last four to seven days it's not fun so the CDC has a stern warning those of you who raise chickens in your backyard is pay extra special attention because this could save you a lot of heart ache and stomach aches the CDC says that you people.

Bunker Hill Paul Revere Mister Longfellow Zeppelin Limbaugh Ohio Solomon stomach cramps CDC William Prescott Randy California salmonella
"lexington concord" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"We allow the president to be above the law we do so surely at the peril of that sounds like sharp in there the we do so shortly just because she declares the present above the law doesn't make it show who she and when you look at that scan that Adam Schiff friend talk about about the law the guy rejects the enlightenment he rejects I mean every major philosopher who talks about republicanism in liberty and all these other issues in order to trying take that are present in the United States it is she who is conducting herself as if she's about the constitution while she rambles on incoherently about the constitution of the constitutional convention maybe she forgot to the battle of Bunker Hill actually occurred in June seventeen seventy five you look at Lexington Concord Bunker Hill these are the battles these were the big battles that led to the revolution it didn't just happen they didn't just come together in Philadelphia in seventeen seventy six at the Pennsylvania assembly house which is now independence mall and say Hey I mean IDM all of a slave owners here what what what is it well we won independence from Great get idea let's that's all she knows beginning and end of it she doesn't care about the constitution she doesn't care about the impeachment clause she doesn't care what the president did or didn't do she is diabolical she's fascistic she and her friendly websites and friendly reporters and our friendly news rooms have no comprehension of American history of our constitutional construct of natural law on alienable wrecked Nunn among other things.

president United States Bunker Hill Lexington Concord Bunker Hill Philadelphia Nunn Adam Schiff Pennsylvania alienable
"lexington concord" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is well let's begin got to go and if we allow the president to be above the law we do so surely at the peril of his house like Sharpton there the we do so shortly just because she declares the present above the law doesn't make it so who she and when you look at that scan that Adam Schiff friend talk about about the law the guy rejects the enlightenment he rejects I mean every major philosopher who talks about republicanism in liberty and all these other issues in order to trying take ten a present in the United States it is she who is conducting herself as if she's about the constitution while she rambles on incoherently about the constitution of the constitutional convention maybe she forgot to the battle of Bunker Hill actually occurred in June seventeen seventy five you look at Lexington Concord Bunker Hill these are the battle space for the big battles that led to the revolution it didn't just happen they didn't just come together in Philadelphia in seventeen seventy six at the Pennsylvania assembly house which is now independence mall and say Hey I mean I do yeah well all of a slave owners here what what what is it what we want independence from Great get idea let's that's all she knows the beginning and end of it she doesn't care about the constitution she doesn't care about the impeachment clause she doesn't care what the president did or didn't do she is diabolical she is fascistic she and her friendly websites and friendly reporters and our friendly news rooms have no comprehension of American history of our constitutional construct of natural law on alienable wrecked non among other things the revolution was fought over private property.

president Sharpton United States Bunker Hill Lexington Concord Bunker Hill Philadelphia Adam Schiff Pennsylvania
"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

"American spring Walter born in the story of Lexington Concord at the road to revolution it is now spring seventeen seventy five there are incidents in all directions as far north as my child's which is then part of Massachusetts that now main there also incidents at see what Walter describes is Lexington of the sea and which the colonials the patriots challenge the English mastery of the Royal Navy however the major action is going to be a and Boston because the patriots have encircled with their headquarters at Cambridge and the militias are now gathering so that forces are coming from Connecticut from New Hampshire from very far away New Jersey and they're gathering to ring in the English a led by gauge gauge has these three generals have arrived in late may and they have their plans and they have their orders Walter a how has a plan to challenge the patriots to challenge them directly Burr going has a plan to because he wants he wants elbow roomy wants to break out what is house plan what is general house plan to general cage well it's it's kind of interesting first that neither the British nor the colonials have occupied some strategic ground both at Dorchester heights to the south of Boston and at Bunker Hill which is on the kind of peninsula there that juts out from Charles we got to remember that in this particular time Boston really is a long peninsula itself with the real narrow neck going to the south towards Dorchester all of the landfills and all of the things are sort of the expansion of the girth of Boston if you will does hasn't occurred yet and and won't for some for some decades Wilbur going is talking about going out and and trying to as you say get a little bit of available room and pushed the rebels back a little bit how things that they ought to go ahead and move across the Charles river and take the high ground which which at the moment is on occupied on on Bunker Hill they do have a fleet to admit a rear admiral Samuel graves in charge of it and they have a lot of guns floating guns and they also can set up a battery on cops hill what is the plan that the admiral wants what does he want to burn the admiral quite frankly from the very beginning has wanted to burn Charleston across the Charles river he thinks that all it does is really provide places for sniper fire such as the British in board on that retreat from from Lexington and he would have just assumed shelves Charleston and burned to the ground but Gage is not permitted him to to do that and as we get into the confrontational little bit and finally there's a decision really almost simultaneously or or close in time frame both on the rebel side that Hey we need to see is that high ground that Bunker Hill and at the same time the British saying well we were across the Charles at at Charleston as we retreated from Lexington we better get back over there and and capture those heights so what we've got is we've got the rebel forces going across the Charleston peninsula and beginning to dig in on Bunker Hill just about the same time the night before the British are deciding that they should go across the Charles in occupied those types first write the plan on the how and Clinton and Berg going engage is to launch their capture of Dorchester heights on Sunday June eighteenth that was the plan however that's going to be forced because the patriots see the same problem the rebel see the same problem and they moved to take command of Charleston heights which is Bunker Hill important now is the command on the patriots side because it creates confusion that will lead to casualties Israel Ponta Putnam is a colonel from Connecticut and Prescott is a colonel from what Massachusetts Massachusetts but who is the general where the generals where are the commanders well the the the commander is is in Cambridge saying that his responsibility is to defend the stores there and to make sure that the British don't break out of of Boston and really create havoc he's he's beginning to feel the nucleus of what would become a Continental Army once about a month after this George Washington arrives on the scene but he's he's very careful that he wants to be at least defensive in terms of preserving his ability to fight that said he gives instructions both to Israel Putnam and to William Prescott that there to go on to the potential of the Charleston and occupied those those heights they have a couple of colonels commanding regiments who take control as other regiments arrive wanted time on Charleston heights Artemus ward at Cambridge is protecting not only of the British from breaking out but also the patriots they're gathered around him including Harvard College is very concerned about us library they evacuate that and they're retired now for a gun fight cop hit cop still has a British battery removed from the the warships too loud to shoot against Charles town which has not been burned and we'll go to the morning of the seventeenth out because the end of the of the you believe there are people scouting out Charles Townes heights Bunker Hill early in the day they don't move there until what is at sixteen they they move there on the sixteenth into the art the sixteenth they gather at Cambridge about six o'clock and then they March out there late in the day this is summer time so there's a lots of light to the English see them moving up to the heights of before the darkness falls no the the rebels take up those positions and begin to dig ditches and trenches and the first news that the British really have even though I tell a story that's reportedly has Henry Clinton out prowling around I think perhaps in expectation of what he thinks is going to be the attack on Dorchester that he may learn of it a little bit earlier than some of the lookouts but eventually lookouts on British ships at our station in the Charles is about four AM hear or see because of the early morning sun the fact that there's this line of entrenchments across the top of Bunker Hill to close his heels toward Boston let's do quickly here before we get to the battle it's Bunker Hill there was no breeze hill in seventeen seventy five so even though not in seventeen seventy five that's sort of a trivia question everybody says all the battle of Bunker Hill and was involved on retail but retail is really a name that's post seventeen seventy five and be even though there are two different elevations sort of a a for lower one but there's three feel now closest and then Bunker Hill higher and and behind it there were those two elevations sort of step down one two if you will I have Bunker Hill at a hundred and ten feet breed sale at sixty two feet molten hell at thirty five feet so it's stepped up and it's it's the centerpiece the sixty two feet where they're going to dig the works and prepare to meet the English and right now the English no it's they've got a scramble their plans they were going to go on the eighteenth but it's now the morning of the seventeenth and the orders are given to gather at the docks to sail around eleven o'clock in the morning so they're going to win full daylight cross with heavy packs in the heat and make an assault on the gathering forces of the patriots on what becomes the battle of Bunker Hill there will be mistakes made on both sides but it's important now to watch how this battle is fought because we're going to watch the future of the battle but how how how and Clinton and we're going to handle themselves against the patriots the book is American spring Lexington Concord in the road to revolution Walter born in is the author I'm John Batchelor this is the John.

Lexington Concord sixty two feet thirty five feet ten feet
"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

"Show taking you through the third shift this is the job actually shocked by I'm John Batchelor this is the John Batchelor show I'm continuing my conversation with Walter born in his new book is American spring Lexington Concord and the roads revolution while the reinforcements are arriving for Gage at the same time everyone in the colonies is hearing word in a wonderful fashion kind of internet of a horse hooves about what's happened at Lexington and Concord and Walter you reproduce carefully how it is that the news traveled from Boston and reached Philadelphia the one man didn't do all that riding what was the system that was established well it was a system of postal riders and again recognizing how important it is on the rebel side to get their story out the smokes barely cleared from Concord when the first press release if you will is dispatch from Concord and sent on its way riding across Massachusetts with the postal riders and is sort of an interesting system you know we talk about hacking into the internet today and not being able to trust what's on the internet except for what they did then if they sent out the message via a postal rider it was delivered to members trusted members of committees of correspondence who then endorsed it which was sort of the mark of authentication made copies of it and about one message then might be copied five times and sent out to five different postal riders so slowly but surely over a course of initially a few days and then a few weeks this word spreads down from Massachusetts of the encounter at Lexington and Concord makes its way to Philadelphia goes on down in its if I'm remembering correctly about three weeks later a little bit less that written word reaches Virginia and and George Washington and and Patrick Henry and learn of so it really spreads down the coast and Charleston actually learns of it via a sailing ship there's a fairly complete our account at least from the rubble perspective that appears in a newspaper called the ethics because that so not only are these dispatches going out but copies of rubble newspapers are going out as well all telling and spreading the rebel side of the story at least Massachusetts on the nineteenth and Walter is very careful to reproduce the fax it reaches New Brunswick at New Jersey and at two AM on Monday that's the following Monday April twenty fourth reaches Princeton at four am Trenton at nine AM and the Lexington alarm arrives in Philadelphia April twenty fourth five days later at five PM that's when the Continental Congress hears about it now along the way the reaches new haven and there are important actors here because everyone's reacting to the story of Lexington and Concord and two players in particular Benedict Arnold at new haven and Ethan Allen they hear and simultaneously or independently they come up with this great idea to March on Ticonderoga why the great Ernie between the Saint Lawrence river and the Atlantic at New York and and the Hudson and whoever controls that high point there of fort Ticonderoga really controls without water way in that corridor and the reason that's so important kind of gets back to John but the line in a couple years at Saratoga the reason that's so important is that if you control that Hudson Lake Champlain water way to to Saint Lawrence river it's certainly possible to lop off with the British at this point think are the more rebellious rebellious colonies of New England from the rest of of the colonies New York and in Pennsylvania so that's that's a critical point and to your telling of the of the story it's interesting that went through a lot Alan does this on his own or whether Arnold does it there certainly to different people almost like a Martin shelf Arnold at this point is a very spit and Polish colonial on officer Ethan Allen is sort of a pair of the words coming out of New Hampshire and and the New Hampshire land grants there but together in the end up having some words and fighting with one another almost as much as they fight with the British they'll put together a small force of men down a very stormy early morning will cross lake Champlain and capture fort Ticonderoga yes in the name of the great Jehovah says Ethan Allen to the man who answers the knock at the fort and the Continental Congress he demands surrender of cut Ticonderoga the English are completely overwhelmed and they do surrender but I think that the real fight here is between Allen and Arnold you've approached it psychologically did they in the eighteenth century understand that these are two brave men who can't possibly serve together well I don't think that they understood that if if but what's cool figure out who they ends in in the name of the great Jehovah and the Continental Congress the truth the matter is is the Connell Congress really knows nothing about these two gentleman are doing wrong so there's really no command and control over either one of them folks in Connecticut have said to each of them in various ways G. it be a great idea if if we had port tie con rogue a captured and I think that they each want to be a leader they're each a leader in their own way and from where they've come from Ethan Allen is definitely on his home turf if Arnold who's the outsider coming north from from Connecticut and at least for that one morning when they capture the fort they do succeed in in working together and of course we talk again when we talk about capturing the fort we're talking about a handful of men less than two dozen who are the garrison at what's really because there's no longer any threat from the French what is really just sort of a dilapidated outpost he strategic location though it may remain on the fort itself is pretty run down and and not very well defended the book is American spring Lexington Concord and the road to revolution we're on to Bunker Hill and those three generals making their plans because right now Gage and his forces in Boston are besieged by the colonials the patriots of.

John Batchelor three weeks five days
"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John batch this is the John Batchelor show I'm continuing my conversation with Walter born in his new book is American spring Lexington Concord and the roads revolution while the reinforcements are arriving for Gage at the same time everyone in the colonies is hearing word in a wonderful fashion kind of internet of a horse hooves about what's happened at Lexington and Concord and Walter you reproduce carefully how it is that the news traveled from Boston and reached Philadelphia the one man didn't do all that riding what was the system that was established well it was a system of postal riders and again recognizing how important it is on the rebel side to get their story out the smokes barely cleared from Concord when the first press release if you will is dispatch from Concord and sent on its way riding across Massachusetts with the postal riders and is sort of an interesting system you know we talk about hacking into the internet today and not being able to trust what's on the internet except for what they did then if they sent out the message via a postal rider it was delivered to members trusted members of committees of correspondence who then endorsed it which was sort of the mark of authentication made copies of it and that one message then might be copied five times and sent out to five different postal riders so slowly but surely over a course of initially a few days and then a few weeks this word spreads down from Massachusetts of the encounter and Lexington and Concord makes its way to Philadelphia goes on down in its if I'm remembering correctly about three weeks later a little bit less that written word reaches Virginia and and George Washington and and Patrick Henry we learn of so it really spreads down the coast and Charleston actually learns of it by a sailing ship there's a fairly complete our town at least from the rubble perspective that appears in a newspaper called the ethics because that so not only are these dispatchers going out like copies of rubble newspapers are going out as well all telling in spreading the rebel side of the story at least Massachusetts on the nineteenth and Walter is very careful to reproduce the fax it reaches New Brunswick at New Jersey and at two AM on Monday that's the following Monday April twenty fourth reaches Princeton at four AM Trenton at nine AM and the Lexington alarm arrives in Philadelphia April twenty fourth five days later at five PM that's when the Continental Congress hears about it now along the way the reaches new haven and there are important actors here because everyone's reacting to the story of Lexington and Concord and two players in particular Benedict Arnold at new haven and Ethan Allen they hear and simultaneously or independently they come up with this great idea to March on Ticonderoga why well I kinda rogue as the colonials and the British now from the days of the French and Indian war and quite frankly from from prior wars hi Conor rogo or as you said earlier that the French college for Caroline that is the key point that controls that wonderful water way the great Ernie between the Saint Lawrence river and the Atlantic at New York and and the Hudson and whoever controls that high point there of fort Ticonderoga really controls that water way in that corridor and the reason that's so important kind of gets back to John was going in a couple years at Saratoga the reason that's so important is that if you control that Hudson Lake Champlain water way to the Saint Lawrence river it's certainly possible to lop off with the British at this point thinker the more rebellious rebellious colonies of New England from the rest of of the colonies New York and in Pennsylvania so that's that's a critical point in to your telling of of the story it's interesting that whether or not Alan does this on his own or whether Arnold does it on there certainly to different people almost like a mutt and Jeff Arnold at this point is a very spit and Polish colonial on officer Ethan Allen is sort of a pair of the words coming out of New Hampshire and and the New Hampshire land grants there but together in the end up having some words and fighting with one another almost as much as they fight with the British they'll put together a small force of men down a very stormy early morning will cross Lake Champlain and capture fort Ticonderoga yes in the name of the great Jehovah says Ethan Allen to the man who answers the knock at the fort and the Continental Congress he demands surrender of cut Ticonderoga the English are completely overwhelmed and they do surrender but I think that the real fight here is between Allen and Arnold you've approached it psychologically did they in the eighteenth century understand that these are two brave men who can't possibly serve together well I don't think that they understood that if if let's call figure out who they is in in the name of the great Jehovah and the Continental Congress the truth the matter is is the Connell Congress really knows nothing about gentleman are doing all so there's really no command and control over either one of them folks in Connecticut have said to each of them in various ways can't be a great idea if if we had port tie con rogue a captured and I think that they each want to be a leader they're each a leader in their own way and from where they've come from Ethan Allen is definitely on his home turf if Arnold who's the outsider coming north from from Connecticut and at least for that one morning when they capture the fort they do succeed in and working together and of course we talk again when we talk about capturing the fort we're talking about a handful of men less than two dozen who are the garrison and what's really because there's no longer any threat from the French what is really just sort of a dilapidated outpost he strategic location though it may remain on the fort itself is pretty run down and and not very well defended the book is American spring Lexington Concord and the road to revolution we're on to Bunker Hill and those three generals making their plans because right now gauging his forces in Boston are besieged by the colonials the patriots of Massachusetts time John.

John Batchelor Walter three weeks five days
"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Thought to their comrades farther out on the road and parents farm indeed begin to rip up at least a portion of of the north bridge there's a fire at the courthouse common who sets that's a kind of an interesting story it's it's sort of set by some some British officers and and won older woman sort of one of the matriarchs of Concord says you've got to put this out it it's going to spread there's there's ammunition stored up in up in the tower and if the fire gets out of control it's it's going to blow up the entire town well that was kind of a ploy on on her part in the fire was actually set more on accident something that got out of control but I think that the key point of that fire is that as the militiamen begin to assemble on the hills above the old north bridge they see the smoke from the fire and they don't know whether this is by accident or justice a minor fire or something really major in terms of the British trying to torch the entire town and so that smoke is the impetus for the companies of militia to start to March down off of the hills by by tricks farmhouse down toward the north bridge and dislodge the British troops who have been holding that position the English are way a out of control now given the whole countryside is awake American spring is the book Lexington Concord in the road to revolution Walter Bornemann is the author and when we come back the English flight back to Boston and the very very fragile nature of the rescue of the English from the patriots I'm John batch so this is the John Batchelor show if you're like me you're on the go all the time you need something to give you that energy.

Concord Boston John batch John Batchelor Walter Bornemann
"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Spring Lexington Concord and the road to revolution Walter Bornemann is the author I welcome Walter I congratulate him and we go to Christ Church within the past couple charged at the time a church of England it is a it it changes its name to old north church but at this point the man climbing the tower there was a look out and there were two men climbing knowing that there to signal that the red coats are going to March on Lexington and Concord in search of weapons these are this is the drama of April seventeen seventy five that the American revolution turns upon and more than two hundred and thirty years later there are still mysteries to discover Walter very good evening to the mysteries in your book are rich but this time we know that eventually two lanterns were shown from the highest chart church in the highest point in Boston who was watching for those lanterns and what to do with it good evening to you Walter well good evening John good to be with you or course Paul Revere was was watching and writing across the Charles river and folks on the Charles side were waiting for him with a horse in order to us spirit him on to Lexington and Concord and spread the alarm that indeed the British were marching the two lanterns of course meant that they were crossing the Charles river by boat rather than going around the long way threw rocks brewery and up through Cambridge but this was really the signal and you know the interesting thing is that this only appeared for a very brief period of time we we sometimes think in retrospective these great beacons that go out in the night but it's a very very quick message and of course the British in Boston see it as well in immediately come to the church to demand what's going on so the folks that that raise those lights needed to get out of there very quickly you do you suggest that revere was in a position to see them at all he's he's getting across and he's got an English warship to get past so he can't be spending time bouncing on the waves looking for two DM's signals in the in the past in the back I do I do suggest that surface particularly the way is the US people is back with with what I think is sort of a rising moon in the southeast there but that message is going out to his cohorts on the Charles shore who are waiting for him the backstory here is that that night is not discontinue was with other nights in which the British have gone looking for American weapons or to challenge the growing turmoil in the Massachusetts colony and we need to walk all the way backwards to how it begins before Paul revere's ride and where he's going that night is also critical the name that comes up again and again in your telling Walter is Thomas Gage who is at this point not only the governor of Massachusetts but the governor general a commander in chief of British forces in North America and he is a man who is extremely easy to lie he's a brave and long serving soldier of the king whose looks to have been in every major battle fought for the last twenty or thirty years was needed Kolodny and before that he fought the job he fought it in at in the Hague and he also was with Brian Braddock right in the massacre at Pittsburgh I think that's the key point in North America he's been everywhere sense Braddock's defeat when Braddock was first marching on for two came during the French and Indian war and I think if there's one person who really understands the colonies and it's far right along side the colonials for more than fifteen years it's Thomas Gage and when he was appointed commander in chief he really gets this responsibility initially a sort of protecting the western boundaries of the case of the country and overseeing what at that point called the proclamation of seventeen sixty three but as things develop and there's more unrest in more taxation and stuff Thomas Gage is really squeezed between I think what he thinks of more in terms of representative government and very much loyalist loyalists who think that the king has the final say in December of seventeen fifty eight is my memory he fights said to what becomes cart for Ticonderoga Karelin when it's under the French is the French and Indian war he marries any merry's very well to the Campbell family Margaret who are they and what is Margaret mean to it well I'm Margaret in a course at this point Thomas gauges I say perhaps the most eligible bachelor in North America but Margaret's father is it's a very wealthy landowner in New Jersey her brothers are well connected with the British and colonial military and Margaret is really quite a catch a stunning young woman she's about twenty years gauges junior and they married and together over a long period of time they're actually going to have have nine children but I think that that gauges very very devoted to Margaret and certainly by all of my research and suggestion Margaret in return is very dedicated and devoted to to Thomas Gage he also comes from a family that will eventually produce one of the great fortunes of Great Britain in the future his brothers of Viscount and so while gauge is been in America for what to a two decades now he aware that back home his brother has not had an air and that gauge could just resigned his commission and go home and live very well so it looks to me like this is the best sort of citizen you'd want in a colony of Great Britain in fact it would be very difficult to a to speak against gauge and a service of for America he certainly very very loyal to his king obviously as a member of the British Army but I think he also has an affinity for the colonials and as an example Margaret and her family and and those ties are very important to him and I think he's far more liberal if we can use that word in terms of his dealings with colonials then some administrators might be I he goes to a seventeen seventy three he sales with Margaret for London and he spends six months or more in at home with with his family and also he has an audience with George the third a personal audience what I like about this Walter is that you get the principles together now and again when they're talking about the in river Merrick and revolution what it what we know about that conversation what did the king one from gauge when he went back well the king wanted King George the third one engaged to go back and really cracked down on on the rebels I think in retrospect if if Gage had known what was coming in terms of the turmoil of seventeen seventy five and what it would do to Marc rich family and just gauge his whole ideas of service in North America I think he might have not been quite as bold as he was in terms of telling the King George the third well you know if if you want me to go back Sir I will I will indeed go back and do that and I will administer not only Massachusetts says it's well governor but also as commander in chief really put a stop to this rebel shenanigans Gage was not only a very capable administrator but he was also something of a masters of a spy master and when we come back the early episodes in which gauges seeking information about the rebels what will become the rebels are those who are in defiance of their king and especially of the parliament I'm John bachelor with Walter born in the book is American spring Lexington Concord and the road to revolution we're on to Lexington but first the spies are a for its.

Christ Church Walter Bornemann thirty years fifteen years twenty years two decades six months
"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:55 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

"The John Batchelor show American spring. Walter Bornemann story of Lexington. Concord in the road to revolution. It is now spring seventeen seventy five there are incidents in all directions. As far north as Mateus, which is then part of Massachusetts now. Maine. They're also incidents at see what? Walter describes as Lexington of the sea in which the colonials the patriots challenged the English mastery of the Royal Navy. However, the major action is going to be an foster in because the patriots have been circled with their headquarters at Cambridge and the militias are now gathering so that forces are coming from Connecticut from New Hampshire from very far away, New Jersey, and they're gathering to ring in the English a led by gauge gauge has these three generals who've arrived in late may, and they have their plans, and they have their orders. Walter how has a plan? To challenge. The patriots to challenge them directly Burgoyne has a plan to because he wants he wants elbow room. He wants to break out. What is house plan? What is general house plan to general gage? Well, it's it's kind of interesting I that neither the British nor the colonials have occupied some strategic ground both at Dorchester heights to the south of Boston and at Bunker Hill, which is on the kind of peninsula there that juts out from Charleston. We've got gotta remember that in this particular time Boston really is a long peninsula itself with a real narrow neck going to the south toward Dorchester, all of the landfills and all of the things sort of the expansion of the girth of Boston. If you will does hasn't occurred yet and and won't for some for some decades. Well, Burgoyne is talking about going out and trying to as you say. They get a little bit of of elbow room and push the rebels back a little bit. How thinks that they ought to. Go ahead and move across the Charles river and take the high ground, which which at the moment is on occupied on on Bunker Hill. They do have a fleet Admiral Rear Admiral Samuel graves in charge of it. And they have a lot of guns floating guns. And they also can set up a battery on cops hill. What is the plan that the Admiral ones, what does he want to burn? Well, the the Admiral quite frankly from the very beginning is wanted to burn Charleston across the Charles river. He thinks that all it does is really provide places for sniper fire such as the British endured on that retreat from from Lexington, and he would have just assumed shelled, Charleston and burned it to the ground, but gauge is not permitted him to to do that. And as we get into. Into the confrontation a little bit. And finally, there's a decision really almost simultaneously or or close in timeframe both on the rebel side that, hey, we need to seize that high ground at Bunker Hill, and at the same time the British saying, well, we were across the Charles at at Charleston as we retreated from Lexington. We better get back over there and and capture those heights. So what we've got is. We've got the rebel forces going across the Charleston peninsula and beginning to dig in on Bunker Hill just about the same time the night before the British are deciding that they should go across the Charles and occupy those heights. I write the plan on the how and Clinton and Burgoyne engage is to launch their capture of Dorchester heights on Sunday June eighteenth that was the plan that's going to be forced because the patriots. See the same problem the rebels see the same problem, and they moved to take command of Charleston heights, which is Bunker Hill important now is the command on the patriot side because it creates confusion that will lead to casualties. Israel, Putnam Putnam is a Colonel from Connecticut and Prescott is a kernel from what Massachusetts. Massachusetts. But who is the general where are the generals where are the commanders? Well, the the commander is is in Cambridge saying that his responsibility is to defend the stores there and to make sure that the British don't break out of of Boston and really create havoc. He's he's beginning to feel the nucleus of what will become a continental army wants about a month after this George Washington arrives on the scene. But he's he's very careful that he wants to be at least defensive in terms of preserving his ability to fight that said he gives instructions both to Israel Putnam and to William Prescott that they're to go onto the peninsula at Charleston and occupy those those heights they have a couple of colonels commanding regiments who take control as other regiments arrive one at a time on Charleston heights. Artem award at Cambridge is protecting not only the British from breaking out. But also the patriots. They're gathered around him, including Harvard. College is very concerned about his library. They evacuate that. And they're prepared. Now for a gunfight cop hit cops hill has a British battery removed from the warships to lie to shoot against Charleston, which has not been burned and we'll go to the morning of the seventeenth because the ING the you believe there are people scouting out Charles Townes heights Bunker Hill early in the day. They don't move there until what is it sixteen. Th they moved there on the sixteenth in sixteenth. They gathered Cambridge about six o'clock. And then they March out there late in the day. This is summertime. So there's lots of light do the English see them moving up to the heights before the darkness falls. No, the the rebels take up those. Positions and begin to dig ditches and trenches and the first news that the British really have even though I tell a story that's reportedly has and re Clinton out prowling around. I think perhaps an expectation of what he thinks is going to be the attack on Dorchester that he may learn of it a little bit earlier than some of the lookouts, but eventually lookouts on British ships that are stationed in the Charles is about four AM here or see because of the early morning sun. The fact that there's this line of entrenchments across the top of Bunker Hill the closest he'll toward Boston. Let's do quickly here before we get to the battle. It's Bunker Hill. There was no breeze hill in seventeen seventy five. So even. Seventy-five that's sort of a trivia question. Everybody says, oh, the battle of Bunker Hill, I was involved on breed's hill. But breach hill is really a name that's post seventeen seventy five and the even though there are two different elevations sort of a third lower one. But there's breach hill now closest and then Bunker Hill higher and behind it. There were those two elevations sorta step down one to if you will. I have a Bunker Hill at one hundred ten feet breed's hill at sixty two feet molten hill thirty five feet, so it stepped up, and it's it's the centerpiece to sixty two feet where they're going to dig the works and prepare to meet the English and right now the English. No, it's they've got a scramble their plans they were going to go on the eighteenth. But it's now the morning of the seventeenth and the orders are given to gather at the docks to sail around eleven o'clock in the morning. So they're going to win full daylight. Cross with heavy packs in the heat and make an assault on the gathering forces of the patriots on what becomes the battle of Bunker Hill. There will be mistakes made on both sides. But it's important now to watch how this battle is fought because we're going to watch the future of the battle of how how and Clinton and Burgoyne handle themselves against the patriots. The book is American spring. Lexington. Concord and the road to revolution. Walter Bornemann is the author. I'm John Batchelor. You're listening to John bachelor on K G O eight ten. Balance.

Bunker Hill patriots Charleston Boston Burgoyne Walter Bornemann Lexington Dorchester heights Charleston heights Cambridge John Batchelor Charles Charles river Clinton Massachusetts Dorchester hill Concord Charleston peninsula
"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"lexington concord" Discussed on KGO 810

"Continuing my conversation with his new book is American spring. Lexington. Concord, the roads revolution. While the reinforcements are arriving for gauge at the same time. Everyone in the colonies is hearing word in a wonderful fashion kind of internet of horse hooves about what's happened at Lexington and concord and Walter you reproduce carefully. How it is that the news traveled from Boston and reached Philadelphia the one man didn't do all that writing. What was the system that was established? Well, it was a system of postal riders and again, recognizing how important it is on the rebel side to get their story out. The smokes barely cleared from concord when the first press release if you will is dispatched from concord and sent on its way writing across Massachusetts with. Postal riders. And it's sort of an interesting system. You know, we talk about hacking into the internet today and not being able to trust what's on the internet, etc. What they did. Then is they sent out the message via a postal rider. It was delivered to members trusted members of committees of correspondence who then endorsed it which was sort of the Mark of authentication made copies of it. And that one message then might be copied five times and sent out to five different postal riders. So slowly. But surely over a course of initially a few days, and then a few weeks this word spreads down from Massachusetts of the encounter at Lexington and concord makes its way to Philadelphia goes on down. And it's if I'm remembering correctly about three weeks later a little bit less word reaches Virginia and and George wash. Washington and Patrick Henry learn of it so it really spreads down the coast and Charleston actually learns of it via sailing ship. There's a fairly complete count at least from the rubble perspective that appears in a newspaper called the Essex gazette. So not only are these dispatches going out, but copies of rebel newspapers are going out as well telling and spreading the rebel side of the store at least Massachusetts on the nineteenth..

Concord Lexington Massachusetts concord Philadelphia Essex gazette Patrick Henry George wash Virginia Boston Walter Charleston Washington three weeks